Top Notch Toys February March 2021

C H AM P I ON O L A D E G R A S V E RY WON D E R F U L W I N S Win

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*AKC STATS AS OF 1.31.21

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GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen (CH Rhapsody’s Stairway To Heaven ROM* x Multi CH Am GCHG Always Pearl ROM*) Zen

#2 #3 MALTESE MALTESE ALL BREED * BREED *

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

*AKC STATS AS OF 1/31/2021

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B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N H O O R AY H E N RY V. TA N I K A Z A R I

# 3

Bree d & All Bree d

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T E A M H E N RY

Presented by Ernesto Lara AKC Registered, PHA

Bred by Mieke Cooijmans

Owned by Judith Epperson & Bradley Phifer

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E R N E STO &

H E N RY

R B I S | M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N S

*AKC Breed & All Breed Stats as of 2/28/21

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CELEBRATING THE PAST...

KENNEL REVIEWAD 1989

51 YEARS A MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN MALTESE ASSOCIATION 38 YEARS A MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN SHIH TZU CLUB MULTIPLE YEARS TOP PRODUCER AWARD AMERICAN MALTESE ASSOCIATION 2020 WESTMINSTER BB WINNER AND PAST BEST OF BREEDS HANDLER/BREEDER/ AND OR OWNER OF MANY BEST IN SHOW AND GROUP WINNING DOGS IN VARIOUS BREEDS BESIDES MALTESE SHIH TZU, LHASA APSOS, TIBETAN TERRIERS, MINIATURE PINCHERS, NORFOLK TERRIERS, SILKY TERRIERS, STANDARD POODLES,

BICHON FRISE, HAVANESE AND CHINESE CRESTEDS WINNER OF THE QUAKER OATS TOY GROUP AWARD 1980 CH JOANNE-CHEN’S MINO MAYA DANCER WINNER OF QUAKER OATS TOY GROUP WINNER 1986 CH. CABRAND’S AGENT ORANGE V LOU WAN

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...THE BEST IS YET TO COME!

2020 AKC TOY BREEDER OF THE YEAR LIFETIME AMA ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

with

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO & DARYL MARTIN

- MULTIPLE BIS & MULTIPLE BISS WINNER - GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

18

40

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING BONNIE GUGGENHEIM bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

32 20

36 40 43 48 55 57 58

14 Boom or Boomer? Dan Sayers

Judging the Miniature Pinscher Pamela DeHetre

18 Toy Talk 20 Toy Box

The Russian Toy: Performance Potential in a Small Package Jennifer Grebinoski

Bonnie Guggenheim

Searching for the Origin of the Natural Lifespan of Havanese Dr. Rafe H. Schindler Yorkshire Terrier National Rescue, Inc. 2020 MaryElizabeth Dugmore, Patricia Kushnir, Hannelie Vermeulen

Dale Martenson & Zoey Porter

22 Just Judy’s Thoughts: 28 Our Own Worst Enemy Cathy M. Driggers

Messing With Mother Nature Judy Thompson

Studying the Past Charlotte Creed

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

30 All Hype But

Where’s the Type? Lee Gorgan

Rates

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

32 Candids: Chihuahua Specialty Karen E. Street

Index to Advertisers

33 Selecting a Japanese Chin Puppy Dale Martenson 10 • T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/21

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ON T H E COV E R J OU R N E Y I N A N EW TOY B R E E D

BY M I C H E L E LYON S

S o, you are thinking about getting in a new or differ- ent toy breed? What is that journey like? My name is Michele Lyons of Triple Crown Pomeranians and Biewer Terriers and I have gotten into a different toy breed to show and breed while still working on my prior toy breed show program. I will share some thoughts and you see if this is something you are thinking of doing. My interest in showing dogs began with Pomeranians 20 years ago and the desire to reenter the show world after show- ing Arabian horses. When I graduated from law school, my mother purchased for me an Arabian horse for my graduation present. This led to a hobby of showing and breeding Arabian horses with many National champion wins. Many of the les- sons and success I learned there, I have applied to my journey in the Pomeranian and Biewer Terrier breeds. My favorite Pomeranian that I have shown is “Huey”. My former handler Lynn Meyer helped make dreams come true and got 9 Best in Shows, 9 Reserve Best in Shows, 50 Group 1’s and 100’s of Best of Breeds including #1 APCDog 2014, 2015, and 2016 on this amazing boy GCHP “Huey” Char’s Seattle Slew for Triple Crown, GC, HOF. My interest in the Biewer Terrier breed began 5 years ago in partnership with Lynn Myer, Theresa Tafoya, Cindi Iken, and Daniel Yona. We spent a great deal of time studying pedigrees, conformation, movement and history of the breed. Health testing in any new breed you are in is highly recom- mended. As you do not have the benefit of knowing the lines of your newbreed and this can assist inmaking the better chance for healthy offspring as well as the top quality you seek in your new breed. Lynn Meyer showed GCH “Donny” Irish Jazz Dzhaga-Dzhaga in FSS. He wonmany Best in Shows, and now has become the first Grand Champion Biewer Terrier to earn the title. Lynn Meyer has moved over to a career with AKC and we continued our journey in this wonderful breed that re- ceived full acceptance in the Toy Group on 1/1/2021 for the past 2 years with our trusted handlers Tonia Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara. “Donny” is ranked #1 at the time of this article in AKC Biewer Terrier Breed rankings and was 2020 US AKC Royal Canin National Championship Best in Mis- cellaneous. CH “Win” Ola de Gras VeryWonderful Wins who is on the cover of TNT is ranked #1 in AKC All Breed Biewer Terrier rankings and 2019 US AKC Royal Canin National Championship Best inMiscellaneous. He was the first Biewer Terrier to win a Group placement and the only Biewer Terrier to date to win more than one group placement. We have some lovely bred bys by and a brother of Donny’s CH “Monty” Irish Jazz Monplezir that we will likely special in 2022. The advice I have for a person entering showing or a new breed is it does take a village. You can do your own “thing” but

