Showsight Express - October 27, 2021

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GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER A TOP TWENTY TOY DOG 2021 * MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER WESTMINSTER BEST OF BREED WINNER 2020 AMERICAN MALTESE ASSOCIATION TOP BREED WINNER 2020

A BREEDER'S KEY TO LONGEVITY, IS GENERATION AFTER GENERATION OF CONSISTENT QUALITY!

BRED OWNED AND HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

OUR S INCERE APPRECIAT ION TO JUDGES

M R S . L I N D A H U R L E B A U S • M S . P E G G Y B E I S E L - M C I LWA I N E

M R . H A R R Y “ B U T C H ” S C H U L M A N • M R . R O G E R G I F F O R D

M R . D O U G L A S J O H N S O N • M R . J A M I E H U B B A R D • M S . C A R O LY N A . H E R B E L

A N D N O T P I C T U R E D

M R . J O N C O L E • M R S . C H R I S T I N E E . C A L C I N A R I

M S . H E L E N E N I E T S C H • M R S . E L A I N E J . L E S S I G

B R E E D E R J U D G E S

M R S . B A R B A R A G . P E P P E R • M I S S C O L L E T T E J A Y N E S

PRESENTED BY G I NNY K I NCER ETHOSGOLDENS . COM

RETRIEVER (GOLDEN)

• B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G

• M U LT I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

• M U LT I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L I T Y S H OW W I N N I N G

• T O P 2 0 G O L D E N - A L L S Y S T E M S *

• G R A N D C H AM P I O N S H I P

• S H OW D O G H A L L O F FAM E

BIS MBISS AM.CH GCH STARRISE DOWNBOUND TRAIN RN CGC SDHF

T I T CH

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8 / 3 1 / 2 1

OWNED & BRED BY ELAI NE KANDZAR I STARR I SEGOLDENS . COM

SAMOYED

*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/21 ONE OF AMERICA’S TOP pointer* POINTER

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER 2021 WESTMINSTER BREED WINNER

ALWAYS HANDLED BY KIMBERLY & PARKER LOURIER

*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/21

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

GCHG Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend BEST IN SHOW • RESERVE BEST IN SHOW

Group First

MS. JOANNE M. BUEHLER MR. JOHN P. WADE MR. JON COLE

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Samburu

BIS MR. BENSON E. RAY

FINISHED HIS CH AT 7 MONTHS UNDER HOUND EXPERT ED HALL BRED BY EXHIBITOR GROUP 1 UNDER DAVID HADDOCK JUGGY NEW CH DAGOBA’ S UNSTOPPABLE MOMENTUM

OWNED AND BRED BY KIM BROWN

BASENJI, SLOUGHI

AAFIQ ALMABOUB IN AAF IQ – DNAd 100% PURE SLOUGHI * EUROPEAN STOCK: INT. CH AND AM. CH QALB ELSSAD BAGIR EL QAMAR X CH KAMEA MAHANAJIM

AAFIQ’S SHOW CAREER JUST BEGAN IN MARCH. HE HAS ACCOMPLISHED SO MUCH AT SUCH A YOUNG AGE MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING, MULTIPLE NOHS GROUP PLACING, AND WINNER’S DOG AT THE SLOUGHI NATIONAL SPECIALTY FIRST SLOUGHI IN AKC HISTORY TO WIN BEST OF BREED AT MORRIS AND ESSEX

#1 #2

SLOUGHI NOHS *

SLOUGHI BREED & ALL BREED ** *AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/21

OWNED BY KIM BROWN AND NANCY LOVELADY BRED BY NANCY LOVELADY

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N E R

Looking For Top Gun

GCHB Bon Idèe’s Quantico

T H A N K YO U J U D G E M S . G LO R I A K E R R

B R E D A N D OWN E D BY A N G I E MOT TA A N D B R E N DA WAT S O N P R O F E S S I O N A L LY P R E S E N T E D BY C A R LO S C A R R I Z O A S S I S T E D BY S O N O H O YA M A DA

B O N I D È E B O U V I E R S B O N I D E E B O U V@ YA H O O . C OM

BOUVIER DES FLANDRES

# 1 B O U V I E R B R E E D * # 2 B O U V I E R A L L B R E E D * * *A KC B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 8 / 3 1 / 2 1 * *A KC A L L B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 8 / 3 1 / 2 1

THE NATIONAL DOG SHOW A BROADCAST BONANZA FOR PUREBRED DOGS

(A VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE APPEARED IN THE OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE OF SHOWSIGHT.)

A SHOW SITE SCRAMBLE In the years that followed the Centennial Show, the Kennel Club of Philadelphia found itself without a permanent home. The complex that hosted the nation’s largest dog show was sold, and the buildings—including Philip Johnson’s Convention Hall—were demolished to make way for a specialized medical facility of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1993, the show moved to the newly constructed Pennsylvania Convention Center, but the facility’s Center City location and its organized workforce proved problematic. As club President Wayne Ferguson tells it, the new hall presented special challenges for a dog club that needs to accommodate both Mastiffs and motor homes. “Handlers didn’t like it because of problems with rooms and parking and so on,” he says. “And it’s a union hall, by the way, which robbed us blind.” Wayne reports that the facility charged $21.00 per square foot just to vacuum the rings. “Of course, they insisted on doing it twice,” he discloses. “It was a nightware.” The catalog for the American Kennel Club’s Centennial Dog Show and Obedience Trial, held at the Philadelphia Civic Center on November 17 and 18, 1984, includes the following excerpts regarding the club’s earliest beginnings: “On September 17, 1884, a group of dedicated sportsmen met in the rooms of the Philadelphia Kennel Club, at the northeast corner of 13th and Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Each member of the group was a representative or “Delegate” from a dog club. Each of those dog clubs had held at least one benched show or field trial in the recent past… It is unlikely that the twelve individuals that attended the first meeting of what was to become The American Kennel Club had any idea of the impact that this meeting would have on the sport in this country… It is fitting that the celebration of The American Kennel Club’s 100th Anniversary culminate in the holding of a dog show and obedience trial in Philadelphia.”

