Showsight December 2020

*

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 11/30/20

RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

# 1 BREED * # 1 WORKING * # 3 ALL BREEDS * AMONG

OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS DAVE BERREY DEBORAH CAYWOOD BONNIE WAGAMAN BRED BY

BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

*AKC STATS AS OF 11/30/20

GCHP2 CINNIBON’S BEDROCK BOMBSHELL

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Owned & presented by: VALERIE NUNES-ATKINSON

Owned by: CARLEY SIMPSON, YVONNE HASSLER-DETERDING & CLAIRE MALCOLM

Assisted by: ANTONIO VIDMAR

Bred by: CLAIRE MALCOLM & MARIAH DUPUY

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AFFENPINSCHER

*

*ShowSight breed stats as of 11.30.20

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The darkness of 2020 while sitting out 3/4 of the year was brightened along the way with Westminster BOB, AMA Specialty Best in Show, Top AKC Breeder for the Toy Group and making future generations of hopeful stars. 2021 will allow us all to shine again...

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

BRED, CO-OWNED & HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN 2020 AKC BREEDER OF THE YEAR TOY GROUP HONOREE

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MALTESE

# ONE maltese (breed)*

©2020 American Kennel Club

- MULTIPLE BIS & MULTIPLE BISS WINNER -

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

- 2020 WESTMINSTER BOB WINNER -

*AKC stats as of 10.31.20

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*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20 POODLE (MINIATURE)

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MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

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*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/20

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BICHON FRISE

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SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

*

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*AKC STATS AS OF 10/31/20

HILLWOOD HOT CHILD IN THE CITY MULTIPLE ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW & MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION TO EVERYONE WHO HAS RECOGNIZED THE QUALITY OF THIS OUTSTANDING BICHON BITCH.

GROUP FIRST–MRS. PATRICIA TROTTER

BEST IN SHOW–MR. DANA CLINE

THANK YOU JUDGES!

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BICHON FRISE

ALWAYS BREEDER/ OWNER HANDLED

BREEDERS/OWNERS ELLEN M. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA & MATT ABBOTT

BREEDER PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLER LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

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G C H C H C H E F ’ S B O U R B O N S T R E E T

P R I N C E S S O F G O L D S H I E L D S

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FRENCH BULLDOG

HANDLERS DIEGO & EVE GARCIA

BREEDERS STEVE TERRY, PERRY PAYSON & HILARY BRANSCUM

OWNERS WAYNE KERR, PASOBUM@AOL.COM & STEVE TERRY

fiona G C H C H C H E F ’ S B O U R B O N S T R E E T P R I N C E S S O F G O L D S H I E L D S

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MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER & MULTIPLE SPECIALTY WINNER GCHG SMASH JP COPENHAGEN

© NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2019

PROUDLY OWNED BY: CATHY & JERRY GAUCHE PERFECTLY PRESENTED BY: MR. KAZ HOSAKA

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

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POODLE (TOY)

© NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2019

TOY POODLE ALL BREED * #1

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MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING 2019 NATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER

TRIPLE CROWN BISS NATIONAL SPECIALTY WEEK

ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW

MULTIPLE ALL BREED RESERVE BEST IN SHOW MULTIPLE REGIONAL SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW

BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLERS: BARBARA & DR. GARY MCNEILL

BREEDERS OF MERIT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 405-833-1774 SILVERLAKEGSPS.COM

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

2 019 N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R B I S, M R B I S, M B I S S, G C H G SilverLakes C G C A, T K A THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS

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W E A R E V E R Y E X C I T E D T O I N T R O D U C E O U R B E A U T I F U L N E W C H A M P I O N , R H Y S , T H AT F I N I S H E D Q U I C K LY F R O M T H E 1 2 - 1 8 M O N T H C L A S S . rhys

E X P E R T LY T R A I N E D A N D P R E S E N T E D B Y : VA L E R I E - N U N E S AT K I N S O N A N D A N T O N I O V I D M A R

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

C H R A I N B OW H I L L ’ S T H E R E I S A G O O D R E A S O N AT G R A C E R I D G E

OW N E D B Y : K A R E N P I P K I N

B R E D B Y : J I L L D AV I S

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*

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/2020

CHINESE SHAR-PEI, BORZOI

**

**AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/20

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*

*AKC STATS 2019

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fire and ice CH BRASSWINDS SONRISE AHHMEN (LONDON) x GCH SET’R RIDGE’N CREEKSCROSSING HOW GREAT THOU ART (CARRIE) CH QUANTUM SET’R RIDGE’N BRASSWINDS

Bred and Owned by TRACY WILES, NANCY ALEXANDER & MELISSA NEWMAN Handled Exclusively by CARLOS CARRIZO

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SETTER (ENGLISH)

Anna

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 33

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RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE

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36 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 37

CONTENTS

Levy FC - SS2012.indd 1

40

Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC

42

Remembering Roger R. Hartinger LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

50

How About a “New Year’s” Resolution For Us All WALTER SOMMERFELT

174

Professional Handlers VARIOUS GUESTS

62

A Reading From The Book of Face DAN SAYERS

202 AKC National Championship VARIOUS GUESTS

70

If You Are A Dog BARBARA “BJ” ANDREWS

236 Boerboel

82

Breeder Interview: Bonnie Threlfall ALLAN REZNIK

VARIOUS GUESTS

250 Miniature Schnauzer VARIOUS GUESTS 256 Standard Schnauzer VARIOUS GUESTS

90

Breeding With Intention CELESTE M. GONZALEZ Lines From Linda LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

110

259 Viszla

130 Form Follows Function

VARIOUS GUESTS

STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH

270 Coming Attractions

162

Looking Back Through Linda’s Lens LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

272 Index to Advertisers

38 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 39

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

WHAT A BLESSING!

