Showsight October 2020

AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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AFFENPINSCHER

rouard Brown.indd 1

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FRENCH BULLDOG

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M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N Evaristo D I R R A U S

3 MA LT E S E i n a me r i c a ! Top *

*AKC all breed stats as of 8/31/20

Owners Regis Prado & Handled by Pat Keen Fernande s

©NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2020

Frank Cl apsaddle Regi sPr adoMa lt e s e .com

DESIGN BY Katie Gochev GRAPHICS

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MALTESE

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CHINESE CRESTED

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OWNED BY MR. KENCHI KATO

BRED & OWNED BY KEVIN & JOCELYN MULLINS AND CAROLYN AUSTIN

HANDLED BY ANDY LINTON

ASSISTED BY LAUREN WICKWIRE AND AVA LINTON

CHAMPION PROTOCOL I CAME I SAW I SPARKLED

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

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*

*AKC stats as of 8/31/20

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BICHON FRISE

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*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20 POODLE (MINIATURE)

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GCHS BARBERRY HILLWOOD HOT CHILD IN THE CITY

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BICHON FRISE

ALWAYS BREEDER/OWNER HANDLED BREEDERS/OWNERS ELLEN M. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA & MATT ABBOTT

BREEDER PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLER LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

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GCHG Cerise Bonanza Following A Strong Family Tradition

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

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Number Two Sporting Dog * Number One English Springer Spaniel *

handled by Howard Huber

bred & owned by Dorothy Cherry

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com *AKC ALL-BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/2020

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multiple

B ISS wi nn i ng

group

wi nn i ng

owned by

JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO

MOLLY LATHAM

L ISA BURROFF

bred by

KERRI KOTT

HOLLY H . SCHORR

always owner

handled by

L ISA BURROFF

photos by

holloway

beautiful

& standard are always i n style

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

tessa GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY

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ZEB OWNER HANDLER CHRIS LEITKOWSKI • BREEDER SUSAN A THOMAS

© LYNN M. STONE

#1 OH SPORTING DOG * #5 ALL BREED *

*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/20

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WEIMARANER

MBISOH GCHS CH CAMELOT'S ZEBULON HERNE CD BN SH CGC TKI SD NRD VX

JUDGE’S PHOTOS BY © MALINDA JULIEN PHOTOGRAPHY © ROBERT J. SKIBINSKI © ALYSSIA BOOTH © PURNELL PHOTOGRAPHY © TAMMIE WILKERSON © JC PHOTO © FRITZ CLARK

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BORZOI

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CHINESE SHAR-PEI

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MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

* A KC B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 8 / 3 1 / 2 0

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G R O U P P L A C I N G , B P I S

B I T C H * # 2 *AKC BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20

© SCOTT BUSS

Hilltop Rhodesian Ridgebacks | Scott & Julie Buss | Bronze Breeder of Merit bussblues@msn.com | 319-240-8189 | hilltoprhodesianridgebacks.com

Rhodesian

Ridgebacks

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

CIRCE G C H B H I L L T O P ’ S E N C H A N T I N G C I R C E O F D Y K U M O S

© SCOTT BUSS

Co-Owned by Dick and Kathy Allbee | Expertly Handled by Mark and Tabatha Bettis

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR, ADVERTISER RELATIONS 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128

BRIAN CORDOVA ADVERTISING SALES, CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGER BCORDOVA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.949.633.3093 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL

CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS MICHELLE SCOTT

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 37

CONTENTS

40 Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC

42 A Letter from the AKC President DENNIS SPRUNG, AKC PRESIDENT/CEO

44 Lines From Linda

LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

64 Breeding with Intention CELESTE M. GONZALEZ

Charles Foxhound FC_v3.indd 1

72 Young Prospects

WALTER SOMMERFELT

82 Candids: Chattanooga Kennel Club PHOTOS BY BLAKE WILLIAMS

140 Toy Group

VARIOUS GUESTS

84 Candids: ShowSight in Circulation

184 Great Dane

PHOTOS BY KATHY AMBLER, BECKY VAN KLEEK & BILLY HUNTINGTON

VARIOUS GUESTS

192 Flat Coat Retreiver VARIOUS GUESTS

92 Breeder Interview:

Susan Kamen Marsicano ALLAN REZNIK

196 Sloughi

104 Blue Book Toys DAN SAYERS

VARIOUS GUESTS

200 West Highland White Terrier VARIOUS GUESTS

112 Form Follows Function

STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH

203 Basset Hound VARIOUS GUESTS

126 Candids: Licking River

PHOTOS BY ROGER COTTON & CANDY WAY

206 Coming Attractions

134 Candids: Memories Captured LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

208 Index to Advertisers

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POODLE (STANDARD)