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY DAN SAYERS

THE NATIONAL DOG SHOW: A BROADCAST BONANZA FOR PUREBRED DOGS

ART IMITATES LIFE IMITATES ART With a new home secured, the historic dog club was about to enter the 21st century with help from a Hollywood blockbuster. In 2000, the Christopher Guest mockumentary Best in Show was released and caught the attention of a dog-loving television exec- utive. “Jon Miller is the President of NBC Sports,” Wayne says of the man who envisioned producing a real life dog show modeled after a movie modeled on a dog show. “He and his wife saw Best in Show and Jon couldn’t stop laughing for two days. His wife enjoyed it even more.” Wayne explains that after seeing the film, the man responsible for bringing emerging sporting events to a television audience wanted to do something dog-related. “So someone [from NBC] contacted Purina, and Carson Interna- tional [the event and production company] contact- ed me,” he says. What dog club president wouldn’t listen to what they had to say? Wayne remembers the meeting he attended in New York as if it happened yesterday. “I went to meet with them at 30 Rock and they said they had it all planned out,” he recalls of their pitch to produce a Best in Show -style dog show. “They wanted to do a parody,” he explains of their offer to feature his club’s historic event as a made-for-TV comedy. “I didn’t know if Jon understood that he was meeting with the real club’s President,” Wayne says. (Movie goers may remember that the film’s fictional May- flower Kennel Club was based on the Kennel Club of Philadelphia.) “We go back to 1878 and we’re steeped in tradition. We’re just not going to be able to fulfill your wish and make that dream come true in real life.” Of course, TV executives have a way of turning “no” into a ratings success story. Only a week after that initial meeting, Wayne received a call from Jon suggesting that the two “roll up their sleeves” to help make one man’s dream another’s reality. After a bit of negotiating, things started to come together. Jon asked, “Would you guys be in tuxedos and could

The National Dog Show is a broadcast of NBC Sports and is televised nationally after the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

With entries dipping below 1,000 for the first time in decades, the club needed to find a show site that worked for exhibitors and for the club. “I started to look for new places and found Fort Washington,” Wayne says of the Expo Center that was located near the Pennsylvania Turnpike. “We enjoyed Fort Washington for years, but then something happened with the management and they sold to a shopping center. So we got kicked out of there.” Finding himself in search of a suitable show site—again—Wayne had to relocate his Philadelphia institution out of the metro area. “We went to Harrisburg one year, and to Reading [Pennsylvania],” he points out. “We had four different sites before we finally got a home in Oaks.” “The handlers love it, the exhibitors love it, and I love it,” Wayne asserts about the Kennel Club of Philadelphia’s current home at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks, Pennslyvania. Located just a few miles from King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, near Valley Forge National Historical Park, the center offers over 240,000 square feet on one level. The convenient site is massive enough to accom- modate virtually any kind of event, even the largest of dog shows. “Our facility lends itself to every kind of event configuration, and our location central to Phila- delphia’s five counties and the greater tri-state area allows for a large and varied audience within easy driving distances,” notes the Expo’s website. With acres and acres of paved parking, there’s plenty of room for handlers’ motor homes and countless mini vans filled with dog-loving spectators too. Inside, four adjoining exhibitions halls provide plenty of space for rings, benching, vendor areas and throngs of onlookers. “We’re just so happy to be where we are,” Wayne reports. “There’s no union and they treat us really well.”

left: Vendors offer a wide variety of gifts for Fido and family just in time for the Holidays. above: The Kennel Club of Philadelphia has featured a variety of covers on its show catalog. below: Best of Breed winners enjoy unprecedented exposure thanks to a television audience numbering in the tens of millions.

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THE NATIONAL DOG SHOW: A BROADCAST BONANZA FOR PUREBRED DOGS

you promise us a lot of beautiful dogs?” The dapper and devoted President of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia responded by say- ing that he and his club could easily oblige. “So we worked out the details, and what you now see [on TV] is what we worked out at that first meeting,” notes Wayne. GIVING THANKS ON THANKSGIVING DAY The details came to fruition when the National Dog Show first aired in 2001 on Thanksgiving Day. The show’s audience of dog-loving viewers has been growing ever since. “We had 26 mil- lion people watching last year,” Wayne is pleased to report. “This year we’re looking for 28 [million].” Although the club’s actual dog show is held earlier in November, a tape-delayed presenta- tion airs following the live broadcast of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. A televised dog show could not have a better lead-in audience. According to Wayne, his club’s association with NBC Sports, Carson International, and Purina has been a positive experience for everyone involved. “We have a great team,” he asserts. Carson works on all the details to transform the Expo Center from an understated exhibition hall to a made-for-TV studio. “They set up the arena, bleachers, lights, carpeting, and flowers,” notes Wayne. “It’s a very important part of what they do and it’s all set up for NBC to arrive and for us to arrive.” Many of the show’s producers have become so committed to the program that they’ve even become purebred dog owners as a result. Once the cameras have been placed and the sound checked, it’s time to open the doors for the dogs—and spectators. Since the televised dog show has increased visibility for the sport, it has also encouraged locals to come out and visit. According to Wayne, “We have between 15-18,000 [tickets sold] for the two days.” As a special treat, the people who come to the show have a chance to meet the dogs that will appear on TV and talk with their breeders, thanks to the club’s commitment to a benched format. To some, a benched dog show is simply a relic of days gone by. But for the three that remain (Golden Gate in San Fran- sisco, New York’s Westminster, and the National Dog Show) it is the best venue for allowing dog lovers to get up close and personal with purebreds. “We still think [benching] is a draw,” Wayne insists. “People are interacting all day instead of rushing their dog out the door, into a motor home, and down the road.”

