Showsight August 2017

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6.30.17

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AMERICAN STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER*

TERRIER**

G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N R O A D H O U S E ’ S

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER | MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY WINNER MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNER

Owned by Dave Berry & William G. Roadhouse

Bred by William G. Roadhouse & Daniel Casanova

Presented by Kimberly Rudzik

*All systems as of 6/30/17

**ShowSight all breed stats as of 6/30/17

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RESERVE BEST IN SHOW JUDGE KATHI BROWN

GROUP ONE JUDGE LINDA MORE

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L uc

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*

**

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 6.30.17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 6.30.17

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America's Top IRISH SETTER *

Many Thanks TO JUDGE MRS. MARILYN PIPES for recognizing Ella

WITH THE FANTASTIC GROUP WIN

Owned by: MAR I LYN D. T I TLE , CAROLYN MCKENZ I E , PATR I C I A KUDLA & SUZANNE WALKER Bred by: CHARL I E & SUZANNE WALKER Presented by: GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D ( 410 ) 822 - 2187

*AL L SYSTEMS AS OF 6/3/17

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G E O R G I A B R O W N

owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY AND LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN bred by CHARLES & JEANNE HURTY presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D, (410) 822-2187

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Our sincere appreciation TO J U DG E M R . D AV I D J AY H Y M A N F O R R E C OG N I Z I N G G E O R G I A W I T H T H I S B E A U T I F U L G R O U P W I N

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*

**

*AKC GCH STATS AS OF 7/26/17 **ALL SYSTEMS 2016

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NUMBER ONE All Systems 2 0 1 6 & 2 0 1 7 * *ALL SYSTEMS 2016 & AS OF 6.30.17

GROUP ONE JUDGE MRS. JANET LOBB FLAGSTAFF KENNEL CLUB | SUNDAY, JULY 22 ND , 2017

THANK YOU HANDLER STEVE WALTENBURG & JUDGE MRS. MARY WEIR

GROUP ONE JUDGE MR. JOE LOBB FLAGSTAFF KENNEL CLUB | SUNDAY, JULY 23 RD , 2017

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Grand Champion R E N E GAD E S PAY ’ N I T F ORWARD A T DAWN H E I R H S A s

type, temperament & balance.

Owned by JOYCE ROWLAND & LAURIE YOUMANS

Bred by JOYCE ROWLAND, LAURIE YOUMANS & MARTY YOUMANS GRIFFITH

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**

*ALL SYSTEMS ALL BREED AS OF 6.30.17 **DN ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6.30.17

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on the cover

*all systems as of 6.30.17

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The plaNe rose hIGher aNd hIGher. Malcontents around me murmured and mut- tered, anxious to pop open laptops and frantically, rapidly, tap. Many punched backlit but- tons to select movies or TV shows to idly pass the time. some had plugs already stuck in their ears and with my near-canine auditory sense I could hear their music, too. I tuned them all out. I was returning from a wonderful weekend of dog shows and refused to enter- tain anything but lovely doggie thoughts.

For I had been fully in my element the last three days, surrounded by smart people, watching masters at the top of their game in rings along with neophytes young and old. And of course everywhere I looked I saw dogs, the focus of my attention and love since I was a child. I’ve included a photo of Amar, son of my dear friends Adnan Balas & Ferida Salkic, with my dog Romeo, FROM THE EDITOR EMERITUS

Joseph Neil Mc Ginnis III

downstairs. Ladies and gentlemen, as a multiple-hurri- cane survivor I tell you what I routinely tell everybody else: ALWAYS treat a warning as if it’s real because you never know if it is or if it’s not. Off my soapbox and back to my dream...) So there I was, not clad for human consumption but ready to compete. And here’s the kicker. I didn’t load a

wearing the expression I’m told was on my face upon my first canine encounter. The picture of him and Romy is one of my favorite images, and in fairness later in this issue I have one of his sister, too. Thinking back, thinking pre- sent, and thinking forward at the same time overloaded my nor- mally-robust brain. I yawned. I sighed. I hit the release, reclined my seat just a bit so as not to mash into the person behind, and the jet engines’ hum lulled me into a deep, comfy sleep. And I had a dream... N ow , iN this dream i zoomed through the next sixty-four years just as swiftly as I seem to have flown through the last sixty-four. (The fact that I was still this age is kind of dreamy, too.) I was ready for a dog show. Homework was

motor home. I didn’t pack a car. My dog and I didn’t even have to leave our home. In my trophy room (well, I said it was a dream, didn’t I?) was all sorts of digital parapher- nalia by which the job would soon get done. This is how it worked. First we utilized our scanner—it’s not breed specific, just crate-shaped. I’d already trained Rebel or whoever to squint for this part of the exam; he cannot wear shades like a reg- ular celeb and we’ll test his eye size, shape and color with a kinder scanner later. He hops happily into the device and 10,000 pairs of electronic cyes capture every exterior attribute he has. A sensor in the floor records his weight. Then we hit the treadmill; its pressure-sensi- tivity evaluates gait and since it’s