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

CHALLENGES AND TRIUMPHS

E very year, the dog show world brings more than its fair share of challenges and triumphs. You might even say that dog show years are a lot like dog years. Show- sight Magazine may be only 28 years old, but we’ve packed several lifetimes of experience into our history—there is literally that much going on at any given time. This experience has taught me to appreciate each year for its uniqueness. For example, this year started out well enough. Then COVID came, which brought me a lot of sadness and, quite honestly, fear for our community and for my Showsight family. Then the Okla- homa shows happened, which I recall with a special fondness that continues to this day. The year 2020 is perhaps one of the toughest—if not the toughest—years I’ve experi- enced to date as an adult, but it has also made me stronger. Now the picture of what our community needs is clearer than it ever has been. We have several initiatives underway that will continue to bring you top-quality publi- cations and, most importantly, expand and promote purebred dogs, the sport and its breed- ers to millions of dog lovers who aren’t familiar with who we are and what we do. This past month, every single AKC National Parent Club Board has received a letter from me outlin- ing what we will be doing. Conversations have already taken place with over 80 breed clubs and other organizations. These will come to light once agreements are set. From this point on, almost everything we do will be showcased not only to people within our sport, but also to millions outside of it as well. I am a huge believer that positive changes will start happening within our fancy as a whole as more people are exposed to and educated about purebred dogs. Beginning this Fall, we will start releasing details about how we plan to reach millions of dog lovers outside our sport and how we will deliver it all to you at the same time—how you can be part of the exciting changes. I would like to thank the thousands of fanciers who have already spent a lot of time helping us bring these initiatives to fruition. A long, hard and expensive road awaits us, but with our “no fail attitude” we will not simply protect the genuine values of our community, we will also grow them and grow our numbers. Meanwhile, we are still confronted with a pandemic, social unrest, climate change and, on top of everything else, it’s an election year. It feels like 70 years are being rolled into one! (There are days when I ask my wife if we are living in a movie.) I have witnessed and heard that many of our fanciers have responded to the events of 2020 with fortitude, perseverance and resiliency. I am proud of everyone’s efforts to keep things going. Through this year’s challenges and triumphs, I have witnessed the Heart of our Fancy shine brighter than ever. For this, I’ll be forever grateful and proud to share the sport of dogs with you. Happy Holiday Season from my daughters Iryna & Adrianna, my wife Hanifa, our Showsight employees, their families and me.

“The Secret of Change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old, but on building the new.”

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

T H E D O G S H O W M A G A Z I N E

Est 1992

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Owned by Valerie Maros Assisted by Ali Apollos GCHB CH Havi Aus Vinkona Bred by Manuela Dossinger Handled by Danielle Frykman

*AKC b r e e d s tat s as o f 8 / 3 1 / 2 0

#1 Icelandic Sheepdog * ICELANDIC SHEEPDOG SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 41

A L E T T E R F R OM T H E A K C P R E S I D E N T

Dear Friends, To say that this year has been chal- lenging would be a gross understatement. We have faced a myriad of unplanned cir- cumstances, including a pandemic, natu- ral disasters, and economic uncertainty that has directly impacted our sports and our communities. And yet, despite unprecedented obstacles, we have seen how resilient we truly are. From exhibi- tors in Performance, Companion, and Conformation events to judges, delegates, superintendents and staff, we have found ways to prioritize the safety of our partici- pants and each other while continuing to compete in our beloved sports. We are incredibly proud of the time and dedication our clubs have put in around the country to make hard deci- sions. Whether it was to reschedule or proceed with caution, each club and its members have risen to the ever growing challenges of holding live events. To date, there have been several successful con- formation show clusters in 18 states. Fast Cat and Hunting tests are increasing. The time, energy, and dedication this has tak- en proves that when faced with challeng- es, we can unite and support each other while finding solace in our competitions. Much of our success has come from a shared responsibility to protect each other during this pandemic. We continue to encourage each of our clubs to follow federal, state, and local guidelines, but we also wanted to assist with direct action in our sports. In June, the AKC developed Suggested Best Health Practices by Sport to provide clubs with manageable ways to

add additional layers of safety for all participants at the events. We have seen their implementation and how effective they have been in preventing illness. This is something everyone deserves to be proud of. As we move forward to our AKC National Cham- pionship Presented Royal Canin, we are encouraged about the year ahead for our sports. Holding the largest dog show in North America is no small feat and, in the middle of the pandemic, may seem almost impossible. However, we are up to the challenge and will do so by prioritizing safety and the health and well-being of everyone who participates. We will continue to get through this challenging year with the strength, intelligence, and perseverance we are known for. In the midst of uncertainty, be certain that our enjoyable events will once again be held. Thank you for everything you continue to do for purebred dogs, our clubs, and for the American Kennel Club.

As ever,

DENNIS SPRUNG AKC PRESIDENT/CEO

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*

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20

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YORKSHIRE TERRIER

LINES FROM LINDA AKC DETECTION DOG TASK FORCE AND PUPPY PROTECTION PROGRAM EXCITING NEWS INTRODUCING PHASE II PROGRAM MANAGER STACEY WEST

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

T he purpose of our Detection Dog Task Force is “to study specific areas in which the AKC can help address the crisis (of a short- age of high-quality explosives detection dogs for US national and public security), work toward improving incentives for US breeders, while also advancing recognition of purpose-bred dogs as crucial to our nation, and AKC as preeminent authority on canines.” The primary role of the DDTF is as “facilitator.” The AKC is uniquely positioned to bring together the leading expert breeders, trainers, research- ers/scientists, purchasers, government officials, private buyers, and others to collaboratively address the obstacles that prevent the US from being able to produce the dogs this country needs. Three key areas of the DDTF focus include: Public Policy/Government Relations, Breeder Education and Out- reach, and Educational Conferences/Seminars. DDTF Chair, Dr. Carmen Battaglia, commenting of the program’s ori- gin said, “The AKC Board authorized the establishment of the AKC Dog Detection Task. The task was to develop a pilot program and demonstrate