Thousands of dog lovers visit the benching area each day to meet the dogs and talk with exhibitors.

With so much exposure, the National Dog Show has allowed the Kennel Club of Philadelphia to thrive in an era when many dog clubs are cutting corners or folding up their tents. “NBC is very generous to us and so is Purina,” notes Wayne. As a result of this generosity, his club has been able to give away $110,000 to various organiza- tions in just 27 months. And its members have plans for more phi- lanthropy. “You’re going to be seeing some exciting things from the Kennel Club of Philadelphia as far as donations go,” he promises. Although the club’s historic show may never again reach its 1984 entry of 8,214, this year’s event is likely to bring more admirers to both the sport of dogs and the City of Brotherly Love. “This year, we’ve extended our entry to 2,300,” Wayne announces. “We have another hall to accommodate [additional entries] where we’ll have two rings and the benching. It would be wonderful to get well over 2,000 plus entries and go back to the old Philadelphia days.”

President Wayne Ferguson is also “the voice” of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia and the National Dog Show Presented by Purina.

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8/31/21

AIREDALE TERRIER

POODLE (STANDARD)

FLASH SARASOTAKENNEL CLUB 6/16/2021 JUDGE: Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman | OS/BOBOH JUDGE: Mr. Gary L. Andersen | SEL/BOBOH GREATER VENICE FLORIDADOG CLUB INC (2) 6/18/2021 JUDGE: Michael Canalizo | BOBOH MID-FLORIDA CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL 6/19/2021 SWEEPSTAKES JUDGE: Gwendolyn Wells | SEL/BOBOH

Owned by Michele True, Co-owned with Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier candid photography by©SueBee Photography

“Beautiful exhibit with a compact body and good spring of rib. Pretty face with kind expression and large round eyes with a well- cushioned muzzle. Excellent movement both coming and going. This gal has so many good things going for her!” Dr. Margaret Reed Thank you judge

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL

GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera

Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to Judge Mrs. Evalyn Gregory for including Bliss in the cut at Westminster Kennel Club. Congratulations to Best of Breed Winners and Westminster Kennel Club for putting on an extraordinary event.

MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER MULTI PLE SPECIALTY WINNER • MULTI PLE GROUP PLACEMENTS

3 X B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R 2 0 2 1 &

I R I S H T E R R I E R *

THANK YOU JUDGE MRS . ROSAL IND KRAMER

THANK YOU FOR CONAR’ S SUMMER WINS

I TCNY SPEC I ALTY WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE BRYN MAWR KC J ENNI FER A. MOORE LYDIA COLEMAN HUTCHINSON N I TA NEE KC JACQUEL INE STACY (G2)

BALD EAGLE KC BRIAN BOGART DR . STEVE KEATING (G2) HUNTERDON HI LLS KC CINDY VOGELS (G2) HUNTERDON HI LLS KC

MARCIA FELD (G4) SUSQUE-NANGO KC CHARLOTTE PATTERSON (G4) T IOGA KC RODNEY HERNER (G4) NEWTON KC CAROL J EAN NELSON (G1 ) PAMELA PEAT SCHOOLEY ’ S MOUNTA I N KC WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE (G4) DR . GERALD PENTA CHESAPEAKE I R I SH TERR I ER CLUB DR . ANDREW KRAMER (B I SS) CHESAPEAKE I R I SH TERR I ER CLUB MRS . ROSLYN KRAMER (B I SS)

IRISH TERRIER

B R E E Z Y ’ S C H A R M I N G C O N A R T I S T gold grand champion

G C H G M E R R Y M A C Z T R I K I N G X C H B R E E Z Y ’ S H O T T O P I C

B R E D B Y : T E R R I VA N D E Z A N D E

H A N D L E D B Y : J A M E S D I C K S O N

OW N E D B Y : N I N A WA R R E N

©JOHN ASHBEY

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/21 4 X B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R 2 0 2 0 & NUMBER ONE I R I S H T E R R I E R I N 2 0 2 0

THANK YOU JUDGES OLYMPIC KC 08/21 BOB JUDGE JOANNE M BUEHLER

OLYMPIC KC 08/22 BOB JUDGE RANDY GARREN

SIMMI VALLEY KC 08/26 BOB JUDGE MR. CHARLES (SKIP) HERENDEEN

SIMMI VALLEY KC 08/27 BOB JUDGE MRS CINDY VOGELS SANTA BARBARA KC 08/29 BOB JUDGE MRS POLLY SMITH ELECTRIC CITY KC 09/19 BOB JUDGE WENDY MAISEY

OWNED BY: CHANNE COLES, MAUREEN TAUBER AND DEBBIE HOLLY

BRED BY: DEBBIE HOLLY AND MAUREEN TAUBER

HANDLED EXCLUSIVELY BY: ANTONIO VIDMAR

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/21

CONTINUING THE LEGACY AT THE RRCUS NATIONALS THI S OCTOBER

NUMBER SEVEN RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK BREED *

NUMBER TWELVE RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK ALL BREED *

BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING • GROUP WINNING

THATCHER B I SS GCHB LYONNESE I RON LEGACY

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE CANINE SPINE

T he spine (vertebral column) of the dog is not only the supporting struc- ture of the body, it also carries the spinal cord, which is composed of nerves that move muscles, originate sensations, and act as a connecting link to all the systems of the body. Preserving the health of the spine begins with a physically fit dog. It is especially important to keep the dog at the proper weight to avoid added stress on this all-important part of the dog’s anatomy. I stress to my puppy buyers that allowing their dog to become overweight is essen- tially “killing them with kindness” and should be avoided at all cost. Simply put, overfeeding your dog leads to an early grave.