done. My dog was pristine clean, microscopically groomed and soldier-like trained. And yet I was in my jammies. I mention pajamas because over that weekend I got to see something that you didn’t, and I didn’t take pho- tos because this isn’t TMZ. I happened to be staying at the same hotel as the judges and at 2:47 am Saturday the fire alarm screamed and we had to evacuate, by stairwells, fast. Granted there were only nine floors— my last apartment in Manhattan was on the forty- fourth and we’d had to do the same thing there once, too—but the best part is, there we all were, in the park- ing lot, and in a little clique was the entire Greenville/Piedmont judging panel in their jammies and whatnot, doing what? What would you expect? Talking about dogs. Within the hour we got the all-clear and had to trudge back up the stairs, only to be re- awakened at 3:45 by the very same blaring thing. (This time, though, I was one of the few who went all the way

not motorized you have to gait with him too, to hit his prescribed stride. So you get exercised and judged at the same time. A brush-shaped sensor run through his coat will tell if that’s good, too. Then you ask him or her fifty questions and he or she must get every one right. Oh wait, is that for judges? We’ll no longer need judges. (Sometimes dreams can get messed up.) In any case, once all the data is collected, it’s shipped off to a central computer and, when compared to that of all other entrants, it’s calibrated and calculated and out of your printer will pop the appropriate ribbon. Make sure you have plenty of toner in red, white & blue. Trophies and placques will be next-day deliverered. By Drone. Just as we were about to receive our dream award, the plane bumped down in Atlanta and I returned to a wide-awake state. I shuddered. That’s a future dog show??? It’s impossible to calculate how little fun that would be. But it brought to mind my fears about the Digital Era and its effects on our sport. >

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FROM THE EDITOR EMERITUS Continued

Yes, ShowSight’s more than old enough to vote and in every State, old enough to drink, so I’d like to raise a toast to every- one who’s been part of this magnificent publication since day one. I also send my love to my late husband, co-breeder of the many champions we showed, my business partner and my co-founder of this magazine, the late Duane Doll, so sorely missed by all. But since I don’t drink and haven’t since ‘95, I had to find another way to celebrate the occasion. So I ordered a cake for you and me. It appears below in all its glory, as yet untouched (but

Access to everyone at any time has emboldened those with an axe to grind. I cannot count the times I’ve seen defamatory or slanderous digi- tal spears hurled between dog fanciers due to any number of real or imagined transgres- sions. This has got to stop because although one’s friends might agree, hundreds if not thousands of people outside our inner circle might believe our sport condones such behavior. Our reputation must stay crystal clean for the bene- fit of all. Losing it would be devastating. That’s a huge fear that I have for our future.

Adna Balas & Romeo. Photos taken by yours truly at my house in July of 2015.

I have no fear that you’ll find this issue as amazing as I find the idea of the at-home dog show awful. In-resi- dence judging would, of course, have helped to prevent the Canine Influenza situation, tackled by Caroline Coile this month, but it wouldn’t have improved much else. Speaking of which, our august team of writers, Jackie Fogel, Linda Ayers Turner Knorr, Dan Sayers, BJ Andrews—joined this month and every month to come by the uber-accomplished Allan Reznik to whom we extend open arms—as ever gives you much to think about and cause to applaud. And the contributions of the guests who share their expertise with us in our Herding Breeds section and our individual Breed fea- tures would keep you occupied from the time you take off from LAX to the time you land in Perth (with much left to savor later). And that’s taking the scenic route. But back to my shocking, in-flight mental movie. In my dream everyone

not for long). Since you weren’t here, each of my dogs got an extra, canine-appropriate healthy treat, while I ate a piece of cake for you and I ate a piece for me. (Perhaps that fantasy treadmill’s not a bad idea after all.) And I thought back over the quarter-century since we invented this magazine, the views and values we’ve promoted, and ShowSight’s gifts to me, to you, to our sport and to our dogs. I no longer own it, but no one loves it more. And no one loves dogs more than the people I’m proud to know. My fellow dog fanciers have kept me going through thick and thin, and dogs have been the highlight of my entire life. With my Sights firmly set on the future of dogs and Shows, I vow that I will view each day, each person, and especially each dog, just as the pictures show: through the delighted, devoted, wonder- ing eyes of a child. I’ll see you next month. n

was kindly to one another online and all the news was “Real.” That in itself would be a dream come true. But regardless of the dire pre- dictions we hear, I cling to a rosy picture of our future. I’m not quite sure where we’re heading but I know where I want to go: to a place where we’re united in

our fight to protect dogs. What has made this sport so powerful and so attractive through its one-hundred- fifty-eight years has been the camaraderie of the people in it, and the dogs that possess the most healing, nur- turing, loving ability of any living thing. And what has made this magazine one-of-a-kind since inception has been the people behind it and the people in it. I’m extremely proud to have been at its helm for what has now been twenty-five years.