AKC Detection Dog Task Force team Stacey West, Dr. Carmen Battaglia, Sheila Goffe, Melissa Ferrell, and Chris Sweetwood meeting in front of the AKC Headquarters in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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© HAN 2020

2 019 N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

B I S, M R B I S, M B I S S, G C H G SilverLakes THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS

C G C A, T K A

BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLERS: BARBARA & DR. GARY MCNEILL

BREEDERS OF MERIT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 405-833-1774 SILVERLAKEGSPS.COM

© HAN 2020

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

© HAN 2020

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C E L E B R A T I N G T H E F I R S T

G R A N D C H A M P I O N N E W F O U N D L A N D I N B R E E D H I S T O R Y

#

“Grateful for all the Judges who have recognized Xander, for the friends made along the way, and for the love shared for this sport.”

OWNED AND PRESENTED BY: KIM & GIGI GRIFFITH • BRED BY: GIGI GRIFFITH & CAROL BERGMANN

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NEWFOUNDLAND

OCEANO DARBYDALE’S XECUTIVE DECISION

# 1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 * 29 BEST IN SHOWS 2XNATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER 2017 & 2018

NEWFOUNDLANDCLUBOF AMERICA TOP SHOWDOG 2017, 2018 & 2019 TOP 10WORKINGDOG

2017, 2018 & 2019 *** TOP 20 ALL BREEDS 2017, 2018 & 2019 **

27 BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWS 22 RESERVE BEST IN SHOWS 127 GROUP ONES 291 GROUP PLACEMENTS

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8/31/20 **AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20 ***AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/20

© Miguel

LOVED & OWNED BY: KATHY WORTHAM • CO-OWNED BY: MARY W. PRICE & CAROL BERGMANN

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 49

Samoyeds B A R K B A R K OWNED & BRED BY JOHN & CLAIRE O’NEILL BARK BARK SAMOYEDS

Reba BISS GCHS WHITE MAGIC’S LITTLE ROCK ROMC CHAMPION AT 6 MOS 21 DAYS SAMOYED CLUB SAN DIEGO BISS 2011

Gunny RBIS GCH BARK BARK’S EAGLE © PHOTOS BY KIT

GLOBE & ANCHOR CHAMPION AT 6 MOS 23 DAYS RBIS SAN FERNANDO KC 2019

© 2018 HOLLOWAY

No No

BISS GCHS SNOWATER N BARK BARK’S NO NO NANETTE ROMC SCA NATIONAL SPECIALTY WB/BOW/BBE/AOM WINNER 2013

SCCA BISS WINNER 2014 #3 SAMOYED BITCH 2015

© KOHLER

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SAMOYED

Sarge MBIS MRBIS MBISS GCHP GLACIER’S N ROWDY’S CZARGENT TROUBLE ROMC #1 BREED SAMOYED 2010, 2011, 2012 FIRST SAMOYED GCH & 5TH WORKING DOG TO GO PLATINUM

© 2011 MARITIME CITY PHOTOGRAPHY

BIS RBIS MBISS GCHP POLAR MIST N BARK BARK’S BUILT TOUGH 5TH SAMOYED TO GO PLATINUM

Blaze BIS BISS GCHS BARK BARK’S SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE SCLA BISS KENNEL CLUB OF PALM SPRINGS 2018 AT 1 YEAR OLD, BIS YUBA CITY KC 2018 AT 1 ½ YEARS OLD

© TYLER CRADY PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 51

LINES FROM LINDA: AKC DETECTION DOG TASK FORCE

TODAY, THE DDTF IS COMPRISED OF THE FOLLOWING MEMBERS: Dr. Carmen Battaglia Task Force Co-Chairman AKC Board of Directors Chris Sweetwood Task Force Co-Chairman AKC Board of Directors Rita Biddle AKC Board of Directors Dominic Carota AKC Board of Directors Vice Chairman Ann Wallin AKC Board of Directors Sheila Goffe AKC Vice President Government Relations and Staff Lead for DDTF Doug Ljungren AKC Executive Vice President Sports & Events Mark Dunn AKC Executive Vice President Registration Management Stacey West Program Manager AKC Patriotic Puppy Program Melissa Ferrell Program Manager Government Relations and DDTF

Dr. Carmen Battaglia, Task Force Co-Chairman, AKC Board of Directors

Chris Sweetwood, Task Force Co-Chairman, AKC Board of Directors

Rita Biddle, AKC Board of Directors

Dominic Carota, AKC Board of Directors, Vice Chairman

Ann Wallin, AKC Board of Directors

Sheila Goffe, AKC Vice President, Government Relations, Staff Lead Detection Dog Task Force

Mark Dunn, AKC Executive Vice President, Registration Management

Doug Ljungren, AKC Executive Vice President, Sports and Events

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FUNDING SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH TO PREVENT, TREAT AND CURE CANINE DISEASE

• Over 1,000 canine health research and education grants since 1995 •$58M in funding for canine health research and education grants since 1995 • Over 815 peer-reviewed publications Help improve canine health at akcchf.org/donate. Over the last 25 years, the AKC Canine Health Foundation has become the leader in canine health research.