On the cover: WIN, CH Ola de Gras Very Wonderful Wins

DONNY, GCH Irish Jazz Dzhaga-Dzhaga

it has to be based upon advice and learning from those who have gone before. I would say refuse to be labeled in any sort of clique or group. This is a small showworld, and do not think most breeders are not giving you a chance it’s just we have to “trust” you. You can be friends with many and make up your ownmind. In the long run, your good deeds and intentions will be known and you will be able to deal with almost everyone in the business who is in it for the right reasons and has your se- lected dog breed best interests at heart. Winning is great with your dog or dogs. You can’t win themall, and do not be the poor sport. Also, don’t gossip about others, it never looks good on anyone’s character when you see someone constantly saying negative things about other people’s dogs all the time, all day long. It’s draining and a negative energy that soon cause most people to distrust you. You do not have to like their dogs, but if they beat you today, congratulate them and move onto the next day. I wish everyone the best in the show days ahead as we re- turn back to more “normal” times.

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BOOM OR BOOMER? THE SPORT OF DOGS CANNOT GO BACK TO THE FUTURE

by Dan Sayers

H ere’s a question for the Baby Boomer generation: If you had a time machine, would you go back and relive your high school years? The answer given in response to this enigmatic ques- tion is most often, “No, but…” (Ah, there’s always a proviso when it comes to matters of the hypothetical.) Most people indicate that, if given the chance, they’d only go back to high school if they could bring with them all the experience and wisdom they’d accumlated in life since graduation. Of course, even without the constraints of time, life doesn’t work this way. In fact, it’s the lessons learned frommistakes made that make life worth living. Solving problems allows us to move confidently towards the future. And although it may be helpful throughout this journey called “life” to look back on occasion, it is not actually possible to “live” in the past. Try as we might, those of us who are Baby Boomers cannot relive our glory days. Though we may not want to admit it, the future—including the future of the dog sport— belongs to today’s high school students. BOOM! In the 1985 blockbuster film, Back to the Future, direc- tor Robert Zemeckis allows viewers to travel back in time with Marty McFly, a skateboarding teen played by Michael J. Fox. The film’s protagonist is a “red-blooded American teenager” who accidently finds himself at this high school—30 years earlier—where he meets his future parents, inadvertly prevents their meeting, reconciles the couple’s relationship and, ultimately, travels in a time-trav- eling Delorean back to the future. The Academy Award- nominated picture gave movie-goers a chance to escape back to a simpler time, when suburban life was predictably safe—and preternaturally boring. So powerful was the pull in the 1980s to return to the post-war boom years of the 1950s that worldwide audiences spent more than $380 million in theater tickets. For $3.55, the decadence and di- sasters of the present could be forgotten—if only temporar- ily—by returning to a place framed in white picket fences and peopled with nice girls wearing Poodle skirts.

Now, more than 35 years since Back to the Future was orig- inally released, many Americans are finding themselves, yet again, looking back to simpler times—the 1980s! Who knew that we would one day be nostalgic for punk rock and spandex? Well, maybe Ray-Bans? The lesson to be learned here is a simple one: The past only “seems” kinder, sweeter, simpler… better than the present—and the future. In real- ity, all we really have is now. Despite the trials that we are all living through at the moment, the truth is that 35 years from now these will be the “good ol’ days” for a generation of Americans. Following are a few thoughts that may encourage Baby Boomer breeders, exhibitors, and judges to enjoy the pres- ent as we daydream about being behind the wheel of a time-traveling Tesla. ENJOY THE SHOW AZoommeeting is a great way to keep in touch with friends and family, but it’s a poor substitute for a legitmate Meet and Greet. Social greetings that are dependant on social cues aren’t quite the same when they’re experienced on a screen where the participants resemble the celebrities from Hollywood Squares or the cast of The Brady Bunch. Though handshakes, hand-waving, and hugs may be in short supply now, their reemergence in a post-pandemic world is all but assured. BREED THIS! Slowing down isn’t always easy to do, especially when the momentum of your life has had you functioning at break- neck speed for the last 35 years. However, with nowhere to go and all the time in the world to get there, tasks that once seemed like chores can become reliable stress reliev- ers; cleaning, making household repairs, and gardening can stave off those feelings of doom and gloom. (It really is a good idea to stop and smell the roses.) When all else fails, there’s always the transformative power of aerobic exercise or opening a bottle of wine.

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friends who share our breed devotion and our commitment to the sport. These are the people who remind us who we are. But in a world where everyone has been disconnected physically, if not technologically, the relationships we share with the people we care about most have become evenmore important to our sense of personal well-being. Whenever we all eventually return to showing dogs again, the experi- ence will likely be akin to a very significant family reunion; The real reason that today’s Baby Boomers have a tenden- cy to view the past through rose-colored glasses is pretty basic. Like it or not, we’re all runnng out of time. There is no going backwards and, just like watching a classic film, the desire to time-travel “back to the future” only offers a pleasant escape from the trials and tribulations of today. (And nobody needs to be reminded of how challenging the last year has been!) The past doesn’t really exist anymore— for anyone. It exists only in our memories and on old VCR tapes. We can’t go back; we can only press “forward.” The best that any of us can hope to do is to take what we’ve learned from the past year, and make a difference today— for a better tomorrow. There’s absolutely no reasonwhy the future can’t be bright. Just ask Marty McFly. a purebred pow wow. BACK TO BASICS