2 021 is finally here and I am quite sure it is going to be a great year! Of course, I am not sure. I don’t know what the future will bring – and none of us do, but I do know that a positive mindset will always create a happier life than a negative one. Although we did have a lot of amazing clubs postpone or cancel their 2020 shows, we will soon be blessed with many others that are fast-approaching in January, including the famously large Florida Circuit, Pendleton in South Carolina, Glen Rose in Texas, and many others nationwide. I myself have had conversations with many Show Chairs of the canceled or postponed shows, and they are all eager to return. Just like the rest of us, everyone is waiting to make any major decision until the beginning of February. However, I can tell you one thing: It is more than likely that the last three quarters of the year could be the best we have had in decades. I know that it is hard for many to see the light at end of the tunnel “today,” but we all know that it is there and we also know that when it shines on us it will be extremely bright. On occasion, we all hear about how our community doesn’t have a bright future. I beg to differ. Our dog show family has spoken, and the attitudes and actions of thousands have kicked such rumors and opinions, like a street sweeping truck, to the side of the road. New decade, here we come... I can’t continue this message without applauding every single person and organization that had anything to do with putting together all the amazing shows we enjoyed in 2020. Thank you, truly, from the bottom of my heart for doing such a phenomenal job of providing a safe and happy environment for the fancy to come together to compete and have a good time. Although I can’t speak for anyone but the SHOWSIGHT family, I’d like you all to know that you have helped thousands keep their jobs this year. Because of you, SHOW- SIGHT was published every single month during 2020 and, in return, we not only kept everyone’s job here and brought smiles to over 100,000 readers of our magazine, your support helped us donate over $250,000 to many who lost just about everything due to the pandemic. I definitely can’t sign-off without thanking our amazing clients who decided to advertise and subscribe to SHOWSIGHT during these unpredictable times. Many thanks also to the American Kennel Club and the Superintendents, Show Chairs, and Judges for enabling us all to participate in the sport. We wouldn’t have been able to produce a magazine without you. Last, but not least, many thanks to the Professional Handlers! ! You have stepped-up so much for your cli- ents, just as they did for you. Many of you left your homes for weeks and months at a time, driving thousands of miles week after week to keep us all whole. If we have learned anything from 2020, it is that we all depend on each other. We are, indeed, one large family that keeps on giving. We should all be extremely grateful for one another—I know the SHOWSIGHT Family is! As my wife and I reflect on the past ten years since joining SHOWSIGHT , we can’t help but feel very blessed that we have been given such a family. We’ve been given the opportunity to serve you and we are blessed to be surrounded by so many passionate people who just want to do well for our community. And I am blessed by having the privilege to consider so many of you our good friends. The trust you place in our magazine makes all the effort worthwhile. Your success—this year and every year—is our success. Hanifa and I are excited to welcome our third child into the world this coming year. We are pregnant and looking forward to welcoming our baby girl/boy sometime in early August. One more time, thank you to all our clients, readers, employees, and industry associates. I was taught that you can never give thanks enough to those who deserve it and, ladies and gentleman, you more than deserve it. May you all enjoy the many blessings in the coming season.

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

T H E D O G S H O W M A G A Z I N E

Est 1992

40 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

Dora

Higgins

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 41

DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

remembering ROGER R. HARTINGER

S hortly before Thanksgiving the Dog World said good- bye to one of the all-time greats of our sport, Roger R. Hartinger. Roger and his wife, Paula, have been one of the most respected and loved judging teams in American Kennel Club history. His hometown newspaper, The Cincinnati Inquirer, published the following remembrance about Roger’s personal life: “If we all judged the same, dog shows would be pretty boring.” He was the antithesis of boring, having led one of the richest lives possible. With his wife, Paula, by his side for over seventy-years, he enjoyed an extraordinary life filled with incredible adventures all along the way. They raised four children and loved being a part of their larger connected families. They traveled the world visiting thirty-five countries, and spent forty-five years as internationally recognized Judges for the American Kennel Club. Roger was suc- cessful in his professional life as a soldier, police officer and Director of the Cincinnati Building Department. He will always be remem- bered for his life full of accomplishments and his deep love for fam- ily, friends and the dog show world. Roger left us on November 18, 2020 after a brief illness. Roger was born in 1934 in Cincin- nati, Ohio, the second son to Charles and Dorothy Hartinger. He enjoyed building and racing cars as a teenager, learned the con- struction trade from his father, graduated from Elder High School in 1952, and attended the Ohio Mechanics Institute to earn his Associate of Science degree in Industrial Engineering Technology in 1954. After a short career as a draftsman, he joined the Air Force for two years before serving as a police cadet for the Cincinnati Park Police before entering the Cincinnati Police Academy, where he graduated in January 1958. He remained with CPD until 1966. After a year as an insurance adjuster, he continued his career with the City of Cincinnati in the Housing and Building Department, working steadily up the ladder until retiring as the Assistant Super- visor of Buildings & Inspection in 1993. Along with Paula and his family, Roger devoted himself to raising, showing and judging dogs. His knowledge was incomparable, and his devotion to the sport was immeasurable. Although he leaves a legacy that can never be surpassed, he also left the people who met and knew him count- less memories of a man full of life, love and passion for so many things. His warm smile, quick wit, immeasurable kindness and affable nature will always be remembered by all who met and knew him. He served with sincerity and heartfelt joy in many leadership capacities in local and national dog show organizations. He and Paula were two of only a handful of judges approved for judging all breeds. Throughout all his travels he earned more than enough frequent flyer miles for a first-class seat on his final journey to Heav- en. His endless love for Paula and his family will forever be his