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Message fromthePublisher AJARAPOVIC

CHANGE—EMBRACEIT! One certainty in life is change. (At least that’s what people say!) History shows us that change is inevitable, so why do we resist it so much? For many, it is hard to accept change, especially when we have worked so hard to perpetuate what we have been taught. We want to protect the “old ways.” But we should also embrace change, or at least be prepared when it hap- pens. We have to be ready to improve on what has been passed down and feel ownership in the new and improved. At AraMedia Group we are mesh- ing the old with the new. Our plan is to not only improve our business model, but to find ways to improve the dog game all-around while protect- ing the legacy of the Fancy. I understand that in order to be able to make positive changes, we don’t just need a bigger team, we need to welcome top-quality teammates who can help us connect the traditions of the “old” with the value of the “new.”

Our newest Contributing Editor, Allan Reznik, brings a wealth of experience to our team. For more than four decades, Allan has been immersed in the world of pure- bred dogs as a breeder, exhibitor, award-winning jour- nalist, editor, broadcaster and occasional judge. Although he has written for television and radio, taught journalism at university, authored books and reviewed theater and film, he is probably best known for his many years of editing show dog magazines. Since 1993, he has been the Editor-in-Chief of Dogs in Canada, Dog Fancy, Dog World and, most recently, Dogs in Review, all of which have won national magazine awards from the DogWriters Association of America while under his stewardship. In 2011, Allan won the prestigious Arthur F. Jones Award for Best Editorial Column of the Year, given by the Alliance of Purebred Dog Writers. He appears regularly on national radio and TV discussing all aspects of responsible dog ownership and is quoted widely in newspapers and magazines. Allan’s involve- ment in the sport began in the mid-1960s as a junior handler. Since then, he has successfully bred and exhib- ited Afghan Hounds, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Tibetan Spaniels. He has judged many prestigious specialty and Hound Show sweepstakes over the years, and stewards regularly around the country. He current- ly serves on the Board of Directors of his two parent clubs, the Afghan Hound Club of America and the Tibetan Spaniel Club of America. Allan is an active clubman, and a proud member of the Morris & Essex Kennel Club, the Western Hound Association of

Southern California, the Gateway Hound Club (charter member), and his two local all-breed clubs. Allan still occasionally exhibits, and finished his last homebred Afghan Hound champion, from the Bred-by-Exhibitor class, in 2016. Welcome to our team, Allan! As ShowSight Publisher, I would like to thank every one of our contributors and advertisers, along with the staff members who have helped put out our latest edi- tion. I’d also like to say “thank you” to our loyal readers for the success of this publication. You all have made this change of ownership transition a snap! Thanks to you, our circulation has grown immensely and we’ve connected with more people than ever before. We have even found a top firm who will be working to improve our appearance and content across the board. Something is always changing around Showsight /AraMedia Group and we’d like you to join us as we grow. So please don't hesitate to contact me with any comments, questions or concerns. I am here to serve you and the Fancy. Best wishes to you & to your loved ones.

AJ Arapovic, CEO, Publisher

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE I THE TOP NOTCH TOYS I SIGHT & SCENT THE DOBERMAN DIGEST I THE ORIENT EXPRESS I BREEDERS ALMANAC 46 • S how S ight M agazine , A ugust 2017

grand champion Mo amour My Favorite

our sincere appreciation to Judge Mrs. Cindy Meyer for the group recognition

owned by Marilyn Title & Carolyn McKenzie presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, (410) 822-2187

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MULTIPLE

MULTIPLE

WINNING

WINNING

©Cook Photography

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*ShowSight breed stats as of 6.30.17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 6.30.17

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AlifeWithPurpose Living with a Purpose-Bred Dog ArtIcleAndPhotosbydAnsAyers The breed standards are the foundation upon which conformation shows are built. Decisions made in the ring at all-breed, limited-breed and specialty shows are predicated upon how closely each dog compares to the ideal described by its standard of perfection. The very best dogs are said to bring the words of the standard to life, and judges often describe exhibits of superior quality as looking as though they are capable of doing the job for which they were bred. This sense of purpose is breed-specific and essential to main-

taining breed type. But what’s it like to actually live with a breed that’s intended to hunt or herd or simply have a good time? What’s it really like to live with a purpose-bred dog? Let’s take a look at some examples that highlight the historic functions of three distinctly different breeds.

Club of America, Inc. titled, “The German Shepherd Dog…,” the breed is described as having no equal in its service to mankind. As stated in the brochure, “It is a choice as a guide dog for the blind — for intelligence, loyalty, and dependabili- ty; of the Armed Services — for alertness, trainability, keen scent, and endurance; of civil authorities — for adaptability and courage; of trainers — for sensitivity and response (because a German Shepherd Dog loves to work); of artists — for its dramatic beauty; and of families everywhere — for devotion, trustworthiness, beauty and protection.” The pam- phlet goes on to state that as a drug detector, the breed serves the Custom service and airport security systems, and has been trained as a hearing dog and as an aid in the psychiatric treat- ment of young people. Clearly this is not a breed suited for the average couch potato or weekend warrior. The German Shepherd’s suitability for a seemingly endless list of duties has evolved over time. The original shepherd

Icon in Action Recognized internation- ally for its remarkable appearance, distinctive gait and commendable character, the German Shepherd Dog has achieved icon status, in

part, owing to its ability to multi-task. For each job accom- plished by any one of the specialist breeds, the “Shepherd” can easily manage two or three and still make time to watch over the kids. This breed can do just about anything it puts its mind to, and here lies the challenge for many dog owners today. When it comes to intelligence, discrimination and plain old power, the German Shepherd can prove more than a match for the average dog owner. In a pamphlet published by the German Shepherd Dog

The dependable German Shepherd Dog remains an efficient livestock herder.

