Top Notch Toys - May 2022

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*AKC stats as of 3/31/22

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FINNICKYSKYE CAVALIERS OWNED & SHOWN BY: J IM & SHARON UTYCH

Edgar

MBIS CKCSC USA & GROUP PLACING RBISOH MBISS AKC GCHS CH BROOKHAVEN THE DREAM LIVES ON, AW CGCA SELECT DOG • PALMETTO CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE CINDY LANE AWARD OF MERIT • PALMETTO CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE LU DUNHAM AWARD OF MERIT • CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB OF GREATER ATLANTA SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE CESAR CORTES

©SKUNKWORX CUSTOMS PHOTOGRAPHY

NEW SILVER GRAND CHAMPION Catcher

RBIS CKCSC USA & GROUP PLACING MBISOH MRBISOH AKC GCHS CH LEGENDCREST FINNICKYSKYE DREAM CATCHER, JW AW CGC

SELECT DOG MAJOR • GREATER PANAMA CITY DOG FANCIERS ASSOCIATION UNDER JUDGE BONNIE LINNELL CLARKE

OH GROUP 2 • GREATER PANAMA CITY DOG FANCIERS ASSOCIATION

SELECT DOG MAJOR • REATER PANAMA CITY DOG FANCIERS ASSOCIATION UNDER JUDGE CAROLYN I . ALEXANDER

OH GROUP 1 • GREATER PANAMA CITY DOG FANCIERS ASSOCIATION

SELECT DOG MAJOR • CHARLESTON KC UNDER JUDGE MARJORIE UNDERWOOD

SELECT DOG MAJOR • CHARLESTON KC UNDER JUDGE LINDA HURLEBAUS

SELECT DOG MAJOR • GRIFFIN GA KENNEL CLUB UNDER JUDGE LINDA HURLEBAUS

SELECT DOG MAJOR • CONYERS KC UNDER JUDGE DENNY MOUNCE

SELECT DOG MAJOR • GRIFFIN GA KENNEL CLUB UNDER JUDGE NEENA L . VAN CAMP

AWARD OF MERIT • CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB OF GREATER ATLANTA SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE MARY HANUS

©SKUNKWORXCUSTOMSPHOTOGRAPHY

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Stevie

MBVIS AKC CH ALMEARA VISIONNAIRE, CGCA

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY AT THE NORTH FLORIDA CKCSC SPECIALTY SHOWS:

BEST VETERAN IN SWEEPSTAKES UNDER JUDGE JAMIE SEIDMAN MCDONNELL

BEST VETERAN IN SHOW & AWARD OF MERIT UNDER JUDGE HAROLD TATRO I I I

BEST VETERAN IN SHOW & AWARD OF MERIT UNDER JUDGE JAMES J. MITCHELL

BEST VETERAN IN SWEEPSTAKES UNDER JUDGE CYNDI MYHRE!

BEST VETERAN IN SHOW • CKCSC USA CAVALIERS OF THE MIDWEST SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE ANDY VELLA BEST VETERAN IN SHOW • CKCSC USA CAVALIERS OF THE MIDWEST SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE SHEENA MACLAINE BEST VETERAN IN SHOW • CKCSC USA CAVALIERS OF THE MIDWEST SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE TRACY FRY JACKSON BEST VETERAN IN SWEEPSTAKES • PALMETTO CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE DANNA ROBINSON SAATHOFF BEST VETERAN IN SWEEPSTAKES • CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL CLUB OF GREATER ATLANTA SPECIALTY UNDER JUDGE JENNIFER FLOWERS FOSTER

©SKUNKWORXCUSTOMSPHOTOGRAPHY

Lennyn BROOKHAVEN NUMBER NINE DREAM

RESERVE WINNERS DOG UNDER JUDGE SHARON MASNICK & JUDGE CHRISTIE MARTINEZ

©SKUNKWORXCUSTOMSPHOTOGRAPHY

Vera INTRODUCING THE NEWEST MEMBER OF THE FINNICKYSKYE TEAM ALL

THE WAY FROM THE UK HARANA HARVEST MOON

RESERVE WINNERS BITCH UNDER JUDGE SHARON MASNICK

THANK YOU TO BREEDER LUCY KOSTER FOR THIS SPECIAL LITTLE GIRL !

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QUALITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE Aria Maltese

2021 CHAMPIONS

CH ARIA MARKY MARK & THE FUNKY BUNCH

CH ARIA ROYAL BEAUTY BRIGHT STORY GROUP PLACING FROM THE CLASSES

CH ARIA ANGEL OF HARLEM GROUP PLACING FROM THE CLASSES

CH ARIA MONSTER MASH PUPPY GROUP PLACING AND FINISHING AS A PUPPY

FOR RECOGNIZING OUR MALTESE. WE WISH ALL MALTESE EXHIBITORS A FANTASTIC NATIONAL IN PHOENIX! Thank you to all judges

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QUALITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE Aria Maltese

CH * ARIA FLEUR DE LIS

CHAMPIONED IN A HANDFUL OF SHOWS EARNING NOHS G2 AND BEST OF BREED WITH MULTIPLE CHAMPION DEFEATS FROM THE CLASSES.