Figure 1. Kelpie Topline

multiple GROU P W I NN I NG multiple B I S S W I NN I NG and now B E S T I N S HOW W I NN I NG

BRED BY KERRI KOTT HOLLY H. SCHORR

OWNED BY JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO

MOLLY LATHAM LISA BURROFF ALWAYS OWNER HANDLED BY LISA BURROFF

GCHP P ENNY L ANE OL E T IME S T Y L E V S YNERGY T essa © HOLLOWAY DOBERMAN PINSCHER

WEEKEND! what a great

MRS. TOBY FIRSCH (BIS) & MRS. CATHERINE BELL (BREED & GROUP 1) thank you judges

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

Figure 2. The Spinal Column

Figure 3. Thoracic Vertebra

Figure 4. Mid-Back Vertebra

Figure 5. Lumbar Vertebra

Again, this can vary from breed to breed, so one must be familiar with the standard that is specific to their breed of dog. On physi- cal examination, the curves are a bit more evident. However, even when placing your hands on the dog, it may still be difficult to feel the curves due to the condition of the thoracic vertebrae at the first thoracic spine; run your forefinger or thumb down the middle of the neck toward the backline until you can feel a bump in the pathway, somewhere (hopefully) between the tips of the shoulder blades. The largest part of the vertebra is the body (B). There are several smaller projections from the central part of the bone, with smaller surfaces that articulate with similar projections on neighboring vertebrae. Projecting from the top of the vertebra is the top spine (SP – Spinous Process), which functions as a base for muscular attachment. The shape and size of the spinous process varies in the different regions of the spine, according to the amount of muscle attachment needed, and can vary (sometimes widely) from breed to breed. More spinous projections for muscle attachment are found on either side of the vertebra. The transverse processes (TP) are situated at somewhat right angles to the long axis and the mam- millary processes (MP) extending from side-to-side. The large hole in the vertebra (VF) is the vertebral opening (foramen) through which the spinal cord passes. The shape and size of the individual vertebra are determined by the function of that section of the spinal column. We will separate the spinal column into four basic sections; the neck (cervical), the chest (thoracic), and the loin (lumbar), plus the sacrum and the tail (caudal). It is relatively easy to see the differences in the shape of these three vertebrae, from the first thoracic vertebra to the thorac- ic vertebra, from the mid-back, and then from the lumbar section. (See Figures 3, 4 & 5.)

General terminology used when discussing the spinal column as a whole is the “topline’” of the dog. The topline begins behind the ears at the occiput, proceeds over the neck, withers, back, and croup, ending at the set-on of the tail. In some breed standards, the term is used to mean the “backline,” which is only a section of the topline from the withers to the base of the tail. The spine functions to support the head, fore and hindquar- ters, and rib cage, and to support and protect the internal organs. This column of vertebrae allows for movement of the head and back of the animal. The encasing and protection of the spinal cord, which transmits messages to and from the brain and through- out the body, is a major function of the spinal column. The spine also serves a vital part in transmitting the force generated by the hind limbs throughout the rest of the body in order to propel the dog forward. A quick overall assessment of the spine will tell us that the spi- nal column is made up of multiple bones (50 in number) called vertebra, which form a sort of chain through which the individual vertebra move against one another. There are five sections of the vertebral column; cervical (neck), thoracic (chest), lumbar (loin), sacrum and coccygeal (tail). Each vertebra has its own identify- ing number. Cervical are numbered C1-C7, Thoracic are T1-T13, Lumbar are L1-L7, and Sacral are S1-S5. The coccygeal vertebrae vary in number from none (no tail) to anywhere from 20-25. Most breeds average 23 coccygeal vertebrae, designated by using Cd and a number. While many a standard may call for a dead level topline, there is a curvature of the spine that can be seen in Figure 2 and is dem- onstrated by the dashed line. Because of the length of coat and the musculature that is overlaid onto the spine, as well as the varying lengths of the spinous processes, the topline can appear to be flat.

Wildisle , Reg J I L L R I C H A R D S B R E G Y

B R E E D I N G T O T H E S TA N D A R D &

P R O T E C T I N G T H E B R E E D S I N C E 1 9 6 6

W I L D I S L E , R E G .

P R O D U C I N G G E N E R AT I O N S O F

T Y P E & S O U N D N E S S

IRISH WOLFHOUND

M U LT I B I S A N D B I S S , C H Warlock wildisle warlock

breeder & owner WARLOCK WINNING HIS 4TH NATIONAL SPECIALTY UNDER JOAN MORDEN AT 6 YEARS OF AGE IN 1979

IRISH WOLFHOUND

OF THE IWCA AND MULTIPLE WINNER OF IWANE AND IWCC SPECIALTIES the only four time winner

WARLOCK WINNING HIS FIRST NATIONAL SPECIALTY IN 1974 FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR CLASS AT 13 MONTHS

WARLOCK FINISHED GOING BIS FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR CLASS AT HIS 5TH SHOW

J ILL R . BREGY, WILDISLE , REG .

