Top Notch Toys - November / December 2020

GCHS TAMARIN TATTOO CHESTER

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*AKC breed stats as of 9/30/20

T H A N K YO U B R I A N ME Y E R A N D PAM P E AT F O R R E COG N I Z I N G H I M W I T H G R O U P P L AC EME N T S .

F L A S H ! B E S T I N S H OW AT A R R OWH E A D K E N N E L C L U B , 1 1 / 2 3 / 2 0 2 0 T H A N K Y O U R O B E R T H U T TO N

B I S S AT T H E C A N A D I A N N AT I O N A L S P E C I A L I T Y 2 0 1 9 U N D E R B R E E D E R J U DG E : J E N N Y MAC A L P I N E , U K .

B O B AT T H E P R OG R E S S I V E 2 0 2 0 U N D E R R O B E R T H U T TO N .

B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H OW

GCH SHEEBA VALEGRO C H O R C H A R D H I L L E L EME N TA R Y X S H E E B A N O T J U S T A DO L L

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VALEGRO B R E D B Y : K A R I N O S T MA N N , MA R L E E N R I C K E R T S E N A N D B R YA N R I C K E R T S E N OWN E D B Y : K A R I N O S T MA N N , I D E L L E C A H N A N D MA R I E T R E A C Y B E AU T I F U L L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y : TA B AT H A A N D MA R K B E T T I S

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*

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CH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen (CH Rhapsody’s Stairway To Heaven ROM* x Multi CH Am GCHG Always Pearl ROM*)

Thank your judge Mr. Bradley Odagiri for this prestigious win!

Zen finished his Champion title quickly winning BW at Progressive Toy Dog Club under judge Mr. Bradley Odagiri and BW at the American Maltese Regional Specialty in Franklin, TN in March under judge Mrs. Anne Savory Bolus. We are very excited about his future. Hopefully, he will follow in his dam, Pearl’s, footsteps in specials ring as we show him selectively as he matures! I wish to thank my friends and handlers, Tonia Holibaugh & Edgar Cruz Guevara, for their fabulous work with all my Maltese!!!

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Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

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BIS TH. PH. EW'19. AM CH TOKIE TREND FACTOR

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Owned & Shown by PETER & SUSAN COLCORD Bred by CHAIWAT TANGKARAVAKUN

© JORDAN ISOM

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

TO THE BTCA ON THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE BIEWER TERRIER TO THE TOY GROUP ON 1/1/21. Congratulations

Win

RUS. CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS, CM4

Multi Champion of Russia, Multi FSS Best in Show and Best of Miscellaneous 2019 AKC Royal Canin Championship Best of Miscellaneous

Bred by Olga Btichenko Owned by Michele Lyons, Cindy Iken, Theresa Tafoya, and Daniel Yona

RUS. CH IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA, CM6 Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons and Daniel Yona Biewer Terriers shown proudly by Toni Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara and their owners Donny Champion of Russia, 2017 BTCA designated Specialty Best of Breed and Best in Show Highest winning record of any AKC Biewer Terrier in AKC FSS Multi FSS Best in Show and Best in Miscellaneous

www . triplecrownpomeranians . com

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

MATRYOSHKA IRISH JAZZ, CM3 Maddie Multi Best in Miscellaneous and 2019 BTCA designated Specialty Best of Opposite

Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons and Aurora Lewis

Thea

TRIPLE CROWN'S MY BOLD BABY

Sired by the great Multi BISA BISS GCHP Char's Seattle Slew for Triple, #1 APC 2014, 2015, 2016

Pomeranian in Breed and Groups x Ch Karal's SweetPea for Triple Crown

Bred by Michele Lyons and Theresa Tafoya Owned by Michele Lyons Shown by Noble Inglett