akcchf.org/25years

The AKC Canine Health Foundation is dedicated to advancing the health of all dogs and their owners by funding scientific research and sharing health information to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. akcchf.org | 888.682.9696

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 53

GROUP FOURTH GALVESTON KC, FEBRUARY 2020 J U D G E M R S . C L A I R E “ K I T T Y ” S T E I D E L

GROUP FOURTH LOST DUTCHMAN KC, FEBRUARY 2020 J U D G E M S . R O B I N R I E L

GROUP FOURTH Galveston KC, February 2020 Judge Mrs. Claire “Kitty” Steidel GROUP FOURTH Lost Dutchman KC, February 2020 Judge Ms. Robin Riel T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S B R E D B Y: MELANIE STEELE & RINDI GAUDET OWN E D B Y: H A N D L E D B Y: ASHLIE WHITMORE & ALFONSO ESCOBEDO DEBORAH BAHM & ASHLIE WHITMORE

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GREYHOUND

Pinny C H A M P I O N G R A N D C R U L E P I N I I

GROUP SECOND ALEXANDRIA KC, JANUARY 2020 J U D G E M R . D A N A C L I N E

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I N T C H M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph R O M , C D , G N , R A , N A , C G C A

Owned by: Kay Backues , DVM | 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by: Teresa Nail & Ray Lively | 817-454-7417 Bred By: Gwen Myers , DVM & Cecilia Martinez Thank you Judge John C. Ramirez

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

AJAX SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 57

LINES FROM LINDA: AKC DETECTION DOG TASK FORCE

PHASE II As of this month, DDTF breeder education and outreach is entering a new phase. A new AKC Canine College program on raising confident puppies is nearing completion, and a new subject matter expert, Stacey West, has been hired to lead Phase II of the Patriotic Puppy Pilot Program. The Patriotic Puppy Program is a program designed to study whether AKC breeders can provide a suitable and reliable source of future “green” dogs that could then be purchased by law enforcement or government agencies advanced training and successful deployment as explosives detection dogs (EDDs). In its first year, the Patriotic Puppy Program established a wealth of educational and technical resources that are available online at https://www.akc.org/akc-detection-dog-task-force/akc-pilot- detection-puppy-rearing-program/ . The task force also worked with a specialist who focused on federal, and specifically TSA, require- ments for explosives detection dogs. DDTF also conducted exten- sive outreach to the federal government, assisting with the devel- opment of mandated reports to improve federal transparency in purchasing procedures and reporting requirements. It worked with members of Congress to create and pass legislation establishing a working group to develop federal guidelines for explosive detection dogs. Dr. Carmen Battaglia served on this working group. Throughout this period, the Task Force continued to receive increasing interest of the program from canine handlers in other agencies, as well as local and state law enforcement, resulting in the decision late this summer to create Phase II of the Patriotic Puppy Pilot Program that would also broaden training and outreach to include the development of detector dogs that might be deployable more locally and even in other detection areas. “We are really excited about this new phase in the Patriotic Pup- py Program,” said Sheila Goffe, Vice President, Government Rela- tions and AKC Staff Lead for the DDTF program. “The new phase of this pilot program represents a new, broader opportunity for AKC dogs and their breeder/trainers. It also incorporates elements of more traditional dog training that AKC breeders and trainers are already familiar with. Additionally, we expect that our participants will be able to spend less time on reporting and more time focusing on valuable new skills and problem solving that are appropriate for a variety of working futures.” Stacey West, AKC’s new program manager is ideally suited to the new role. Stacey has extensive experience in breeding, training, and handling Sporting and detection dogs, and in working with federal, state and local government agencies to help them address their working canine needs. His experience in this area includes the development of proposals for contracts, the sourcing of detection dogs, and the preparation and presentation of detection dogs for contract or purchase. As president of Anchored Canine Inc., he has been responsible for all aspects of the development and operation of a canine breeding and training program to produce detection and Sporting dogs. Stacey also worked with K2 solutions, where he first interacted with the AKC DDTF. Stacey attended several of the AKC DDTF conferences, including one in which he demonstrated explosives detection with K2 dogs. While at K2 Solutions, he was also deployed to Camp Leatherneck, Helmond Province, Afghani- stan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Stacey is also an AKC Licensed Retriever Field Trial Judge and a Key Opinion Leader with Eukanuba Dog Food. Stacey has a Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Wildlife Science from North Carolina State University and a Master of Science in Zoology from Clemson University. Stacey currently resides in Pinehurst, North Carolina, with his family.

Stacey West and “Yadi.” Stacey will lead Phase ll of the AKC Patriotic Puppy Pilot Progam.

that a domestic breeding program could be developed with AKC breeders who are willing to help produce explosive detection dogs. If successful, the country would no longer be dependent on foreign sources for dogs needed to protect the country. I was asked to chair the effort. The Board also approved a large work- ing committee and hired an outside consultant. We knew from the beginning that Phase I would have many startup problems. We also learned that public awareness was low and that only a few US vendors were active. We learned that breeders had many questions and would need a support system, which included information about breeding, training, and deployment. We responded by developing videos, and a group of “go to” contacts who could help with questions and some of the unforeseen prob- lems in their breeding and training program. We have taken all of the valuable input, information col- lected from our surveys and three national conferences, and developed the plan for Phase II which is being implemented as this article goes to press. We have hired a new consultant who is well-known and respected by federal and state agencies, ven- dors, and the academic community. He has an excellent history of breeding, training, and placement of dogs bred and trained for single and dual purpose deployments. Phase II will include the launch of meetings with breeders, webinars about breeder questions, and a series of meetings aimed at those who have an interest in participating. With an enhanced AKC website and database, the Task Force will be moving closer to demonstrating that a domestic breeding program for dogs needed to protect this country can be achieved with the efforts of AKC breeders and purpose-bred dogs.”

