Showsight - September 2017

GRAND CHAMP ION BEST IN SHOW ARANI SLE STAR OF SAN J AC INTO

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7.31.17

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2017 #1 AFFENPINSCHER * 2017 #3 TOY DOG ** • 2017 #15 DOG ALL BREEDS ** 2016 #1 TOY DOG WINNER • 2016 PURINA TOY DOG OF THE YEAR WINNER 2017 PROGRESSIVE TOY SHOW; RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNER • 2017 BEST OF BREED; WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB WINNER • 2017 TOY GROUP 4; WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB WINNER

JOSEPH GREGORY

MICHAEL CANALIZO

JOHN BOOTH

VIRGINIA LYNE

WILLIAM DeVILLENEUVE

MICHAEL CANALIZO

ELAINE LESSIG

ANNE SAVORY BOLUS

BRADLEY JENKINS

RODNEY HERNER

FRED BASSETT

BONNIE LINNELL CLARKE

VIRGINIA LYNE

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 6.30.17 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7.31.17

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G C H S T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

OWNED BY DOYLE & CAROL GIROUARD • BRED BY TAMARIN KENNELS • PRESENTED BY ALFONSO ESCOBEDO & ASHLIE WHITMORE S how S ight M agazine , S eptember 2017 • 5

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 7.31.17

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BACK TO BACK GROUP 1ST WINS THANK YOU JUDGES MRS.PAULA HARTINGER AND MR. ROGER HARTINGER. BACK TO BACK BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWS, BOXER CLUB OF MILWAUKEE THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. KAREN HYNEK AND ROBERT VANDIVER.

OWNERS STEVE & ANN ANDERSON • HANDLER RICK JUSTICE BREEDER/CO-OWNER JULIE WILMORE • BREEDER CLAUDIA PARSONS

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GCH RUMMER RUN'S OLYMPIC SLAM DUNK

ALL BREED & SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW WINNER

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 7.31.17

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BRED & OWNED BY: LINDY BARROW / SKYEHIGH WESTIES LINDY@SKYEHIGH.CA

HANDLED BY: COURTNEY KNIOLA

FLASH! ICEY WON BIS ON 9/3

UNDER MERLE TAYLOR AT DANVILLE, IL KENNEL CLUB.

ICEY CONGRATULATES

Courtney Kniola & Tony Vacha

on their recent wedding vows.

© Lynda Beam

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B I S , MU LT I P L E R B I S A N D G R OU P W I N N E R C A N AM C H S KY E H I G H ’ S S U B Z E R O

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7.31.17

ON E O F AM E R I C A’ S

Our very sincere appreciation TO J U DG E S M R S . C E C E L I A M A R T I N E Z F O R T H E G R O U P 1 A N D M R S . R I TA B E L L F O R T H I S WO N D E R F U L R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW

G E O R G I A B R O W N

owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY AND LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN

bred by CHARLES & JEANNE HURTY presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D, (410) 822-2187

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*CANUCK STATS

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*all systems as of 7.31.17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 7.31.17

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*ShowSight breed stats as of 7.31.17

Monamour My Favorite grand champion

tokio 30 • S how S ight M agazine , S eptember 2017

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, (410) 822-2187 Tokio is owned by Marilyn Title & Carolyn McKenzie

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OWN E D BY :

KA R E N O S P E R ,

J E S S I CA L E GAT H &

RU I D AS I LVA

B R E D BY :

KA R E N O S P E R

NUMBER ONE BLACK COCKER * *ShowSi ght breed & a l l breed stats as of 7.31 . 17

P R E S E N T E D BY :

J E S S I CA L E GAT H

S PAD E R I S S P O N S O R E D BY :

PA M S U L L I VA N &

PAU L A RA M B O

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P L AT I N U M G RA N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T (CH Si l verha l l Santana x CH St i l l -Pi nes Hol iday Cheer )

MULTI PLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTI PLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C I N G

J U G E R E D E L W E I S S

King Arthur

owned by K A R E N J ’ A N T H O N Y presented by

G R E G S T R O N G | A K C R E G ’ D | ( 4 1 0 ) 8 2 2 - 2 1 8 7

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- Josh Bi l l i ngs AKA Henry Wheeler Shaw that loves you more than he loves himself ”

“A DOG IS THE ONLY THING ON EARTH

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* all systems as of 7.31.17 **DN stats as of 7.31.17

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ARA |MEDIA GROUP INC. AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cellular 512 541 8128 michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567 TAMPA FL 33679

TABLE OF CONTENTS MONTHLY COLUMNS 44 TABLE OF CONTENTS 45 COVER STORY 46 SHOWSIGHT -- FROM THE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 48 MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER AJ Arapovic 50 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 58 LEARNING ALL THE MOVING PARTS by Allan Reznik 74 THOUGHTS I HAD DRIVING HOME FROM THE DOG SHOW by Caroline Coile

SHOWSIGHT THE DOG SHOWMAGAZINE _______________________________ EXECUTIVE EDITOR Since Volume I, Number 1 Chief Media Consultant JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 EDITOR@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________ Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS CAROLINE COILE ARLENE CZECH KATHERINE ELDREDGE JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS

88 BECOMING Jacquelyn Fogel 94 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 110 SANTA BARBARA ‘17 by Joseph Neil McGinnis III 126 SURVEY SAYS: What do you think of the 80% rule recission? 148 CANFIELD CANDIDS 164 GOING EXTINCT: BREEDERS IN HIDING by Cara Ryckman 170 STATEN ISLAND CANDIDS VARIETY GROUP FEATURE: THE TERRIER GROUP

177 SHOWSIGHT CELEBRATES TERRIERS 184 MONTGOMERY COUNTY MEMORIES

220 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, THE ICONIC TERRIERS SHOW by Dan Sayers 230 GETTING TO KNOW YOU: PEGGY BEISEL-McILWAINE by Allan Reznik 238 TALKING TERRIERS with MCKC President Bruce Schwartz by Dan Sayers 250 FOND MEMORIES OF DAN KIEDROWSKI by Joan Huber BREED FEATURES

LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director, Social Media & Web Site DANIEL CARTIER DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM ADVERTISING BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com

POODLES 254 • CURLEY-COATED RETRIEVERS 274 • AFFENPINSCHERS 279 • RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS 288 • SAMOYED 298 • BLACK & TAN COONHOUNDS 315 • BLUETICK COONHOUNDS 320 • TREEING WALKER COONHOUND 325 • AMERICAN ENGLISH COONHOUND 331 • REDBONE COONHOUND 339

287 COMING ATTRACTIONS 340 ADVERTISING RATES 341 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION by Daniel J. Cartier 344 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. 221 Indigo Lane, Georgetown, Texas 78628. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COURTESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

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in all breed points* # 1

O N T H E C O V E R J J B I S A R A N I S L E S T A R O F S A N J A C I N T O GrandChampion

“ J J ” I S SURELY A SPEC I AL DOG . HE F INI SHED 2016 AS THE

DANDI E DINMONT TERRI ER

WHI CH INCLUDED HI S F IRST BEST IN SHOW.

HE ALSO WON THE BREED AT BOTH THE AKC NAT IONAL CHAMP IONSHI P AND THE WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW IN 2016 / 2017 . JJ is the son of four time BIS winner “Ch. Schooner’s Spirit of Sherman” and is undoubtedly following in his father’s footsteps. He is already a best in specialty show winner and multiple best in show winner with best in shows in both America and Canada. We are so pleased to be able to continue on where the late Peggy Carr left off with a legacy of best in show winners.

JJ epitomizes the Dandie Dinmont Terrier’s affectionate and dignified nature with a tenacity and boldness that is evident if you are ever so fortunate as to get to know him.

*ShowSight all breed stats 2016

WHO HAVE RECOGNI ZED THI S L I TTLE DOG WI TH A B IG PERSONAL I T Y AND WE LOOK FORWARD TO THE REST OF 2017 .

© HOLLOWAY

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YOUR BREED IS OUR SPECIALTY. At ROYAL CANIN ® , we obsess over purebred dogs—and the perfect nutrition for each of them. ROYAL CANIN ® formulas are developed with your breed’s unique needs in mind for superior muscle tone, coat health and digestion. As a breed expert, you know the right nutrition can unlock the magnificence inside your dogs, and so do we.

A Major Win for Breeders Join the Crown Partners Rewards Program Today! my.royalcanin.com

GCH LOCKENHAUS’ RUMOR HAS IT V KENLYN, “RUMOR” BEST IN SHOW 2017 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show 2015 AKC™ National Championship Dog Show

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC A NEW LAUNCH AND A LITTLE LOVE!

For nearly 25 years, ShowSight’s founders (Mr. Joseph Neil McGinnis and the late Mr. Duane Doll) provided the dog fancy with a print publication teeming with educational content, breaking news, and breathtaking ads of some of the world’s most accomplished show dogs. For the past few years, they also brought you a digital version of the magazine. Our readers and advertisers have come to appreciate both media sources, and expect even more from our online presence. To that end, I am committed as AraMedia Group’s publisher to make the necessary investments in this area that will best serve the community. So even as our team continues to work on improving the quality and content of our print publication, we’re also retooling our online offerings. Our brand-new website, SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM, is scheduled to launch by early October. The com- pletely reimagined site promises to become a new hub for all dog organizations and every “happening” within our sport. Showsightmagazine.com won’t simply concentrate on our business model—advertising, articles, fea- tures and photos—it will function as a live, interactive dog show community database! Our relaunch will come with easier-to-use navigation, menu links to popular listings and contact information for photographers, pro- fessional handlers, superintendents, breed and all-breed clubs, the AKC and even overseas kennel clubs. Other online-only resources will include breaking news, the most up-to-date point systems, and searchable archives for several years’ worth of advertising and editorial. When you need to find something online, we want our website to speak to you, entertain you and make your life easier. We want to bring it all to you under one virtual roof. Access to all parts of SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM will be freely accessible by all, but the success of the new website will depend on help from our visitors. If you are interested in advertising on our new site or in our print publication, we’d like to make it easy for you to reserve space and submit advertising. You can always upload content to us online and, if you’d prefer, you can book an ad over the phone. Ms. Tammy Gincel, Mr. Brian Cordova and I are your Customer Relationship Managers and we’re always available 24/7/365 when it comes to helping you plan your next ad campaign. Advertising options will be announced at the time the new website goes live, but rest assured your ads will be shared with thousands of weekly view- ers to our website, digital newsletter and social media pages. Let us help to make your dreams come true. P.S. May I say a thing or two about love?