GCH TNT'S TIM TAM OF TRIPLE CROWN Timmy

2020 AKC APC National Specialty Best of Veterans

Bred by Theresa Tafoya and Michele Lyons Owned by Michele Lyons and Theresa Tafoya Shown by Theresa Tafoya

www . triplecrownpomeranians . com

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

18

49

46

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1.908.288.7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING BONNIE GUGGENHEIM bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1.512.686.3466

62

52 54 56 62 65 66

16 Message from the Publisher AJ Arapovic

History of the Chihuahua Art Johnson

18 Toy Talk

Judging the Chihuahua Linda George

Bonnie Guggenheim

28 Blue Book Toys Dan Sayers

Chihuahua Questions & Answers Bradley Jenkins & Richard Miller

40 Breeding With Intention Celeste M. Gonzalez 44 Checking the Pug Head Donelle Richards 46 Judging the Pug Charlotte P. Patterson 49 The Basics of Judging the Italian Greyhound Lilian S. Barber

Judging the Biewer Terrier Myrna Torres & Gayle Pruett

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

Rates

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

Index to Advertisers

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*Dog News Magazine Top 100 Dogs based on AKC All-Breed Competition and RBIS through 12/31/19 . The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors. Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A.

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER

2 020! I don’t think I need to talk too much about this year. I’d just like to extend my warmest wishes to you and to your loved ones, giving thanks for your continued support. The TNT family has much for which we are grateful. The close of 2020marks the end of our 37th year in publication, and this achievement is a credit to our team that has worked tirelessly to make TNT the best Toy Group Publication in the industry. Year after year, Top Notch Toys has gotten better because we continuously challenge the possibilities of who we are and what we can do. This year, however, has been a particularly hard year. We lost our Editor In Chief, Joseph Neil McGinnis. Special person like Joe can never be replaced. But the rest of us who are here can and will get better (not just to continue the quality of our magazine, but to make it even better.) Personally, whenever I’ve lost someone who has been really close to me, I don’t collapse. If anything, I try to add all of their strengths to my own, so that they are always present. Of course, this is an almost impossible task, but I try. After all, the best we can do is try! Joe, you will be missed, but you will never be forgotten. Bonnie, I and rest of our TNT family will make you proud. I have said that I won’t talk much about 2020, but I must say how impor- tant it is for us to be with everyone who has been deeply affected by the pandemic, I am truly sorry, but please stay strong. This too will pass. Our history tells us this is true, and our history has always been right. I’d like to offer my sincerest appreciation to our clients and readers, and to our hardworking staff and talented contributors, for making our suc- cess possible. I couldn’t be more thankful, nor could I be more excited about the plans we have for next year and for the opportunity to continue to serve ALL OF YOU. May you and your family enjoy the happiness of the holidays and the very best at the year-end shows. See you at a show site near you!

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

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BISS CKCSC, USA CH. AKC GCH. Infinidad Instant Gratification , TKA Iggy

instant Sometimes you know in an

Always breeder-owner handled & adored by Dr. Tracie Laliberte Infinidad Cavaliers Massachusetts infinidaddog.com Find us on Facebook, Instagram & YouTube

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TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor Advertising Tips

W e are frequently asked for ways to make advertising easier and thought we would share a few tips. 1. Select the right photo or photos. Make sure it is clear, well focused and that it is not too dark or too light. Always choose a photo with the most contrast. 2. Scan and email to me at 300 DPI (most scanners do this auto- matically). Email your photos to bonnie@aramediagroup.com 3. If you need to mail it to our of- fice, be sure to attach your name and address so it can be returned to you. 4. Type or print the ad text. Hand- written text is often hard to read. 5. If you know how you want your ad to look you can email a draw- ing or tell us what you have in mind—include idea for the back- ground. If you dislike a specific color please tell us! 6. Highlight important facts. If some parts of your text need spe- cial treatment like bold letters or italics, indicate that on your text email.