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

Figure 6. Side View of Vertebrae Showing Intervertebral Disc

Figure 7. The Seven Cervical Vertebrae

Figure 8. The 13 Thoracic Vertebrae

THE CERVICAL VERTEBRAE SUPPORT THE HEAD AND ALLOW FOR ITS MOVEMENT UP-AND-DOWN AND FROM SIDE-TO-SIDE AS WELL AS ENABLE THE DOG TO EXTEND THE NECK FORWARD OR TOWARD THE GROUND.

Between the vertebrae are intervertebral discs that are composed of a compressible substance and are attached to each vertebra, allowing for movement and serving as a shock absorber. During my research, I think the most interesting description of these discs was comparing them to jelly donuts—with the dough being the fibrous covering on the outside of the disc and the inside being the jelly or gelatinous material (nucleus pulposis) serving as the cushioning inside the disc. (See Figure 6.) As a dog ages, the jelly inside the disc becomes chalky and harder. When the disc is damaged due to deterioration or inju- ry, it can leak the jelly-like or hardened interior, which is termed a herniated disc. As the interior is extruded, it compresses the soft tissues and nerves surrounding the disc, causing pain and immobility. When the discs degenerate, the condition is referred to as intervertebral disc disease or IVDD. THE NECK (CERVICAL VERTEBRAE) The canine neck contains seven cervical vertebrae as do all mammals, with only a few exceptions. Think on this for a moment: Mammals, from humans to giraffes, have seven cervical vertebrae. The only difference is in the length of the cervical bones. The cervical vertebrae support the head and allow for its movement up-and- down and from side-to-side as well as enable the dog to extend the neck forward or toward the ground. The first two vertebrae of the neck are unique in their formation and function. The first cervical vertebra is the atlas (“A” in Figure 7), which allows up-and-down

movement (think “yes” movement of the head), and the second is the axis (“B” in Figure 7), which allows the side-to-side or rotary movement asso- ciated with the “no” movement of the head. The Atlas has a smaller body and spinous process, but also has very long, thick transverse processes called “wings of alae,” which are easy to feel in the neck. The wings allow for the attachment of powerful neck muscles from which arises the much-admired arch in the neck of a dog. The atlas attaches to the skull in a unique way and allows for the hinge-like up-and-down movement of the skull on the neck. Most of the cervical vertebrae do not have the high spinous process as shown in the thoracic vertebrae in Figures 3-5. The neck vertebrae tend to be wider in body, with spinous processes that gradually increase in length to the last (7th) vertebra. In some of the larger breeds, the cervical vertebrae are mal- formed, leading to disc rupture and compression of the spinal cord. This is commonly referred to as “Wobblers Syndrome.” THE THORACIC VERTEBRAE There are 13 thoracic (chest) vertebrae. Their primary function is the sup- port of and attachment to the ribs for the vital process of breathing. The longer spinous processes allow for the attachment of the strong neck and back muscles. The first nine thoracic vertebrae have the longest spinous processes, and they all angle back toward the tail of the dog. These verte- brae comprise what is called the “withers” of the dog (most especially the second and third vertebrae, which are the highest). Even more important, the first nine ribs are attached to both the thoracic vertebrae at the top and to the sternum underneath the dog, forming a nearly solid, enclosed unit. The last four thoracic vertebrae, which have tips that are fairly level with one another, form the mid-back of the dog. Some refer to this section as the “true” back, as these four vertebrae are nearly identical in shape to the lumbar vertebrae, but they still fully function as rib-carrying thoracic vertebrae. (See Figure 8.)

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*AKC STATS AS OF 8/31/21

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

Figure 9. The Seven Lumbar Vertebrae

THE LUMBAR AREA AND THE LAST THORACIC VERTEBRAE PLAY A MORE IMPORTANT ROLE IN MOVEMENT WHEN THE DOG IS AT A GALLOP.

Figure 10. Pelvic Girdle from Above

vertebrae, whereas the shoulder blade is attached to the body with only muscles and ligaments. This is one of the main reasons that we can see much more lateral movement in the forequarters than we can see in the rear, as there is a less rigid connection to the body in the forequarters (so there is space for “wiggle” room). The croup is that area between the rim of the pelvis, which includes the fused sacral ver- tebrae, and the first four or five of the tail verte- brae. These vertebrae form a slightly curved area that can be fairly easy to feel through a physical examination on a dog in correct weight (not fat)! The angulation of the croup determines tail set. A fairly level croup indicates a higher tail set, and a more angled croup indicates a lower tail set. It is important to note that the angulation of the croup and the angulation of the pelvis are two separate and distinctly different parts of the body, and are independent of each other. You can have a dog with a flat croup and a flat pelvis, and one with a steep croup and a steep pelvis. But you can also have a flat croup and a steep pelvis as well as a steep croup and a flat pelvis. The final set of vertebrae are the tail (coc- cygeal) vertebrae that can number from no tail at all through a full tail of approximately 20-23 vertebrae. If you have any questions or comments, or would like to schedule a seminar, you may con- tact me via email: jimanie@welshcorgi.com.

