Showsight Presents The Poodle

poodle Q&A WITH DEBRA FERGUSON JONES, NANCY HAFNER, DORIS COZART, KAY PEISER AND JACQUELINE RUSBY

“WE CAN GROOM TO MAKE IT LOOK AS THOUGH THE FRONT IS UNDER THE WITHERS, MAKE THE TAIL SET LOOK AS THO ITS SET ON HIGH, GIVE LEG UNDER THEM, SHORTEN LENGTH OF BACK. IT CAN BECOME A GROOMING CONTEST THAT NEW JUDGES NEVER SEE IN THE BEGINNING!”

10. Describe “Poodly.” DFJ: Stopping for a party in the middle of working. A Poodle is happy to be alive. There is a party in everything.And if she can’t find a party she will make a party, girls just want to have fun. NH: It’s as our Breed Standard refers to “air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself!” Once you see it in the ring, standing around looking to see who and if any oth- ers are watching! 11. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? DFJ: New judges have a difficulty getting passed the hair. NH: The grooming in as much as what is under the hair—a moderate, balanced, dog! We can groom to make it look as though the front is under the withers, make the tail set look as tho its set on high, give leg under them, shorten length of back. It can become a grooming contest that new judges never see in the beginning! DC: Many find the coat difficult. What I mean is they are somewhat afraid to put their hands into the coat. It won’t break and you must feel the dog. We are a glamorous breed but we are just a dog under the coat. It is hard to learn to see past the coat. I recommend that anyone who wishes to judge our breed attend the National Specialty. The judges education program is good. Plus you get to go over many Poodles. Every allowed color, trim in all three varieties. It is a great opportunity to learn. 12. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? DFJ: This breed has an air of distinction and a dignity and elegance that sets them apart.

NH: Poodles must be of breed type , sound, groomed, car- rying himself proudly in a light springy trot in any of our solid colors. DC: It is a special breed. A very versatile breed. Each variety is special in its own way. From companion dogs to Field Trials, there is something for everyone in this breed. 13. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? NH: Was showing a Miniature Poodle in Atlanta inside with large posts in our ring, trying to get dog to go down and back and ran into one of the posts. In these number of years, lots of humor one must laugh at oneself and move on! It’s life—enjoy. DC: At a show I was judging, there was a new exhibitor, she had a lovely example of the breed and I awarded her BOW. I was marking my book and said, “Arm band please.” She took off her arm band and handed it to me. I now say, “Armband number please!” KP: It was the Ocala dog show and Bill and I were just get- ting together. It was a Sunday and we had to break down and drive home. Bill wanted to help and he was great help with the heavy stuff. Then, it came time to empty the buckets, you know, the ones we use when we scoop up after the dogs? Well, let’s just say that was his true introduction to every aspects of dog shows. I’m happy to say it did not scare him off as we have been married now for over 13 years. JR: Camaraderie amongst exhibitors is enjoyable to see. Everyone should work hard for harmony amongst breed- ers for the common good. There is much to learn from each other.

328 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , N OVEMBER 2018

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