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

greatest legacy. He always recognized her first. It was obvious she was his heart and inspiration. They will forever be remembered hand in hand or embracing wherever they were. Their house was always filled with the love and laughter of family, and while Roger was often content to be in the background, he made sure that every detail was attended to. Roger was a proud, intelligent and kind soul with boundless enthusiasm, integrity and love. Roger leaves his wife, Paula, and their four children, R. Mark (Caro- lyn), Kathleen (Richard) Skalski, Paul (Lisa), David (Lee Ann), and former daughters-in-law Denise and Marilyn. He was grand- father to Allison Johnston, Andrew Hartinger, Brittany Picard, Chelsea Skalski, Lindsay Skalski, Kyle Skalski, Brittany Snell, Andrea Reinstatler, Kaitlin Hartinger, Julia Hartinger, Anastacia Hartinger, Jason Hartinger and Ryan Hartinger, Zachary Doran, Adam Doran, and seven great-grandchildren, Brenna, Keira, Jax- son, Caleb, Charlie, Agnes and Carter. He is preceded in death by his parents and his brother, Charles. He will be missed more than can be imagined by his family and all who were fortunate to have known him.” As we begin the new year, we look forward to seeing Paula at the shows and sharing stories of so many happy dog show memories about Roger. May we “always remember” Roger R. Hartinger. Roger and his wife Paula, recognized by the American Kennel Club to judge every breed, have always been two of the sport’s favorite and highly respected couples. Photo by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr/Orlando 2017

42 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

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VIZSLA

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 45

MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING BISS MBISOH GCHS CH CAMELOT'S ZEBULON HERNE CD BN SH CGC TKI SD NRD VX

© LYNN M. STONE

© JORDON ISOM PHOTOGRAPHY

AMERICA’S # 1 SPORTING DOG NOHS 2020 * NUMBER 5 * ALL BREED *AKC NOHS STATS 2020 *AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

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WEIMARANER

ZEB OWNER HANDLER CHRIS LEITKOWSKI BREEDER SUSAN A THOMAS

© JEANIE TROYAN McADAMS

WEIMARANER CLUB OF AMERICA WINTER SPECIALTY BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. MARY B. NAPPER FOR THIS HONOR.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 47

THE FIRST

GRAND CHAMPION NEWFOUNDLAND IN BREED HISTORY

30 BEST IN SHOW 23 RESERVE BEST IN SHOW 29 BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW 2 NATIONAL SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW

STILL #1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS*

#1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL BREED 2016-2020** #1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS 2017-2020*

#6 WORKING DOG 2017 #9 WORKING DOG 2018 #4 WORKING DOG 2019

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/20

48 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

NEWFOUNDLAND

OCEANO DARBYDALE’S XECUTIVE DECISION

©MIGUEL

©THEA MARTIN PHOTOGRAPHY

“GRATEFUL FOR ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED XANDER, FOR THE FRIENDS MADE ALONG THE WAY, AND FOR THE LOVE SHARED FOR THIS SPORT. - HAPPY HOLIDAYS”

©TEDDY’S

LOVED & OWNED BY: KATHY WORTHAM • CO-OWNED BY: MARY W. PRICE & CAROL BERGMANN OWNED AND PRESENTED BY: KIM & GIGI GRIFFITH • BRED BY: GIGI GRIFFITH & CAROL BERGMANN

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 49

“NEW YEAR’S” RESOLUTION FOR US ALL

HOW ABOUT A

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

W e are on the verge of a new year and, after 2020, I am sure we are looking forward to some type of return to normalcy. We have just survived a year in which so many things have happened. Debates and bad behavior have become more of the norm than the rare occurrences of the past. We live in a divided country and a world in which people do not seem to respect those who may have different views and ideologies from their own. Lack of respect does not only occur in the world of politics, but also in many other facets of our lives. Recently, our sport (as well as our ability to hold shows and trials) has suffered in too many ways to count. Everyone in this country is entitled to his or her own opinions; it is one of the great protections of our constitution. Free speech is what makes America so unique and the envy of many other countries in our world. But free speech also has its victims as some people do not consider the harm they may be causing others by their comments, tweets, posts, and the like. Nowhere in our sport, it seems, does expressing one’s opin- ion show up more than in the critiquing of the judging com- munity. I always tell new judges that once they start officiat- ing they need to grow a thick skin because, no matter what they do, the critics will be plentiful and not always kind. This is not about pointing fingers at anyone. Rather, it is about respecting our sport and everyone involved (before we get to the point where we destroy it for any newcomer due to the behavior they see within the sport).