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512.971.3280 I look forward to working with you and getting to know you better. Together we can plan an ad or a campaign that will be beneficial and accomplish the goals you have in mind. Call or email me so we can TALK ABOUT TOYS. Inquiring minds want to know. stock, its strongest points and future breeding plans. It is sohelpful to sit down, page through a magazine and find out what we need to know in terms of pedigrees, winning dogs or owners names. Best reason to place ads that promote what you would like others to see for the future. There is no substitute for the printed word and beautiful photo. An ad with your latest win or your exciting upcoming litter is the best way to get information across to the people you want to reach. A national magazine like TNT reaches more serious Toy lovers and judges than any other source. TNT is all fabu- lous toys, all the time!

7. Check the spelling on your text and be sure you have included ev- erything. One email is best if you can have the judges names, show, all pertinent information. Need a flash? Just name it! 8. Remember that LESS IS BET- TER. The more words the less likely to be read and makes the photo less impressive. One Pic- ture is really worth 1,000 words. 9. Cropping? Let us crop, but tell us where. If you are removing peo- ple be sure you are not deleting an important person! 10. Payment— Top Notch Toys ac- cepts all credit cards. 11. Electronic files—we can accept photos in JPEG or a PDF ADVERTISING IS VERY IMPORTANT Placing ads on a regular basis helps fanciers recognize your kennel name, your commitment to the breed and see your accomplishments. Many of us are familiar with one another at ringside but at shows there is little time to talk. Even at specialty shows it is often hard to quiz fellow breeders about their

HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND AWINNING 2021!

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Viva Bless Your Heart New Grand Champion

MayBelle

Keep Some Room in Your Heart for the Unimaginable

Bred by and exclusively handled by Cecilia Bozzo

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Squirrely debuted and finished in a flash, expertly shown by Kimberly Calvacca. Squirrely is the 5th and final puppy from GCH Sidels Tenacious Tony x CH Sidels Gimme All Ya Got, HOF, to finish in 2019, thus making her parents sire and dam of the year in 2019 for the Miniature Pinscher Club of America 2020 has halted our plans to special her, so we are very excited to see her puppies once her health testing is completed.

LOVED AND OWNED BY YELENA WEISSMAN AND JACQUELINE ZWIRN

BRED BY JACQUELINE ZWIRN, SIDELS MINIATURE PINSCHERS | SIDELSMINPINS.COM

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BLUE BOOK TOYS POCKET-SIZE POOCHES FEATURED IN 1938 AKC PUBLICATION

by Dan Sayers

I n 1938, the American Kennel Club published a book of “bench show dogs” that provides a snapshot of the sport as it existed in the US more than 80 years ago. Described as a volume devoted to the outstanding dogs of the preceding year, this one of a kind “Blue Book” features many im- ported and American-bred dogs that helped to raise the visibility of pure- breds during the Great Depression. At a time when people yearned for trustworthy allies and creature com- forts, pedigreed dogs (particularly Toy dogs) found greater acceptance as both companions and comfort- ers. Dog shows of the day appealed to people from all walks of life, although these events certainly found their greatest supporters among the na- tion’s hoi polloi . As recognized breeds became a status symbol of sorts, their patronage by ladies of society pro- pelled Poms, Pekes, and Pugs into the American consciousness—and into American homes. The collection of Toys that follows provides a photographic record of a dozen recognized breeds that were embraced by the American fancier and, subsequently, by the American family. For some, the heady days of popularity seem a distant memo- ry. For others, the best is certainly to come.

Ch. Burlingame Dubarry (Meadowlands Rubus x Meadowlands Angelica)

“…searched England for the choic- est foundation stock that could be purchased and [her] selections made history in many show rings.” The Burlingame Kennels housed both im- ports and homebreds, including Ch. Hitane, Ch. Idla, Ch. Gerrards Chiff Chaff, Ch. Bridesmaid, and Ch. Aus- tral Lil Black Sambo. At 18 months of

BRUSSELS GRIFFON A wedding gift of a Brussels Griffon inspired Rosalind Layte to begin her hobby kennel in Short Hills, New Jer- sey. In the AKC Blue Book of Dogs, Mrs. Layte relates, “I was so excited… really, I do not know which got the more attention, the dog or the groom!” The breed’s newest fancier reportedly