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ALIFEWITHPURPOSE• DanSayers continued

In her book The Norfolk Terrier, author Joan R. Read introduces readers to the breed’s inherent appeal with a quote from Marjorie Bunting whose world-famous Ragus Kennels has enjoyed tremen- dous success as a family enter- prise for generations. “What was it that so attracted us to these little red dogs,” Mrs. Bunting ponders? “Well basi- cally I suppose it was their character, their tough, sturdy independence, their ability to work out a sticky situation and find the answer for themselves; their great love of people, they more than any other breed I have ever had to do with, can make you feel important and loved. They are great flatter- ers.” If flattery can get a dog anywhere, it’s little wonder the Norfolk has found its way into the hearts and homes of dog lovers in need of a compliment on both sides of the pond. Though small in size, the breed’s exceeding charm can mask a demanding little tyrant. The Norfolk isn’t called the “perfect demon” without rea- son. To ensure these drop- eared Terriers are as obedient as they are ebullent, Mrs. Read

dogs drove sheep and cattle across large swaths of Europe before finding work as police dogs under the name German Sheepdog by the early 20th century. Later, as the German Shepherd Dog, the breed was recruited for Dogs for Defense, Inc. which supplied approxi- mately 20,000 animals to the U.S. Army during World War II. The role of guide dog for the blind followed, as did the breed’s role as a police dog. The first K-9 partners went to work in American cities in the 1970’s, and Search and Rescue teams soon followed as the need for drug and bomb detection dogs became critical to public safety. Perhaps it’s this feeling of safe- ty that results from living with a German Shepherd Dog that has allowed its considerable appeal to endure. At its core, the breed remains a devoted partner that’s at its best when it has a job to get to. Game and Hardy The name Terrier comes from the Middle French terre , which derives from terra, the Latin word for “earth.” To many fanciers devoted to the scrappy British and Irish breeds that bear the name, it

Charming and demanding, the Norfolk Terrier cannot and will not be ignored.

may come as a surprise to learn that the word terrier means “burrow” in modern French. Oh, well! To paraphrase the Bard from his play Romeo and Juliet, “A Terrier by any other name would dig as deep.” Whatever their provenance, each of the recognized Terrier breeds is a rough and ready character, hardwired to rid the planet of all and sundry vermin. With a Terrier on the job, no rat or rabbit is out of bounds. And even the sly fox is no match for the Group’s smallest member, the game and hardy little Norfolk.

encourages owners to give their charges a bit of formal train- ing. “Not only is a well-trained Norfolk a happy Norfolk, he is more likely to be a welcome addition to any social situation in which he’s involved,” she writes. “And most importantly, a Norfolk who heeds the command “Come!” or who will “Sit!” and “Stay!” rather than chasing the neighbor’s cat, will have a greater chance of living to a ripe old age than his untrained peers.” Trained or untrained, few cats — and fewer humans — stand a chance when a game little Norfolk is on duty.

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P L AT I N U M G RA N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T

#1 BLACK COCKER*

(CH Si l verha l l Santana x CH St i l l -Pi nes Hol iday Cheer )

P L AT I N U M G RA N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T

#1 BLACK COCKER*

(CH Si l verha l l Santana x CH St i l l -Pi nes Hol iday Cheer )

MULTI PLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER

MULTI PLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER

MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER

OWN E D BY : KA R E N O S P E R , J E S S I CA L E GAT H & RU I D AS I LVA

B R E D BY : KA R E N O S P E R

P R E S E N T E D BY : J E S S I CA L E GAT H S PAD E R I S S P O N S O R E D BY : PA M S U L L I VA N & PAU L A RA M B O

*ShowSi ght breed & a l l breed stats as of 6.30. 17

©2017 PBJ Photos

P L AT I N U M G RA N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T

MULTI PLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTI PLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER

NUMBER ONE BLACK COCKER *

*ShowSi ght breed & a l l breed stats as of 6.30. 17

NUMBER ONE BLACK COCKER *

*ShowSi ght breed & a l l breed stats as of 6.30. 17

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ALIFEWITHPURPOSE• DanSayers continued

The Irish Wolfhound is known too by the more familiar motto, “Go mín le bánaí, ach briogtha le bánaí” or “Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked.” Since 390 AD at least, when a gift of seven Irish dogs was given to a Roman consul by his brother, the breed’s tender heart and courage in battle have been admired and revered beyond the Emerald Isle. However, despite the breed’s venerable past, today’s hounds are not immortal. In fact, the average lifespan for an Irish Wolfhound is six or seven years on average, although many do live longer. Though a big dog can seem larger than life, its shorter life span often leads to heartache, if not a broken heart. Living with a purpose-bred dog does not make for a perfect life, but it is predictable. And that’s the whole point. Whether you’re looking for a dependable partner, a little charmer, or commanding colossus, there’s an AKC-recognized breed — or two — that fits the bill. n Dan Sayers covers the dog sport with a particular interest in the peo- ple who’ve served to promote and preserve purebred dogs. His arti- cles feature breeders and exhibitors of the past as well as those who work tirelessly on behalf of the fancy today. A self-taught artist, Dan’s artwork is represented in collections worldwide and his illus- trations appear in the award-winning Encyclopedia of K-9 Terminology by Ed and Pat Gilbert. Since 1981, Dan has exhibited primarily Sporting breeds and Hounds. He’s bred both Irish Water Spaniels and Rhodesian Ridgebacks and has judged a variety of match shows and sweepstakes, including the Irish Water Spaniel Club of America National Specialty twice.