SPECIALTIES ARE SPECIAL There are some skills in life that do, in fact, need to be re- learned. Who knew that driving would be one of them? With so many family cars and RVs sheltering in place, countless drivers have very likely lost the ability to parallel park or back out of the driveway with confidence. Despite the millions of valid driver’s licenses issued, the return to the open road requires that every motorist proceed with extreme caution. (Or maybe it’s time to dust-off that old bicycle—again.) HIGH PERFORMANCE What is it they say about opinions? Oh right, everybody has one. For many stay-at-home fanciers, mixing social distancing with social media has only proven a point your mother likely impressed upon you when you were a teen- ager: If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all. Oversharing—and opining—in the digital age can be ru- inous to friendships as well as reputations. Before hitting the “send” button, it’s best to remember another piece of advice your mother probably gave you: Keep your opinions to yourself. FASHION FORWARD For dog people, “family” often includes a small circle of

Spotlight on: Chinese Crested • Papillon

RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY! deadline APRIL 10 TH

1 Full Page $425

2 Full Pages $750

Contact Bonnie Guggenheim 512-971-3280 (call or text) • bonnie@aramediagroup.com

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Promo TNT210203.indd 1

4/1/21 10:13 AM

THE TERRIFIC TOYS OF “TNT” TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

A ll of us love our breed (or breeds in Group Five) and we love to support local all-breed clubs and national parent clubs. And we celebrate every single one in every single issue of Top Notch Toys . Our wonderful Toys are also in a very competitive Group and are strong competition in the Best In Show Ring. Check out the ratings published in Top Notch Toys each month. Toy dogs are more than special. They are fabulous show dogs, won- derful companions to loving their owners, outstanding service and therapy dogs, and protectors of their homes. They think they are much bigger than any large breed, with a sometimes-big bark. They are smart, clever, funny, spoiled, darling, delightful, and totally terrific! What would we do without our small and smaller four-legged friends? If you are one of the “old guard” who used to write a breed column for the AKC Gazette, I would love to hear from you. Would you like to submit an article for Top Notch Toys or send photos showing Toy dog history for publication in our Toys-only maga- zine? I’m sure you have some stories that we would all enjoy hearing; and I know some of you are still out there judging and/or showing. Does your breed have a publication or newsletter? I’m very familiar with

some, but let me hear from you. My goal is to promote Toy dogs with com- prehensive articles, and continue to make “TNT” even more important in the world of Toys. Remember, you WILL be found in Top Notch Toys . We have a Facebook page where all of our ads are found online for everyone to see. Many breeders and exhibi- tors outside the US look at Facebook, and they comment on the dogs—and the wins. Anewexhibitor askedme for some ad- vice on how to move forward in dogs, and questioned why some breeders and show people have more than one breed. There was a time when I felt strongly that if you specialized in your particular breed, truly stud- ied, and focused on that breed, it would lead to success. This works to a large degree, but to truly learn about dogs, you will benefit from becoming knowledgeable about other breeds, inside and out of the Toy Group. You will pick up bits and pieces of wis- dom from a wider group of friends and exhibitors. Try and exhibit in different parts of the country, look- ing at your breed with an eye to the strengths and weaknesses in that geographical area. Judges see it every time they leave the local area, and you should too. As a former judge and successful own- er-handler with years of experience

in all aspects of the dog world, I’m here to help you. Together, we can create winning ads, plan effective campaigns, and show-off your new champions as well as your Group and Best in Show Winners. Representa- tion in TNT gets the word out and it lets the fancy know about your success. Everyone has a budget, and I can work within your guidelines. Let’s talk! Enjoy the upcoming Spring flowers, the excitement of the shows, and the return of gorgeous weather. Have a winning year and, remember, inquir- ing minds want to know. So, call me! Bonnie bonnie@aramediagrp.com 512.971.3280

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M U LT I O H G R O U P W I N N I N G • M U LT I G R O U P P L AC I N G • O H B I S GCHS TYAVA’ S SUGARFOOTS STRIKE FORCE

Appreciation to the judges who have awarded this very correct Yorkie. Thank you Judge Richard Mullen for BOBOH, and Judge Jerry Watson for the Group 1 OH. Group 1 OH Number 1 NOHS Yorkshire Terrier * *AKC Stats as of 3/12/21

BREEDER: AVA TYREE, TYAVA’S YORKIES

OWNER/HANDLER: VICKI EDWARDS, SUGARFOOT YORKIES

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog. 20 • T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021

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JUST JUDY’S THOUGHTS

By Judy Thompson OHA

Judy can be reached at JudyThompsonOHA@aol.com

MESSING WITH MOTHER NATURE

D og breeders have been using fro- zen semen and artificial insemi- nation (AI) for quite some time. This process has enabled them to breed to sires in distant locales, and even to sires that have long since crossed over the Rainbow Bridge. It is certainly nothing new. Then, in July of 2015, seven puppies were born through in vitro fertiliza- tion (IVF). This was the culmination of attempts made since the 1970s, when it was first proven successful in humans. But, the process proved more difficult in canines. Canine sperm cannot immediately fertilize an egg. The sperm have a coating that must be broken down by the chemi- cals in a bitch’s uterus. That chemical bath removes the coating that pro- tects the sperm’s DNA information. It also helps the sperm to burrow into the egg so that the DNA can be depos- ited. In addition, bitches’ eggs are also not immediately viable. They must remain in the oviducts for some time before fertilization can take place. It took scientists many years to repli- cate the chemicals in the uterus and learn the correct timing necessary to create new cells, cells that could then be frozen and, later, implanted into a surrogate bitch.

