Showsight Express - July 1, 2021

WIDELY DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY REASONABLE • RELIABLE • REALLY REALLY FAST!

MBIS RBIS GCHS SOLIVIA’S DEFINING MOMENT AT PLAYLIST Chalice

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

MY, HOW THINGS HAVE CHANGED!

I f you didn’t have a calendar, would you know that any- thing has changed? Well, things certainly have changed. Here we are, six months into 2021, and the fact that you need to look at a calendar to check on the year is confirma- tion of just how different things have become. I think many of us thought that ringing in the new year would have quickly restored us to the lives that we had been living. Now, we realize that life is not that simple. Due to the events of the past year, we now know that when we rise after sleeping, everything may have changed overnight. If there is anything that can be learned from 2020 it’s this: Many of us now understand that the way to a better life is to live with purpose… in our thoughts and in our actions.

Let’s take this time, mid-year, to be grateful for one another.

I’ll start by taking this opportunity to welcome our new Cus- tomer Relationship Managers, Meegan Pierotti-Tietje and Ryan Tepera , to SHOWSIGHT and RING-READY . (I am sure ya’ll know them personally or are familiar with them.) Both Meegan and Ryan are energetic, intelligent, educated, ambitious, positive, and happy people who grew up in the sport, almost since birth. They are ecstatic to be serving the community and they’re exactly the kind of people we’ve always wished to have on our team. Most importantly, they are people with strong values who will serve you, the dog show community, with dedication and enthusiasm. To welcome Meeghan and Ryan and/or to discuss your 2021 advertising campaign plans, you may reach Meegan at 512-593- 5517 or meegan@showsightmagazine.com, and Ryan at 512-851- 1256 or ryan@showsightmagazine.com. We’ll look forward to seeing many of you at Lyndhurst Castle in Tarrytown, New York, for the 145th Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. The iconic show’s “summer season” is just another example of how things have changed. Let’s be grate- ful to the club and its members for their efforts to continue a tradition that honors the past while embracing the future. Wishing you a great day, everyday!

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

Photo by Dan Sayers

Liberty & Amy

Thank you Judges Mr. Ken Murray & Mr. James Moses RESERVE BIS WINNER • MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER • TOP 10 DOBERMAN 2020 DPCA TOP 20 FINALIST 2019 • 2021 TOP 20 CONTENDER Back-to-Back Group Ones

BREED JUDGES • MR. DOUGLAS R HOLLOWAY JR • JANE A MYERS • RICHARD W POWELL GROUP JUDGES • JAMES A MOSES • CLAY COADY • KEN MURRAY BEST IN SHOW JUDGE • MARY ANN ALSTON • RESERVE BEST IN SHOW GCHS CAROSEL V. EPIC SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIAL WAC CGC

BREEDERS & OWNERS • ERIC & LYNDA GLOFKA • EPIC DOBERMANS.COM • CO BREEDER • CAROL PETRUZZO

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING

GCHG Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend

THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. JUDITH A. BROWN AND MR. ROBERT E. HUTTON FOR RECOGNIZING HIS QUALITY.

the number one RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK BREED & ALL BREED*

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY

BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21

Samburu

BOOM! BACK IN THE RING FOR 6 WEEKS 2021 #1 MALTESE!

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

BRED, OWNED & HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN

2020 AKC BREEDER OF THE YEAR TOY GROUP HONOREE

WATCH FOR HIS PUPPIES SOON TO BE SHOWN!

MALTESE ALL BREED* # 1

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/21

SAMOYED

I N T C H B I S M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph C D X , R E , N A , C G C A , R O M

Thank you judges Mrs . Christie Martinez & Dr. Donald Gill

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

Owned by: Kay Backues , DVM 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by: Teresa Nail & Ray Lively

Bred By: Cecilia Martinez & Gwen Myers , DVM

AJAX

SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21

T H I S YOU N G S TA R L E T T E H A S B E E N A H I G H AC H I E V E R I N T H E S H OW R I N G GA R N E R I N G H E R G C H AT 7 MO N T H S W I T H G R P L AC E M E N T S A N D B I S O H W I N S A LO N G T H E WAY. J U S T 1 3 MO N T H S N OW, S H E CO N T I N U E S TO M AT U R E I N TO A T Y P E Y A N D S H OWY G I R L . S H E I S A R E S U LT O F M Y 7 T H G E N E R AT I O N I N M Y B R E E D I N G P R OG R A M . M A N Y T H A N K S TO H E R N UM E R OU S FA N S A N D S U P P O R T E R S A N D T H E E S T E E M E D J U D G E S WH O A R E AC K N OW L E D G I N G H E R QUA L I T I E S .

B R E E D E R / OW N E R / H A N D L E R C H E R I E M C D A N I E L

B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N

REH-PINS I AMCHARMED FOR CHERISTAR

B R E E D * *AKC STATS AS OF 5 / 22 / 2 1 * *AKC NOHS STATS AS OF 5 / 27/ 2 1 #2 #1 T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R S . H O U S T O N ( T O D D I E ) C L A R K O H M I N I AT U R E P I N S C H E R **

CHAMPION GRANDCRU LE PIN II Pinny © photo by greg

Bred by MELANIE STEELE RINDI GAUDET

Owned by DEBORAH BAHM ASHLIE WHITMORE

Handled by ASHLIE WHITMORE ALFONSO ESCOBEDO

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

*

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/21

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

W hy is side gait such an important characteristic of breed type? It is important simply because it proves the true structure of the dog. The correct profile is the most important breed characteristic of any breed. Why? Because we are to assess the dog as a whole, thus consid- ering all of the parts and how all of the parts relate, one to another, to make up the whole of the dog. As breeders, we must understand where the faults lie in each of our individual dogs because, as breeding stock, we must know what needs correcting in the next generation. With the long-awaited upstart of dog shows again, we are eagerly getting back to doing what we love to do—and that is to show dogs! Some of you are new to the sport and are trying to find your way in what can seem to be a complex new world. Hopefully, some of you have been in the sport for a very long time. This is a sport. It is a game we play, but a game, to us, that has a very serious outcome; the preservation of the many breeds of the purebred dog. As “show breeders,” we are charged with the preservation of our individual breeds for future generations of dog lovers to own and love these breeds as we do now. Do you think for even one minute that those who do not show their dogs, but either breed the occasional litter for fun and profit or who breed mostly for profit in order to supply the demand for the more popular breeds—and especially those who breed the exotic colors or patterns (which are NOT standard) or cross-breed two (or more!) breeds to dupe the public with “designer dogs” as “spe- cial” or “exotic” or “rare” to an uneducated public—would ever be able to answer the simple question, “What is your breed(s) most important breed characteristics? I would have to say the answer is NO. The important thing for all of us to remember is the purpose for which our breeds were developed and to do our very best to continual- ly breed toward these genes and not away from them. We must remain vigilant as we are battling for our very survival against the misinfor- mation concerning designer dogs and the propaganda of the animal rights movement. LET’S TALK ABOUT TYPE IN TWO BREEDS