*PENDING AKC CONFIRMATION

Always Breeder Owner Handled

HEIDI SULLIVAN & WILLIAM LOPEZ, ARIA MALTESE WWW.ARIAMALTESEDOGS.COM

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Chan FC.indd 3

5/3/22 10:04 AM

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR MEEGAN PIEROTTI-TIETJE Customer Relationship Manager meegan@showsightmagazine.com call/text 512.593.5517 AJ ARAPOVIC Publisher

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aj@aramediagroup.com call/text 512.541.8128 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

20 How Smart are the Toy Breeds? Judy Thompson 24 Toy Group Survey Various Guests 50 Living with the English Toy Spaniel Tom O’Neal 53 Maltese:

54 Judging the Papillon Sharon Newcomb 56 Rates 57 Index to Advertisers 58 Coming Attractions

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

A Discussion About Type Daryl Martin

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CELEBRATINGMISS BLISS’S SHOWCAREER AND LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING EVERYONE ATWESTMINSTER.

GCH CH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera Owned by Michele True | Co-Owned & Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier

Photo by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier

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Breeder/Owner/Handler C H E R I E M C D A N I E L Cheristar Miniature Pinschers

M B I S S B I S G C H S C H R E H - P I N ’ S I A M C H A R M E D F O R C H E R I S T A R

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M B I S S B I S G C H S C H R E H - P I N ’ S I A M C H A R M E D F O R C H E R I S T A R

Thank You Judge Mrs. Lydia Coleman Hutchinson

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NUMBER TWO Biewer Terrier in breed*

THANK YOU JUDGE S

PROFESSIONALLY HANDLED BY BARBARA BEISSEL , AKC HANDLER

OWNED BY KATHY SCOTT SCOTTSBIEWERS@YAHOO.COM

*AKC breed stats as of 3/31/22

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BIG DOG IN A

small package

SUCCESS HEADY SNOW AVALANCHE Silver Grand Champion

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CLARK

#2 BRUSSELS GRIFFON *

GCH TAZLANDZ FLYING HIGH AT JOVAL

OWNED BY DR. VALERIA & JOHN RICKARD CO-OWNED WITH BREEDER JULIE ACHORD BOB AT ABGA SUPPORTED ENTRIES AT MID-KENTUCKY AND LOUISVILLE KC, AOM AT ABGA NATIONAL

© HAN ‘22

THANKS TO JUDGES MR. KEATING, MR. REYNOLDS, MR. KIRKLAND AND ESPECIALLY TO MR. JOHNSON FOR

JOVAL’S LA MADELEINE FRENCH COOKIE

APPRECIATING THE QUALITIES OF OUR DOGS AND FOR MAKING THIS YEAR’S NATIONAL SPECIALTY WEEK SO MEMORABLE.

RESERVE WINNERS BITCH ABGA SUPPORTED ENTRY AT LOUISVILLE KC

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ESPEN

CH JOVAL EWOK NETWORK NATIONAL SPECIALTY BEST OF BREED & BEST BRED-BY #1 BRUSSELS GRIFFON BITCH *

JOVAL DONUT WORRY BE HAPPY

JOVAL FULL OF PASTABILITIES

CO-OWNED WITH TYLER MILLS & JOE METHENEY RESERVE WINNERS DOG AT ABGA NATIONAL AND BOS IN SWEEPS

WINNERS DOG AT ABGA NATIONAL

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/22

WWW.JOVALGRIFFS.COM

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HOW SMART ARE THE TOY BREEDS? JUST JUDY’S THOUGHTS

by Judy Thompson

Q uestion: How does one measure the intelligence of any dog breed? Answer: With great difficulty. Clearly, we cannot adminis- ter the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale to make a determination. If we employed the scientific method, we would need a control group consist- ing of a good number of dogs from each breed—at least ten. We’d use both males and females. Currently, the AKC recognizes over 200 breeds, so that would calculate to 2,000 dogs needed to be purchased for the study. They would all need to be pup- pies of the same age, all living in the same environment, eating the same food, receiving the same training and social interaction. We’d need an immense kennel facil- ity, food, veterinary care, and a large number of kennel help and research- ers.We’d need to put each dog through the exact same hours of training and cognition tests. Clearly, this would be a huge, expensive, and lengthy under- taking. It is not surprising, then, that such a study has never been done and such data does not exist. Stanley Coren, author of The Intel- ligence of Dogs , is a professor of psy- chology and a dog trainer. He wanted to devise an alternate method of gath- ering data on the intelligence of dif- ferent breeds of dogs. He first relied on records derived from obedience trials. He obtained the records from nearly 2,000 trials and 125,000 en- tries during the trial year.

(photo by Chris Caviness Photography)

If we follow the premise that breeds winning the most obedience titles had the best working and obedience intelligence, then the Golden Re- triever would be rated as the most intelligent breed. But there were 670,000 living, registered Goldens in the test year. A rare breed could never match that total, even if ev- ery single dog won a title. You would also have to take into account the percentage of dogs of each breed

competing in trials and somehow determine if owners had more moti- vation to train certain breeds more than others. Personally, I would find it more imperative to take my dog for obedience training if it were a large dog bred to guard and protect, than if it were a small Toy bred to sit on a vel- vet pillow and look pretty. Determin- ing breed intelligence by the number of obedience titles earned simply lacks credibility.