Gentle Giants Though the appeal of a small dog is undeniable, some people just have to have a big dog. And though bigger isn’t always bet- ter, only one breed towers above the rest. The Irish Wolfhound owns this distinction and can measure three feet at the with- ers. When standing on its hind legs, the breed can easily stare down a grown man. With a frame so large, it’s a good thing the breed’s heart is just as big. Though commanding in appear- ance, Wolfhounds are really just gentle giants with a disposi- tion that is both patient and prudent. To many big dog lovers, this amiable breed is perfectly suited for life in the 21st centu- ry. However, the modern man or woman needs to be fully pre- pared to open heart and home to such an immense Irishman. The August 1988 issue of the AKC Gazette features an arti- cle by Irish Wolfhound breeder and author Gretchen Bernardi titled, “Ireland’s Wolfdog.” In a sidebar with the heading, “A Hound from Antiquity,” the author honors the dedication with which modern-day breeders have undertaken the task of breed preservation. As Bernardi notes, “Conscientious breed- ers of Irish Wolfhounds strive to bring this ancient hound to perfection and towards that end are fortunate to have at their disposal a standard virtually unchanged since Captain Graham himself faced the same challenge. [Captain G. A. Graham, a Scotsman in the British army, is credited with reviving the breed in the 19th century.] The author goes on to write that even though modern hounds are seldom called upon to prove their dogs’ hunting skills, the breed’s “courage, devotion and gentle nature, which were equally as esteemed in ancient song and lore, are celebrated as much today as when Spencer wrote of the Wolfhound in 1801, ‘So true, so brave — a lamb at home, a lion in the chase.’”

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Image used with permission. Royal Canin is not a sponsor of or affiliated with the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

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# 4

# 2 The

The

NEWFOUNDLAND GRAND CHAMPION POINTS*

NEWFOUNDLAND BITCH ALL BREED**

WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB SELECT BITCH NEW-PEN-DEL NEWFOUNDLAND CLUB SHOW BITCH OF THE YEAR 2016 MULTIPLE GROUP PLACINGS AND SPECIALTY WINS

Our sincere appreciation and thanks TO ALL OF THE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED JOVI’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY. OWNED BY Mark & Wendy Keyser | Christine LaMuraglia | EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY Alexis Ditlow BRED BY Christine LaMuraglia & Peggy Helming

*AKC GCH STATS AS OF 6.30.17 | **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6.30.17

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POUCH COVE'S LIVIN' ON A PRAYER

AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP BEST OF BREED WINNER

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*Showsight all breed stats as of 6.30.17

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GRAND CHAMP I ON F l a t b r o o k WH I SKEYTOWN ' S BLUE LABEL JH

PHOTO BY ELAINE

ON E O f t h e T O P W I R E HA I R E D P O I N T I NG G R I F F ON S A L L B R E E D AND B R E E D *

*Showsight breed & all breed stats as of 6.30.17

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Owned by RICHARD & LAURIE BYRNE AND KRISTI RODNEY Bred by KRISTI RODNEY

Handled by LAUREN HAY-LAVITT Assisted by KAYCEE KLANG and Benjie Marcus

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*ShowSight Breed Stats 2016

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SEABEE’S KING LOUIE D’KOKOPELLI’S AT KOBA

GCHG CH D1’S MODERN DAY WARRIOR X CH SEABEE’S BELIEVE IN Z GIRL

JUDGE MR. BRADLEY JENKINS

BREEDERS OF THIS YOUNG BOY CATHEY & DEWAYNE MARTIN

OWNERS CYNTHIA CARLSON, ARMANDO VILLALOBOS & ELVIN IZAGUIRRE

HANDLERS MATIAS MATO & ELVIN IZAGUIRRE

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At just

7 MONTHS OLD,

AND A GROUP TWO LOUIE WON A BEST OF BREED

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Lines fromLinda LINDAAYERSTURNERKNORR AtlantaKennel Club’sLegacyContinues Ann Wallin AKC’sNewestBoardMember

Judith S. Felton was the new editor of the Atlanta Kennel Club's newsletter, THE NEWS HOUND, in July of 1962. (I had just grad- uated from high school.) The club roster of officers was quite impressive. See how many of these popular personalities in our sport you remember.

Judy was married to Herman Felton and each of them became extremely popular judges. Herman also later served as President of the club. Dobermans ruled the Feltons' home and a large bronze statue of the breed graced their grounds. Florence H. Dendy , an attorney was the new President.