AIREDALE TERRIER

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

WHAT HAS ALL OF THIS GOT TO DO WITH TYPE? In order to truly preserve a breed, we must preserve type in the breed. Type, simply defined, is the characteristics that make a breed what it is; unique from all other breeds. For some, type is what makes the dog appealing to the eye, but not necessarily able to per- form the duties for which it was developed. Correct movement in a breed cannot be separated from breed type. It is an integral part of type and is the final proof of correct structure in a breed. You simply cannot have one without the other. One can breed an exceptionally beautiful dog, dripping in “type,” but if it cannot move properly for its breed, it is actually lacking in the final way to provide the proof of its ability to fulfill its purpose. Even if the reason it were bred was to sit in a lady’s lap to draw fleas from her body to theirs, the dog still has to be able to move from the chair to the water and food bowls in order to sustain its very existence. All of this is leading up to what started me on this train of thought. How is it that some breeds can be so beautiful and pleas- ing to the eye, and yet look quite different from the dogs that were the origins of the breed? I will use my own two breeds as examples. THE GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG My first show dog was a German Shepherd Dog, purchased in 1969. A nobler dog I have never known than my beloved “Jalk.” Were this not so, I would not be here today—over 50 years later. I loved competing in the “sport of dogs” and enjoyed hunting (mostly quail) with a variety of breeds. (I actually had Brittanys before I had Corgis.) Alas, the reality of a divorce and moving away from home to start a career in an area with which I was unfamiliar made me turn to finding a smaller breed that could be better managed in a more restrictive setting. I had a few Shetland Sheepdogs, but realized I was not a dedicated enough groomer, and so I finally settled on the Corgi. I had both Corgi breeds for a while, and continued with my German Shepherd Dogs for about ten years, but finally settled on the Pembroke. This was mostly due to limitations on the number of dogs I could manage at that time. Over the years, I have added a new breed or two to my pack, simply because I liked the breed. Jalk (see Figure 1) is shown at my very first attempt to show a dog, at the German Shepherd Dog Club of Charleston’s “A” match on December 14, 1969. His sire was a German import, BIS AM/ CAN CH Dago v Sixtberg, SchH III, CD who had a good career in the US. Dago’s sire was two-time German Sieger in 1959 & 1960 (equivalent to BOB at the US National), Volker v. Zollgrenzschutz- Haus, SchH III, CACIB. He also acquired the World Sieger title in 1960. In the book, This is the German Shepherd Dog, Revised Edition , published in 1967, it is stated about Volker, “He himself is a living model of what a male Shepherd should be.” To this day, this is the dog I have in my mind as the ideal German Shepherd Dog. (See Figure 3.) Unlike the breeds seen in hieroglyphs and in ancient tombs, such as the sighthounds and various hunting dogs, the German Shep- herd Dog is a relatively new breed, developed in the late 1800s-early 1900s in Germany, mostly due to the vision of Captain Max von Stephanitz. He set the guidelines for the breed standard, and was the first president of the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (S.V.), the parent club of the breed in Germany. He used many of the techniques utilized by English dog breeders of the period. He was primarily interested in improving the German shepherding dogs because they were local and were the working dogs of his time used for moving livestock from one area to another in the times of fenceless grazing. Stephanitz enjoyed attending dog shows and observed that there were many different types of shepherding dogs in use in Germany, but there was no breed standardization.

Figure 1. Achtung’s Jalk vom Sixtberg, CD

Figure 2. BIS Am/Can CH Dago vom Sixtberg SchH III, CD

Figure 3. BIS Am/Can CH Dago vom Sixtberg SchH III, CD

B I S B I S S G C H W I N W E I M B R E I C A H A R L I N E P U R P L E R A I N

F rom her very first show under Mrs Danelle Brown, to her very first Breed win under Mrs Gloria Kerr, to her very first specialty win under Mrs Susan St John Brown, to her First Best in Show under Mrs Loraine Boutwell.

With appreciation, we wish to thank each and every Judge who has recognized our Dream Girl ...