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NO. 1 LIFETIME OH HAVANESE*

NO. 1 2020 OH HAVANESE*

NO. 2 BREED* 52 POINTS SHY OF #1

NO. 4 ALL BREED*

Moose platinum grand champion bred by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER co-owned by Climbing to the top...the hard way! Best Of Breed at the KC of Philadelphia National Dog Show Toy Group 2, KC of Philadelphia Thank You Judge Mark Kennedy for these prestigious wins. MBOB, MGrp Winner, MOHBIS, MOHRBIS AKC Angelheart N Adorabull’s Moose On The Loose candid photos by ©Brielle Marie Duprat *AKC stats as of 9/30/20

BILL & PAULA FRAZIER & JANE CHAVEZ co-owned & exclusively owner handled by KAREN MARIE DUPRAT-FELDMAN

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Ch. Hop-O of Hartlebury (Jo Jo of Caversham x Topsee of Caversham)

PUG At the 1935 Morris & Essex Kennel Club dog show, the entry of 3,175 was the show’s largest up to that time. (The 1939 event was the show’s grandest with 4,456 entries.) In his coverage of preparations for the event, New York Times writer Fred van Ness re- ported, “$20,000 in cash prizes and 220 trophies will be distributed.” Al- though Harry Hartnett handled the celebrated Irish Setter, Ch. Milson O’Boy, to Best in Show under judge G .V. Glebe that year, other winners emerged from breed entries deep in quality. Among them was Ch. Jin Rickey, a Pug owned by Mrs. Edna Hillgamyer of East St. Louis, Illinois. The entry was reportedly one of the largest the breed had ever seen in America. The win certainly gave the Midwest Toy a lot of exposure. Dur- ing the 1937 show season, the fawn dog was Best of Breed on six occa- sions, placing in the Group each time. Mrs. Hillgamyer’s kennel also in- cluded eight “very fine” brood bitches as well as three champions at stud, as noted in the AKC Blue Book. JAPANESE (SPANIEL) CHIN When Ch. Kumochi-No-Koban ap- peared on the bench in America, his breed was known as the Japanese Spaniel. (In 1977, the AKC officially changed the misnomer “Spaniel” to the appropriately royal designation, “Chin.”) The little dog’s owner, Mrs. Edward H. Berendsohn, was one of the breed’s earliest promoters in the US. In 1932, the lady judged the Toy Group at Westminster and gave the Ch. Jin Rickey (Ch. Silver King of Broadway of Georgian Court x Adile of Sigvale)

Ch. Kumochi-No-Koban (Kumochi-No-Kobe x Kumochi-No-Taiko)

win toKeuwannaTiti, the breed’s first Group Winner at the Garden. Mrs. Berendsohn imported the Austrian- born Nagako v. Miniatur, a bitch that proceeded to win specialties in 1933, ’35& ’37. Of particular interest to stu- dents of 20th century American dog shows, Dr. and Mrs. Berendsohn in- troduced Alva Rosenberg to purebred dogs. The future all-rounder worked in the kennel at the couple’s home in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn. PAPILLON Mrs. J. De Forest Danielson was gifted a pair of Papillons from Paris by Mrs. William Storr Wells in 1907. In the years that followed, the Bos- ton native imported another pair, one of which produced a dog named Jou Jou, the first Papillon registered with the AKC and the breed’s first American-bred champion. In 1915, the year of the breed’s recognition in the US, Mrs. Danielson resided at 4 Commonwealth Avenue, her child- hood home that had been built by retail druggist William Brown on land purchased directly from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Mrs. Danielson was the parent club’s first president and the breeder of Am. Eng. Ch. Offley Coquette, the first Papillon in America to win the Toy Group, and Am. Eng. Ch. Off- ley Black Diamond, the breed’s first Best in Show winner. By the time Ch. Itho of Offley appeared on the bench, the lady divided her time between a townhouse at 28 Commonwealth and Pound Farm, her country home in Medford, Massachusetts.