I fell in love in 2007. It was my only time. I was a young college student and she was still in high school. Her name was Hanifa and I met her on Myspace. (Let’s be clear, she messaged me first!) Because of the length of her messages, it took me a couple of days to reply to her (smile). But after some back-and-forth, I asked for her phone number and she gave me a wrong number! Can you believe it? Well—long story short—fast forward 10 years, we are happily husband and wife and, most importantly, parents to our two beautiful girls, Iryna who is three-and-a-half and Adrianna, 13-months of age. They are my loves and we’d like to thank you, along with the entire ShowSight team, for your continued support on behalf of our efforts to promote the sport we all love. Wishing you and yours all the best. AJ Arapovic, CEO, Publisher

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7.31.17

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Lines from Linda BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Stars of Tomorrow - The Pee Wees

When Kris Harner, Show Chairman of the Greenville Kennel Club, applied for our club to host its very first Pee Wee event she was excited but not exactly sure what to expect. Avery Clute, daughter of Jamie Clute, is our only club member with a child whose age fits the five to nine year category. Our past president, Ken Walker, and his wife, Deb- bie’s grandson, Christian Wall,

According to Alan Slay Director of AKC Event Programs, “There were 55 Pee Wee events offered in 2016 and they aver- aged five participants. In 2017, 88 have been offered or sched- uled averaging seven participants. Clubs report that they have had a very good experience with this special attraction and intend to continue offering it. Those clubs are providing a welcoming and memorable experience for both the chil- dren and their families.” Following their appearances when the Pee Wees gathered for photos with Pat Hastings, a few youngsters had already rushed over to the “After Party.” The Greenville Kennel Club ladies were passing out refreshments much to the delight of the kids who were full of conversation about their new experience. Our club was blessed to have Christine Weisse and Bar- bara Ohmann with the AKC Booth just in front of the ring. Barbara, AKC Director of Club Education perhaps summed it up best, “Your Pee Wee Competition was definitely one of the best ones I have seen so far. Pat Hastings as judge was amazing in her ability to work with the kids and dogs. The Little Boys in their suits and bowties were adorable. The little Southern Debutants in their dresses and jewels were a sight to behold. And then the event began. The dog show audi- ence and families around the ring were supportive and proud

would be a sure one we could count on too. So, at least we knew we could look forward to watching Avery Clute and Christian Wall participate in our first exciting Pee Wee event! The Fabulous Pat Hastings was on out judging panel and, luckily, her schedule would allow her to be our judge. I can think of no better mentor for the youngsters. We were on our way! I volunteered to put together the gift bags for the children. Oh, what fun that was because it seems like only yesterday that I first entered the show ring at the age of six. Don’t we love to reminisce. Alamaza Kroeshel helped me fill our large totes with a dog bowl and more goodies than you can imagine from AKC and our generous sponsor Purina. Purina even included a new grooming bag for each young handler. Wow! The children would be going home with loads of gifts and information to encourage them to participate in all of the many activities our American Kennel Club has to offer. I was thrilled to see some youngsters wearing AKC bandanas before the day was out. As the morning progressed, twelve youngsters from four Southern states signed up to participate: Annaliesa Yoshida, Fletcher, North Carolina; Laney Oliver, Greer, South Carolina; Christian Wall, Pelzer, South Carolina; Eva Stielow, Greenville, South Carolina; Jenna Yoder, Fairplay, South Carolina; brother and sister Grayson and Annalee Milan, Lakeland, Florida; sisters Ansley Smith and Kayla Smith, Rome, Georgia; Avery Clute, Williamston, South Carolina; Lexi Keel, Inman, South Carolina and Mor- gan Kelley, Denton, South Carolina. Adults could learn lessons about proper attire from our Pee Wees. Each young handler was impressively dressed! Their exhibits were large and small. Breeds represented were Great Pyrenees, Doberman Pinscher, Labrador Retriev- er, All American Canine Partner, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Pug, Border Collie and Havanese. I invited my neighbor, five-year- old Eva Stielow and her All-American Canine Partner, “Hon- ey.” Eva had never been to a dog show. Eva is now enrolled in our Canine Partner program and is hooked on participating in AKC events!