THE LUMBAR VERTEBRAE The seven lumbar vertebrae support the organs of the abdomen and the pelvis, and offer protection of the abdominal organs and the spinal cord. They are vital in the movement of the dog. The loin area of the spine rises upward in a curve that then slopes downward toward the pelvis and then on to the three sacral vertebrae and the first several tail (coccygeal) vertebrae that form the croup. The lumbar vertebrae gradually increase in width from the first to the seventh, with bodies that are longer and heavier than the thoracic vertebrae, and increase in length from the first through the sixth. The last lumbar vertebra is shorter than those that precede it, making it about the same length as the first lumbar vertebra. In the average dog, the first nine thoracic vertebrae are about equal in length to the seven lumbar vertebrae. The spinous and transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae are massive, to allow for strong muscle and ligament attachments that are vital for the transmission of power from the rear of the dog. (See Figure 9.) Because of the shape of the lumbar area and the position of the articular facets of the individual lumbar vertebrae, free flexion and extension and a slight rotation are allowed, though this inhibits much lateral movement. Because of this special formation of the lumbar spine, it is not unusual for a dog to show a slight roach over the lumbar area that is temporary and does not affect the dog in motion. The lumbar area and the last thoracic vertebrae play a more important role in movement when the dog is at a gallop. They begin to “roach” as the dog brings both rear legs forward under the body, which causes more forward reach, and then the same vertebrae begin to straighten out, increasing the rear extension and adding power to the force of forward propulsion through the powerful back muscles. The reach of the spinal cord ends at the fourth lumbar vertebra. SACRAL VERTEBRAE AND CROUP The sacral vertebrae consist of three vertebrae that are fused together. (See Fig- ure 10.) The important function of the sacral vertebrae is that on either side, it is joined by a cartilaginous joint with the pelvis. This forms a firm union that allows the transfer of forces from the hindquarters to the vertebral column. It is extremely important to understand that the hind limbs are attached to the pelvis with a ball and socket joint, and that the pelvis is firmly attached to the spine via the sacral

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In Search of the Last Shetland Sheepdog Breeders in Shetland

AN ADVENTUROUS QUEST FOR THE ORIGINS OF THE SHELTIE

ARTICLE BY KARL DONVIL PHOTOS COURTESY OF KARL DONVIL

A fter a journey to the Faroe Islands in 1998, I fell in love with the scenery offered by the Atlantic coastline and its islands. And as a dog lover, I decided to put Shetland on top of my list for any future exploration. Those islands are similar, though less dramatic, and I could turn my visit into a search for the last Shetland Sheepdogs, a breed that I like very much. Flying to the Shetlands from Belgium is not that easy, as there are only flights from Aberdeen in the north of Scotland. So, I had to go via Prestwick with Ryanair, and from there to Glasgow airport to Aberdeen with British Airways. Flight schedules were not fitting nicely and I had to book a night in Prestwick. But this offered a way to climatize a little, though the weather was still good for September. I was only wondering if it would also be good enough in Shetland. The climate in Shetland is not the sunniest, and the weather can easily ruin your whole trip. Winters can be harsh, mainly due to the winds that make the temperature feel a lot worse than it is,

in fact. In reality, temperatures are rather moderate. Winters are rarely very cold, and summers are never very hot either. This is thanks to the milder influence of Gulf Streams. Anyway, you have to be prepared for every possible scenario, whether you go in sum- mer or winter. The islands can be very foggy, sometimes for days in a row. And if there is no fog, most of the time this is thanks to the winds, which can blow you off the cliffs if you are not careful. But in general, the climate is much milder than certain people tend to believe, with an average of 2°C [35°F] in winter and 14°C [57°F] in summer. Locals say that you can have four seasons in one day. Luck traveled with me and it all looked very promising when I arrived with a small propeller-operated aircraft at the airport of Sumburgh. It was sunny, and the contrast of the green rolling hills with the dark blue ocean (edged with foaming waves like lace bor- dering a royal blue robe) was all topped with a blue sky with bright white dots formed by the clouds. It was 4 p.m. and it would stay clear significantly longer than in Belgium, as the islands are situat- ed as high as Bergen in Norway. I had booked a hotel for a night in

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IN SEARCH OF THE LAST SHETLAND SHEEPDOG BREEDERS IN SHETLAND

On the walls of the stairway to the rooms were heads of tigers and antelopes, and on the floor was the skin and head of a bear. The walls of one of the rooms were completely decorated with prints, cut out from old magazines from the late 19th century. The bed, furniture, and bathroom were also in the very same style, as if I was thrown back into time. It was all very promising. It was the former children’s room that I was in, and the prints on the walls showed many lovely old pictures of children with dogs, the ones you could find on old tin biscuit boxes. I was asked to be on time downstairs for dinner. As the Shet- land Islands, and certainly the more remote places, don’t have res- taurants at every corner, I wisely had chosen to rent a room all-in, and this proved to be a wise decision. The lady of the house was an excellent cook. After dinner, I had a lovely and entertaining evening around the old fireplace, talking with them along with another couple of residents about my plans for the coming days. Hermaness National Nature Reserve was high on my list, and the Edmonstons offered to bring me to the entrance and stressed to me to be on time for dinner in the evening. The reserve was a project of my host’s forefather, Dr. L. Edmondston, a botanist who started to protect the Skuas (called Bronxies here), which were as good as extinct. This was back in 1831. Nowadays, around 100,000 seabirds are nesting here. It is now managed by the Scot- tish Natural Heritage, but the reserve is still the property of my host. I planned to go back walking, no need for them to come and pick me up. The reserve itself reveals a lot of the terrain that is common on these islands. Peat is omnipresent here. Grasslands on rocks are intersected by numerous little streams that sometimes, suddenly, disappear underground and reemerge often hundreds of meters away. If you wander around here without knowing the ter- rain, you can unknowingly end up in real danger and fall in an earth hole, right into such an underground stream. Those gaps can sometimes be deep too, and fatal for small dogs. Our small Shelties would probably take no such chance, and I start to doubt if the little companions, like we know them today, would make it here. As a working breed, I seriously have my doubts. From west to east coasts, none of the islands are wider than 16km [9 miles] and it did not take very long before I ended up at the western cliffs of the reserve, the northernmost point of the UK. This stunning coastline offers spectacular cliffs where thousands of seabirds are nesting. Unfortunately, the cute and funny-looking Puffins were already gone. At a certain point, the cliffs were cut downwards, and I was treated to an enormous spectacle; thousands of Gannets were nesting, flying on and off to feed the chicks that were almost ready to fly out to the sea. The Hermaness Reserve hosts around 12,000 of these birds. I know how dangerous these places can be, but I could not help but go as near as was safe to the edge, taking my time to take some stunning pictures and enjoy the numerous birds sailing right in front of me, 170 meters [557