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obeying a command, the first time it was issued, 95% of the time. The only Toy breed placing in the top ten was the Papillon, ranked #8. Those dogs ranked #11 to #26 were likely to un- derstand a new command in five to fifteen repetitions and obey the first command 85% of the time. The Po- meranian was ranked #23. Dogs ranked #27 to #39 were clas- sified as above average working dogs. The Toy breeds included were the Yorkshire Terrier, Affenpinscher, Silky Terrier, and Miniature Pin- scher. Dogs ranked #40 to #54 were classified as average in their working or obedience intelligence. That would include the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the English Toy Spaniel. Dogs ranked #55 to #69 were classi- fied as only fair. The Toys on that list were the Pug, French Bulldog, Brus- sels Griffon, Maltese, Italian Grey- hound, Chinese Crested, Japanese Chin, and Chihuahua. Finally, those dogs ranked #70 to #79 were judged to be the most difficult to train for obedience. That included the Shih Tzu and the Pekingese. Let’s take a look at the top two Toy breeds according to this ranking. Pa- pillons were bred down from Span- iels, hunting dogs bred to flush birds out of the bush. If I were breeding and keeping Spaniels to help me hunt and keep food on the table for the family, I would breed and keep only those dogs that had good intelligence and hunt- ing ability. Pomeranians were bred down from working sled dogs. Again, only those dogs that had good apti- tude for learning their job would be kept and bred. Now let’s look at the Shih Tzu and the Pekingese. They were both bred as a companion for Chinese royalty and expected to not wander far from the Imperial Palace. Rather than being prized for their obedience intelli- gence, they were prized for their lion- like appearance and their qualities as companions. It is not surprising to me that the Toys, which were bred down from working dogs, would fare better in obedience trials.

Looking at the AKC Standards for the Toy breeds, about half mention intelligence in the Standard. But ex- actly what kind of intelligence is be- ing described? Dogs possess working and obedience intelligence (ability to learn from the trainer), instinctive intelligence (ability to perform the tasks it was bred for), and adaptive intelligence (ability to solve problems on its own). Coren’s ranking list was really only indicative of the first type. So how do the Toy breeds fare in in- stinctive intelligence, the skills and behaviors preprogrammed into their genetic code? One of the first uses of dogs was that of watchdogs, barking to alert humans to a possible intrud- er, which is not the same as a guard dog that could physically intervene. Again, Coren went to the experts, this time to trainers of dogs for protection and police work. The Yorkshire Ter- rier, Chihuahua, Shih Tzu, and Silky Terrier all ranked in the top fifteen for watchdog barking. The tiny Chi- huahua will do a better job of giving warning than a huge St. Bernard! Certainly, the Toy Terriers were bred for their instinctive intelligence for the hunt of small mammals. To determine adaptive intelligence, CorendevisedvariouscanineIQtests. Some tested learning and memory, others tested problem-solving ability. It is fun to try these at home with your own dogs. Of the Toy breeds, the Toy Poodle excelled in overall scores, and the Chihuahua was particularly good at problem-solving. Finally, we need to look at how per- sonality affects a dog’s abilities. The Obedience Personality Test provides a score that shows the willingness of a dog to obey a human. Some Toy breeds were selectively bred for gen- tleness, friendliness, and lack of ag- gression. Happily, these personality traits can combine with intelligence to make a little Einstein out of your

So, Coren went back to the drawing board. He came to the conclusion that the peoplewith themost extensive ex- perience evaluating dogs were the dog obedience judges, themselves train- ers. He sent out long, comprehensive questionnaires to every obedience judge in the AKC and the CKC, ask- ing them to rate each breed in many aspects of intelligence and ability. Over 200 judges responded, and then many had follow-up interviews. Those judges cautioned that there were certainly many variations among dogs of the same breed, and that a great deal had to do with the skill of the trainer. Yet, there was strong agreement when rat- ing the top breeds for working and obedience intelligence. After correlating the data, Coran pub- lished the rankings. He included 133 breeds, and with ties the list capped off at 79. As might be expected, there was a certain amount of “growling” from lovers of breeds that placed low on the list. It should be noted that Toy Poodles, Toy Manchester Terriers, and Toy Fox Terriers were not sepa- rated by variety but were grouped with the standard size of their breeds, making it impossible to rank them on their own. Havanese, Biewer Terriers, and Russian Toys were not on the list at all, as they were not yet recognized by the AKC at the time of the study. The dogs ranked in the top ten were described as understanding new com- mands in less than five exposures and DOGS, WOULD FARE BETTER IN OBEDIENCE TRIALS.” “IT IS NOT SURPRISING TO ME THAT THE TOYS, WHICH WERE BRED DOWN FROM WORKING

beloved Toy. SOURCE

Coren, Stanley, The Intelligence of Dogs: Canine Consciousness and Capabilities , Macmillan, Inc., New York, NY, 1994.

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Multi Specialty Winning, Group Winning Pug Winning Great Lakes Pug Specialty Nationals Week

Thank you judge Mr. Douglas A. Johnson

Thank you judge Mrs. Nancy Liebes

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ROSE’S SORRY, NOT SORRY

Handled by Tiffany Skinner | Assisted by Andrew Mueller Bred & Owned by Carla Rose , Rosepugs@machmedia.net

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THE TOY GROUP JUDGES

1. Where do you live? Howmany years in dogs? Howmany years as a judge? 2. What is your original breed? What is/was your kennel name? 3. Can you list a few of the notable dogs you’ve bred? Any performance or parent club titles? 4. What are some of the qualities you most admire in the Toy Breeds? 5. Have you judged any Toy Breed Specialties? 6. Can you offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presentation of these “table” breed? 7. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In your opinion, has this had an impact on quality? 8. Toy Breeds can require special care. Do you have any advice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? 9. In your opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? 10. Why do you think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? 11. If you could share your life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? 12. Just for laughs, do you have a funny story that you can share about your experiences judging the Toy Group? VICKI ABBOTT