Original Pee Wee, 1952 Author Linda Ayers and Ch. Conrad’s Sweet Expression, “Pam”

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Introducing the AKC/ROYAL CANIN ® National All-Breed Puppy & Junior Stakes! For the first time ever, we invite you and your Puppy or Junior (6-18 months) to compete with other top breeders from across the country at the 2017 National Championship. Mark your calendar! December 15, 2017 (During the 2017 AKC National Championship) Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL We’ll see you at The Stakes As the event approaches, look for updates including entry details, information about judges and more in the premium list coming this September. WE HEARD YOU BREED GREAT ONES.

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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LINES FROM LINDA: Stars of Tomorrow: The Pee Wees

of each child and their dogs. So many great moments—I loved the little five- year-old bow tied boy who ran out of the ring yelling at the top of his lungs to grandmother, MIMI I WINNED!!! Wonderful job Greenville Kennel Club.” To the sounds of thunderous applause every young handler rounded the ring with their dogs under control. What a sight it was to see! Cameras were flashing and tears were flowing. These are our Stars of Tomorrow!

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AMERICA’S TOP IRISH SETTER* G C H K E L L Y G L E N ’ S T W I L I G H T A F FA I R

OWNED BY Mari lyn Ti t le, Carolyn McKenzie, Pat ricia Kudla & Suzanne Walker

BRED BY Char l ie & Suzanne Walker

PRESENTED BY Greg St rong, AKC reg’d | (410) 822-2187

*al l systems as of 6.31.17

Many thanks to Judge Mrs. Mari lyn Pipes for recognizing El la wi th the fantast ic group win.

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 7.31.17

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Learning all the Moving Parts BY ALLAN REZNIK The Superintendent

Although a few ken- nel clubs choose to be their own superinten- dent, for the most part clubs are happy and relieved to entrust this huge responsibility to professional superin- tendents. Chapter 9 of the AKC’s Rules Applying to Dog Shows, specifies, in

agent of the show-giving club and as the trustee of the club’s income from entry fees to protect large sums of money either by bond or other acceptable means. President of the Dog Show Superintendents Association is Bob Christiansen, who is also President of Moss Bow Foley Dog Shows. He started at MB-F in 1981 as a computer programmer, became a superintendent in 1983 and President in 1985. Asked what exhibitors’ most common misconcep- tions are about superintendents, Christiansen identifies six. 1. Since we accept all the entry fee money, many assume that superintendents are wealthy and keep the majority of the money. Some may also think we set the entry fee, which is solely determined by the club. A full 100% of the money is credited to the club on the show settlement and then our contract charges are deducted. Forty or 50 years ago, superintendent charges were typ- ically 50% of the gross entry fees. That percentage is now only about 25% with the difference claimed by ris- ing costs for show sites, parking attendants, judges, travel and AKC fees. Superintendents have been able to reduce their costs with more efficient use of technology, computers, the Internet, email and printing methods. 2. Some believe we determine the layout of the show- grounds. This is a club decision. We may be asked to visit a site initially and make suggestions but the club decides how it wants to lay out the event. 3. Some believe that superintendents can do anything they want. No. We have to follow the AKC rules just like everyone else. What exhibitors don’t realize when they ask us to “bend” or “break” those rules is that we are subject to fines, reprimands or, in some cases, suspen- sion of our licenses. We have $5 million invested in the property and equipment we use for producing the best product possible. This is our livelihood and that of our employees; we don’t want to jeopardize that. 4. Many today who believe superintending organiza- tions are “out for themselves” probably do not realize that superintendents are responsible for a lot of the things now taken for granted. For example, it was a superintendent who came up with the idea of producing an organized schedule and catalog (Foley). It was a club and a superintendent that made it possible to have the first cluster shows in response to the gas shortage in the 1970s (Raleigh KC and MB-F). It was a superintendent who first utilized a computer in producing dog shows and aided the AKC in their first foray into computers (Tom Crowe). It was a superintendent who made it pos- sible to take entries by phone and then online (MB-F). It was superintendents who lobbied to make it possible to accept an entry for a divided Puppy Class that did not

Section 1, that “The Superintendent of a dog show held under the rules of The American Kennel Club must hold a license from The American Kennel Club.” Later, in Section 12, it is stipulated that “Any reputable person or superintending organization in good standing with The American Kennel Club may apply to said Club for license to act as Superintendent of a dog show… When the application is received by The American Kennel Club, its Board of Directors shall determine whether the applicant is reasonably qualified from training and experience to act as Superintendent of a Dog Show and whether a license shall be issued to said applicant. The fee for being granted a yearly license to be a Superintendent and the fee for renewal of said license each year shall be determined by the Board of Directors of The American Kennel Club. The fee for being granted a license to superintend one show and/or one field trial only shall be determined in like manner. No yearly license will be issued to any person or superintending organization until having superintended at least three dog shows.” And in italics appears the all-important caveat, “No annual superintendent shall be granted a license to be a judge.” Have you ever heard of the Dog Show Superintendents Association? According to the organiza- tion’s website, it was “formed in 2002 to represent pro- fessional AKC-licensed superintendents in all important matters impacting superintendents and the Dog Fancy.” The national association is a “fully organized group of professional superintendents that, in many cases, can call upon more than 100 years of experience in offering services to the AKC, show-giving clubs and dog show exhibitors.” The duties and responsibilities of AKC-licensed superintendents are many and varied, always promoting and defending the sport of showing purebred dogs as defined by the Constitution and Bylaws of the AKC. Superintendents will assist clubs in site inspection and layout when requested, and, in preparing and mailing premium lists per their contract agreement, act as the