age, the kennel’s American-bred Ch. Burlingame Dubarry won the parent club specialty. Not to be outdone, Ch. Burlingame Hellzapoppin won the Toy Group at Westminster in 1940—

owner-handled. PEKINGESE

“The Toytown Pekingese will spend their summers on Cape Cod,” reports an AKC staff writer in the Blue Book. “An island has been purchased. An ideal summer kennel has been erect- ed… They will have one entire end of the island to themselves.” This idyll life on Pine Island, Osterville, Mas- sachusetts, was the vision of a New England mother and daughter team. “It has always been the aim of both Mrs. and Miss Connell to own only the best Pekingese that could be pur- chased or bred,” the 1938 publication advises. “They have imported 60 of the finest bitches and dogs they could find, and from these they are breeding outstanding American-breds.” One of Judith Connell’s top winners was Ch. Honey of Toytown, Best in Show at the national specialty in 1939 under Mr. Frank Downing. Another out- standing Toytown Peke was Ch. Hop- O of Hartlebury. “He was chosen by his owner as the best young dog in England, in her opinion, after visiting 23 of the leading kennels and seeing championship shows in various parts of the country,” the Blue Book claims. This import hailed from the legend- ary CavershamKennels ofMissMary de Pledge.

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TOP 15 BRUSSELS GRIFFON BREED * # 3 BRUSSELS GRIFFON OWNER HANDLER BREED * *AKC stats as of 9/30/20

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO AWARDED CORKY.

BRED BY SALLY GEORGE

OWNED & HANDLED BY JEANNE ROMANELLO

GCH ABERGLEN POP THE CORK

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THANK YOU JUDGES STEVE KEAT ING & L INDA HUGEBOUS

WHI SPERING WATERS HAVANESE OWNED BY PAT TSCHOHL , SANDY MCCABE , DEB MCHUGH AND WADE KOSTE IN HANDLED BY WADE KOSTE IN

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Holiday wishes from Whispering Waters Havanese

Platinum Grand Champion HEARTLANDS R I PP IN T IME B I S , RB I S , & B I S S

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the lady’s Toys is featured in a photo with a caption that reads, “Ticky, the parti-colored Toy Poodle, challeng- ing a teddy bear to a fight.” CHIHUAHUA (SMOOTH COAT) Mrs. Henrietta Proctor Donnell Reilly was an American promoter of many Toy breeds, most notably the English Toy Spaniel, Miniature Pin- scher, Affenpinscher, and Chihuahua. In its heyday, her Etty Haven Kennels in Larchmont, Westchester County, New York, was home to more than 100 dogs. Mrs. Proctor Donnell was co-founder of the Chihuahua Club of America and its president for eight years. She was also the first presi- dent of the Progressive Dog Club, the revered Group show where a Group First is officially considered a Best in Show win by the American Ken- nel Club. The Etty Haven Kennel’s top-winning Chihuahuas included littermates Ch. Uz of Etty Haven and Ch. Buz of Etty Haven, and the di- minutive Ch. Cecillee of Etty Haven. Beginning in 1933, Ch. Joya Preciosa was a reliable winner for the ken- nel, earning Best of Breed wins and multiple Group placements for three years running. POMERANIAN According to the AKC Blue Book, Po- meranian fancier Mrs. Vincent Mat- ta was “one of the most prominent personages in ‘Poms’…representing years of careful breeding and fear- less showing.” A resident of Astoria on New York’s Long Island, Mrs. Matta is described as favoring line-breeding based on several imports, including Ch. SealandMoneybox and Ch. Little Sahib, both grandsons of Ch. Wood- field Diamond King whose progeny influenced the breed in America and Australia. In 1937, Little Sahib won Best of Breed 21 times, Best Toy 20 times, and Best in Show on three oc- casions. He was top American-Bred Toy for 1936 and runner-up for Best American-Bred dog all-breeds the following year. For three consecutive years, he was Best of Breed and Best