Always Proudly Presented By Owner Susan Line | Owners Susan Line & TJ Palmer

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

Figure 4a. Horand von Grafath S.Z.1 1

covering the maximum amount of ground with the minimum number of steps. At a walk it covers a great deal of ground, with long stride of both hind legs and forelegs. At a trot the dog covers still more ground with even longer stride, and moves powerfully but easily, with coor- dination and balance so that the gait appears to be the steady motion of a well-lubricated machine. The feet travel close to the ground on both forward reach and backward push. In order to achieve ideal movement of this kind, there must be good muscular development and ligamentation. The hindquarters deliver, through the back, a power- ful forward thrust which slightly lifts the whole animal and drives the body forward. Reaching far under, and passing the imprint left by the front foot, the hind foot takes hold of the ground; then hock, stifle and upper thigh come into play and sweep back, the stroke of the hind leg finishing with the foot still close to the ground in a smooth follow-through. The overreach of the hindquarter usually necessitates one hind foot passing outside and the other hind foot passing inside the track of the forefeet, and such action is not faulty unless the loco- motion is crabwise with the dog’s body sideways out of the normal straight line. Transmission—The typical smooth, flowing gait is maintained with great strength and firmness of back. The whole effort of the hindquarter is transmitted to the forequarter through the loin, back and withers. At full trot, the back must remain firm and level without sway, roll, whip or roach. Unlevel topline with withers lower than the hip is a fault. To compensate for the forward motion imparted by the hindquarters, the shoulder should open to its full extent. The forelegs should reach out close to the ground in a long stride in harmony with that of the hindquarters. The dog does not track on widely separated parallel lines, but brings the feet inward toward the middle line of the body when trotting, in order to maintain balance. The feet track closely but do not strike or cross over. Viewed from the front, the front legs function from the shoulder joint to the pad in a straight line. Viewed from the rear, the hind legs function from the hip joint to the pad in a straight line. ” What I would like to see in the ring is a German Shepherd Dog to be shown, at least for a short while, on a loose lead while “the head is forward rather than up and but little higher than the top of the shoulders.” It amazes me that so many of these dogs are shown strung up, charging out in front of the handler with the feet, especially in front and usually also in the rear, high in the air. The standard clearly states three times that the feet travel close to the ground, which I have emphasized in the paragraphs above. This is important because what is always desired of a dog in motion is that it expends as little energy as possible when going from point A to point B. If the feet are high in the air, much more energy is expended in order to do so. Another point that is not often seen is when the dog is in motion, the back should be firm and LEVEL (defined as a flat surface at right angles to the plumb line). This judge would simply like the dog to be shown, at least once, on a loose lead with the head and feet not high up in the air, and with a level topline. I often ask for this, but unfortunately, the majority of the dogs shown have not been trained to do anything other than a flat out run. I often ask those who attend my seminars on structure and movement if they have ever read the German Shepherd Dog breed standard. If they answer no, why not? I tell them, simply, it is one of the best written standards in the world. This breed has gone through a lot of changes in the 50 years I’ve been watching it. For quite a while, I feared that the breed was going to be lost due to an over emphasis on side gait alone and not much attention paid to the rest of the dog. It is interesting to me that this should be the case with any breed. It is usually the other way around—so much

Figure 4b. Horand von Grafath S.Z.1 (Hektor Linksrhein) as Drawn by Ernest Hart.2

He greatly admired those dogs with a wolf-like appearance and prick ears that were intelligent, had sharp senses and a willingness to work. He believed that he could create a better working dog that could then be used throughout Germany. When Captain von Stephanitz and his friend, Artur Meyer, were attending one of the first all-breed dog shows ever held, they saw a dog that was the per- fect example of their vision of the Shepherd breed they wanted to establish. The dog’s name was Hektor Linksrhein. To them, he rep- resented the true native working dog of Germany. Stephanitz pur- chased the dog on the spot for his Grafrath Kennel and renamed the dog Horan von Grafrath. He became the first registered Ger- man Shepherd Dog, S.Z.1. 1. (See Figures 4a & 4b.) The German Shepherd Dog has undergone many changes worldwide, but I think that those breeders in the US who are the true preservation breeders have done a good job in keeping the same make and shape as those early dogs in the breed. Worldwide, the breed has been separated into several different styles from different geographical areas—and there is a definite split between the “working” lines and the “show” lines that have become the norm, similar to what has happened with the show and field lines in the hunting dogs. The GSDCA (AKC) Standard for the breed devotes 444 words (out of a total of 1,861 words) to the description of the movement required of the breed. This is the breed known worldwide for its ground-covering side gait, but the standard states that “Faults of gait, whether from front, rear or side, are to be considered very seri- ous faults.” As a judge, I well know that the GSD, to be correctly evaluated, needs a larger ring than is normal. For many years, most of the breed have been shown charging around the ring with heads in the air and toplines sloping downward toward the rear, which is not exactly what the standard calls for in the gaiting section. It does state under the “Neck, Topline, Body” section: “When the dog is at attention or excited, the head is raised and the neck car- ried high; otherwise typical carriage of the head is forward rather than up and but little higher than the top of the shoulders, par- ticularly in motion.” The section on Gait states: “ General Impression—The gait is outreaching, elastic, seemingly without effort, smooth and rhythmic,

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/21

WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

breeder strives for—preservation of what allowed the dog to fulfill its original purpose, and improvement on what can be improved, mostly in the health clearances that we find in the era of DNA. THE PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI Another more extreme example in changes from original type involve the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. I purchased my first Pembroke in 1977; a deep red and white bitch that had already been shown to her championship. CH Oldlands Pennywise began a new chapter in my life that continues to this day. (See Figure 5.) Please Note: Much of the historic information and some of the photos used here were gleaned from a scrapbook put together by Geraldine Rockefeller Dodge, the patroness of the Morris and Essex dog shows held in the 1930s–1950s. I was fortunate enough to purchase this scrapbook and it is one of my cherished posses- sions. Mrs. Dodge clipped photos, articles, and advertisements from magazines, published in both the US and in the UK, as well as many columns printed in the club sections from the PWCCA. It is my understanding that she had many scrapbooks on many dif- ferent breeds about which she was interested to learn more. The first Pembrokes came off the farms of Wales and into public awareness in the early 1900s. Even though the Corgi was considered to be an ancient breed, it was little-known outside of the neighboring counties that produced them. (See Figure 6.) In 1925, the Kennel Club recognized the Welsh Corgi, but it was not until 1934 that the Kennel Club granted separate registrations and status as individual breeds for the two varieties of Welsh Corgi: the Cardigan and the Pembroke. The Cardigan and the Pembroke would—from that point forward—be shown in separate classes as different breeds instead of together as two varieties of one breed. Marcus de Bye (1639-1688) was a seventeenth century Dutch etcher and painter of animals who studied art in The Hague under Jacob van der Does. Like his teacher, he began his career by etching both landscapes and animal depictions. However, throughout most of his career, he dedicated himself to animal studies after the designs of Markus Gerard and, most particularly, Paulus Potter. I believe from my research that this etching was entitled, “The Fat Spitzhund.” The first Pembroke Corgis acquired from the Welsh crofters were very different from the dogs we know today. (See Figure 7.) Through the years, the breed has changed from the feisty Terrier- like dogs bought from the Welsh crofters who used them as all- around farm dogs and drovers of livestock (Black Welsh Cattle, hogs, geese) both on the farm and to the local markets. One duty mentioned in early writings was to “go before the cattle in the morning” to drive off the livestock wandering into the unfenced area that was allowed by the crown for use by his master. The Cor- gi was small and an easy keeper, and also acquitted himself well for vermin control on the farm (from badger to fox to weasel). I found it quite amusing that in a description of the Welsh Corgi in a long ago magazine (I have no idea if it was in the US or Britain, as a photo of the Corgi in Figure 8 was from Mrs. Dodge’s scrapbook, but I lean to the latter), the following paragraph appears under the photograph of Crymmych President: “ It has been stated that this little fellow was evolved by breeding between a Sealyham Terrier and a Border Terrier, and if the dogs are compared, some similarity will be noticed. One thing is certain: that the dog has been known in the Welsh hills for centuries. Like all Terrier types, he is a game little hunter and, being low to the ground, can move where a longer-legged dog is beaten. There are two fixed types exhibited at the shows to-day, the ‘Cardigan’ and the ‘Pembrokeshire.’ ” This statement was sim- ply untrue, but it can show how easily trying to research a breed can lead to confusion! In my study of the breed, I have found a