proudest of, that I handled but did not breed, was Ch. Sand Island Small Kraft Lite, bred by Carol F. Andersen. “Henry” won the Toy Group at Westminster in 1992, was the top-winning Maltese Dog of all time, No. 1 Toy Dog for several years, No. 5 among All Breeds, and he is the ances- tor now to many of our dogs at Scylla. Because of that, I am very proud of his offspring (combination with our Scylla Maltese). His great-grandson, Ch. Scylla’s Small Kraft Re-Lit, “Hank,” was bred by Scylla Kennels and remains the top-winning Group and Best in Show winning Mal- tese in this millennium—handled by my daughter, Tara Martin Rowell. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? They are just big dogs in little bodies. They have no clue that they are small! That is what makes them endear- ing. They will try anything, and usually achieve it, and they are excellent companions. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? I have had the honor of judging many Toy Breed Specialties over the years, and am constantly rewarded with quality entries of dogs to choose from all over the country. It is the highest honor to be invited to judge a Nation- al Specialty. Being asked to judge a National Specialty is about those breeders entrusting their very best from that year to you as a judge. It is a lot of fun and a great responsibility! Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presen- tation of these “table” breeds? Presentation, of course, can make a mediocre exhibit look great, or a great exhibit look less desirable, until you actually have the dog on the table to go over it and weigh all the factors involved. I expect the dogs that come into my ring to be clean and groomed—but I do not expect them to be perfect. They should be bathed, brushed, and de-matted, eyes should be clear, and the dog should have clean teeth. There are a lot of exhibitors who show and groom their own dogs and are not professionals, and sometimes, the best dog in the ring is not the most per- fectly groomed. But there is more to the choice than just the grooming. Conditioning means many things, includ- ing being in the right weight and muscle tone, even in a Toy Dog. So often you hear that Toy Dogs don’t have to really do anything other than be companion animals, so consider- ation of how they move, are put together, or their condition is secondary and does not reallymatter. Oh, but it does. You can have the typiest, showiest Toy Dog, but if that dog has definite structure problems, you can bet it is not going to serve the purpose for which it was bred—to be a good com- panion. A dog with bad hips, unbalanced angulation in the front and rear, knees that need operations later, or even a

Where do I live? How many years in dogs? How many years as a judge? I live in Fairview, Texas, which is just north of Dallas. I have been in dogs for over 45 years, first as a breeder/owner-handler, and then as a professional handler for many years, concentrating on the

Toy Breeds. I am most well-known for the many Maltese that I handled in the past, especially the No. 1 Maltese Dog of all time and Westminster Group Winner, Ch. Sand Is- land Small Kraft Lite. I have been a judge for 21 years. What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name? My original breed is Maltese, although I also bred Pekingese and Shiba Inu. My kennel name is Scylla. While I originally started the kennel in the 1970s, it became a family endeavor, including my husband, Larry, and my daughter, Tara Martin Rowell, and her husband, JD. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? We have bred many Group-Winning and Best in Show Maltese that have held the title of No. 1 Maltese over the years. The one I am

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TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

mouth with horrible teeth will eventually be a dog in pain and on medication. This does not a happy Toy companion make! The temperament on a dog that is in pain all the time will obviously deteriorate the more pain that he is in. Even- tually, the lifespan of dogs with structure problems can be much less than those put together correctly. Toy breeds are the long-livers of the dog world; these little guys can act like puppies for years and live to the ripe-old ages of 15-17 years. Much progress has been made in presentation by owner- handlers and professionals alike, especially in the area of coat presentation, as there are many different coat types in this Group. Coming from a drop-coated breed like Mal- tese and having shown and groomed many others as well, I know the dedication it takes to not only breed a good dog, but to learn how to present it in good condition. So, when someone puts a very nicely groomed Toy Dog on the table in my ring, no matter what the coat type, I can appreciate the time and effort that went into that! Newcomers are so welcome to this Group, and the two best things to do to learn how to best present your dog are to ask for assistance by a good mentor in your breed, as far as the grooming, and to watch how your Toy breed is presented on the table by experienced exhibitors at a show. The thing that I, as a Toy Breed judge, find quite frequently is Toy Breeds that are not trained to stand for examination or have their mouths shown by the owner or handler. Toy judges should always take care that if a puppy has a problem, not to give them a bad experience in the ring. Being heavy-handed, or try- ing to pry into small mouths, is not a good idea. I make it a practice to judge the mouth/bite at the very end of the ex- amination, which seems to help with the occasional wiggly “happy to see you” puppy or sensitive adult. Exhibitors can assist by having their dogs trained to stand and have their mouths examined, whether it is a thumb exam by the judge or where the lips are opened to check the bite by either the judge or exhibitor. Again, mouth exams on a Toy Dog should be done quickly. Having your Toy Dog prepared for this ahead of time will be a great asset in the ring for both the exhibitor and the judge. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? Posi- tive changes! While we once had certain less popular breeds like Affenpinschers, Brussels Griffons, and Eng- lish Toy Spaniels, just to name a few, that were not well- represented with a lot of quality, that has now changed for the better, thanks to dedicated breeders who have spent so much of their lives improving these breeds. That, in addition to the continued dedication of breed- ers of the other Toys in the Group, is what has made this Group so competitive. We welcome experienced breed- ers from other Groups who are interested in putting in the time, experience, and effort needed to breed good Toy Dogs. Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any advice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? One thing that I