I started my journey in this sport of purebred dogs in 1972. Looking back, I believe it was a time when our sport was in its prime. In those days we had a ton of sanctioned “B” matches, a place where breeders, novice exhibitors—and even the occa- sional professional—would take their youngsters to practice and hone their skills for the confor- mation as well as the obedience rings. Living in Northeast Ohio at the time, one could attend a match on most weekends within a drive of two to three hours; they were plentiful and a great place for the novice to learn. Matches were also a place where prospective judges would learn (through true hands-on experience) about the breeds they were considering judging. Since you entered the match in the morning and the judging would follow later in the day with no published schedule, judges and exhibitors had plenty of time to talk, teach, and learn from one another. When you talk today with people who have been around that long, you will find that we all have fond memories of those times. They not only taught us about our breed and our sport, but also about the value of differ- ent opinions and outlooks on various things going on in our sport at the time. The decline in these matches is a lost opportunity for newcomers to our sport as they were a great asset in preparing for the “Real Shows.”

50 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 51

HOW ABOUT A “NEW YEAR’S” RESOLUTION FOR US ALL

“They only use handlers on my do-not-show list.” Another post for the same: “Wonderful, knowledgeable, looks at all the dogs, very fair no matter who is on the end of the lead. One of my all- time favorites.” I often think of something I was taught as a child. When you are angry and thinking of writing or saying something, write it down, then sleep on it and see how you feel the next day. The writ- ten and spoken words can last a long time and damage a relation- ship over a simple issue that is just silly in hindsight. Some of these sites even show the person’s name, some with photos and other information that is easily accessible to all. It is OK to have an opinion, but some of these attacks are nothing more than sour grapes because they did not win. You rarely see, “My dog really misbehaved or was out of condition.” Or “Even though I did not win, the winners were deserving.” Or “Yes, the professional handler won, but he/she had a very good dog in great condition and presented properly.” Most judges try to be kind and considerate. They are on their feet bending over and twisting and turning for, sometimes, 8-12 hours, with over 200 dogs a day when adding Groups. Handlers and exhibitors have a great deal of time to rest and take breaks during the day to recharge, whereas the judges are often worn out after a long day. In one conversation, some judges wondered what would happen if the judges started some type of “exhibitors report card.” What might we see? Might it look something like this? “He/she is first-class all the way, accepts wins and losses with grace, never complains or denigrates the competition. Always exhibits dogs in excellent and clean condition.” “A vile and nasty person, never happy even when they win. Always runs down the competition and thinks he/she deserves to win all the time.” “A great “user-friendly” person, always respectful. Wish he/she had better dogs.” “A know-it-all. Been in the breed a year or two and thinks he/ she knows everything.” “Boy, could he/she use a bath, or some deodorant. The smell is nauseating.” “You would think they never heard of soap and water. I won- der what a bath and brush might do to make a difference in that exhibit.” “Do they not understand that all the extra time they take switching dogs and running back to crates takes time away from everyone?” “Always waiting for them to get in the ring because they are outside shooting the bull with someone when they should be in the ring.” “Oh, this one’s a COVID-19 baby. That’s why he is being so bad, sorry.” (Translation: I was too lazy to train him when I had the time, so I am doing it in the ring.) I am sure that if there were such a site there would be hundreds of far more colorful posts. The point here is simple: We are all human beings sharing a common interest; our dogs. It does not cost anything to be nice to each other, but it also does not mean that just because you don’t like someone or the results at a show you need to run down or attack that person. Ask yourself, “How would I feel if they said or wrote that about me?” We have enough negativity and rudeness in the world. Our shows should be a place filled with friendships and camaraderie. We should all try to make our New Year’s resolution to be nice to one another. Happy New Year to everyone!