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ICEYCREEKCANECORSO.COM ICEYCREEKCC@GMAIL.COM

Cane Corso

#1 CANE CORSO IN BREED * #4 CANE CORSO ALL BREED ** 2017, 2018, 2019 TOP 10 CANE CORSO

C A N E C O R S O * *AKC BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20

IN BREED * 2020 WKC INVITATION #14 LIFETIME CANE CORSO

**AKC BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20

***AKC GCH LIFETIME STATS

BY GCH POINTS *** VARIETY RESERVE BEST IN SHOW BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING

Sebec R B I S B I S S G C H G C A S T L E G U A R D S P I R I T R I D G E M A G I C A L S E B E C F D C T T R A T S C G C A C G C U

WATCH FOR SEBEC AND THE STARR-COOMES CONNECTION AS THE MAGICAL ADVENTURE CONTINUES

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2020 | 59

CANE CORSO

LINES FROM LINDA: AKC DETECTION DOG TASK FORCE

The year 2020 was designated as the year of the breeder by the AKC Board. Our breeders are the heart and soul of the AKC, and with their 20/20 vision they have continued to produce the best American purpose-bred dogs in the world. —Chris Sweetwood

A second part of the new educational programming includes development of Confident Puppy, a new AKC Canine College course that provides a new, broader focus, and provides a more structured approach to understanding the fundamentals of raising a confident puppy that could go on for advanced training as a detec- tion dog, service dog, or a well-trained competitor or pet. WHY ARE SO FEW US BRED DOGS BEING TRAINED AND USED AS DETECTION DOGS? There are a number of reasons this is happening. These include: • The Department of Defense, which purchases many of the military and TSA dogs, typically wants to purchase 50 or 100 dogs at a time. Typical individual Sporting breeders can’t provide those kinds of numbers. • Years of anti-breeder laws and the animal rights agenda have resulted in discouraging potential breeders from pro- ducing the kind of dogs needed. • The extra effort associated with government contracts is a hurdle many of our breeders currently aren’t interested in dealing with. • Most dogs aren’t bought until about 8-10months of age, well beyond the age that most breeders can keep large numbers of dogs. • There’s also lack of transparency about the real cost of what it takes to breed, raise and deploy a successful explosives detection dog. This is a problem the AKC Government Relations team is working on now. Patriotic Puppy Program participant “Mini” sits with owner Sharon Smith of Greenville, South Carolina. Photo courtesy of Gabrielle Miller, ©gabriellegracePHOTOGRAPHY

“Typically, the outright purchase cost for a dog in Europe may be cheaper, however when you consider the number of dogs pur- chased overseas that never make it through the full training cycle, we believe it can be more efficient to purposefully breed and train the dogs here in the US where we can also study the pedigrees, genetics, health tests, and other traits of the dogs so that we really understand how dogs succeed in these programs; we can select for those traits, and we also can monitor the care and conditions with which they are raised. This is a concern about some of the overseas kennels from which our governments are obtaining these dogs. We haven’t heard a lot about this yet, but in the future, I think we will,” explained Sheila Goffe. Thoughts by AKC Board Member and Co-Chair of the Detec- tion Dog Task Force Chris Sweetwood are right on target as we welcome Stacey West. As Chris notes, “The year 2020 was desig- nated as the year of the breeder by the AKC Board. Our breeders are the heart and soul of the AKC, and with their 20/20 vision they have continued to produce the best American purpose-bred dogs in the world. The Patriotic Puppy Program is a tribute to their efforts and as we step into the future we know they will produce the best American purpose-bred dogs for our first responders. We value their continued support and patriotism, and look forward to the future as our program enters its final phase. With Stacey working with breeders, I have no doubt this three-tiered approach will take our program to exciting new levels of success!” For more information, go to https:www.akc.org/AKC-detection- dog-task-force/ or contact Melissa Ferrell, Program Manager, at Melissa.ferrell@akc.org and 919-816-3577.

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Breeder/Owner: Suzanne T. Ritter . 572 W County Rd, Sugarloaf, PA 18249 Handler: Rachel Kulp LEGACY'S FREESTYLE gold grand champion MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING

# 1 Breed *

*AKC breed stats as of 8/31/20

Freestyling to Big Wins! ! ! Thank you to the judges who have awarded him group placements: Ms. Ann Yuhasz, Mr. Charles Olvis, Mr. Dana Cline, Mr. David Bolus, and Ms. Peggy Beisel-McIlwaine. And a big thank you to the Mr. John Wade and Mrs. Cindy Meyers who awarded him recent Group 1’s.