Figure 5. CH Oldlands Pennywise CD

Figure 6. Perhaps the earliest portrait of a Corgi? (Dated 1650.)

Figure 7. The First British Champion, Shan Fach (by CH Bowhit Pepper out of Shan, whelped January 22, 1928)

emphasis is placed on standing type and beauty (especially of the head) that movement is neglected to the point that it is almost impossible to find a specimen that moves as the breed should. In German Shepherds, sound temperaments were being lost as was clean movement coming and going. I am pleased that dogs are looking more like males these days and not as feminine as it had seemed for a while. This is quite important in a breed that asks for “ secondary sex characteristics are strongly marked, and every animal gives a definite impression of masculinity or femininity, according to its sex. ” I am very happy to see the breed regaining the respect it deserves in the sport after many cycles of what seemed to be a slow degeneration of a noble breed. But this is what being a preservation

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21

GREAT DANE

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

Figure 9. From left to right: CH Golden Girl, Rozavel Lady Supreme, CH Bowit Bisco, CH Crymmych President, CH Shan Fach, and (not yet CH) Rozavel Red Dragon-as a puppy.

Figure 8. CH Crymmych President

few more references to the Pembroke having an infusion of Terrier somewhere along the way and, as time progressed, these references were left out and their true use as a farm dog was acknowledged. In 1931, the remarkable rise of the popularity of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi began and was further boosted when, in 1933, King George VI (then still Duke of York) acquired a Pembroke puppy for the then Princess Elizabeth (Figure 10), sired by CH Crymmych President (Figures 8 & 9) out of CH Rozavel Golden Girl (Figure 9). There have been many comments concerning the changes in the color of the breed as well as the lengthening in outline over the years. Some people seem to think that the original color was a deep red with few white markings. I found that the picture shown above put to rest the fact that there was little white on all of the early dogs. The dogs in the photo are all from the most well-known kennel of Pembroke Welsh Corgis at the time, Rozavel Kennels, owned by Mrs. Thelma Gray (nee Evans), taken from an advertisement in December 1933. I was surprised the very first time I saw photos of the early Pembrokes. The outline of the modern Pembroke Welsh Corgi is very different from the dogs brought from the crofts of Wales. The length of leg has shortened over the decades and the modern dogs have more substance than the early dogs. I was curious about these changes; the Cardigan of long ago could still be recognized as a Cardigan Welsh Corgi, but I doubt that one of the early Pembrokes would get a second look in the ring today. On my first trip to the UK to attend Crufts, in 1988, I was invited to visit Pat Curties of Lees Pembroke (and Cardigan) Welsh Corgi fame. At that time, she had been involved with the breed for nearly 60 years. I asked her what she thought had brought on these changes in the breed. She said that she thought much of it, especially that the improvement in substance in the breed was brought about by the improvement in canine nutrition after World War II. This seemed to be a very logical explanation to me. Since then, I have had some very good discussions with longtime Pem- broke breeder and judge, Simon Parsons, who is a wealth of knowledge on the history of the breed in the UK and beyond. Simon thought that the change began with the improvement in the front assembly, the increased breadth of which added to the overall length of the body. The final illustration (Figure 11) is from Popular Dogs in 1958 with a photo serving as an illustrated standard for the breed type of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi at that time. So, there we have it; two very different breeds, at first glance, but both exhibit many shared characteristics. The Corgi was first described to me as being similar to the German Shepherd Dog, but with very short legs! The ancient Corgi has certainly changed, hope- fully, for the better, and the younger German Shepherd Dog still carries on the basic make and shape of the original, purposefully developed German shepherding dogs. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if breed character has been maintained in both of them. Please note that this article is written from the experiences of and the opinions formed by the author and is not an official statement of the PWCCA or the GSDCA. Much of the information on the Corgi was first published in a DVD produced by the author titled, “Structure and Movement in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi.” For questions or comments, or to schedule a seminar on structure and movement, I may be reached via e-mail: jimanie@welshcorgi.com.

Figure 10

Figure 11. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi, c. 1958

“THE ANCIENT CORGI HAS CERTAINLY CHANGED, HOPEFULLY, FOR THE BETTER, AND THE YOUNGER GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG STILL CARRIES ON THE BASIC MAKE AND SHAPE OF THE ORIGINAL, PURPOSEFULLY

References: The German Shepherd Dog in Word and Picture, (American Edition) v Stephanitz ©1923

This is the German Shepherd, Goldbecker/Hart ©1967 The Pembrokeshire Corgi Clifford L. B. Hubbard ©1957 The Corgi, Mrs. Thelma Gray ©1952 The Welsh Corgi Pembrokeshire and Cardiganshire, Thelma Gray

DEVELOPED GERMAN SHEPHERDING DOGS.”

Champion

FLEETFIRE NOVAHEART Loki of Mischief

LOKI

Thank you judge MRS. NANCY SMITH HAFNER

BREEDERS & OWNERS: IVANOWA ORAN & MS. MARY SCHROEDER EXCLUSIVELY SHOWN BY KIMBERLY LOURIER

FRENCH BULLDOG

IS IT TIME FOR CHANGE?