J. Wen Lundeen was the AKC Delegate. Not only was he a former Atlanta Kennel Club President and Director, he had served on the Board of Directors for the American Kennel Club. The Lundeens joined in 1929 and are well remembered for their Kalmar Great Dane Kennels in Stone Mountain, Georgia. He

Florence was a well-known breeder of Dobermans, Italian Greyhounds and Min-Pins. We used to enjoy wonderful matches and fabulous picnics at the Dendy home. My father, Roy Ayers , the Past President was the new Vice President and Show Chairman. Our family had become active in the club in 1950. Daddy always said he held every office except treasurer, always making a joke about it. He went on to become an All-Rounder. Even though he judged all Breeds all over the globe, his heart belonged to our original Conrad Collies.

was also a judge. I will always remember the many picnics, parties and club matches they hosted at their estate. The Board of Directors was filled with long remembered greats of the day. You may remember Mrs. Frances Abercrombie 's (1945) Best in Show winning Boxer, Ch. Zack's Appeal. Bill Austin (1959) showed beautiful Great Danes. Frances Kuhnen (1953) bred Chows. Larry Shaw (1952) loved his Italian Greyhounds, Greyhounds, Borzois and Whippets. Larry was also President of the Afghan Hound Club. Harold Stech (1951) came to Atlanta after serving as President of the Montgomery

Ann Wallin

Mrs. Jessie Robinson , a former Director was elected 2nd Vice President. Her Kerry Blue Terriers were top winners of the day. She suffered a terrible injury to her arm when trying to separate two of them in a dog fight. That made a lasting impression on me and my younger brother Roy. Thus, we have always had a great respect for that breed. Jessie became active in the club in 1948. Mrs. Charles (Rocky) Austin served as Recording Secretary. After joining the Atlanta Kennel Club in 1948, she later became a popular Pekingese judge. She also served as President of the local Peke Club and was Secretary of the Combined Specialties Club. Wyn Heaton , busied herself as Corresponding Secretary. Poodles were her passion and her interest in showing brought her into the club in 1949. Heaton was also a former Director. Elmer Kight , an accountant was re-elected Treasurer, a position he had already held for 10 years. I can still picture him holding one of his Chihuahuas in one hand. We often joked about trading grooming responsibilities, my Collies for his tiny Toy! He joined in 1948.

Kennel Club. Dobes and Min-Pins were the Stechs' Breeds. Last but certainly not the least of the memorable members of the 1962 Atlanta Kennel Club Board of Directors was Charles Venable (1947), also a judge. He and his beautiful wife Christine owned the Pekingese Ch. Chik T'Sun of Caversham, the first dog to win 100 All Breed Best in Shows, quite a phenomenal achievement of the time. Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club in 1960 was the highlight of those 100 wins. Chik T'Sun was always in my lap on Christmas Eve as it was our family tradition to spend Christmas Eve at the Venables. After all that history, I bring you to Judith Felton's newslet- ter Editorial message. Thinking her club members would be busy grooming, clipping and training their dogs they would have no time for contributing to her newsletter, "Dogs are the ones with leisure time," she said. Thus, here's a message she included in her 1962 NEWS HOUND written from a dog's point of view and penned by a close friend of the Felton's named Jason. Continued on page Eighty-Eight

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M u l t i p l e G r o u p P l a c i n g B I S S W i n n i n g

PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GI RL’S BEST FR I END

lovingly presented by DEBRA MATT INGLY

bred by ROBERT SMI TH AND STEPHEN MI L LER OF PECHE MIGNON FRENCH BUL LDOGS

owned by DEBRA MATT INGLY, KENNY MATT INGLY, TRACY GR I FF I TH, CAROL HURST-NEVI L LE, ROBERT SMI TH & STEPHEN MI L LER

D E B R A M AT T I NG LY. C OM \ \ P E C H E M I GNON F R E N C H B U L L D OG S . C OM

GCHS PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GI RL’S BEST FR I END

FRENCHI E no. 1

*ShowSight breed stats as of 6.30.17

GCHS PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GI RL’S BEST FR I END

FRENCHI E no. 1

*ShowSight breed stats as of 6.30.17

Introducing the AKC/ROYAL CANIN ® National All-Breed Puppy & Junior Stakes! For the first time ever, we invite you and your Puppy or Junior (6-18 months) to compete with other top breeders from across the country at the 2017 National Championship. Mark your calendar! December 15, 2017 (During the 2017 AKC National Championship) Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL We’ll see you at The Stakes As the event approaches, look for updates including entry details, information about judges and more in the premium list coming this September. WE HEARD YOU BREED GREAT ONES.