In this instance, nineteen embryos were transferred to the host bitch. Of the seven that survived, five were from Beagle-Beagle pairings, and two were from Beagle-Cocker Span- iel pairings. Apparently, scientists were curious as to whether or not they could successfully cross-breed using IVF. (I am guessing the bitch herself was grateful that she did not have a lit- ter of nineteen to care for, and I fear for any future host bitch that may find herself in that situation.) But, our scientific accomplishments did not stop there. Since 1996, we have had the ability to clone mam- mals from an adult somatic cell, using the process of nuclear transfer. “Dol- ly” the sheep was cloned that year, after 227 failed attempts. Dolly lived for roughly half the average lifespan of a Finn Dorset, and she developed arthritis at the age of four. This brings us to two questions: Can we clone our greatest show dogs? And, more importantly, should we? Let’s first look at what happened when cloning was brought to another sport; polo. Aiken Cura is the name of a chestnut stallion with a white blaze, beloved by Adolfo Cambiaso, a gifted Argentinean polo player. In 2006, af- ter an important polo championship,

Aiken Cura’s left foreleg suddenly gave out and had to be amputated. Before he was forced to euthanize his stallion, Cambiaso asked a veteri- narian to save a small sample of cells from the horse’s neck, freeze it, and store it in a laboratory. Fast forward to today. Aiken Cura E01, another chestnut stallion with a white blaze, is galloping across polo fields in Argentina. He is the prod- uct of cloning technology, and he is not alone. Cambiaso partnered with two wealthy polo enthusiasts to form Crestview Genetics, and that com- pany has created more than 70 cloned polo ponies. International polo play- ers have been willing to pay over $120,000 to own one. Branching out from polo to Thor- oughbred racing, Crestview now has three clones that are genetic repli- cas of Storm Cat, who died in 2013. A descendant of Secretariat, Storm Cat once commanded a stud fee of $500,000. Three foals sired by Storm Cat were purchased by the same buy- er for a total cost of $16.2 million. So, for some, the cost of a cloned descen- dant is not necessarily a deterrent. Dog breeders could easily be think- ing about how amazing it would be to clone one of the great ones; a BIS at a

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handled by owner handler, JOHNNATAN LINARES

bred & co-owned by ROMULO SANCHEZ

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BBIS CH Julius (Sanchez) T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021 • 25

prestigious show, a Platinum Grand Champion, a dog with 100 Bests in Show or an All-Breed Ranking of Number One. They might well be thinking that having that dog in their breeding program would be a dream come true. But hold on, wait just a minute! It might just turn out to be a nightmare. The whole point of cloning a great show dog would be to reproduce, ex- actly, a dog that looked identical to the donor dog. We cannot assume, however, that this would be the case.

A kitten named CC (for Copycat) was cloned in 2001. The donor was a Cal- ico cat named Rainbow, but CC was born a black and white tiger Tabby. The two cats have the identical ge- netic material, so how could that be? Well, it has to do with a process called x-inactivation, which happens nor- mally in females to prevent them from having twice as much x-chromosome activity as males. I have seen published photos of two Aiken Cura cloned foals. They both have white blazes, but while one has

a nice symmetrical blaze, the other has one with more of a zig and a zag. While this makes no difference for a polo pony, it would be very important in a conformation dog. In some stan- dards, the wrong facial markings are actually a disqualification. Did that great show dog have a fabu- lous presence in the ring?Would your new prospect have the same experi- ences as a pup, the same training, the same handler—even the same essen- tial personality? If not, chances are the clone might have very different results in competition. And how old would your new show prospect be at birth? Remember, the genetic material from the donor is taken from a mature show dog, per- haps five years old. That material will continue to age so that some genes in your newborn clone could be five years old at birth! Thus, there is a huge potential for premature aging. Based on the fact that her telomeres were short, there is some basis to believe that some genes in Dolly the sheep had a biological age of six years when she was born. Finally, but most importantly, we need to consider the suffering of the dogs involved. Currently, a successful cloning happens in a small percent- age of attempts. Think of all the pups destined to die just before birth or soon thereafter. And there is always the potential for abnormalities and deformities, such as in the case of the cloned calf born with two faces. If, in the future, cloning technol- ogy advances to the point where it becomes affordable and feasible for dog breeders to employ, what are the ethical questions that may arise for dog show competition? Athletic orga- nizations ban performance enhanc- ing drugs because it takes the human/ natural process out of competition. Will cloned dogs also be banned, since scientific manipulation is not part of the natural breeding process? The next time lightning strikes, thunder claps, and hailstones strike the earth, it may be a message from Terra Mater . Don’t mess with Mother Nature!

“IF, IN THE FUTURE, CLONING TECHNOLOGY ADVANCES TO THE POINT WHERE IT BECOMES AFFORDABLE AND FEASIBLE FOR DOG BREEDERS TO EMPLOY, WHAT ARE THE ETHICAL QUESTIONS THAT MAY ARISE FOR DOG SHOW COMPETITION? ATHLETIC ORGANIZATIONS BAN PERFORMANCE ENHANCING DRUGS BECAUSE IT TAKES THE HUMAN/NATURAL PROCESS OUT OF COMPETITION. Will cloned dogs also be banned, since scientific manipulation is not part of the natural breeding process?”