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Learning all the Moving Parts: TheSuperintendent

BYALLANREZNIK continued

if they’re experiencing a problem. And be aware of, and adhere to, the AKC and superintendent dead- lines. “Exhibitors should also be familiar with AKC rules and policies. They should carefully check over their entry information before they submit it, and submit their entries in a timely fashion, no matter what method they use (postal mail, phone, online),” adds Christiansen. “Waiting until 11:55 a.m. to attempt to enter for a noon closing isn’t the best idea. Be sure your information is correct on your entry form.” Finally, Christiansen cautions both clubs and exhibitors that “just because you sent it doesn’t mean we received it. Problems occur in postal mail (we’ve received mailed items anywhere from a day to three weeks to a year after a deadline, or we never received it at all) as well as email (sent to the wrong email address, or a typo in the email address that makes it undeliverable).” n

specify the division (previously if the division was not included we had to return it). It was a superin- tendent who began online posting, real-time post- ing and transmission of results to the AKC (MB-F). It was superintendents who made it possible to be able to change a dog from a class for which it was ineligible to the Open class, which allowed the dog to be exhibited (DSSA). 5. Many exhibitors believe we choose the judges— especially if there is a change the day of the show. This is solely a club decision. If they were notified a day or two before their event a club will usually have an idea of what they may want to do and may have already contacted a replacement; sometimes, if they’ve just been notified that morning, they may ask us for suggestions; but it’s their decision. Once they’ve made the decision it’s our job to try to make the judging program work in the best way possible. 6. There is the misperception that we are not writ- ing judging schedules efficiently. In recent years, with the addition of special attraction groups (e.g. Owner-Handler, Puppy, Bred-by-Exhibitor, etc.), shows are typically running one to 1.5 hours longer. Numerous variables affect the schedule, such as AKC Best Practice Policies, the number of rings available, the number of judges, concurrent special- ty and group club events, and added special requests for rings and times. Our software specifi- cally computes judging times to the minute in accor- dance with all these variables. We calculate and publish a group order in every judging schedule and it rarely varies. In almost every case where there is a variance it is due to a judge falling behind for some reason (exhibitors switching dogs, some incident in the ring, the previous judge in the ring running late, etc.), a last-minute judge change or some other unforeseen circumstance. Superintendents are the first to arrive at the show and the last to leave. Our goal is always to schedule the show to finish as efficiently as possible. Christiansen commends show chairs who, for the most part, he says are very experienced and have worked closely with superintendents for many years. “Even new show chairs, who may rely more on us their first year, are typically experienced exhibitors and have interacted with us in that capac- ity as well. They should always feel comfortable asking questions and always remember that our goal is to help them have the best event possible.” How could exhibitors and clubs work more effec- tively with show superintendents? “Clubs should be familiar with AKC rules and policies and our con- tracts, to better understand our responsibilities,” says Christiansen. “Let us know as soon as possible

For more than four decades, Allan Reznik has been immersed in the world of purebred dogs: as a breed- er, exhibitor, award-winning journalist, editor, broadcaster and occasional judge. He has been the Editor-in-Chief of multiple show dog publications, all of which have won national magazine awards from the Dog Writers Association of America while under his stewardship. In 2011, he won the presti- gious Arthur F. Jones Award for Best Editorial Column of the Year, given by the Alliance of Purebred Dog Writers. Allan appears regularly on national TV and radio discussing all aspects of responsible dog ownership and is quoted widely in newspapers and magazines. He has successfully bred and exhibited Afghan Hounds, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Tibetan Spaniels, and current- ly serves on the Board of Directors of the Afghan Hound Club of America and the Tibetan Spaniel Club of America. He is a proud member of the Morris & Essex Kennel Club, the Western Hound Association of Southern California, the Gateway Hound Club of St. Louis (charter member) and his two local all-breed kennel clubs. Photo: Julie Lynn Mueller

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MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST

IN SHOW WINNING

MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING

owned by ANNA MARIE YURA

bred & co-owned by RAY HARRINGTON

exclusively presented by JAMES BETTIS

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grand champion DUNHILL WILL I AM

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*

**

*all systems as of 7.31.17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 7.31.17

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g o l d g r a n d c h a m p i o n T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n e r | R e s e r v e B e s t I N S h o w

n u m b e r

b r e e d *

n u m b e r

a l l b r e e d * *

* ShowS i gh t br e e d s tat s a s o f 7 . 3 1 . 1 7 * * ShowS i gh t a l l br e e d s tat s a s o f 7 . 3 1 . 1 7

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Dat e o f b i r t h

Owned by: B e t h Me r c i e r & Mar gar e t D e F o r e

agent: C J Favr e

assisted by: ang e l a cha s e

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SilverGrand Champion TORR I D ZONE WHAT ’ S LOVE GOT TO DO W I TH I T