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MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

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*AKC STATS 2019

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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BY CELESTE M. GONZALEZ SIXTH IN A SERIES WITH INTENTION T his series is a discussion about the natu- ral tension that exists between how we view show dogs, field/working dogs and dual-purpose (show and work/field)

dogs. The dog grouping last discussed was the Spitz members of the Working Group. This month, we will explore those questions for other functional groupings within the AKC Working Group. How does the evolved morphological form relate to past and/or current function? How and why is it that some breeds have developed different types for field/work and show? What are the actual or perceived similarities and dif- ferences between the purebred show dog and field/work dog? What have breeders done to breed dogs that can do the job for which they were intended, if it still exists, and if not, what sim- ulations exist that are as close to the original intent as possible? Before standards were written for the Working Group breeds we recognize today, dogs were already being used and selectively bred to perform certain work. Multiple factors impacted the development of these breeds and their continued evolution, including geography, climate and terrain, culture and customs, as well as type of work to be performed. Within this Group, we find breeds that serve as flock/livestock guard- ians, human/property guardians, farm dog/draft dog/watch- dog, sled dogs, and other purposefully evolved dog breeds working in various jobs via snow, water or big game hunting. In so many cases, the original purpose of the breed has been supplanted by technology and machinery, enabling man to do the dogs’ work faster and more efficiently at times. Still, there are dedicated breeders who continue to breed quality speci- mens that demonstrate the individual breed’s working abilities where the actual work, or a simulation, exists.

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*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/20

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RETRIEVER (LABRADOR)

LONDON IS THE ONLY ENGLISH SETTER IN THE HISTORY OF THE BREED TO WIN BEST IN FUTURITY - 1999 AND BEST OF BREED – 2000

AT THE NATIONAL SHOW THE FOLLOWING YEAR

MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER

2004 PEDIGREE TOP PRODUCER AWARD

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SETTER (ENGLISH)

QUANTUM SET’R RIDGE’N BRASSWINDS FIRE AND ICE

CH BRASSWINDS SONRISE AHHMEN (LONDON) x GCH SET’R RIDGE’N CREEKSCROSSING HOW GREAT THOU ART (CARRIE)

Owners / Breeders TRACY WILES, NANCY ALEXANDER, & MELISSA NEWMAN Handled Exclusively by CARLOS CARRIZO

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BREEDING WITH INTENTION

The Anatolian has retained its functional characteristics and there are no discernible type differences between those used for work and those that are shown. Of course, the working dogs don’t encounter a bath and brush as often as the show dog, so coat density differences may be seen that are beyond seasonal.

climatic conditions, and lifestyles. It had to tolerate hot, dry sum- mers and cold winters, semi-nomadic movements with the seasons, and guarding flocks of goats and/or sheep that moved great distanc- es on the central Anatolian plateau of Turkey. It was and is expected to guard flocks without direction or human assistance. Working in trios, they are expected to guard a flock against predators, includ- ing wolves and coyotes, attacking the predator(s) when needed to defend the flock. To this day, they can be found guarding flocks in rural areas of Turkey as well as many areas in the US. The Anatolian has retained its functional characteristics and there are no discernible type differences between those used for work and those that are shown. Of course, the working dogs don’t encounter a bath and brush as often as the show dog, so coat density differences may be seen that are beyond seasonal. Known as the Pyrenean Mountain Dog in its native land area straddling the south of France and north of Spain, in the US the breed is known as the Great Pyrenees (Pyr). Puppies intended to be working guardian dogs are raised with their flock of sheep and form a close protective bond with them. Their needed agility allows them to easily go up and down steep Pyrenean mountainsides in the con- tinual guarding of their flock. In the US, they can be found guard- ing goat herds and sheep flocks, working in trios, braces, or singly depending on herd/flock size. What is common to each working guardian Great Pyrenees is an extreme devotion to the flock/herd and an alertness to danger that belies their quiet demeanor. When a predator is spotted, the Pyr(s) move toward the predator and sound warning barks to keep the predator away. If the predator insists, the Pyr(s) defend the flock/herd. Pyrs have, by and large, retained the characteristics of their immediate Pyrenean ancestors. However, their guarding ability is not formally tested through the parent club. (You can imagine that tests would take days and days per dog, and require immense areas of land and flocks or herds!) However, the parent club website maintains a list of Pyr breeders who breed livestock guardian dogs. Much like other working dogs, the coat of the working Pyr does not often see a bath or brush. The show dog, on the other hand, is kept bathed, brushed, and unstained by foliage or dirt. To that end, too many show dogs are shown with coats blown-out via forced air, giv- ing an unnatural or “stand-off” look to the coat. The two Hungarian breeds of livestock guardian dogs, the Komondor and the Kuvasz, were developed independently. A Komondor-type dog was brought to the Hungarian region by the Cumans in the 12th and 13th centuries, and a Kuvasz-type dog was developed by the Magyars circa the 9th century. A declared Hungarian national treasure in its native country, the Komondor is a livestock and property guardian. The breed is related to the South Russian Ovcharka, Puli, Pumi, Mudi, and Pol- ish Lowland Sheepdog. It is used primarily in the regions of lower elevations with drier climates. The corded coat of the adult Komondor provides protection against predators, weather, and vegetation. The coat of a working Komondor looks much like that of a sheep from a distance, allow- ing the dog to blend in with and look like its guarded flock of sheep. In the US, the breed is sometimes used as a guardian of sheep or goats against predators such as coyotes, cougars, and bears. The breed has a natural tendency to protect farm, ranch, and its human and animal inhabitants. With such numbers representing the breed in the show ring, it is difficult to ascertain whether there has been morphological, type or style departures from those dogs used in everyday guardian work. Certainly, the show dogs we see are tidied up considerably as