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GINGERBRED Olympic Gold

C M 3 B N C D R E C G C T K N

BRED BY ELOISE RAYMOND • LOVED & OWNED BY GRISELLE FREIJO-CANTRELL • HANDLED EXCLUSIVELY BY JESSICA HERZON THANK YOU JUDGE CHARLES TROTTER

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OUR OWN WORST ENEMY by Cathy M. Driggers

A s we dealt with one of the hardest years for our sport and as a na- tion in 2020, I believe there are many lessons to be learned from what we have experienced. Whether we wanted it or not, we were forced to spend more time at home and more time with family. Many people who did not normally cook found them- selves cooking dinners and doing a lot more baking than normal. People who could, worked from home. Com- panies adapted to the “newnormal” of operating remotely. Many lost their jobs and had to find news ways of gen- erating income. So many people have been sick and many have lost loved ones. People are on edge and emo- tions are running high. Our sport was hurt in multiple, differ- ent ways. Handlers, groomers, super- intendents, and AKC reps were out of work for a long time and some even chose not to return to the sport. Clubs lost income, volunteers, and mem- bers. Meanwhile, we are attacking our own. In several meetings, I have referred to people in our sport as can- nibals. If you are on social media, you have certainly seen how—as shows were cancelled—people attacked the clubs, the show chairs, and even the venues. The attacks came fromexhib- itors, breeders, and handlers. It was a diverse group of people who were up- set with the decisions that were made. It is important for people to under- stand that the shows they attend are

being put on by volunteers who are giving many hours of their time and are working very hard to make sure you have a show to attend. Without the volunteers (who work not only the two days of the show, but throughout the year to prepare for that show), the handlers would not have jobs, the breeders would have no place to show off their breeding stock, and many people would be without a hobby to enjoy with their dogs. How many more years are these peo- ple who are working hard (for free) going to put up with the attacks be- fore they quit? Run enough people off from working at these shows and the clubs will not be putting them on. We worry so much about the animal rights people attacking us and trying to take away our sport, but we are far more dangerous to ourselves. Do not get me wrong, the animal rights move- ment has an agenda and the money to support it, so we need to be diligent in our defense. Nevertheless, they will have nothing to worry about if we kill our own sport fromwithin. The next time you attend a show, re- member a few key things. Be gracious, be kind, and be respectful of the rules, the club, and fellow exhibitors. Tak- ing it one step further, I challenge you to find a club member working the show and simply say, “Thank You.” It may be the only time they will hear it that day!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR I have studied a diverse group of ani- mals and, growing up in Florida, this, of course, included reptiles. I was first in the ring in the 1980s with Briards. My first Pomeranian was one that I adopted from a shelter in 1994. It was not until 2004 that I became inter- ested in breeding and showing Poms. Since then, my husband and I have enjoyed breeding, showing, and train- ing with our all-breed club as well as the APC. We have produced multi- BIS and Group-winning Poms, and finished championships on various other breeds. I was taught at an early age the im- portance of serving and giving. I enjoy taking our Poms to assisted living fa- cilities, prisons, schools, and Meet the Breed events. It is my deep passion for mentoring and education that has kept me so involved in our community and working with juniors.

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Evan B I S , R B I S , G C H B C I N - D O N D E A R E VA N H A N S E N

E XC E L S I N type & style

F O R E VA N ’ S G R O U P 2 AT T H E G R E AT B A R R I N GTO N K . C . S H OW, F E B R UA R Y 7, 2 0 2 1 . MRS. ELAINE LESSIG A S P E C I A L T H A N K YO U TO J U D G E

OWN E D B Y: B E V E R LY M E R R I T T

B R E D B Y: B E V E R LY M E R R I T T, J OYC E WA L L & S C OT T TO N E Y

P R E S E N T E D B Y: A L A N WAT E R M A N A S S I S T E D B Y: D E A N G E LO

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ALL HYPE

BUT WHERE’S THE TYPE?

by Lee Gorgan

Seeing my beloved breed in other countries has really helped to educate and train my eye, both as a Japanese Chin aficionado and as a judge. I be- lieve there is no better way to educate oneself than to travel to other coun- tries and learn from others. While watching your breed and speaking with other Japanese Chin breeders, owners, and handlers, one can learn a great deal of valuable knowledge and, let’s face it, no one can—or will—know it all. We never stop learning; it is part of what makes life so exciting and in- teresting after all. The greatest difference that I’ve no- tice while on my travels is the great variance in type among the Japanese Chin in each country. Having had the great honor of judging the breed in three countries thus far, I have experi- enced this hands-on and not just from ringside observation. Type, like people, differs from coun- try to country (not that this is a bad thing). How bored would we be to see the same type over and over again? The excitement of coming across a dog that oozes the type you believe in, the type of dog you hope to breed, own, show or incorporate into your breeding program, is what keeps us going, pushing us forword and striv- ing for “perfection” in our minds. That excitement, forme, is what keeps me interested and keeps my passion for this enchanting breed burning bright. Wherever I am in the world, I always find at least one dog that gives me goosebumps.