In those days, we had many “colorful people” in the sport as both judges and exhibitors. We did not have access to the Internet, Facebook, cell phones, and the many forms of social media that we have today. Some of our judges in today’s world might be con- sidered mean, gruffly, crooked, and many other adjectives, but one thing was absolute in all of those “old-timers”; they were “true” dog men and women who had devoted a good part of their lives to the sport, which in those days was more about producing and improv- ing breeding stock than the race for the top dogs that we see today. There is no doubt that we had people with huge egos and a desire to win at all costs, but decency and decorum ruled the day— for the most part. Even though our judges were very qualified, they each had certain tendencies that we all understood, even if we did not agree with them. The numbers of judges back in those days were significantly lower than what we see today. You might have seen certain judges in your area numerous times each year. Some judges would not tolerate bait of any kind in their rings and would even slap it out of your hand if you used it. We had “Tooth Fairies” who, if your dog’s teeth were not sparkling white, would dismiss you to the end of the line no matter how good of an exhibit yours was. Others would dismiss you if your dog soiled the ring. We also had many in those days who believed in a theory of “spread- ing it around.” For example, say you had numerous dogs entered in a specific breed and you went Winner’s Dog; no matter how good your bitch or special might be, those judges wanted to spread the wealth and would give the wins to other exhibitors. Many of these judges also recognized that there were numerous good speci- mens of breeds at the Group level. Most of us stayed in our local areas, so we competed regularly with the same dogs and handlers at almost every show. In those days, you might win the Group today under Judge “A” and, a few weeks later, not even place under the same judge because he or she felt it was someone else’s turn to be rewarded. We all had our favorites as well as those we did not like. What we did not have was the public trashing of judges that is seen everywhere you look on social media sites today. A little while back, a few judges who have been judging for decades were discussing these so-called “Judges Report Cards” on various social media sites with a variety of different names. One of the most common reactions was that it seems exhibitors today do not care if the judges are genuine dog men and women who truly know and understand breed type and quality. They want judges who smile all the time, play nice with the unruly and untrained dog, and do not award the professional handlers regardless of the quality of dogs being exhibited. Examples: (No names or shows are identified.) “Report on Mrs. X who judged on (date) at (show). I have no concern over her choices, but her demeanor was very rude. She was curt with exhibitors. After judging, she broke for lunch and an exhibitor asked for a picture, but she said, ‘Not right now.’” “Judge Mr. XYZ for Breed. Does he like black (substitute any color or pattern)? I am having trouble finding judges who don’t ignore my black dog.” “I showed my nine-month-old puppy to Mr. X on Saturday at ABC Kennel Club. It was not a great experience for my boy. Mr. X took his face to check the bite and my boy shied away. Mr. X stopped the exam, had us do our down and back, and pretty much ignored us the rest of the ring time. I will not show under him again.” Response on opinions for Judge Z: “A big no. Heavy-handed, terrible with puppies, no patience, rude.” And in the same com- ments section, “Definitely looks at owner-handler; won a lot under him. He is quiet, and you have to really listen and pay attention. Nice hand on the dogs too.”

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GCHg Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

*AKC stats as of 11/30/20

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

WE ARE ETERNALLY GRATEFUL TO MARTIN FOR THE LOVE AND CARE OF ELLA AND FOR HIS EXCEPTIONAL

PRESENTED BY: MARTIN EGOZCUE OWNED BY: ORLANDO CANO, SANTOS CANO, ANTONIO CANO BRED/OWNED BY: DIANE PROHASKA & SUSAN PROHASKA ASSISTED BY: FERNANDO CORONA

PRESENTATION OF OUR GIRL. OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED ELLA FOR HER BEAUTIFUL STYLE AND QUALITY.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO 2021 AND ELLA’S FUTURE.

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

2020 DOG OF THE YEAR – MEXICO

TOP POINTING DOG OF ALL TIME – MEXICO (WITH ONLY 6 MONTHS OF SHOWING)

THE ONLY GSP TO EVER WIN DOG OF THE YEAR – MEXICO

2020 WESTMINSTER BOB

2019 ROYAL CANIN BOB

2018 ROYAL CANIN BOS

#7 GSP 2019 WITH LIMITED SHOWING*

*AKC BREED STATS 2019

MBIS MBISS MBISOH MxCH AmGCHS HIDEAWAY ACRES GLASS SLIPPER RN CA

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I N T C H B I S M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph C D , G N , R A , N A , C G C A , R O M

AJAX DOBERMAN PINSCHER 56 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020

Owned by: Kay Backues , DVM | 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by: Teresa Nail & Ray Lively | 817-454-7417 Bred By: Cecilia Martinez & Gwen Myers , DVM

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multiple

B ISS wi nn i ng

group

wi nn i ng

owned by

JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO

MOLLY LATHAM

L ISA BURROFF

bred by

KERRI KOTT

HOLLY H . SCHORR

always owner

handled by

L ISA BURROFF

photos by

holloway

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

beautiful &

standard are always i n style

tessa GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2020 | 59

Grandeur E S TA B L I S H E D 1 9 4 1 80 years! The Grandeur strain of today traces back in a continuous line directly to the foundation stock of the Afghan Hound. The line has shunned every fad or fashion that has made an appearance over nearly a century. Respect for every point in the Standard was our mantra. Years breeding to strengthen weaknesses and retain recog- nizable type with the soundness the breed needed to perform their primary function as a Sighthound, one bred to navigate hard, rocky mountainous terrain for days on end with large feet, hard muscle and sound running gear, coupled with correct temperament and the elegance that defines the breed. Grandeur Afghan Hounds have been awarded at the highest level. Top Sires, Top Dams, National Specialty Wins, Westminster Kennel Club recognition including a Best in Show and numerous Hound Group winners. Over 300 Best in Shows have been earned by a Grandeur Afghan Hound. Several Quaker Oats wins as Top Hound and Top Dog of All Breeds was accomplished by Ch. Tryst of Grandeur : The Top Winning Hound of All Time with 161 Bests and her sire Ch. Triumph of Grandeur is the Top Winning Hound Dog of All Time. Now, his son GCHB. CharterOak Traxx of Gran- deur continues the legacy as the Top Afghan Hound (All Systems) * for 2020 having been awarded an incredible 8 Best in Shows and 2 Reserve Best out of 15 Group Firsts in his first season shown.

Grandeur looks forward to A Successful 2021 with Health and Prosperity for our Dog Sport and the World.