O ver the past few years, a great deal of change has taken place in the dog show world. The National Owner-Han- dled Series has been added to many shows and is grow- ing every day. COVID-19 hit our country, causing the cancellation of thousands of events. Following the resumption of shows, we have seen many new protocols put into place, such as the wearing of masks, social distancing, a change in ring procedures, judges now not only marking their books but also pull- ing and handing out the ribbons, the Groups being divided into sections to allow for social distancing, the return to various outdoor/indoor undercover venues and, due to the reduction in the number of shows, a significant entry increase for many of the shows being held throughout the country. These changes have had a huge impact on the running of shows. Most shows start judging at 8:00 in the morning and, in many cases, Best in Show is not being com- pleted until 7:00 to 8:00 at night. Currently, judges are limited to a maximum of 175 dogs per day. But with many doing regular and Owner-Handled Groups, today’s judges may be judging between 200-275 per day. For many judges, this can mean anywhere from 8 to 11 hours a day standing, bending over, and judging. Those of us who do judge know that this means the day is not only physically demanding, but also mentally demanding. Calculate it over a three- to four-day period, and it is truly strenuous. Following the show, the judges barely have time to shower, eat dinner, and review their standards for the next day before they grab a few hours of sleep and are back at it the next day. BY WALTER J. SOMMERFELT

THOSE OF US WHO DO JUDGE KNOW THAT THIS MEANS THE DAY IS NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY DEMANDING , BUT ALSO MENTALLY DEMANDING.

Presented by Joanne Thibault

T AYL O R AM GCHS / CAN GCH

SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM BRED AND OWNED BY ROSLYN ESKIND, SEABURY (REG’D) PWDS CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

2 0 2 1

number one

C A N E C O R S O *

2 0 2 0

number one

C A N E C O R S O B R E E D A N D A L L B R E E D **

2 0 2 0 C A N E C O R S O C L U B O F A M E R I C A

Dog of the Year H E I S T H E 7 T H C A N E C O R S O T O H AV E A C H I E V E D H I S P L AT I N U M G R A N D C H A M P I O N S H I P

P H O T O G R A P H S BY P H Y L L I S E N S L E Y P H O T O G R A P H Y A N D S A M A N T H A B E T TA M P H O T O G R A P H Y

CANE CORSO

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21 **AKC STATS 2020

I C E YC R E E KC A N E C O R S O . C O M I C E YC R E E KC C @ G M A I L . C O M

OWN E D BY J O H N & S U Z E T T E B O E H M S A N D LY N S I S A N C H E Z

B R E D BY S H A U N A D E M O S S A N D A N N E T T E G A L L I H E R

P R E S E N T E D BY L A U R A C O O M E S A N D J A S O N S TA R R

R B I S B I S S G C H P C A S T L E G U A R D S P I R I T R I D G E M AG I C A L S E B E C F D C T T R AT S C G C A C G C U sebec Sebec

NORWICH TERRIER

4 X B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R 2 0 2 0 & NUMBER ONE I R I S H T E R R I E R I N 2 0 2 0 * SPRING 2021 CONAR’ S WINS MONTICELLO KC J ACQUEL I NE STACY (G2 ) , MARCH 1 4 KC OF ANNE ARUNDEL JOE WALTON, APR I L 1 KC OF ANNE ARUNDEL EL I ZABETH MUTHARD, APR I L 2 TROY KC DR . JOHN IOI A , APR I L 1 0 TRAP FALLS KC STEVE HAYDEN, APR I L 1 1 HARRI SBURG KC BR I AN BOGART ( PROV I S IONAL ) , APR I L 1 4 LEBANON COUNTY KC DR . DAN I EL DOWL I NG, APR I L 1 6 HARRI SBURG KC RODNEY HERNER , APR I L 1 7 MASON & DIXON KC TODDI E HOUSTON CLARK , APR I L 1 8 WI LMINGTON KC JOHN CONSTANT I NE-AMODE I , APR I L 30 UNION COUNTY KC JUL I E FELTEN, MAY 27 STATEN I SLAND KC AL I CE M. WATK I NS , MAY 29 PLAINF I ELD KC J AN R I TCHI E GLADSTONE , MAY 30 PLAINF I ELD KC APR I L CLYDE , MAY 3 1 J AMI E HUBBARD, MAY 3 1

THANK YOU JUDGES JUL I E FELTON, AL ICE M. WATKINS , JAN RITCHI E GLADSTONE , AND APRI L CLYDE

B R E D B Y : T E R R I VA N D E Z A N D E

H A N D L E D B Y : J A M E S D I C K S O N

OW N E D B Y : N I N A WA R R E N

IRISH TERRIER

B R E E Z Y ’ S C H A R M I N G C O N A R T I S T G C H G M E R R Y M A C Z T R I K I N G X C H B R E E Z Y ’ S H O T T O P I C silver grand champion

NUMBER TWO I R I S H T E R R I E R *

M U LT I P L E S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R M U LT I P L E G R O U P P L A C E M E N T S G R O U P W I N N E R

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/21

AM E R I C A’ S N UM B E R ON E Giant Schnauzer * BAYOU

T H A N K YOU J U D G E S W O R K I N G G R O U P - M R . C H A R L E S L . O L V I S B E S T I N S H O W - M R S . P O L L Y D . S M I T H

Handled by Alfonso Escobedo and Ashlie Whitmore

*A KC S TAT S A S O F 4 / 3 0 / 2 1

GIANT SCHNAUZER

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW SILVER GRAND CHAMPION L AGN I A P P E ’ S From the Mountains to the Bayou Owned by Holly & Chris Reed and Laurie & Mike Mason Bred by Holly & Chris Reed, Maryann Biseglia, and Mike Reese

VIZSLA

4422 PEET ST, MIDDLEPORT, NY 14105 CELL: 716-863-5979 • LANDLINE: 716-735-3161 BRASSLITE3@AOL.COM • WWW.BRASSLITEARABIANS.COM BRASS LITE Sussex Spaniels

Mia

Champion BRASS LITE’S KEEP MIA CLASSY N SASSY CGC TKN

Brass Lite Sussex Spaniels

BRED & OWNED BY KATIE TUTTLE

SPANIEL (SUSSEX)

Oliver

Silver GrandChampion CH LABRY BERRY DEPECH MODE CGCA TKN

PROUDLY OWNED BY KATIE TUTTLE HANDLED BY MICHELLE SMITH WOLCOTT, CELL: 570-656-2218

LEADERS HAVE A MINDSET THAT INVOLVES PREPARATION AND A PRESENTATION PLAN SHOWING FOR THE LONG-TERM T here are two kinds of people in this world. There are leaders and there are followers. Which are you? If you’ve been in the world of dogs for a while, BY LEE WHITTIER All photos are courtesy of Lee Whittier.

you know that the exhibitors who are most suc- cessful in the sport are leaders who are forecasting into the future. They have a mindset that involves preparation and a long-term performance plan. Leaders take action. Successful exhibitors understand that prepara- tion is key. Preparation is a vital process that runs on a continuum, from the planning of litters to planning a show schedule. Preparation is establish- ing a solid foundation, which involves far more than pulling the dog off the couch the day before the show to give it a bath.