think all Toy breeders and exhibitors would like for Toy judges to understand is that you have to be considerate of the smaller breeds during examination. It is not necessary to apply undue pressure on the dogs, squeeze parts of their bodies, or mess up the hair that took the exhibitor hours to prepare for you to look at! There are ways to go over these little ones, and it behooves every potential Toy judge to learn this at seminars or frommentors. This would include how to approach the dog, go over bites, heads, tails, and coats in a way that is appropriate for the breed. You will be much appreciated for your attention to this detail. These diminutive dogs have made for loving companions since they were first bred centuries ago. There is much va- riety in this Group frombreed to breed. Some are of ancient lapdog types, and some are small versions of hunting dogs, Spitz, or Terrier types, bred down in size for a particular kind of work or to create a pet of convenient size. Because of this variety, the most important consideration when judg- ing this Group is type. My best advice to breeders and/or exhibitors is to please study your standard! You would be surprised how many times, in speaking with an exhibitor after judging, I have asked if they have read their standard—and the answer is no, or not lately! You cannot understand how to improve your breeding program or know why your dog probably did not win on the day if you don’t know what your standard requires. Good books on your breed, and breeding in gen- eral, are a good idea to have and keep as references. Also, find someone whose breeding program you respect and learn everything you can from them. A good mentor is priceless and will steer you in the right direction, even if it is not with them. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? Well, I’m a little biased, having competed in this Group for so many years, but my opinion is that the Toy Group is, and has been for a very long time, one of the strongest Groups, with great overall quality. Toy Groups are most always deep, and it is such a joy to judge any National Toy Dog Specialty where you can actually see the quality of the breeding programs. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? Toy Dogs were bred to be companion animals, and therefore, are very excited about being near, and pleasing, their owners. Toy Dogs will do just about anything you ask of them, just as long as they can be by your side. Their at- tentiveness and eagerness to please are what make them not only good show dogs, but sometimes clowns in the ring. They are very entertaining and creative. It is always a fun day to judge the Toy Breeds! If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? Obviously, this would be a Maltese. I enjoyed handling many of the Toy breeds and have owned quite a few, but there is nothing like the little silky white dog with the black eyes and nose! Just for laughs, do I have a funny story that I can share T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022 • 25

TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

about my experiences judging the Toy Group? One time, in the early 1990s, I was showing the Maltese, “Henry,” at a local all-breed show where the Best in Show judge asked that I take the dog on an “L” pattern on a loose lead. I head- ed down and then across, turned around, and the dog took off by himself, putting every foot down right, all the way back to the judge on the mats. He stopped and baited, then turned around and barked at me while I was catching up to him. He was very proud of himself. As I arrived back at the judge and picked up the lead, all I could say was, “Well, at least it was on a loose lead!” Needless to say, we ended up with the red, white, and blue ribbon. Since then, I have seen this attitude fromall the Toy Breeds from time to time in my ring, and it is always quite entertaining and reminds me why I love this Group so much. For anyone who would question it, Toy Dogs are indeed very smart; there’s always a clown in the bunch, and humor can always be found at the Toy rings! JANET ALLEN Tzu, and Japanese Chins. As partner in Sing Lee Peking- ese, I made up over fifty champions with numerous BIS and BISS (including two National BISS) winners. In ad- dition, I handled (and owned) Pugs, Papillons, Yorkshire Terriers, Pomeranians, Chihuahuas, Tibetan Spaniels, and a BIS Norwegian Elkhound. Licensed for the Toy and Non-Sporting Groups, Junior Showmanship, and Best in Show, I have enjoyed judging in the United States, Canada, and Sweden, awarding CCs in England, Australia, andNew Zealand, and judging all breeds in South Korea, China, and Taiwan. I have judged Regional and National Specialties in Chow Chows, Lhasa Apsos, Bulldogs, Bostons, Chinese Shar-Pei, Shiba Inu, French Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, Shih Tzu, Pekingese, Pomeranians, Papillons, Pugs, English Toy Spaniels, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Chinese Cresteds, Miniature Pinschers, Japanese Chins, York- shire Terriers, and Silky Terriers. I was honored to judge at Westminster in 2014. Retired after a career as an academic medical center administrator, I am active in local all-breed and specialty clubs, and with judges education. I am always happy to make new friends—with dogs as well as people. Where do I live? How many years in dogs? How many years as a judge? I live in a rural community north of San Francisco. I have been “in dogs” for 45-plus years, judging for 30 years (Toy and Non-Sporting Groups). Since 1975, I have been involved in the sport as a breeder, owner, han- dler, and since 1990, a judge. I was successful in Chow Chows under the Tai Yang prefix, with multiple cham- pions, including BIS and BISS win- ners. I became involved with other Oriental breeds; Pekingese, Shih

What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name? My original breed was the Chow Chow (Tai Yang), but I quickly addedPekingese tomy home. I was in partner- ship for over 20 years with J. Robert Jacobsen (Sing Lee). I owner-handled many Toy and Non-Sporting breeds; be- sides Pekingese and Chows, notably Japanese Chins, Pugs, and Yorkshire Terriers. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? Some of the Pekingese I have produced include Ch. California Gold Sing, Ch. Raf- fles Jubilation Sing Lee, and Ch. Windemeres Gold Fever Sing Lee. These are among 12 BISA Pekingese and 20- plus BISS winners. I am recognized by the Pekingese Club of America as a Breeder of Merit, with multiple Register of Merit sires and dams. Also, I produced multiple Group and BISA winning Chow Chows, notably Ch. Tai Yangs Beefeater. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? As form follows function, the function of Toys is to be decorative and amusing (plus some that exterminate rodents); these are qualities that I admire in Toys. I think, “Would this dog look good/be happy on my couch?” Does this dog “make me smile?” Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? I have judged many Toy (and other breed) Specialties and Group Shows in theUnited States andworldwide. Pekingese assignments have included Pekingese Club of America, multiple Pe- kingese Regional Club Specialties, and Specialties in Aus- tralia, New Zealand, England, and Canada. I am pleased to be sought-out as a “Toy Specialist,” known for having gentle hands, a friendly approach, and an appreciation of breed type. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the pre- sentation of these “table” breeds? I believe that Toys (any breed) should be of sound body and mind, with presenta- tion combining this with breed-specific type and appro- priate grooming. There is no reason why Toys should not be outgoing and self-assured; well-socialized and trained. They need to be happy in their surroundings. They should not be expected to be “stuffed animals.” Rather, they should be inquisitive, animated, and engaging—calm but fun! Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? The im- pact on quality by judges/breeders/exhibitors from “larger breeds” can be positive in that some bring to Toys a better understanding and value of structure and soundness. Look at the influence in the past decades of the Stacys and Beth Sweigert on the Affenpinscher breed, the Langseths (and more recently, MaripiWooldridge) on Japanese Chins, and Karen Pricket Miller, Doug Johnson, and Jamie Hubbard on English Toy Spaniels. Toys should be treated not as deli- cate and sheltered, but as “real dogs.” Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any ad- vice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? Toys, and re- ally any dog, should be treated with respect and gentleness;