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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*Showsight breed & all breed

stats as of 6.30.17

M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C I N G

King Arthur J U G E R E D E L W E I S S

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- Josh Bi l l i ngs AKA Henry Wheeler Shaw that loves you more than he loves himself ”

“A DOG IS THE ONLY THING ON EARTH

owned by K A R E N J ’ A N T H O N Y presented by

G R E G S T R O N G | A K C R E G ’ D | ( 4 1 0 ) 8 2 2 - 2 1 8 7

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Tips from a Wagging Tail Written from a Dog’s Perspective From Atlanta Kennel Club’s News Hound July 1962 Editor: Judith Fellton Author: “Jason” AtlantaKennel Club’s legacy continues frompage 76 by Linda Ayers Turner Summertime – Vacation Time – Dog Show Time: I don’t think that summer is much fun for any of us at home in the Kennel – too many flies; too much sun; and worst of all they seem to think that you like to stay out all day. Going on a trip by car, however, is a nice change for any dog. I like to go to sleep on the back seat, but some eager pooches sit up all the way and watch the scenery. This is strictly for puppies, what good is scenery if you can’t smell it? The people who drive for me wonder what I like about it, by the motion is pleasant and I can listen to their chatter. It doesn’t do, of course, to be too agreeable when you’re on a trip with your people - they tend to forget you are there. One of my favorite devices is to refuse the food they take along for me. I eat that stuff at home all the time and I want something different. Usually, (and espe- cially if this is a dog show trip) they worry about it and sooner or later they’ll bring you a steak or some hamburgers. If they forget remind them by howling a little (or if you’re the barking type, bark) and noise on your part will get you your own way pretty fast. They are scared about motel managers and people in the room next door.

My own Ch. Fantasy's Magic Man dreaming of his old days on the show circuit. Photo courtesy the author

If you have been bathed at home the day before its rather amusing to find some way to get dirty when they take you for a walk. This must be done carefully and with good judgement – perhaps you can find a puddle to step in or lie down in some sand. Don’t overdo it or you’ll find yourself getting another bath! Just get messy enough to keep them on their toes and fix it so that they’ll spend the evening in the room with you instead of going to a party somewhere else (parties aren’t really good for them). It takes a good while to brush out sand or wash feet. This works mostly for longhaired dogs. Shorthaired dogs really have a prob- lem here – Wet paint is a good thing – something to roll in is good for all of us. I’d like to hear from you shorthaired dogs on this problem. One more hint that will help on a trip. If you like to sleep on the bed (I don’t) but some of my friends do. First make sure that they don’t bring a create on the trip, or if they do, see that it is left in the car. Then, after they have gone to bed, make your first attempt. You will be pushed off. Start pacing. Go to the windows, whine at the door; Chew on a stocking or some underwear. The important thing is to keep them awake. If they aren’t very smart they’ll probably take a while to get the message. It’s fun to have one of them get up and put on a bathrobe and take you for a walk. By all means walk with them, smelling everything (you don’t need to make use of this walk, they’ll be up early). When they get you back to the room, continue the treatment. If they should lock you in the bathroom – howl, bark and scratch the door. Sooner or later they’ll invite you onto the bed. Be sure you have enough room – they tend to stretch out. We find Afghan kicking very effective – and let’s face it, a dog my size needs three quarters of a double bed. Small dogs may enjoy stretching our horizontally or snuggling into pillows. Just remember – this trip is for you – see that you enjoy it. Happy Motoring! • • • • • Today the Atlanta Kennel Club bragging rights continue! Following in the footsteps of Mr. J. Wen Lundeen, Dr. Asa Mays and Dr. Carmen Battaglia, Mrs. Ann Wallin is the newest member of the American Kennel Club Board of Directors! Congratulations to the club and especially to Ann Wallin for this tremendous honor! Linda Ayers Turner Knorr n

Linda Ayers Turner Knorr is from one of our dog world's very special families. She is the daughter of the late All Breed Judge Roy Ayers. Both Linda and her brother Roy Ayers, Jr. became second generation judges. Three judges is one immediate family is quite a rarity. Linda is also a second generation AKC Delegate. She entered the show ring with one of her Conrad Collies when she was only six years old and has never stopped giving back to our sport! Her love of the American Kennel Club and its mission is reflected in all of her uplifting articles.

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MBIS MBISS AM CAN GCH WINTERHOLME ANY WAY U WANT IT

NO. 1 SHIH TZU ALL BREED *

NO. 8

TOY

*

O W N E D & B R E D B Y : W e n d y A n d e r s o n a n d R i c h a r d P a q u e t t e P R O F E S S I O N A L L Y H A N D L E D B Y : M a n d y C a r l s o n

* D N S T A T S A S O F 6 . 3 0 . 1 7

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 6.30.17

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ALL BREED *

H

ALWAYS BREEDER/ OWNER/HANDLED BY: LISA KNOCK BRED BY: TRISORTS, LISA KNOCK & BARBARAVITARELLI

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6.30.17

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TRISORTS SUMMER HARVEST HSAS, NA, NAJ

Harvey

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Gold Grand Champion BO- BETT ’ S FAVOR I TE P I CK B E ST I N SHOW

BRED & CO-OWNED BY Carol Harris | OWNED BY Deborah Bahm EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY Ashlie Whitmore

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Thank you esteemed judges FOR ADMI R ING P IXI E

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Becoming JACQUELYNFOGEL Our Great Expectations

I tell the following story often, usually to illustrate how fickle genetics can be and why breeding is such a challenge. Sometimes I tell it to encourage breeders with a “disaster” litter to try again, and not give up. Sometimes I tell it just to illustrate the level of humility we all need to develop as we continue in this sport.