TOP A L L BRE ED * fifteen

*Sh owS i g h t a l l b r e e d s t a t s a s o f 7 . 31 . 17

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Mu l t i p l e Be s t o f Br e e d Wi nn e r Mu l t i p l e Gr o up Wi nn e r

Breeder: MARGARET DE FORE Owners: BETH MERCIER & MARGARET DE FORE Agent: C. J. FAVRE Assisted by: ANGELA CHASE

© Me gan C l o u dman

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all breed *

TRI SORTS SUMMER HARVEST HSAS, NA, NAJ

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7.31.17

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HARVEY GOING BEST OF BREED WI TH HI S DAUGHTER GOING BOS F INI SHING HER CHAMP IONSHI P WI TH THREE MAJORS TRISORTS POURQUOI PAS OF MISTY MORN * * Owned and Loved by: T & J Peters

Always Breeder/Owner/Handled by: LISA KNOCK Bred by: TRISORTS | LISA KNOCK & BARBARA VITARELLI

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Thoughts I Had Coming Home From The Dog Show BY CAROLINE COILE Frozen Assets

dog from working lines. She ended up with two very hard to place puppies, along with a promise of free storage and surgical AI in the future. In another case a BIS winner was DNA tested before being bred and his parentage found to be inaccurate. AKC cancelled his registration. The stud owner had to get DNA samples from all her stored semen, and the bitch owner from all her males. It turned out the facility had shipped out the semen from the chosen dog's brother. The dog was reinstated with a new sire. They sued, and the stud owner was awarded $8000 (in part because she had lost several breeding units doing DNA on the other frozen dogs) and the bitch and offspring owner was awarded around $10,000. The amount also included the DNA test- ing as well as the shipping and insemination costs. "The facility was never nice about it, so we got a lawyer," says the stud owner, whose name cannot be disclosed as part of the settlement agreement. Too often workers don't examine the labels as they should, so mix-ups between semen owned by the same person occur. In one recent case the breeder wondered why her litter resembled her other stud more than the planned one, so she DNA tested them at several years of age. She was right. She brought the mistake to the facility's, AKC's and the puppy owners' attention. The registration was changed, the owners were just as happy, and the championships they had earned stood. The unhappiest ending comes when dogs are inadver- tently bred to semen from another breed. There was the 2009 case in which a Pembroke breeder sued a facility after her dog was inseminated with Great Pyrenees sperm. In at least one case a frozen semen mixed-breed litter was the result of a spiteful worker who managed one last caper before being let go. But before you get too worried about wrong stud dogs, it's very rare and probably more rare than mismatings when sending bitches to the stud owners for live service when they own more than one stud! Ownership Then there's the topic of ownership. If you thought co- ownerships were bad with living dogs, just wait until you see the headaches they cause with frozen semen. No two freezing facilities seem to treat the matter the same, so while one may insist that the semen be under the control of only one party, others may let any of the co-owners con- trol the semen. What happens if one co-owner tires of split- ting the storage fee? Or one agrees to breed to a bitch that the other disapproves of? Some even acknowledge whoev- er brought the dog in for collection and freezing to own the semen; something to consider the next time your friend offers to dogsit! What happens to the semen after the owner's death? Some facilities ask for a "next of kin" so to speak---would

At virtually any large show you can see the special vendor with a line of happy male dogs leaving. It's now routine to have our dogs' semen frozen. But it's far less routine to ever use it. For some, just knowing their dog has a pellet of immortality, or a straw of insurance, is enough

to justify the expense. Fewer will ever use the semen, whether because they don't have the right bitch, are never asked, or find it too costly. Of those who do use it on an outside bitch, very few have considered the important dif- ferences from a financial viewpoint to consider compared to the traditional way of breeding. Oops... Let's start with the first concern: What happens if the semen is lost? And yes, it can happen. Many have heard of the Whisperwind Poodle case, in which 122 frozen semen samples from five Standard Poodles were allowed to thaw due to an error after being stored there for ten years. The facility's insurance company offered to pay out $1000, rep- resenting actual costs of collection and storage. The semen owners went to court, and in 2012 a jury awarded them $200,000. This value was not based on the value of the puppies that could have been produced, but on the lesser value of the stud fees that would have been earned. While the Whisperwind is far from the only such lawsuit stemming from lost semen, it is the most expensive to date. The take home message: If you have irreplaceable semen, store it in more than one facility. Tanks can fail, Mistakes can happen. In fact, mistakes happen more than you might think. Kelly McIntosh was ecstatic to finally get her Aussie bitch- --she'd already had two failed attempts with chilled semen, one because they missed her ovulation and the other because the package was lost in transit and showed up three days later, ruined. The third time was a charm---or so she thought. She arranged to have frozen semen stored at the vet and surgically implanted. Three days later the veterinarian called and apologized; she'd implanted semen from a working Aussie whose semen had just been shipped in. The mistake wasn't realized until the botch that dog was supposed to be bred to showed up and they couldn't find his semen. They did arrange for one of the very last straws of that male to be rushed in and the bitch did have a litter of puppies, but that was small consolation to Kelly, whose conformation bitch was now in whelp to a