26 • T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022

TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

they should be understood, but not coddled. With Toys, one needs to be aware of size/spacial differences, and this needs to be considered in one’s approach. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? Today’s exhibits compared to the past… I think that most Toy breeds are well-represented in the show ring with (mostly) depth of quality and adher- ence to the Breed Standards. Pekingese have been consis- tent since the 1950s when Ch. Chik T’Sun of Caversham made his mark in the show ring; some grooming trends, but basically the same make and shape. Japanese Chins are much improved over the past decades; sounder, for sure. Pugs have morphed into what I see as being “cleaner,” with less exaggeration. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? Toys can be outstanding Show Dogs, as their major purpose is as companions. As such, they need to engage with people. They are works of art with charis- ma. Toys are often very good at “asking for it” with a soft, beguiling expression. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? Pekingese will always be part of my life. You live on shared terms with them; they are inde- pendent and not demanding. (You give one a toy and they say thank you, and then go off and play with it.) They are loyal and friendly to those they know; but can be a bit aloof (but tolerant) with strangers. They are very clean in their habits and (typically) are not destructive They do not bark without a purpose. Contrary to popular belief, their coat is very easy to maintain and they have fewmajor health prob- lems. Their mesmerizing eyes say it all—easy to share love. I’m smitten. JEFF BAZELL Where do I live? Howmany years in dogs?Howmany years as a judge? I bred my first AKC registered lit- ter while still a teenager living at home. I have been judging for over 30 years now and find it rewarding and relaxing, though the travel can be like falling down a rabbit hole. My husband, Jeff Kestner, and I live in southeastern Ohio in what is known as the Hocking Hills region.

What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name? St Johns has been a registered kennel name sincemy maternal grandfather was breeding Coonhounds and Fox- hounds in the mid 1930s along St John’s Creek in southern Ohio. My paternal grandmother was a well-known Chow breeder, dating back to the breed’s height of popularity in the late ‘40s. As a family, we have bred over 300 champions in six different breeds through the years. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? To separate the Brussels Griffon out of the mix, we currently have close to 150 AKC champions, with another 240 titles around the world. We also have proudly bred about 30 performance titlists in the US and another 10 worldwide. Some of our best have in- cluded Ch. St Johns the Dog Faced Boy, Ch. St Johns Your Name in Lights, Ch. St Johns Maximus, Ch. St Johns Isn’t She Precious, and Ch. Winterfell’s Almost An Angel at St John, in Griffons. A lovely pair of Landseer litter brothers named Ch. Michael’s Boat of St John and Ch. Admiral Jack of St John made an impact on the Newfoundland breed be- fore we sold our remaining Newfoundlands in Europe. I’ve also had a long history with many sighthound breeds, but most especially Greyhounds through a long relationship with Judie Donaldson of Kingsmark fame. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? I have judged many Toy Specialties around the world and en- joyed each of the experiences, and I look forward to doing even more. I have judged Specialties for Shih Tzu, Ital- ian Greyhounds, Pugs, Pomeranians, Poodles, Papillons, Maltese, Havanese, Cavaliers, Chinese Cresteds, Chi- huahuas, Japanese Chin, and Griffons, of course, and I judged the first Russian Toy Specialty before they became AKC recognized. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the pre- sentation of these “table” breeds? My best advice to any- one entering a Toy ring is to be aware of what you have on your lead. DO NOT RUN WITH TOYS! Every Toy must be shown at a breed-specific pace that does not over-work or over-move the dog. Chinese Crested are, indeed, to move a bit faster, but not so fast that the legs fly all over the place and make an otherwise beautiful dog look awful. Al- low your Toys to walk into and out of the ring. Never clutch them over your heart, as this will make them as anxious as you are. Introduce them to loud noises and large dogs be- fore making your show entry. Toys should drip confidence almost to the extent of being obnoxious, if you really want a

“MY BEST ADVICE TO ANYONE ENTERING A TOY RING IS TO BE AWARE OF WHAT YOU HAVE ON YOUR LEAD. DO NOT RUN WITH TOYS!” 28 • T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022

TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

show dog. Do not over-correct a Toy or you will pay a price that will stay with them for years. When tabling a Toy, I much prefer picking them up and “dropping” them into po- sition on the table in one smooth step. Many people try to re-position legs, and this usually makes things much worse than a simple one stroke maneuver of placing them from a floor stack to a table stack. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? I feel that downsizing to Toys from a Working, Sporting or Herding Breed can be quite helpful for understanding structure. All of my early Toy mentors said that if you hear a Toy judge going on and on about great movement, you know one thing for certain... they know nothing about Toy type. I agree with this wholeheartedly. Not so long ago, I had a woman approach me after judging some really nice Pekes. She’d beaten all the good ones that moved with the correct rolling gait and put up what she felt was the best mover. This dog had an exaggerated nose roll obstructing the nostrils, but it did move well, though with no roll at all, a breed character- istic. I am not saying to ignore movement, but if it is all you can see, perhaps stay with a breed that requires absolute soundness and ability to run all day. Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any advice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? Aside from some of the heavily coated dogs, I do not find that Toys require special care outside of simple things that we should all know innately. Do not drop them, they may break. Do not allow them to overheat or freeze, their size comes into play with both extremes of weather. And, do not overfeed them as you will dramatically shorten their lives. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? I have been in and around Toy rings

for my whole adult life and they have always been tough. Breed win records still stand from the ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s in several Toy Breeds. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? A Toy Dog with spirit can be the very best of Show Dogs, but Toys can be dramatic, and push their handlers to the limit. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? I have shared my life at home with wonderful Griffons, and hopefully this love for the breed will continue for years. I have been fortunate to have judgedmany of the very best Toys that this country and Eu- rope have exhibited for the last 30 years, and I have special memories of each of them; dogs that dripped with breed type and the details that make a Toy Dog a great one. ARLENE CZECH Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any perfor- mance or parent club titles? No performance titles, but five sequential Dams of Merit and two Dogs of Merit. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? I admire the attitude of “I’m here… I’m the best.” Then, I look for the details. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? I’ve judged many Toy Breed Specialties. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presen- tation of these “table” breeds? Yes, practice at home first. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? Quality does not depend on size. Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any ad- vice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? I have only one suggestion: Judges, approach the table to examine with hands down, and chuck under the chin. Don’t spook them. This next comment isn’t “special care,” but become famil- iar with the Standard; refer to it if needed. Where do I live? Howmany years in dogs?Howmany years as a judge? I have 62 years in dogs, judging for more than 50 years. What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name? My origi- nal breed is the Papillon. My ken- nel name is Coquina, appropriately named after the butterfly sea shell. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? Overall, they have made vast im- provements in faults, with corrections in breeding. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? Toys are, first of all, SHOW dogs and it’s natural for them to become outstanding. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? Papillons… and that’s obvious.

“TOYS ARE, FIRST OF ALL, SHOW DOGS and it’s natural for them to become outstanding”

T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022 • 29

TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

DR. TROY CLIFFORD DARGIN

the top winners. A special ShowDog has that special some- thing that says, “Come, look at me.” We all know it when we see it. It’s breathtaking. This can’t be taught and usually can’t be trained out. It’s unusual to see, and when we do, we forgive the overall little parts because, in the end, judging is about the overall dog compared to the Standard. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? Shih Tzu, the best breed. I will just have a pool boy to do the grooming. I’m done with that! Just for laughs, do I have a funny story that I can share about my experiences judging the Toy Group? I have many funny stories. If they are in the Toy Group or not, I can’t remember. Come findme at a show and I’ll share some with you! TED EUBANK What ismy original breed?What is/was my kennel name? My origi- nal breed is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. My kennel name is Pinecrest Cavaliers. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? Notable dogs include CH Pinecrest Rock The Boat, who won BOB at Westminster KC in 2007 at age 20 months, and again in 2008. That year, “Rocky” was Best in Show at two National Specialties, won eight all-breed BIS and 75GroupOnes, BOB at the National Dog Show and a Group One, and Best in Owner-Handled Group at the AKC National Championship. He was No. 1 Cavalier and No. 7 Toy in AKC in 2007, and Breed Winner andGroupTwo at theAKCNational Championship in2009. CH Pinecrest Kiss Me Kate was the No. 1 Cavalier Bitch and No. 4 Cavalier in 1996 when AKC first recognized the breed; mother of 12 AKC children and many grands. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? Most of the breeds are tremendous family pets. They love being with their people. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? Yes, Cavaliers, Pugs, Chihuahuas, Shih Tzu, Yorkshire Terriers, and Chi- nese Cresteds. Where do I live? How many years in dogs? How many years as a judge? I live in Dallas, Texas. I have owned Cavaliers for 30 years and have judged at point shows for 23 years. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presen- tation of these “table” breeds? Presentation is so different from breed to breed. My advice is to get a good mentor in each breed and follow the advice from someone who knows proper presentation. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? Not that I can see.

Where do I live? How many years in dogs? How many years as a judge? Due to the Pandemic, I live all over; I fled NYC to take care of parents in Iowa. Now I live between the Omaha area (when I’m visiting parents); Nashville, Miami, NYC, and Philadelphia.

What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name?My original breed is the Shih Tzu. Falling Star is my kennel name. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? I have had numerous ROM titles. I actually don’t apply for them anymore because I can’t keep track. The titles are not why I show. I had 10 ROM as of 10 years ago, I probably would have double that now. In 1996, I got my first Group One, Am./Can./Int’l. Ch. Munchkintown O’ Falling Star ROM. That year, I bred 10 champions. I bred another 10 champions in 1998-1999. In 2000-2001, I bred 9 homebred champions; 12 in 2004; 11 in 2006; 8 in 2010, to name a few. At present, I have bred close to 100 homebred champions. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? I admire their ability to make you smile. They are all so sweet and willing to please, and they love you… and, their sweet faces. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? Yes. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presen- tation of these “table” breeds? Don’t pick the dog up by the tail or by the throat, it hurts themand throws off their perfor- mance. Relax and realize it’s a table; they are dogs, and they are not supposed to be completely still. A good judge will be able to analyze what they need to see efficiently to make it a quality experience for both the dog, handler, and judge. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? No, but re- cently I sold two dogs to a FrenchBulldog breeder. They are very nice dogs. She’s having a learning curve with groom- ing. This is to be expected. We need to help these people, even the competition. I think it’s easy to look and judge. Instead, we need to help and encourage. Grooming is hard and is a skill you don’t learn overnight. Let’s be considerate and helpful. Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any advice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? Love—lots of love. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? It’s always easy to say that it was much better yesterday. That could be, but even in the past 10 years I see my own breed’s transition. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? Well, not all dogs should be Show Dogs and not all dogs can be outstanding Show Dogs. In fact, some of the most mediocre-quality dogs (according to breeders) are