The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) has divided this grouping of dogs—all found in the AKC Working Group— mainly into two distinct groups: Spitz (FCI Group 5); and Molos- sian (FCI Group 2). Two of the breeds, Komondor and Kuvasz, fall into FCI Group 1 (Herding, Sheepdogs). The Portuguese Water Dog falls into FCI Group 8 (Retrievers, Flushing, Water Dogs). Neither the Chinook nor the Boerboel are classified or recognized by the FCI. Five of these breeds (Cane Corso, Doberman Pinscher, Giant Schnauzer, Rottweiler, and Boxer) are subject to working trials. For these breeds, their working ability is commonly demonstrated via IPO/Schutzhund. Internationale Prüfungs-Ordnung (IPO) is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles. Within the Working Group, the Black Russian Terrier, not named in FCI as subject to working trials, also participates in IPO/Schutzhund. The purpose of Schutz- hund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are a strong desire to work, courage, intelligence, trainability, a strong bond with the handler, perseverance, protective instinct, and a good sense of smell. The various levels of Schutzhund working trials encompass tracking, obedience, and protection. There are various Schutzhund associations within the United States, some focusing on one or mul- tiple eligible breeds. In this installment of the series, the flock/livestock guardian type dogs of the AKC Working Group (Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Great Pyrenees, Komondor, Kuvasz, and Tibetan Mastiff) will be explored. None of the breeds discussed has a working certification requirement in their native countries. Three of the five breeds mentioned above are found in FCI’s Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer—Molossoid and Swiss Mountain and Cattledogs, Section 2.2 Mountain sub-type within the Molos- sian type (Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Great Pyrenees, Tibetan Mas- tiff). Two of the five breeds (Komondor and Kuvasz,) are classified as belonging to FCI Group 1: Sheepdogs and Cattledogs (except Swiss Cattledogs). Section 1, Sheepdogs, includes the Komondor and Kuvasz. The Anatolian Shepherd Dog (Anatolian), a livestock guardian, originated in the Anatolia region of Turkey. In June of 2018, Ana- tolians were coalesced into one registry with the genetically indis- tinguishable (same breed) Kangal Shepherd Dog as one FCI breed by the Turkish Kennel Club, and are now known as the Kangal Shepherd Dog. Prior to the joining, the only distinguishing charac- teristic was coat color. It is reported that dogs of this type existed over 4,000 years ago. However, the breed was developed over time to meet specific needs,

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T AYL O R AM GCHS/CAN GCH SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM Presented by Joanne Thibault

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*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/20

CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

BREEDING WITH INTENTION

Are we paying attention to the original intent of the breed when observing it? How conscious are we of these real and perceived differences when we make our judging decisions, be they in the show ring, working trials, water work or in breeding? Is there a divergence in type or morphology? What are we doing, as breeders and judges, to close the gap?

compared to their working counterparts. The question is wheth- er the cords on a working specimen are allowed to grow to such lengths as seen in a mature specials dog/bitch, or are kept naturally or forcibly trimmed to accommodate a working environment. The Kuvasz, like the Komondor, was also developed in the Hun- garian region. It was used primarily in the damper, higher eleva- tions as a livestock (sheep) guardian and guardian of large estates. During WWII the breed was decimated. With less than 30 dogs remaining, the breed was revitalized through the efforts of dedi- cated Hungarian breeders and a few others throughout Europe. The breed is characteristically independent and protective. This writer’s early exposure to a friend’s Kuvaszok during her college years left an indelible imprint of the protective and vocal nature of the breed, as well as what working dogs’ coats looked and felt like. The peculiar coat pattern, with the head, ears, and paws of short, smooth hair, and body coat consisting of a fine undercoat and guard hairs, resembles a lamb or sheep in appearance—but not texture. The body coat may be quite wavy to straight. The breed is found in small numbers in the US and [any] departure in type and style from those in its home country cannot be ascertained. What is certain, however, is the difference in coat between those dogs being shown and those dogs serving a guardian lifestyle. The latter’s coat tends to look more like the aforementioned lamb, while the former’s is often washed and blown-dry so as to erase any of the characteristic wavi- ness and crispness of the guard hairs. An open coat, such as is often seen in the show ring, is not protective from the elements. Various pieces of artwork from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) depict the Tibetan Mastiff much like the breed we see today. The term “Mastiff” is a misnomer as applied by the English to these large dogs found in the Himalayan region when, in fact, they are locally known as Himalayan Mountain Dogs. Of peculiar inter- est is the Tibetan Mastiff’s tolerance to hypoxia due to a genetic hemoglobin adaptation. Keep in mind that air has decreasing oxy- gen saturation the higher one moves into the atmosphere, i.e., up to high-mountain grasslands. This primitive breed was long used by nomadic Himalayan fam- ilies as nocturnal guards against predators and livestock thieves. They are known as fearless protectors of the family and their posses- sions, and occasionally found as watchdogs in Tibetan monasteries. The breed displays two distinct types that can occur in the same litter; the “monastery” type and the “nomad” type. The monastery type is described as taller, heavier, and more heavily-boned, with more facial wrinkling and haw than the “nomad” type. The larger, heavier “monastery” type is used in more stationary jobs versus the more active jobs of the “nomad” type, which is better structured and well-muscled. While the breed is shown in Western countries under one standard, the Indian standard separates the breed into two varieties; the “Lion Head,” which is of smaller stature with quite long hair from the forehead to the withers (the mane), and the “Tiger Head,” which is of larger stature and displays shorter hair. Tibetan Mastiffs exist in relatively small numbers in the US. However, they are almost indistinguishable from those remaining dogs still used as guardians by nomadic families and maintained as watchdogs in monasteries.