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A MAN BE ING R ICH Don’t you know that is like A GI RL BE ING PRETTY? “

You wouldn’t marry a girl just because she’s pretty,

photo by © Gina Clear Photography

BUT MY GOODNESS, ”

- M a r i l y n M o n r o e

A MAN BE ING R ICH Don’t you know that is like A GI RL BE ING PRETTY? “

You wouldn’t marry a girl just because she’s pretty,

photo by © Gina Clear Photography

BUT MY GOODNESS, ”

- M a r i l y n M o n r o e

M u l t i p l e G r o u p P l a c i n g B I S S W i n n i n g

PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GI RL’S BEST FR I END

lovingly presented by DEBRA MATT INGLY

bred by ROBERT SMI TH AND STEPHEN MI L LER OF PECHE MIGNON FRENCH BUL LDOGS owned by DEBRA MATT INGLY, KENNY MATT INGLY, TRACY GR I FF I TH, CAROL HURST-NEVI L LE,

ROBERT SMI TH & STEPHEN MI L LER

D E B R A M AT T I NG LY. C OM \ \ P E C H E M I GNON F R E N C H B U L L D OG S . C OM

GCHS PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GI RL’S BEST FR I END

FRENCHI E no. 1

*ShowSight breed stats as of 7.31.17 photo by © Gina Clear Photography

FRENCHI E no. 1

*ShowSight breed stats as of 7.31.17 photo by © Gina Clear Photography

*

PRESENTED BY

*AKC Stats thru 07.31.17

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Thoughts I Had Coming Home: Frozen Assets

BY CAROLINE COILE continued

As you might imagine, the horse world is somewhat more organized when it comes to the finances of frozen semen. Ann Egan runs a USDA approved semen export center for equine semen. She kindly let me see one of the contracts they typically use. Among the main points: They require a nonrefundable stud fee at the time semen is shipped. There is no “live foal” guarantee, but if no preg- nancy results, a return service for the following season only is offered. The return service covers only semen. The semen provided is for one pregnancy. If any remaining semen is used to obtain multiple pregnancies, the female's owner is responsible for the stud fee for each pregnancy. The contract cannot be transferred to anyone else without consent of both parties. Registration papers will not be signed until all fees are paid. Egan says the provisions are the same for deceased studs, but most owners are much choosier about who gets the semen because there is a finite supply. Egan brings up an additional concern: "Sometimes peo- ple will split doses and inseminate two animals but only pay one stud fee. It can be a real problem." Contracts must make clear who the intended bitch is. Which brings us back to contracts. Egan is concerned with the lack of con- tracts in the dog world overall. "I will never breed a dog without one," she says. And I never let canine or equine clients sell semen without one. I just got a call from a breeder who shipped semen to the US from Mexico. All kinds of issues. My first question was what does your con- tract say? It's sad." Egan also admits the live foal/puppy clause can be hard for some to accept. "There's a good reason for that. You buy semen from me. If the horse gets pregnant, the mare owner has 340 days to screw it up. Same with a bitch owner. You pay for semen. I am not Mother Nature and I can't control if a female ovulates. Or how she is taken care of by her owner during pregnancy. If a female gets preg- nant, the stud has done his job. And sometimes if she does- n't the stud has still done his job...contracts just try to make the murky clear." And that is why before you ever freeze your dog's semen---you need to consider all contingencies, write them down, and try your best to make the murky clear! Contracts don't challenge friendships---they save them... n Dog Writers Association of America Hall of Fame inductee Caroline Coile, Ph.D. has written 34 books about dogs, including the top selling Barron's Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds. Caroline holds a Ph.D. in psychology/neuroscience with research interests in canine behavior, senses, genetics and neuropsychology. She has breeder-owner-handled her Baha Salukis to Best in Shows, National Specialty BOB, HITs in both agility and obedience, and Best in Fields and is a strong proponent of multi-dimensional dogs.