30 • T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022

INTRODUC ING G C H G L A D I AT O R ’ S C A R T OM A N T E

EASY Thank you to all the judges for your acknowledgment of this young dog just beginning. In two weeks he accomplished such honors. Dr. Albert P. Bianchi, Patricia Trotter, Gareth Morgan-Jones, Donelle Richards, Alfred J. Ferruggiaro & June Penta Breeders: Carlos & Gloria Fernandez • Owner: Pamela Souter • Presented by: Michelle Soave 540-817-0980 T op N otch T oys , M ay 2022 • 31

TOY GROUP JUDGES Q&A

Toy Breeds can require special care. Do I have any advice to offer breeders, exhibitors, and judges? Because care dif- fers frombreed to breed (coats significantly differ inmany), my answer about getting a good mentor and learning what is proper is the same here. Inmyopinion,howdotoday’sexhibitscomparewiththeToy Dogs of thepast? I think they comparewell, especially inmy breed, Cavaliers. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? Because most Toys bond strongly to their people, they tend to have a good time in the ring and enjoy the time with their person. This is so important to success in the show ring. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? No question, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. Just for laughs, do I have a funny story that I can share about my experiences judging the Toy Group? Better leave my stories out of print! CATHY GISH Where do I live? How many years in dogs? How many years as a judge? I live in Henderson, Kentucky. I got my first show dog in 1969. He was an Afghan Hound. I started judging in 2005. What is my original breed? What is/was my kennel name? My original breed is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, under the affix of Flying Colors. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any perfor- mance or parent club titles? Ch. Flying Colors Maxima is a notable dog, but really there are so many special notable dogs over all the years. I am the first person to finish all four colors in AKC and the first and only person to breed cham- pions in all four colors, in the original parent club. No per- formance titles, but many Best in Showwins at the old club. What are some of the qualities I most admire in the Toy Breeds? The qualities that I most admire are size and cuteness. Have I judged any Toy Breed Specialties? I have judged specialties in Cavaliers, Poms, and Chihuahuas. Can I offer any advice to exhibitors regarding the presen- tation of these “table” breeds? Train your dogs to free-stack so that you don’t have to get on your knees. Some longtime exhibitors have “downsized” to Toys. In my opinion, has this had an impact on quality? I’m not sure about large dog breeders in Toys now, but I do see a lot of changes in the Cavaliers—and it is not for the better. They are not supposed to have a huge, heavy coat. And the heads are so extreme now, with domed heads and low set ears. Ear-set is supposed to be high to make the slightly domed head appear flat. Ears are to fan forward and frame the face. In my opinion, how do today’s exhibits compare with the Toy Dogs of the past? I think breeders have worked on

structure and movement, and these have improved, but it can be different from coast to coast. Why do I think Toy Dogs can become outstanding Show Dogs? With proper breed type, structure, movement, and attitude, any dog can be an outstanding show dog. It’s hard to get it all right. If I could share my life with only one Toy Breed, which would it be and why? I love the Cavalier. They are so laid- back and are not yappy. I have also shown and bred Chinese Cresteds and they are very affectionate and funny dogs. They have the ability to make their handler look absolutely stupid by not doing what they should do. Sometimes, they absolutely have a mind of their own and are very stubborn. NANCY SMITH HAFNER Chief Engineer of Heat Pumps to design. I applied to judge my one breed, Poodles, in 1997 and I judgedmy first assign- ment in January 1998. What ismy original breed?What is/wasmy kennel name? My original breed is the Miniature Poodle in brown, black, and apricot colors. My kennel name is Apogee, in a partner- ship with Monroe McIntyre of Daktari Miniature Poodles. So, our kennel names were Daktari Apogee Poodles. Can I list a few of the notable dogs I’ve bred? Any per- formance or parent club titles? In Miniature Poodles: Ch. Daktari Apogee Halston, Ch. Daktari Apogee Jarvas, Ch. Daktari Apogee Capezio, Ch. Daktari Apogee Macho, Ch. Daktari Apogee Sabrina, Ch. Apogee Daktari Lyca Corn- flake, Ch. Apogee Daktari Arina, Ch. Apogee Daktari Arinna, Ch. Daktari Apogee Dakota, Ch. Daktari Apogee Allura, and Ch. Daktari Apogee Arabica. For me, in this time period, I was credited with 77 Min- iature champions. In those 20 years, we always had one or two among the Top Ten winning Miniature Poodles, with Top Producing Sires and Dams yearly. Where do I live? Howmany years in dogs?Howmany years as a judge? My late husband and I moved to the small town of Tuscumbia, Alabama, inMay 1987. I sold my boarding and grooming kennel in Nashville, Ten- nessee, as my husband took a job as In Toy Poodles: My first All-Breed and SpecialtyWinner was Ch. Apogee Daktari Conspiracy, a black bitch, along with her litter sister, Ch. Apogee Daktari Coppatina. These were from an accidental breeding to a black Baliwick dog that climbed a six foot chain-link fence and bred a small brown Miniature bitch of all Miniature breeding! These were my true beginning foundation bitches in Toy Poodles. (AsMaxineBearn once toldme, theBESTToys she showed came down fromMiniature breeding!) No performance titles for me. I went to my first training classes in Obedience in 1970... we graduated in the class,

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