“The Inn on the Hill” in Whiteness. This hotel is situated between Sumburgh and the capital, Lerwick, and its pub proved a popular meeting place for the locals from far around. While checking in, the hotel manager, who was also the barkeeper, inquired about the intentions of my visit to the islands, and I told him about my plans to search for the last breeders of the Shetland Sheepdog. He looked at me as if he’d never heard about a local breed named after the islands. I also asked him about the possibility to see the Northern Lights that could be seen from September on, if you were lucky. Some of the customers frowned at me and told me that they never saw it. But the manager contradicted them and claimed to have witnessed it a few times, but it was a matter of luck. After dinner, I mixed it up a little with some locals who were shooting pool, when suddenly the manager called me and asked me to come outside. “Sir, you wanted to see the Northern Lights, no? Well, come and see outside.” My heart bounced with enthusiasm. “I was taking some crates of beer out of my trunk and looked up to the sky and there it was,” he said, obviously sharing the same enthusiasm as me. I looked up to the sky as all the other locals followed me out too in disbelieve… and a minute later, we were all breathless and silent, overwhelmed by the spooky spectacle above our heads. Like endless stage curtains, the lights moved fluently, rolling like waves from green to yellow and to blue. The hotel manager closed down all the lights inside and outside on the parking lot, and the only thing we were missing was a Peer Gynt symphony playing in the background. This is one of the experiences that follows you for the rest of your days, like meeting whales or a group of elephants, or discovering a huge waterfall in a jungle. I felt so lucky that on my very first night on the islands I was experiencing something the majority of people would envy me for. The next day, still excited about what I’d witnessed the previ- ous night, I took off towards Baltasound on the island Unst, the highest situated island of the Shetlands. I was welcomed by my hosts, the Laird and his wife, and David and Jennifer Edmondston and their dog in their manor, Bunnest House, which looked even more promising than it appeared on the Internet. It was not the most strategic place to discover the islands, but it certainly offered the best way to experience them. The house was located near a bay, and it was rather misty when I arrived. After the customary introductions, I was shown my room. Apparently, the owners were descendants of a noble family with a tradition of exploring nature.

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feet] high above the sea, including the spectacular flight of Skuas, the largest predatory gulls, attempting to steal away the catch of other Gulls and Gan- nets. Proof again that this is no place to bring around a pet Sheltie; not just for the cliffs, but also for the Skuas that would not hesitate to attack them, dive-bombing them, claws and beak open, if the dogs should wander near the nests hidden in the grass. It was such a fascinating sight that I forgot about the hour, and I suddenly realized that I had to hurry to be on time for dinner in the guesthouse. Suddenly, I started to realize that distances are very rela- tive. Darkness started to fall and there was nobody to ask for the direction, or even a house or phone around. Mobile phones were not common then, and if so, it was not certain that there was any reach. Suddenly, a car stopped and the other guests of the home stepped out. My guests were very worried and had started a search. If they would not have found me, a search and rescue team would have been formed to look for me. I was very embarrassed to have caused all this trouble. The next day, they took me to a place where there would be a chance to see sea otters in real life. It was a spot without cliffs, but instead, a small, golden sand beach. I say a “golden beach” and this it really was. Two giant rocks of silicate stood aside from the beach. They were losing flakes of sili- cate in the sand and these reflected their oily-colored shades. Mixed with the sand around, it looked like the beach was covered all over in golden glitter; a brilliant sight. The beach was covered all over with paw prints, ending in a hole nearby. Clearly, they were paw prints from a sea otter family, but unfortunately, no otters to be seen. I was then brought to another place for a nice walk along an elliptical bay. The starting point was at an old abandoned graveyard facing towards the sea. What an amazing last resting place, prob- ably the most beautiful spot to be buried. I checked the names as far as they were readable, and it was fascinating to find out that it was merely people from around 1900 and somewhat later. But what surprised me most was that the average age of their death was very high, almost as high as nowadays, and this was unusual for that time. It’s probably proof that the harsh life on the islands was not necessarily life-shortening. Walking along the cliffs, I met some cormorants. And while looking out over the water, I suddenly spotted a few porpoises. A little further, I heard the blowing of a whistle, and when I looked up, I saw a man on the hills, direct- ing his Border Collie to collect the sheep that were all around. The dog was running high speed, and it was dawning on me again that this would not be the work for a Sheltie. Fog surprised me again, suddenly, but this time I was right on time at the meeting point to be picked up again by my hosts. The morning of my last day in Unst threatened to end, literally, into a misty cloud. But Mrs. Edmondston advised me to walk to a tiny reserve nearby… where a flower bloomed, unique in the world. I quickly found it. But not being a botanist, I did not know what to look for as there were many sorts of beautiful, tiny flowers all over. As the area was no larger than a foot- ball field, I stepped over the fence and continued for a walk. Mist and cliffs are never a good combination, and I was aware of the danger. My senses were on edge. Not far from the fence that I’d climbed over, I heard the sound of the sea, and so I slowed down my pace and approached carefully until the sight cleared in front of me and I found out that I was very near to the edge of a cliff. Curious to see how high I was, I layed down on my belly. At least 50 to 100 meters [164 to 328 feet] below me, three seals were lazily lying on a flat rock that stood out of the sea. Fascinating! A few photos later, I was on my way again along the edge of the cliffs. They were going down, but it was easy walking and the weather seemed to clear up a little. At some point, it felt like I was being watched, but I waved away the thought until I looked into the sea and spotted the head of a seal in the water, following me with prying eyes. How funny was that?! Suddenly, he was gone, and so I proceeded with my walk. Not far away, he was back, his piercing eyes pointed at me. He dove again, only to reappear a little further, but this time he must have called for his friends as I saw not one pair of eyes following my steps, but three! They followed like this for almost a kilometer long. What a lovely meeting!