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AFGHAN HOUND

*AKC Results as of 10/30/2020

The Number Two Hound and the Number One Afghan Hound (All Systems)* Simba

Tryst

*AKC Results as of 10/30/2020

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WHAT HAPPENS ON FACEBOOK STAYS ON FACEBOOK of BOOK FACE A Reading From The

T he year 2020 is coming to an end…and all those social media posts are coming with us to 2021. In March of this year, dog shows were in full swing when exhibitors were sud- denly sent packing. Clusters were being cancelled well in advance of their closing dates and the entire fancy simply, painfully, closed for business. Exhibitors, handlers, judges, and show chairs unexpectedly found themselves cut-off from the dog show community. With- out any pre-planning, many fanciers stayed at home full-time with children who needed to be homeschooled. Others had parents and grandparents they were not allowed to visit. Some had to plan funerals they could not attend. Mercifully, video conferencing platforms such as Zoom made virtual connections possible, and social networking sites such as Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook allowed everyone to stay in touch. Initially, the new stay-at-home lifestyle provided some relief for handlers whose livelihood depends on weekly transcontinental excursions. However, the newfound freedom also presented a downside; a dark side. In no time at all, stress levels started to rise. Many idle exhibitors sought solace at their keyboard (and refrigerator), offering commentary on every- thing from the future of dog shows to the future of the civilized world. Suddenly, everyone was a social media influencer with a brand identity and opinions to spare. As we now know only too well, free-flowing sentiment can be met with resistance. Opinions posted in response to a tweet or two can lead to remorse on the part of the sender, and disappointment—or worse—on the part of many receivers. Righteous indignation has become the order of the day. For every “like” that’s posted on Facebook these days, a strongly-worded challenge appears in the comments section that results in public displays of animosity and rancor. Battle lines are drawn and emotions run high, all due to the ease with which opinions are shared instantly— and rebuffed furiously—in a world that’s gone mad. When the pandemic is ultimately extinguished and we have all returned more completely to the world of dogs and dog shows, it won’t be the posts and comments themselves that will be remembered. Instead, it will be their “tone” that lingers. The details of posts on social media are likely to be forgotten, but the feelings they evoke may be harder to forget. The following resolutions may be useful to keep in mind as we all return to our “new normal” lives: 1. Keyboard King/Queen – I will resist the temptation to comment in real time about the “stories” I’m being told through television, radio, print and online news sources. 2. Master My Emotions – I will endeavor to comment (online and in person) only in ways that would make my grandmother and my baseball coach proud. 3. TV Time – I will limit my consumption of televised “news” programming that is designed to stir my emotions and lead me to the keyboard. 4. Outdoor Adventures – I will routinely disconnect from all media outlets and find a balance in the natural world—with only my dog at my side. 5. The Parent Trap – I will be patient and understanding of those who are multi-tasking as teacher, counselor, therapist, nurse, employer/employee, spouse, child, and parent. 6. Boredom Bliss – I will take comfort in the quiet moments when there are no demands, and I am able to disconnect and listen with my heart. 7. Make a Difference – I will do everything I can to promote the benefits of the pure- bred dog and the sport that has brought so many good people into my life.

BY DAN SAYERS

May the year ahead bring you all the joy that you have been missing.

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*

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/20

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NORWICH TERRIER

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PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

MULT I PLE GROUP WI NN I NG & PLAC I NG GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE CH DELL - ROS S BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES x CH OVERO P I NKAL I C I OUS AX OA J

Ruby & MICHAEL Our sincere appreciation and thanks to all judges who have awarded Ruby’s fine quality and movement.

We are looking forward to seeing what 2021 will bring. Happy New Year!

Owned by JENNIFER PORTER DELMER

Co-Owned & Bred by JAIME BRAGG

Exclusively presented by MICHAEL SHEPHERD

Assisted by DOTTIE JAMES

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GCHB LAZY D BLUEBONNET’S MAGIC KINGDOM M B I S S

Pam Winter IN LOVING MEMORY OF

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MASTIFF

Number One AMERICA’S MASTIFF * BREED & ALL BREED

OWNED BY MARY HANCOCK, PHIL HANCOCK, LAURA WATSON, PAMELA WINTER & NANCY WALKER

PRESENTED BY TERRY SMITH

*BITCH AKC STATS AS OF 10/16/20

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CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

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ON THE LINE

What do you do? If you are a dog,

BY BARBARA “BJ” ANDREWS

T he fact that the dog loves PEOPLE in a way no other animal on earth can or ever will is an unsolved, but inarguable, genetic-creation mystery. Puppies are not ducks. They aren’t born knowing how to swim, but by the time their eyes are open (unlike fox, coyote, woIf, lion or tiger CUBS) dog babies, called PUPPIES, are born to love a HUMAN. Not only unique among carnivores, the dog is bonded— unlike any other animal on earth—to humans. It can be said that the love between a mahout and his elephant is the only com- parison, but even in that remarkable bond, untethered, the ele- phant will seek his own kind. The dog, untethered, will stay with his master. While that is sinking in, think about this…the DOG is also the only living creature that will suffer abuse, starvation, sick- ness, even death, and with his last breath he will love you and, if able, he will lick your hand… So (not to digress into the age-old argument of Creation vs. Evolution) let’s suppose there is a process, whether natural or Divinely created, that continues to shape the human race today. Either way, dog owner or zoologist, I think we can agree that dogs are becoming more intelligent and capable…and those of us who are already pretty smart are getting better at understanding them. Is this a process of natural evolution or is it some kind of planned programming? The answer is as complicated as the Paleolithic Era is long. That period of human history was at least 20,000 years ago and, since we were just beginning to discover meat with our veggies, we probably noted two things. One, that pregnancy was the pits and, two, that wolves had nannies… It took us a while to catch on to the nanny-thing. Any fertile female can have children but, let’s admit, some women are bet- ter at it. Psychologists debate whether human parenting comes naturally or is it an acquired skill? We learn from other human mothers. We even take classes! OK, we won’t tackle that debate except to say that caring for kids or raising puppies takes time and patience. Hopefully your child will learn there are limits, but what about your puppy? Your kid went to school where he learned about rules, basic behavioral, and social skills. What and from whom did your new puppy learn?