any of your relatives really want to pay storage fees for your dogs after you're gone? Would anybody? Would it be considered part of your estate, or even subject to inheri- tance tax? Or would it, as happened in one case, become the property of the storage facility, to be used (and sold) as they deemed? These need to be decided before you take the leap. Or, as one friend of mine is contemplating, just have a "garage sale" when you get too old to breed any- more! Stud Fees But let's say all of that is settled, and you have an inquiry! What will you charge? There are two schools of thought here. The first is that the bitch owner is paying a lot of money for a very iffy breeding. She's paying for ovu- lation timing, semen preparation, shipping, and insemina- tion. Depending on location, this will likely add up to sev- eral thousand dollars. So especially among friends, or in low population breeds where stud owners are more involved in litters, there is the tendency to say "no puppies, no charge." If you have a live stud dog, and the bitch owner has paid for all expenses, this is an option. But if you have a deceased stud, then school of thought #2 applies: You are selling an irreplaceable product. Whether puppies result or not, you have used up one breeding opportunity. If you have more than you will ever need, you may afford to be more generous, but generally, you should charge for the semen, not the pregnancy. Remember also you have expenses in initial collection and in storage for many years; I have semen from 1992, so at about $90 per year storage plus $350 collection that semen has now cost me about $1700. Let me repeat: With frozen semen, you are not selling a stud service; you are selling a product. That means that, especially when dealing internationally, you have no con- trol over that semen after you sell it. They can split it up and inseminate more than one bitch, sell it to your worst enemy, or decide to save it themselves for whatever rea- son. It's their property. This becomes especially important with international shipments. Shipping overseas is expensive, so many semen owners send enough for a second try should the first one not work. But what if the first one works? Should the bitch owner be able to sell the remainder? I don't think too many stud owners will be happy about somebody else collecting their stud fee. Should the bitch owner be forced to, or allowed to, dispose of it? What if it is rare semen from your deceased dog? If you agree to store the semen overseas, who pays the storage fee? Basically, unless you can keep an international lawyer on hand, it comes to down to a wireless handshake and both your good words. Many years ago a friend sent enough semen for many breedings over- seas, and was told it was thawed in transit. She was to receive a certain price per puppy that resulted, but there went that. Only in subsequent years that breeder had sev- eral litters that strongly resembled my friend's stud...

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©Adam King Photo

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BEST IN SHOW

JUDGE JOHN WADE

BRED & CO -OWNED BY Carol Harris

OWNED BY Deborah Bahm

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY Ashlie Whitmore

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BO-BETT ’S FAVORITE PICK

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Becoming BY JACQUELYN FOGEL Building Community and Having Fun

transition in membership. We have actively recruited young millennials into the club, and had just elected a 26-year-old president. We have found that the Millennials have some different ideas about what service in a community means. We have an exceptionally suc- cessful golf outing that raises and impressive amount of money in one day, but it does not reach out to the gen- eral public. Like many other service organizations, Rotary was needing some updating to keep its member- ship strong, and the younger people who were coming in were not content with many of the old ideas for recruiting members and keeping us viable in our com- munity. Their idea of community service extended far beyond our traditional support of the local schools with scholarships and sports field lighting. They wanted us to be visible to a larger population of residents. The selling of the idea to the three organizations was frighteningly easy. Of course it did not hurt that I am the current president of KMKC and KYP and a two-time past president of my Rotary Club. I already have a proven track record with the organizations, but I had never before attempted anything quite this large in scale, and

May 13, 2017 dawned cool, but sunny and dry. For Wisconsin that was a small miracle just by itself. But the magic did not end with the weather. It was a day many of us had worked hard for 5 months to pull together. We called it our Joint Fundraiser in the Park – or The Community Dog Walk & Wash. It was an outdoor festival for neighbors and dogs, and it was

an enormously fun event. We even raised a little money! In one way, this was a unique event because it involved three non-profit organizations coming together to manage it. We had never before tried to pull organi- zations together, and we were amazed at the successes we had combining the strengths and contacts of the 3 community-based non-profit organizations. Kettle Moraine Kennel Club (KMKC) joined forces with my non-profit, Keep Your Pets, Inc (KYP). and the Slinger- Allenton Rotary Club to jointly sponsor the festival. A

I knew I was going to need a lot of volunteer help if it was going to succeed. I was pleasantly surprised at the number of people in all three organizations who immediately vol- unteered to work on the project. We called ourselves The Steering Committee and they appointed me chair because I had regular contact with all three groups. We started meeting on a regular basis just two months after the initial idea was presented at Rotary. The first thing the committee did was to decide what each organiza- tion expected from the event.

steering committee of volunteers from all three organizations was formed, and they began to meet regularly starting in November 2016. The idea for this event was actually hatched at a “fireside” meeting of our local Rotary Club last August. We were looking for another event to raise money we were losing by dropping a Comedy-Night fundraiser. And we were also looking for a way to re- introduce Rotarians to our com- munity as a group of real people, not just hidden checkbooks that

Rotary clearly wanted a visual presence in the commu- nity, and they also wanted a successful fundraiser to fill the gap in their budget. Keep Your Pets, Inc wanted public visibility and funds to continue their mission to keep families in crisis together with their pets. Kettle Moraine Kennel Club wanted public visibility in a non- competitive environment. They wanted the community to be introduced to pure-bred dogs and breeders in a relaxed, comfortable setting to counter some of the bad publicity originating from Animal Rights groups. They also wanted a venue to increase local awareness of our all-breed dog show in June. KMKC did not need to use the event as a fundraiser because their shows are typi-

funded school scholarships and fire department equip- ment. The lightbulb in my head went off because, as president of Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, we were also looking for a way to introduce ourselves to the public outside of our annual dog show. I had read in a Rotary Magazine about the success other clubs had partnering with local non-profits to raise funds. So my thinking immediately went to joining forces with KMKC and another local dog-related non-profit, Keep Your Pets to sponsor a dog related fundraising event in the commu- nity. I don’t know if this idea would have caught any wind in its sails if our Rotary Club had not been in a recent

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