WHY SO DIFFERENT? I feel the various, different types that I see are a result of the different standards used by each kennel club/ organization around the world. Per- sonally, I find that some standards describe the “perfect/ideal” Japanese Chin specimenmore clearly than oth- ers; although, I feel no standard has it perfected. Some standards provide more detail than others when it comes to anatomy and breed characteris- tics. You judge to the standard of the country you are judging in. (This goes without question.) But I ask you, do you breed to the standard of the coun- try in which you live? I believe the power to change a breed resides with two groups of people— the judges and the breeders. Judges decided which dogs become cham- pions, promoting representatives of the breed by sending them into Group rings for a wider audience to view. As a judge, by awarding a dog, you are saying it is a good representative of the breed. (If you didn’t think so and just had nothing else on the day, then you shouldn’t make the award.) You are giving it your stamp of approval. How often have you looked upon an- other breed and thought to yourself, “I know nothing about this breed, but Judge XYZ put it up, and I respect his or her opinion, so it must be a good representative?” I know I have. As for breeders changing a breed, not much explanation is needed. When you breed, you create. Make sure you create something you believe in and

SOME WORDS THAT ARE SYNONYMOUS IN ALL STANDARDS WHEN DESCRIBING THE “IDEAL” JAPANESE CHIN ARE:

• Dainty • Square • V-shaped Ears • Feathered/Feathering • Rounded Skull • Profuse Coat

I n my 13 short years or so of showing dogs, I have been very lucky to have travelled all over the world thanks to this wonderful hobby of mine. Along with seeing parts of the world, I have also seen many dogs. No mat- ter the show I’m attending, no matter the country I am in, you will always find me at the Japanese Chin ring. Whether I am showing, judging or just sitting, analyzing, and taking ev- erything in—that’s where I’ll be.

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WE’RE NOT THAT DIFFERENT YOU AND “EYE”—OR ARE WE?

A SAMPLING OF DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES IN A FEW SELECT STANDARDS FROM AROUND THE WORLD AMERICA UK FCI

CANADA

Moderately large, dark and set far apart. Size should be in proportion to size of skull. Small amount of white shows in the inner corners, giving characteristic look of astonishment. Eyes should be forward facing, not set on side of head.

Set wide apart, large, round, dark in color and lustrous. A small amount of white showing in the inner corners of the eyes is a breed characteristic that gives the dog a look of astonishment.

Large, without exaggeration, rounded, set wide apart and lustrous black in colour.

Eyes large, dark, lustrous, rather prominent and set wide apart.

EYES

In size they vary considerably, but the smaller they are the better, provided type and quality are not sacrificed. When divided by weight, classes should be under and over 7 lb. (3 kg).

Daintier the better, provided type, quality and soundness are not sacrificed. Ideal weight 1.8–3.2 kgs (4–7 lbs.).

Height at the withers: males are approximately 25 cm (9 inches); females are slightly smaller than males.

Ideal size is 8 inches to 11 inches at the highest point of the withers.

SIZE

The jaw is wide and slightly undershot. A dog with one or two missing or slightly misaligned teeth should not be severely penalized. The Japanese Chin is very sensitive to oral examination.

Teeth white and strong; level bite desirable, but scissor bite or undershot mouth permitted.

Bite preferably level or slightly undershot; wry mouth or tongue showing highly undesirable.

MOUTH/ JAWS/ TEETH

respected, experienced, and quali- fied Japanese Chin authorities from around the world to make sure that it includes everything that one would wish to learn and know about what a Japanese Chin should be. When I read a standard of any breed, I always ask this question of myself, “If I handed the standard to an artist who has never seen this breed in his/ her life, could he/she draw the ideal dog from the descriptions given in the standard alone?” T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021 • 31

What is important is that we must respect others’ ideas and opinions of correct type, especially if they are judging at a show we entered—and paid for that opinion. STANDARDIZED STANDARDS My dream is that one day every ken- nel club/organization around the world will use the same breed stan- dard, so that we can all “sing from the same hymn sheet.” Of course, it would have to be written by the most

not just something that you think will win or is a current trend. What you breed is the next generation for the next generation to take in the ring and carry the breed further. BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER What is correct to youmay not be cor- rect for me. As they say, what is nor- mal for the spider is chaos for the fly. We all have our opinions of how Japa- nese Chin should appear.

CHIHUAHUA SPECIALTY

Nashville Chihuahua Club . March 12, 2021 photos by Karen E. Street

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SELECTING A JAPANESE CHIN PUPPY by Dale Martenson

T he first step to breeding and rec- ognizing the desired quality of Chin is to be familiar with the breed standard. With the first two descriptive words being “a small” (and with multiple references to fine- boned) it is clear that the desired traits are with the smaller dog. Our desired size, in addition to the eight to 11 inches, would be five to sev- en pounds as an adult. Roughly trans- lated, this puts a seven-pound adult at no more than two and a half pounds at 12 weeks. The 12-week size can be doubled, with one additional pound for a fine-boned dog, and two to three pounds for a heavier-boned puppy. Well-balanced is the key. Compare the size of the head to the circumfer- ence of the ribcage, as they should be close to the same. Many times I have heard, “This one had the biggest head.” This could be a statement of quality, if only it were on a small specimen. A 10-plus pound Chin with a big head is nothing more than a big dog; there is no stylish, aris- tocratic movement or presence. When looking at a Chin puppy or an adult, standing or moving, there should be the appearance of a one- piece dog that demonstrates the lively movement in a square package. Next is the expression—the hallmark of the breed—and those dark, lustrous eyes that set the Chin apart from all others. Where the Pekingese stan- dard calls for “massive” and “bold” features rather than “prettiness,

daintiness or delicacy,” Chin are all about everything pretty, dainty, and delicate. No ropes, wrinkles or folds obscure the wide-eyed, “open” look of the Chin’s astonished, Oriental expres- sion. The amount of cushion should be in proportion to the age and gen- der of the Chin. The Chin is a work in progress that will mature three years before full development. Too much, too soon can be a fair indication of the old adage “early ripe... early rotten.” Nostrils should be open, with clear air exchange. A dog’s “mouth breathing” when temperatures are not high could be a sign of concern. In my opinion, any person qualified to evaluate a Chin should be able to easily check the bite without having to subject a Chin to the indignity of an oral exam—unless there is evi- dence of a wry mouth. The standard makes mention of their sensitivity, with the eyes/nose/mouth area being easily the size of a human thumb. No dog would like it and, to a Chin, it is just rude. Alignment with a reverse scissors bite can be easily checked by touch and visual inspection. If you touch the tongue, and the Chin can retract it, there is an acceptable bite. Somany times in the ring, youwill see a judge [whose only resource is] to put up a lesser quality Chin after offend- ing the better quality dog with an in- vasive oral exam.