PREPARATION INCLUDES STEPS FOR BOTH YOU AND YOUR DOG. COMMAND A LEADERSHIP ROLE WITH EVERY ACTION STEP THAT YOU PLAN AND EXECUTE. YOUR DOG NEEDS TO BE SOCIALIZED WITH PEOPLE OUTSIDE ITS HOME HOUSEHOLD, AS WELL AS WITH DOGS THAT ARE OF BOTH THE SAME AND DIFFERENT BREEDS.

Kazuri’s All I Want For Christmas MBIS BISS GCHB BRED & OWNED BY SARAH SWEETMAN, MICHAEL & KAREN KURTZNER EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY MICHAEL KURTZNER #1 Beagle * #2 #13 Breed * Hound *

THANK YOU JUDGES DR. DONALD GILL BIS – NORTHWEST ARKANSAS KC APRIL 25, 2021 MS. JOANNE BUEHLER BIS – SOUTH HILLS KC MAY 1, 2021

NICK

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND GRATITUDE TO ALL THE JUDGES: MR. NEIL MCDEVITT, MR. RAYMOND V. FILBURN JR, MRS. BARBARA DEMPSEY ALDERMAN, MR. HAL T. BIERMANN, MR. TIMOTHY CATTERSON, MR. ALLEN L. ODEM, MRS. LINDA HURLEBAUS, MR. JOHN P. WADE, MR. DANA P. CLINE, MR. THOMAS KIRSTEIN, MR. JAMES MITCHELL, MR. ROBERT FROST, MR. CHARLES L. OLVIS, MRS. LORI L. NELSON, MR. MICHAEL CANALIZO, MR. DAVID BOLUS, MRS. ANNE SAVORY BOLUS

BEAGLE (OVER 13 IN.)

PREPARATION, TRAINING, AND CONDITION Present your dog as though he was about to win Best in Show at Westminster! In the spring of 2020, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, lead- ers started to create plans for puppies on the way, and for those in the whelping box or the young hopefuls. Even exhibitors with limited experience realized that they needed to set up a plan. It was essential to get their dogs out into the public to expose them to new, interesting, and unfamiliar or even scary things. These pup- pies were ready to perform once dog shows restarted. I recently interviewed a successful owner handler who had less than two years in the sport. Early last year, he set up a schedule to take his puppies to home improvement and farm stores. He prac- ticed his training routine with his puppies in the lumber area, to get them used to loud noises and smells that he couldn’t duplicate at home. It doesn’t necessarily take experience to create a successful plan. It takes action. In the example above, the exhibitor was just start- ing out in the sport when he created his plan. He demonstrated that he takes the sport of dog shows seriously and is committed to participating long-term. What is remarkable about his plan, (though he didn’t say this) is that, I think, he also set a training schedule for himself in the art of table presentation, the free stack, and his own cadence and foot timing. His work was duly rewarded as he finished his two puppies quickly with 5-point majors! His young puppies walked into the ring confidently, happy, and striding out in a breed-appropriate gait. He walked alongside them with a poise that lent them self- confidence. His strategies provided leadership to his puppies, and the confidence that he’d gained during the practice sessions trav- eled down the lead to his puppies. Another example of dogs needing us to take the lead is with Mary. Mary is a Dog Show Mentor member who shared with me that she was working through a training issue with her dog. She wondered why her dog was taking more steps than he had previ- ously taken to reach the stop and stand at the end of the individual evaluation. Through the use of video, she understood, in a flash, the reason. She was taking more steps than she used to, and the dog was matching her steps. She realized that she had lost some of her fitness, which had caused her to slow down a bit. Having identified the issue, as the leader, she adjusted her steps—and so did the dog. This demonstrates the trend that recognizes that our dogs mimic us. When we take three steps, they take three steps.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DON’T DO THE PREPARATION AND TRAINING?

As a longtime breeder, I’ve observed that there are three kinds of puppies. The first group is bomb-proof, nothing bothers them; the second group, and the predominant portion of the lit- ter, turn out well when properly socialized and trained; the third group, if present, will not be great citizens, no matter the amount of socialization. There is current research that demonstrates how nearly all the puppies in a litter will fall into the first group, if appropriate neona- tal stimulation practices are applied. So, the answer to the question above is—it depends. What do you do as a breeder/owner/handler? What kind of exposure do you give your puppies and young dogs? Maybe you’re the breeder who does it all, and all the puppies turn out with perfectly balanced temperaments. I ask myself as a judge, mentor, and breeder/exhibitor: Who are the breeders who have raised the dogs in the ring that are hesitant, confused, and uncertain? And which breeders do owner handlers purchase these dogs from? These owner handlers either haven’t done adequate research into breeders and/or the breeders aren’t ade- quately educating their puppy buyers in how to train and socialize their puppies. We don’t know what the core cause is, nor can we identify each puppy or dog’s issue; however, there are some tips that I can pro- vide from a judge’s perspective. I’m not normally concerned about any particular breed. My first breed is Rottweilers, which I bred for twenty-five years. I have a lot of experience in “reading” dogs. So, when a medium or large breed is not adequately trained to stand, and when the handler doesn’t take control of their dog’s head, per- haps drops the lead, or the dog’s posture is leaning away with wide eyes, yes, I feel at risk. When the handler asks me to, “please try again, she’s friendly,” and I’m not seeing “friendly” in body posture or eyes, and then the handler tells me that she couldn’t socialize their dog last year—I continue to feel concern for my safety. It is critical to learn how to take control of the dog, especially the head. The head controls the dog. I would certainly “try again” if the dog was stacked and the exhibitor demonstrated that they knew how to, and subsequently did, take control of the situation. That would likely end on a posi- tive note for the dog, the handler, and the judge. Please don’t expect the judge to do your dog training for you. It’s not fair to your dog or to the judge. I am sometimes baffled at the number of exhibitors who actually tell me that they are using dog shows as a handling class.