The following commentary was received from a very long- time Alaskan Malamute breeder/exhibitor/sledder/judge regard- ing the fourth in the series inclusion on the breed: Because Alaskan Malamutes no longer have to survive in Arc- tic conditions, some “survival characteristics” are being lost. 1. The Malamute standard calls for a scissors bite and large teeth. This was necessary to eat a frozen hunk of meat when it was tossed to them; and this also frequently included bones. Bad bites, missing teeth, and small teeth are being overlooked by judges and ignored by breeders. 2. Cat feet are pretty, but wrong for the breed! They work just fine in a show ring, but will punch down through the snow. Large feet must be kept and, although the standard does not give the shape, if you look at working sled dogs in the Arctic for the past 200 years they all have large feet—and the two middle toes are longer than the sides; to borrow a common phrase, “snow shoe foot.” 3. Another problem is the over-angulation in the rear with hocks flying up in the air or not being extended when moved into gaiting position on the ground under the dog. Wasted motion is wasted energy. With food so scarce in the Arctic, a dog that used his energy (food) for unnecessary movement would soon be dead. 4. A theory about the stop, or in the case of Malamutes, the lack of it: “The topline of the skull and the topline of the muzzle show a slight break downward from a straight line as they join.” Both the Siberian Husky and the Sam- oyed standards call for a “well defined” stop. A slight break downward is not the same as a well-defined stop. If the stop is observed on all the land mammals that live in the high Arctic in winter, none have a stop; wolf, fox, polar bear, rabbit. Since the Samoyeds and Siberian Huskies belonged to reindeer herders, they would have had to migrate south for the winter in order find food for the reindeer. The Malamute stayed in the high arctic all year round, sleeping outside in temperatures up to 40 and 60 degrees below zero in snow and wind. Any indentation on the body would be subject to collecting snow and freezing there. I’ll look forward to your commentary and questions on this article, as well as the ones that follow in this series. Feel free to send your comments to info@aramediagroup.com or to me at jollytime- hounds@northstate.net. Are we paying attention to the original intent of the breed when observing it? How conscious are we of these real and perceived dif- ferences when we make our judging decisions, be they in the show ring, working trials, water work or in breeding? Is there a divergence in type or morphology? What are we doing, as breeders and judges, to close the gap? People are paying attention!

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*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/20

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LAKELAND TERRIER

A

ACT

I t does not matter if you are a long-time breeder, exhibitor or just a first-time own- er—watching your young hopefuls mature is an exciting time. You feed, care, train, and nurture the young prospects with visions of success as they develop in prepara- tion for their ring debut. When the time approaches that you feel the prospect is ready to hit the ring, you have many choices to make in your effort to make the debut a great experience for both you and your youngster. You will review the premium list for upcoming shows to evaluate the site (determine if the show is indoors or outdoors), the judge, and all the other factors to consider for that premier event. Once you have decided on the show or circuit, it is time to fill out the entry and start the process. When you sit down to enter the show, you must decide in which class you will par- ticipate. Depending upon the breed, there can be numerous options based upon age, size, color, the experience of the exhibitor, and a multitude of options for you to consider. First, it should be pointed out that Winners Dog or Winner Bitch can come out of any class. The AKC only requires clubs to offer the American-Bred and the Open Classes at all shows. However, in almost all cases, there are seven regular classes at a conformation dog show—with a few variations. Most youngsters are initially entered in the Puppy Classes. The Puppy Class is for dogs at least six months of age and under 12 months of age. These classes may or may not be further divided by age into two classes: 6-9 Months and 9-12 Months. There may also be 12 months to 18 months of age class offered. This class may also be further divided (just as the Puppy Class) into 12-15 Months or 15-18 Months. One note of caution is to be sure when entering the Puppy Class or the 12-18 Months Class that you have the birth date and proper class. There have been numerous occasions when the exhibit won the points only to lose them because they were declared ineligible for that class. In most cases, they may have been a day or two older or younger than the class in which they were entered. The Novice Class is for those dogs that have not previously won three first places in the Novice Class, first place in Amateur-Owner-Handler, Bred-by-Exhibitor, American- Bred or the Open Class, as well as those that have not earned one or more points toward their championship. Amateur-Owner-Handler is a class in which the dog is being handled by the registered owner of the dog who has not, at any point, been an AKC-approved conformation judge, a professional dog handler or employed as an assistant to a professional handler. In the world of dog shows, there is probably no single class that carries the significance of the Bred-by-Exhibitor Class. Many may wonder why someone would say that “Bred-By” is more important or significant than the Best of Breed or Group and Best in Show awards of any dog show. When I think about the Bred-By class, the first thing that comes to mind is that the exhibitor has bred this dog and is very proud of it. It signifies the hard work and plan- ning that, hopefully, went into producing the exhibit. Anyone who has been breeding for

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

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