If a young human needs structured education, why wouldn’t a young dog need the same things…to be taught to think , to avoid danger, to learn social skills and how to play properly? In a pack, the way nature intended, he would learn how to sur- vive and do well. A wild coyote or wolf cub is an eager learning machine. He learns by watching his dam, then other pack members, and by experimenting. It is the latter that can get a child or a “pack- less puppy” in trouble. The domestic puppy, left alone most of the day, will be stressed and bored, with nothing for his eager brain to latch on to. If loose in the house, he will find a leather shoe or a chair to chew. (He isn’t keen on plastic bones or synthetic fabrics.) Bowel and bladder will demand to be emptied, and paper instinctively feels “foreign” to his feet (and it doesn’t smell “earthy” either). Carpet feels and smells the most like dirt and it is equally as absorbent. If he’s outside, he will bark (loudly and often) hoping his pack will hear him and come back. Bored, the puppy will distract him- self by digging, instinctively looking for buried bones or seeking to cool down in damp earth. If you’re still with me, you are thinking. After all, YOU have a well-developed brain and reasoning capabilities. So, see yourself as a bored, lonesome, uncertain child. You’ve scribbled in that coloring book. You’ve watched TV you don’t understand. You need a hug and your stomach feels bad. You begin to cry, but no one comes. You feel soooo alone. If you are a dog, what do you do? Suck your thumb or chew-up a shoe?

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BIEWER TERRIER

BISS OH-BIS GCH TIMARU BEKCI AYISI

SINCE THERE HAVE BEEN NO SHOWS IN CALIFORNIA, BEAR & TALLULAH WENT TO FLORIDA FOR 8 SHOWS AND CONQUERED: Suwannee Valley KC of FL (1) Judge Cathy Daugherty BOB - Tallulah Suwannee Valley KC of FL (2) Judge William Daugherty BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah Space Coast KC Judge Judith Daniels BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah Brevard KC Judge Douglas Holloway BOB: Tallulah & BOS: Bear Central Florida KC Judge Hal Biermann BOB: Tallulah & BOS: Bear Central Florida Working Group Judge Joseph Napolitano BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah AKC National Championship OH Finals Judge Cindy Stansel BOB: Tallullah AKC National Championship Judge Robin Stansell BOB: Bear & BOS Tallulah GENERATION SPECIALTY- WINNING LITTERMATES. BEAR WILL BE TAKING OVER RING DUTIES WHILE TALLULAH IS ON MATERNITY LEAVE. BRED & OWNED BY TIMARU ANATOLIANS & SALUKIS, REG. JOHN & LESLEY BRABYN WWW.SALMONCREEKRANCH.COM EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY STUART MCGRAW & JUSTINE SPIERS JUSTARTBORZOI@GMAIL.COM WE ARE SO PROUD OF THESE THIRD

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ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD DOG

BIS OH-BIS RBIS GCHS TIMARU TALLULAH

Tallulah

BRED & OWNED BY TIMARU ANATOLIANS & SALUKIS, REG. JOHN & LESLEY BRABYN WWW.SALMONCREEKRANCH.COM EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY STUART MCGRAW & JUSTINE SPIERS JUSTARTBORZOI@GMAIL.COM

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*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

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GIANT SCHNAUZER

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Reserve best in show C A N E C O R S O W I N N I N G

no.2 C A N E C O R S O * B R E E D *AKC BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

MUSCULAR AND ATHLETIC WHILE MOVING WITH CONSIDERABLE EASE AND ELEGANCE.

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CANE CORSO

R B I S B I S S G C H G C A S T L E G U A R D S P I R I T R I D G E M A G I C A L S E B E C F D C T T R A T S C G C A C G C U sebec Sebec

I C E Y C R E E K C A N E C O R S O . C O M I C E Y C R E E K C C @ G M A I L . C O M

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BR ED BY KAR L A & S T E PHEN WAL L

EXCL US I VE LY HANDL ED BY E LV I N I ZAGU I RR E

OUR S I NCE R E APPR EC I AT I ON AND GRAT I T UDE TO AL L JUDGE S WHO HAVE AWARDED ANNA’ S QUAL I T Y.

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SIBERIAN HUSKY

B I S M R B I S G C H B N I KAL UK N KOBA’ S SHAL L WE DANCE ?