CONDITION INCLUDES YOUR DOG’S FITNESS, WEIGHT, AND RESPONSIVENESS.

BASSET HOUND

Ruby

OWNED BY JENNIFER PORTER DELMER

CO-OWNED & BRED BY JAIME BRAGG

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21 BREED * #8 ALL BREED * #4

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE

CH DELL-ROSS BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES X CH OVERO PINKALICIOUS AX OAJ

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R . J A M E S M O S E S

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N E R

Looking For Top Gun

GCH Bon Idèe’s Quantico

# 1 B O U V I E R * # 2 A L L B R E E D *

B R E D A N D OWN E D BY A N G I E MOT TA A N D B R E N DA WAT S O N P R O F E S S I O N A L LY P R E S E N T E D BY C A R LO S C A R R I Z O A S S I S T E D BY S O N O H O YA M A DA

B O N I D È E B O U V I E R S B O N I D E E B O U V@ YA H O O . C OM

*A KC S TAT S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 2 1

BOUVIER DES FLANDRES

B e s t i n S p e c i a l t y a n d M u l t i p l e G r o u p W i n n i n g A C D

Biss gchb hiredhand smokehouse

THANK YOU J UDGE MR . J AMES MI TCHELL

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

# 1 AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG * OWNER HANDLED # 4 BREED *

BREEDER CONN I E HAYES H I REDHAND AUSTRAL I AN CAT TLE DOGS OWNER HANDLER KENT WE I NHE IMER HOLDEN , MA FLSTC2 00@YAHOO . COM

CAND I D PHOTOGRAPHY BY © MI A S PEC I ALE

*AKC STATS AS OF 5/31/21

CH ALTA OCEANS TITANIC

VALERIE NILSSON

EXPERTLY PRESENTED & CHAMPIONED UNDER ANNA STROMBERG

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ©SARAH MURPHY

ALTA MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERDS

CH ALTA CS CHAMPAGNE ON ICE

MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

A

DAM OF CH ALTA OCEANS TITANIC & CH ALTA CS CHAMPAGNE ON ICE GCHG CH ALTA OCEANA SIREN OF THE SEA

BISS GCHS CH WYNDBRAE’S TRAILBLAZING TOBIAS

Mu l t i p l e Bre ed & Group Wi ns | We s tmi ns t e r I nv i t e e

OWNED & LOVED BY: Nancy A. Rasor

BRED BY: Pamela G. Whiting DVM & Winnie Noble

PROFESSIONALLY PRESENTED BY: Jorge & Susie Olivera

WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIER

2 0 2 0 NUMBE R TWO WE S T I E *

TRAINING ENCOMPASSES BOTH YOU AS THE HANDLER AND, BY EXTENSION, YOUR DOG IN THE CHOREOGRAPHY OF RING PRESENTATION. THAT COMPOSITION INCLUDES LEARNING HOW TO PRESENT YOUR DOG’S DENTITION TO THE JUDGE, AND HOW TO WALK OR RUN IN A WAY THAT ENHANCES YOUR DOG’S BREED-SPECIFIC GAIT, PRACTICING HOW TO STAND FOR EXAM, AND HOW TO STAND OUT!

Tips:

When exhibitors with under-trained, under-socialized dogs are not stepping in as leaders for their dogs, they become allocated to the role of followers. They have allowed their dogs to make the decisions. The dogs are in control. SHOW UP PREPARED TO EXECUTE AS PLANNED Picture in your mind how you want your dog to behave, not what you fear might happen. Here is a common scenario that I have observed: The handler is concerned because he knows his dog doesn’t stand well for exam. In a vicious cycle, the dog becomes more anxious as he is picking up on the handler’s unease. I ask you, do you bring out the best (or the worst) in your dog? What energy are you transmitting to your dog? Are you confident or anxious? If you are in the sport of dog shows for the long game, consider what you have to do to get your dog into a position to win. As leaders, we must implement a mindset that facilitates preparation and a long-term plan. Before you go to your next show, create an action plan and retrain your dog. Do the preparation that will allow you to step into the ring with full confidence. Show up prepared to execute as planned. Be a leader for your dog so that he can rely on you to make the next ring experience a good one; actually, let me restate—a brilliant one!

If you’re having a problem with showing an anxious dog: 1. Keep the collar/lead in your hand. 2. Take control of the

head—the head controls the dog. 3. Put the bait away.

ABOUT LEE WHITTIER

Ms. Lee Whittier has been involved in the sport of purebred dogs for over three decades. Her involvement began as an owner, exhibitor and, subsequently, a breeder of Rottweilers. She has owned Akitas, Bullmastiffs, and a Sussex Spaniel. She currently owns, breeds, and exhibits Tibetan Terriers. Ms. Whittier began judging in 2000, and then took a hiatus for several years to work for the American Kennel Club as an Executive Field Representative in the Pacific Northwest. She returned to judging in 2011, and currently judges the Working, Terrier, Toy, and Non-Sporting Groups, eleven Hound Breeds, six Sporting Breeds, Bouvier des Flandres, and Best in Show. Ms. Whittier has judged dog shows around the world, from the United States to Asia, at shows large and small; all of great importance to each and every exhibitor. Some of the larger shows are Westminster Kennel Club, Kennel Club of Philadelphia, Del Valle, Great Western Terrier Association, Northern California Terrier Association, Hatboro, Malibu Kennel Club, and the Kennel Club of Palm Springs. Ms. Lee Whittier is a standing member of Dog Fanciers of Oregon, the American Rottweiler Club, and the Tibetan Terrier Club of America. She is Show Chair for Vancouver Kennel Club and the Terrier Association of Oregon’s January show with Rose City Classic. As an active member in numerous clubs, she has worked in the capacity of Show Chair, President, Vice-President, Secretary, Board Member, and Constitution & By-Laws Revision Committee Member.