That brings me to another, seemingly unrelated topic. Humility. I love hanging out with Basset people because most of them have been sufficiently humbled by the realities of breeding this difficult breed. Most of us have stories like the one I just wrote and all of us talk about the round-the-clock feedings we have had to do with weak puppies. We have found soul-mates in Collie breeders – both of us breed puppies that want to die. Unlike my terrier puppies that are born with unbeliev- able vigor and will to live, Basset babies need to be taught how to nurse and must work very hard at not getting squished by their mother. They require 24/7 monitoring and even then will die for what seems to be no reason. People look at Bassets in the show ring and think of them as an easy, no-groom, hearty breed. Nothing could be further from the truth. Every Basset breeder has earned their stripes. Yes, the puppies are to die for – there is no cuter baby. But they are not easy. They are hard to get pregnant, hard to keep pregnant, diffi- cult whelpers, and challenging mothers. Promising show dogs fall apart at older ages and some pets that are placed and neutered turn out to be beautiful. Perhaps that is why Basset breeders are not so quick to reach that stage in our sport – usually around the five year mark – where they arrogantly believe they know it all. Basset breeders seem to know that day never comes. We are not lone rangers. We have learned to value the experience and the offers of help from the breeders who have come before us. Like our breed, we are independent thinkers who have learned to work in a pack and look to each other for support and guidance. While we often have disagreements, we have no desire to kill. In short, we respect each other, even if we do not always like each other. Recently I have had the good fortune to travel with new exhibitors in another breed. I love their enthusiasm and willingness to learn. Right now they are focusing on their chosen breed and are trying to learn how to present it, how to groom it, and how to evaluate what the judges are looking for. I love learning about other breeds, so this part of the relationship has been fun. However, they are also learning to get discouraged when they do not win at every show and do not yet understand that losing is a big part of showing, espe- cially at the beginning. They do not understand why

I had worked years at a Basset breeding program to get to a point where I had what I considered the best dog I had ever bred and the best bitch I had ever bred. The dog was a beautiful top- winning special and the bitch was getting rave reviews from all of the breeders I most respected. She placed well in the puppy classes at the Basset nation- al, and I was sure she would

be a top-winner and a top producer. As luck would have it, they were at ages where they could be bred together. So I did. I bred my best ever dog to my best ever bitch and I had great expectations! I got five pets – all placed in pet homes, none used in a future breed- ing program. My great expectations were dashed on the shores of reality – nothing is a sure thing. Unfortunately I had to discontinue breeding both of these great dogs – the male died young after surgery to remove a swallowed object. I stopped breeding the bitch because she was the fourth generation of bad mothers, and I could no longer fool myself that this characteristic was not being passed on genetically. The mothers were all beautiful, elegant dogs, but all of their puppies needed to be hand-raised from birth. This was not a characteristic I wanted to continue in this breed. One of the lessons I took away from this breeding was how difficult it is to envision and plan breedings with an achondroplastic breed. Bassets do not breed true. Every litter is a crap shoot surrounded by a lot of edu- cated guessing and intense praying. I have since learned that other breeds do breed true; my Bedlingtons are far easier to predict given a basic knowledge of genetics and pedigrees. Puppy selection is far easier with Bedlingtons than it is with Bassets. While everyone else talks wisely about choosing their puppies at eight weeks because they are proportionate- ly correct at that age, you will find Basset breeders nod- ding and smiling while mumbling to the Basset breed- er next to them, “Yeah, right. With my breed it is not over until it is over, and who can afford to keep whole litters of these dogs until they are TWO.”

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M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n e r | R e s e r v e B e s t I N S h o w

g o l d g r a n d c h a m p i o n T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E

DOB | 02 . 10 . 15

M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n e r | R e s e r v e B e s t I N S h o w

g o l d g r a n d c h a m p i o n T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E

DOB | 02 . 10 . 15

n u m b e r

a l l b r e e d *

n u m b e r

b r e e d * *

Owned by: B e t h Me r c i e r & Mar gar e t D e F o r e agent: C J Favr e | assisted by: ang e l a cha s e

* ShowS i gh t a l l br e e d s tat s a s o f 6 . 3 0 . 1 7

* * ShowS i gh t br e e d s tat s a s o f 6 . 3 0 . 1 7

Breeder: MARGARET DE FORE Owners: BETH MERCIER & MARGARET DE FORE Agent: C. J. FAVRE | Assisted by: ANGELA CHASE

MULT I PLE BEST OF BREED WINNER MULT I PLE GROUP WINNER Silver Grand Champion TORR I D ZONE WHAT ’ S LOVE GOT TO DO W I TH I T

MULT I PLE BEST OF BREED WINNER MULT I PLE GROUP WINNER Silver Grand Champion TORR I D ZONE WHAT ’ S LOVE GOT TO DO W I TH I T

JOURNEY Multiple BISS BGCH Tabu XP Caryse D O N ’ T S T O P B E L I E V I N G

Owned & bred by: DR. CARMEN HERBEL SPEARS

& RENEE BRUNS

Presented by: THOMAS & SUSAN KATZENSTEIN

ERREGEN KENNELS

Photos by: NOR CAL BULLDOGGER

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