There are many acceptable versions of facial markings, with the symmet- rical hourglass pattern being most desirable. Eyes should be large and dark; the lustrous or liquid eye gives the bright, inquisitive, and intelli- gent expression the standard calls for. When the eyes are perfectly round and large, there will be a small amount of white showing in the inner corners, adding to the look of aston- ishment. The better heads will have the largest wide-set eyes (from the start to the finish of the maturing pro- cess), with eyes being larger than the nose as a gauge to size and quality. “Round” best describes the shape of the Chin’s eyes, topskull, and fore- head. There are no sharp edges on this soft, Oriental expression and, personally, I prefer the whiskers to be left, to protect the eyes and add even more detail to the face. How the Chin stands on its front to- tally dictates the shape and move- ment of a puppy, and how it keeps the desired shape. With the elbows tight to the chest, having a full, rounded ribcage, the shoulder placement should allow for the high head car- riage of this Oriental aristocrat. Inmy experience, the fine-bonedChin has a bladed bone, leading to the lovely hare-shaped foot. If the bone is heavy and round, the toe is usually short. Moving straight, front and rear, the Chin with the most desirable rounded rib and hare-shaped foot will stop at 11’’ and 1’’ for balance. Oftentimes the inexperienced will fault this.

T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021 • 33

with the longer coat in the rear mak- ing culottes or pants. Chin do not have side skirts like a Shih Tzu, and the amount and tex- ture of their coat is part of the charm of this low upkeep companion dog. With puppies and intact females, look for the desired pattern of coat and the correct texture, but only expect full coats on the adult males, primarily in the winter months. This breed is no less ancient than the dogs of Malta, and it is up to the integ- rity of the breeders to maintain this centuries-old type. Many Chin of the 1800s would still be desirable to show and breed today. This is the heritage that we must strive to honor.

spine. And, in a perfect world, on the judges side. Sometimes standing around, the Chin will drop its tail (on lead) in boredom (shame on you for allowing your Chin to be bored!) but on the go, it should be carried over the back on either side. The texture of the Chin’s coat, along with the pattern of longer and shorter hair, is equally—if not more—impor- tant than the amount of coat. Straight, single, and silky (with no undercoat), you should be able to part the hair to the skin with two fingers. [The coat is] more profuse and stand- ing-out around the neck, shoulders, and chest, to form the mane or ruff,

On the rear, angulation is the key. Avoid the puppy that is straight in stifle even if it appears straighter in the hock. A puppy with angles will usually muscle and tighten-up, end- ing up with the sounder rear andmore extension in movement. So many times, the straight rears will appear to knuckle over and even cause the entire croup to be at a slant. The crowning glory of the Chin’s outline is the tail. Flowing on the ma- ture dog, it is a direct indicator of the Chin’s mood and outlook on the day. I prefer a longer tailbone, free of any kinks and with good flexibility. The set is high, off the croup, and with length to drop below the line of the

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VISTA LAFLEURS LOTUS T'SEAS MI G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N

I S B A C K !

After a year of maternity leave Lotus is back better than ever! Lotus won BISS and BISS/OH under breed expert Mr. Richard Miller (Mar-Rich Kennels) at the Texas Chihuahua Club.

© BOB KOHLER

FLASH Daughter, Vista T’seas Mi Primrose “Primrose”, had fun in Texas too, Best of Opposite to Best in Sweeps under breeder judge Shawn Christine Jones. Then on to a Specialty reserve under Mr. Richard Miller.

Deborah Long, T’Seas Mi Chihuahuas | Stephanie Schultes, Vista Chihuahuas, vistachis@gmail.com

T op N otch T oys , F ebruary /M arch 2021 • 35

THE MINIATURE PINSCHER JUDGING by Pamela DeHetre

I t is an honor to be asked to write about Miniature Pinschers, as they are one of my favorite breeds. My love of this breed began in the late 1960s and continues to this day. Their spirit and presence captured me. Hopefully, some of you judges who are newer to this breed will under- stand the Min Pin better after read- ing this article. I’m hoping that some of you breeders out there will also benefit from my “words of wisdom.” However, my opinions are just that— my opinions. Judging the Miniature Pinscher can be challenging as they are not shown stacked motionless like most other breeds. They are very animated, with complete self-possession and a spirited presence. If you have one in the ring without these characteristic traits, please do not reward it. I bought my first Miniature Pinscher in 1968.What an experience that was! She was fearless in my arms and fear- less on the ground, but a real wimp on the table. Not being an experienced handler, I would get so embarrassed every time my wonderful Min Pin would shrink fromexamination. I was told by those with more longevity in the breed to simply exclaim, “Oh my, I don’t knowwhy she is doing that, she has never done that before!”Well, that

“HOWEVER, THEY ARE BIG LITTLE DOGS AND SHOULD BE EXAMINED ON A TABLE—AND JUDGED ON THE GROUND.”