In addition to judging, Ms. Whittier developed the Dog Show Mentor program, exclusively for owner handlers. This is an online program where owner handlers of all stages and levels learn to develop an individual, strategic approach to showing dogs. She also travels to speak to owner handlers all over the world. She currently lives in Vancouver, Washington, with her husband, Wayne, and their three Tibetan Terriers. Her other interests include gardening and hiking with the dogs.

NORFOLK TERRIER

ALESSANDRA FOLZ RISSANA WEIMARANERS BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? This question always makes me mildly uncomfortable because I don’t have an easy answer for it! My father was a colonel in the US Air Force, and by the time I came along he was a squadron commander and a “red-phone-can’t-tell-you-I’d-have- to-kill-you” kind of military person. I always believed he was something between Batman (he would disappear for long periods of time, and was working below ground for a while) and Snoopy fighting the Red Baron. Long story short, I was born in Landstuhl, Germany. We lived in several different small towns in Germany, and then, in Mons, Belgium, Belleville, Illinois, and Woodstock, Connecticut. Do you come from a doggy family? If not, how did the interest in breeding and show- ing purebred dogs begin? My mother (Patricia Folz) started breeding Vizslas in 1970. We had two old Vizslas from her first breedings when we lived in Europe, but she didn’t get more dogs while we lived overseas. The European style of Vizslas, at that time, was incred- ibly different from the style in the United States, and she wanted dogs that would be competitive in the AKC show ring. So, when we returned to the US, my mom set about finding a new Vizsla. Now, I don’t know how many of you have ever lived in Belleville, Illinois—and not to throw any shade—but at the time, it wasn’t exactly the height of cultural interest and activity for a family that had just come from Europe. And it was truly in that artistic vacuum that my love for this sport was born. Necessity really is the mother of invention. Who were your mentors in the sport? Please elaborate on their influence. I have been so lucky to have had amazing mentors in this sport. I know that I was partly helped by being a truly interested kid, so adults were willing to share

GOLD Grand Champion • Multiple Group Placements RB I S GCHG CH CORNERSTONES ANTHEM OF NOEL

& Carol Herr Breed & All Breed 15" Bitch * # 1 Beagle

Westminster BOS winner 2021 Thank you judge Ms. Bonnie P. Threlfall

Handler: Carol Herr Breeder/Owner: Paul Hines, Nashville, TN

*AKC stats as of 4/30/21

BEAGLE (OVER 13 IN.)

ALESSANDRA FOLZ, RISSANA WEIMARANERS

Patrick Pettit

Ch. Rissana Hillwood’s Perfectly Tuned going BISS from the classes, sitting with my baby nephew, Ronan.

My mother also has an uncanny ability for whelping puppies. In all our years of breeding, we have only ever had (knock on wood), two C-sections. She could get puppies out of a stone. And dead puppies simply come alive in her hands. I always tell people that the three of us are in charge of different departments; my sister runs stud dogs, my mom runs breedings, and I run the showing department. My second mentor would have to be my best friend, my sister, Sosanna. She is three years older than I am, and we competed against each other in Juniors and in the breed ring at every single show. We were fierce with each other inside the ring gates, but when we walked out, we were just sisters again. We didn’t and don’t harbor grudges against each other. We both understand that we are work- ing toward the improvement of our own line of dogs. She’s a better handler than I am, and is always nurturing that one special puppy toward perfection. I know that I am luckier than most to have a built-in group of “peeps” around me, who cannot and will not betray each other, something that I know can be a painful part of this sport. The first handling class I went to was at the Belle-City Kennel Club, run by a lady named Grace Church. She gave me a beginner’s packet that I still have today. She was very much about the correct way to show your breed—and your dog. There was no grandstanding. There was just the proper way to do things. It was the finest foundation in handling anyone has ever had. And then another hugely influential person entered my life: Patrick Pettit. He taught me about the art and joy in showing dogs; the presentation of beauty, and most of all, Drama. He taught me tips and tricks, and always with a gleam in his eye. He bred curvaceous Whippets under the kennel name Patric. And we were there, every week, come rain or shine, driving to St. Louis for handling class. And every week, after class, we would all go to the restaurant down the street for dinner. And I sat still, was as quiet as was possible for me, and just listened. It was devastating for me when he died. I wish he was here to help me and to see what I’ve accomplished. He was someone who believed in me so much that it made me believe in myself. It was in the Midwest that my love for Weimaraners was also born. We only had one Vizsla when we started showing in the US, but my mom had made a friend, Kelly Lovejoy (also a military wife living in Belleville), who had come back from being stationed in Germany with two Weims, and at one time had

their knowledge with me without feeling threatened. Through years of moving to new schools and being thrown into new environments, I had already per- fected the secret to getting great mentorship; sit still, be quiet, and listen. I am always bemused by people who claim to be unable to find “good” mentors or find that people are unwilling to share their knowl- edge. Mentors don’t have a curriculum for people to follow. Being mentored takes time and patience— something in short supply lately. My first mentor was, obviously, my mother. She has a keen eye for a dog, and is unflinchingly merci- less when it comes to our own breeding program. It is the single greatest lesson I ever learned from her. I had a Vizsla puppy that was 10 months old, and I was 12 years old when I showed her to Best of Win- ners at the National. Being a kid, this clearly made her perfection on a lead. Well, after that, I couldn’t get a point on her to save my life! One car ride home from a show where we had lost miserably again, I was lamenting about all of the terrible judges who were all “such idiots.” My mother slammed on the brakes and pulled the car over onto the gravel (I can see it in my mind, to this day). She turned around, looked at me, and with steel in her voice said, “Do you really want to know why she lost?” “Yes,” I replied. “Get out of the car, then.” She got my puppy out of the back of the car with a show lead on her, and made me watch as she took her down and back. Twice. And there it was; a front you could drive a Mack truck through. I was devastated. Heartbroken. But mostly, embarrassed. Then she looked at me and said this: “There are a few bad judges. But, put together, ALL of the judges can’t be wrong.” She is, quite often, annoyingly right (don’t ever tell her I said so).

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141

showsightmagazine.com

Powered by