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IN SEARCH OF THE LAST SHETLAND SHEEPDOG BREEDERS IN SHETLAND

invited was speaking the local dialect, and even when she tried to speak proper English, or Scottish, it was very hard to understand a word. My recordings were undecipherable. Fortunately, Mrs. Jamieson later explained to me what the discussion was all about. According to her friend, the “Shetland Sheepdog” was the working dog, not the Sheltie as we know him now. The first dogs were the Shetland Collie, a type smaller than the Scottish Collie but larger than the Sheltie as we know it now. They could work fast, herding the sheep and bringing them into the farm. However, they had a shorter coat, one that was very water-resistant. Mrs. Jamieson was trying to convince her that the Sheltie, as a breed, is now called “Shetland Sheepdog,” hence the confusing discussion. And maybe she was right. The working dogs that I saw in the fields were all Border-Collie-like, far from the small Sheltie that we know from the shows. This became more clear to me later on my journey. The next day, Mrs. Jamieson arranged for me to visit her par- ent’s farm where the sheep would be ear-marked that day. A black Border Collie was already very busy collecting the sheep accord- ing to his master’s commands, and not long after that, they were safely behind the fences while the dog kept focus on them like no other breed can focus on sheep. A chocolate-colored Border was also around, but obviously, he was older and no longer nervous— but still fit for the job. And there was a Sheltie around too, but he seemed more interested in herding the chicken instead of the sheep, as if he knew that herding the sheep was not his task. And suddenly, I realized the advantage of keeping a smaller, less ner- vous dog to keep an eye on the farm; killing vermin, barking when necessary, herding the chickens, pigs, and sheep on the farm, and being company to the family and the children, all while the larger “Shetland (Border) Collie” was the dog for the big and fast work in the prairies. It’s something you often saw on farms in the old days; a big dog outside, often chained, and a small companion dog inside the house. Mrs. Jamieson told me that the small Shelties you see nowa- days were never typical. They have always been a bit larger. She showed me some old photos that she’d dug up from the drawer of her cupboard. “See how the Shetland Ponies were shipped to Scotland?” she asked. She showed me a photo of several ponies in a large rowboat, and one pony being pushed by the locals to step into the boat to be taken to a larger ship waiting further in the sea. The ponies didn’t look like the Shetland Ponies as we see them now; they were larger, but smaller than the Icelandic horse. “That’s the way they were transported to Scotland to work in the mines,

The following morning, I had to head for my next place to stay and I had to be on time for the ferry. Once on the boat, I was look- ing for some change to pay for the transit. A nice man told me to say to the ferryman that I was with him in his car and I’d offered to come along with him by car as far as I needed. So, no need to pay for the ferry, as the tariff for a car includes its passengers. It was a rather long drive. Suddenly, he asked me if I already found traces of the Shetland Sheepdog. I was surprised by this and wondered how he could know about my intention to visit Shetland. “We met at the hotel... the Northern Lights... remember?” he asked. “I was there when you arrived, and in Shetland we don’t easily forget!” And from one moment to another, the long way didn’t seem so long anymore. He dropped me at my next B&B, about 10 minutes’ drive from his place on the Isle of Walls. Mrs. Catherine Jamieson ran not just a B&B, but, with the help of the tourist office, I found out that she was the only breeder of Shelties left on the islands. My arrival was immediately reported by a little oversized Sheltie, or was it a rather small-sized Rough Col- lie? Anyway, the welcome was warm, the place very nice, but mod- ern this time, and I was her only guest at the moment. I was late in the short summer season, as I was told. We immediately started to chat about the dogs, and she showed a lot of very interesting photos and very old postcards. She participated regularly in the annual small dog show, held as part of the Agricultural Fair. The next day, I’d planned to hike around and discover the area. There were no restrictions to trespass the prairies and fields, pro- vided you don’t leave any waste and you close the gates behind you. It was a lovely day and I wandered through the fields that were nothing like the steep hills and peat, pit-covered heather on Unst. There were many abandoned roofless cottages and barns around and I stumbled upon a carcass of a sheep, and a skull. I had to admit that this area would be more suited for a Sheltie, though it could never work as fast as a Border Collie. But on the other hand, these Shelties were a lot bigger than show-bred Shelties. Later in the evening, Mrs. Jamieson showed me some more photos, and on one of them, there was a more Border-Collie-like Sheltie, black and tan, that had won a medal. Mrs. Jamieson knew about the purpose of my trip, as I’d spoken to her on the phone when I booked my stay, and as a nice surprise, she had invited a few friends of hers who also owned Shelties, bred by her. When the bell rang and Mrs. Jamieson opened the door, a vivid conversation started not only among the ladies but also among the dogs. The house was full from one second to another. Unfortunately, the friend who was

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