A M E R I C A ’ S

# 3 # 1

S I B E R I A N H U S K Y B I T C H *

S I B E R I A N H U S K Y B R E E D *

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

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BONNIE THRELFALL EDGEWOOD ENGLISH COCKER SPANIELS BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? I grew up on Long Island which, at the time (1950s and ‘60s), was a hot- bed of dog breeders and dog shows. It wasn’t unusual to have match shows with entries of 200 to 300 dogs. There were dog training clubs with huge memberships that also held training classes. The one I went to had Peggy Adamson, Diane Bleeker, LaMar Kuhns, Muriel Freeman, among many others, attending to work their young dogs. It really was an education to see so many high-quality dogs of different breeds. Do you come from a doggy family? If not, how did the interest in breeding and showing purebred dogs begin? I am a second-generation dog fancier. My dad had Labradors. His interest in the sport was encouraged by my godmother, who had National Specialty and Group-winning Samoyeds in the 1940s and ‘50s. My dad’s main interest was obedience, but he wanted good-quality dogs. His interest wasn’t in breeding so he would seek out good breeders from whom to pur- chase a dog. At one time, he had two males he was working in obedience. One was a Group winner and the other, a National Specialty Best of Breed winner, at a time when that was the only Labrador specialty. Who were your mentors in the sport? Please elaborate on their influence. I can’t say that I had any specific mentors in the sport. Back then I don’t think mentorship was a common concept. I went to handling class and listened to the longtime breeders talk about their breeds. I went to match shows, met people, and learned about their breeds. One of the first people I remember meeting at the match shows was Sybil Sommer, Scott’s mom. All regular dog shows were benched, outdoor ones included. If you were

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*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

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CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

BONNIE THRELFALL, EDGEWOOD ENGLISH COCKER SPANIELS

Ch. Kenobo Rabbit of Nadou, ECM

Ch. Kenobo Capricorn, ECM

smart enough to keep quiet and listen, you picked up so much expe- rienced knowledge. People would realize you were truly interested and share their thinking. I had shown my dad’s Labradors in the breed ring. A local Irish Water Spaniel breeder loaned me one of his bitches to show. She became the first champion in the breed to get a UD degree. I was in my early teens when I showed her, but she placed twice in the Groups at a time when bitches in the breed really weren’t recog- nized. The judges who placed her were William Kendrick and Alva Rosenberg. She also was the great grandmother of “Irishtocrat” who was Best in Show at Westminster. She was a quality dog all around and a wonderful dog with which to learn. Being one of the kids who hung around dog shows all day long, we were tolerated by the well-known handlers. We were allowed to watch and learn as long as we were quiet and did not get in the way. They were the bonafide professionals like the Forsyths, Annie Clark, Richard Bauer, Ted Young, Bill Trainor, Steve Shaw, and others. They were nothing like the “have lead, will show” secret agents of today. These people had such depth of knowledge span- ning many decades, and were also successful breeders. There was so much to learn by keeping quiet, watching, and listening. That was the mentoring experience back then. Priceless. The Edgewood English Cockers are widely known, highly successful and well respected. What breeding philosophies do you adhere to? I began in the breed with two males, a father and son. By hav- ing a background in dogs, I was well aware that I had a lot to learn about the breed before starting to breed, if I were going to be at all successful. I made my mistakes and learned with the two boys while I was in college and right after graduating. They were wonderful dogs and I was so very fortunate. Both were BIS winners, Westmin- ster Group placers, and top producers. As to breeding philosophies, I have to like the dog and the pedi- gree equally. No matter how much I like a dog, I will not breed to him if I don’t like the pedigree. Conversely, no matter how wonderful the pedigree, if the dog doesn’t match it, I will pass.

Having been interested in, then involved with, then breeding Eng- lish Cockers for 50-plus years, longevity certainly does have its advantages. I usually have seen all of the dogs in a four- or five- generation pedigree and know how they’ve produced. I linebreed. It’s what works in this breed. I have gone out very occasionally, but then it’s right back to linebreeding. I had done a father/daughter breeding once. It was the bitch’s last litter after see- ing what she produced, and the sire was older and well proven. I felt comfortable that nothing disastrous would be revealed. The result was a two-time National Best of Breed winner, but that was the only time I did an inbreeding. I do like to plan at least two genera- tions out, three if possible. Sometimes this does work out accord- ing to plan, but other times a reassessment is necessary, depend- ing upon results. When breeding, always remember that Mother Nature will have the last laugh. I have only done a breeding when I have needed something to go forward with. I will keep a bitch puppy only if she is an improve- ment on her dam. To keep a male puppy, he has to have a platinum head, a body of gold, and two diamond testicles. I want the puppy I keep to be of such quality that he is competitive at the National. This breed is judged so poorly at the all-breed level that the only true in-ring test (comparing breeding stock) is at our National Spe- cialties. I will only sell a puppy to a show home if its quality is such for me to have kept and shown. There are more than enough poor- quality dogs in the ring. I do not wish to add to that. I have bred BIS winners, National Specialty winners at all levels, and top pro- ducers but, in 50 years, there are fewer than 75 Edgewood champi- ons. If they aren’t top quality, I don’t want them in the ring. I usually have one or two litters from a bitch. A wise person once told me that the first time you breed a bitch, the result will tell you how you should have bred her. The second litter should be an improvement on the first. If it’s not an improvement, either she’s not worth breeding again or you are not smart enough to figure it out; so just stop. I don’t repeat breedings. The only time I might consider it is if I needed a bitch from that particular combination

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