worked fine until the day she won the Breed and thenwimpedon the table to the Group judge (same judge). Before I knew what I was saying, I declared, “Oh my, I don’t know why she is doing that, she has never done that before!” Well, needless to say, I learnedmy les- son to keep my mouth shut. So, in a further effort to learn about this breed, I actually talked to people who really knew them. Mr. John Mc- Namara of Jay-Mac fame was one. I spent quite a bit of time listening to him at the shows, and he graciously let me come to his home for more Min Pin education. Most are now better trained for the table than the dogs of old. New techniques and a concen- trated effort can produce stability on the table. However, they are big little

dogs and should be examined on a ta- ble—and judged on the ground. Some advice for you breeders is to get a grooming table and put your pup- pies on it (one at a time, of course) on a leash, and play with them using some bait and toys. You could even take it a step further and feed them on the table. If they are comfortable on the table at home, you have a much better chance of them being happy on the table in the ring. Take the time to do this even if you have to put the table in front of your couch or chair and do it while you are watching TV. I know I don’t have to mention this, but I will anyway: Never leave a Min Pin alone on the table. Other breeds you can leave alone on a table, but NOT a Min Pin!

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*

*

*AKC NOHS stats 2020

Mr. McNamara used to pay the kids a dollar a dog to take his extra dogs in the ring. My daughter, Angela, was so thrilledwhen she became one of them. At one of her first shows as a “handler” for Mr. McNamara, she came out of the ring with a reserve ribbon—so proud of her accomplishment! She actually got the dog to stand still. However, when I casually mentioned that she got the Reserve because there were only two in the ring (of course, the one Mr. McNamara took in got WD) her reply was, “The judge didn’t have to give it to me.” Nothing was going to disturb her happiness with that Reserve and, of course, her dol- lar. Back in the early ‘70s, you could actually purchase something with a dollar. She was correct, the judge did not have to give her the Reserve. Since that time, I have bred some championMiniature Pinschers. How- ever, most of my accomplishments with them came as a handler. I fin- ishedmany andwon someGroups. My grandson, Seth, traveledwithme quite a bit. When he was about 8 or 9 years old, we were showing a Min Pin bitch that did not take to strangers too eas- ily. I was awardedWBwith her. I had a special, however, so I made a snap de- cision to letmy grandson take her back in for the Breed. Even though he was not an experienced handler, the bitch knew and loved him. So, I thought she would look better for him than with a stranger. I was right. He won Best of Breed! One of the things to realize when judging this breed is that they are totally devoted to their people. They are great show dogs whenever they are comfortable with the person on the other end of their leash. Many years ago, we were training sev- eral puppy Min Pins for a client and decided to take them to a fun match. I got a youngster to practice with them and take them in the ring. They, of course, walked quite nicely outside the ring, but in the ring… walk a step, spin, walk another step, spin twice, walk another step, jump, another

step, jump twice. Get the picture? The judge said, “Why don’t you train your dogs?” My little handler’s response was, “They are Min Pins.” That ex- plains it! So, in judging them, there are times when you will need patience and the ability to look beyond the spinning and jumping. They can be walking along perfectly and, quick as a blink, they can do a total spin around and then walk perfectly again. When examining the breed on the table, just walk right up to them. You can have the handler show the bite or you can gently do it yourself. As a judge, I do prefer to do it myself be- cause, sometimes, the handlers are inexperienced and they let go of the dog to show the bite. This causes the dog to move, and time is lost waiting for the handler to get the dog back under control so that you can finish the examination. It is more benefi- cial to use the time watching the dog move than waiting for the handler to restack it. Min Pins should be shown on a loose lead. They should not be stacked on the ground, but should stand and ei- ther focus on something off in the dis- tance (only they knowwhat fascinates them so much), be baited, or they can stand and look at each other. They can flit from one position to another from one second to the next. Please don’t penalize this type of behavior, for to do so would be overlooking the very essence of this breed. The trick is to catch them being still enough to look at them. Of course, I understand you can’t put up a dog that doesn’t stand still long enough for you to see it, but don’t expect them to be still the entire time they are in the ring. As an interesting aside, since I have lived with many Min Pins, they are great pets. My first went to dog shows withme all her life, and she lived to the wonderful old age of 17-1/2. Min Pins love their owners and friends. The flighty attitude that you see at the dog shows is not there at home. They are totally devoted and focused on you at

home, but at the shows they see imagi- nary objects that demand their atten- tion, causing themtoflit fromone posi- tion to the other rather quickly. One of the most important attributes to look for in judging the Min Pin is its hackney-like action. Without its hackney-like gait, it isNOTaMinPin. From the standard: “The hackney-like action is a high-stepping, reaching, free and easy gait in which the front leg moves straight forward and in front of the body and the foot bends at the wrist.” This gait, combined with “correct temperament of fearless ani- mation, complete self-possession and spirited presence,” is very important. These characteristics set this breed apart from all others. I would like to go a bit further to ex- plain that the true hackney-like ac- tion is one of reach and break. This is very hard to get, but should definitely be rewarded when found. Many will break in front of their nose, but will not reach out at all. And then you have those with plenty of reach, but abso- lutely no break whatsoever. If faced with two exhibits that are equal in all other aspects, I would choose the one that does have break, thus making it a Min Pin. No hackney? It’s not a Min Pin!! Simple as that. Also, this is a powerful, confident breed that struts its stuff—the tail should be up. After examination and after your ex- hibits have been moved, you may have a few dogs that, in your opinion, look equal. Move these around the ring (not down and back) and look for the true hackney as a decision maker. Re- member, head and tail carried high, high-stepping, reaching, free and easy, with a bend at the wrist. The Miniature Pinscher is a compact dog with a level or slightly sloping topline and a tail set high, and held erect. The whole package is one of confidence, authority, and presence. The breed has an unmistakable take- charge attitude. He’s a remarkable little guy, full of energy and drive. This breed is the “King of Toys.”

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