MINIATURE PINSCHER In 1929, the American parent club of the Miniature Pinscher was formed, four years after AKC recognition. In- terestingly, the “King of Toys” origi- nally competed in the Terrier Group. Among the breed’s early supporters in the US was Mrs. B. J. Wentker of Burlington, Wisconsin. (A brew pub by the name B. J. Wentker’s operated in the city, though it is unclear wheth- er its German immigrant proprietor and his wife were associated with the Min. Pin.) In any event, Ch. Princess Sylvia v. Konigsbach was owned by a Mrs. Wentker and competed success- fully on the bench during the breed’s earliest years in America. As detailed in the 1938 Blue Book, “This beauti- ful little Miniature Pinscher set the circuit ‘on fire.’ She would show ‘just enough’ against her own breed. In the Groups she would get steamed up, but when she was in against larger breeds she’d really ‘turn on the heat’ and show her champion class.” POODLE (TOY) By the 1930s, the Poodle had be- come a force to be reckoned with in the ring. The dogs of Pillicoc, Misty Isles, Fair Acres, and Blakeen feature prominently throughout the pages of the AKC Blue Book of Dogs. Most, if not all, are Standards, with a few gor- geous Miniatures included for good measure. A notable exception is a small white Toy that appears on page 126, sandwiched between two Pom- eranians. Mitor of Muriclar is the sole representative of the variety that would ultimately capture the hearts of innumerable fanciers in the US and around the world. Owned byMrs. Charles Clark of San Francisco and bred by Florence Orsie, the coy little coquette is listed as having been sired by Happy Chappy out of Orsie’s Mit Zee. According to Mackey J. Irick Jr. in The New Poodle , many US Poodles can be traced back to this particu- lar sire. Mrs. Clark’s involvement in the breed apparently spanned sev- eral decades. In a 1951 San Francisco Chronicle article covering the Golden Gate Kennel Club Dog Show, one of

Ch. Itho of Offley (Trytho x Bella du Chauffeur)

Ch. Princess Sylvia v. Konigsbach (Nichol’s Buddy Boy x Ch. Eui v. d. Konigs- bach)

Mitor of Muriclar (Happy Chappy x Orsie’s Mit Zee)

Ch. Joya Preciosa (Ch. Little Meron x Angelica) 34 • T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020

by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shannon of Fox River Grove, Illinois. So sure was Mrs. Stone of this combination that she undertook the pairing on five sep- arate occasions, producing five AKC champions. Two sisters became mul- tiple Group winners; Ch. Petit Baby Jill won nine Groups and Ch. Petit Wee Wee earned 14 Group Firsts. A brother, Ch. PetitMagnificent Prince, became the first American-bred Yorkshire Terrier to earn an all-breed Best in Show. More than four decades after this win, it was reported in the press that Mrs. Stone passed away at Another notable dog from the Etty Haven Kennels of Mrs. Henrietta Proctor Donnell Reilly, the Affen- pinscher Niki v. Zwergteufel made his show debut in 1938. The German import’s name translates to “dwarf devil,” and the little “monkey-like Terrier” wasted no time be-deviling American judges. For six consecutive years (1938-1943), this little black dog introduced the breed to fanci- ers at Madison Square Garden. An imported kennelmate, Ch. Everl v. d. Franziskusklause, was breed winner each of the four years that followed. The Affenpinscher was just beginning to gain notoriety in the US before the Second World War halted additional importations fromGermany. Perhaps this explains why no records exist of these Etty Haven Affens producing in America. It would take another half century for the fearless and friendly “monkey dog” to gain its rightful place among the nation’s top Toys. the venerable age of 105. AFFENPINSCHER

Toy at Morris and Essex. “The record of this orange Pomeranian establish- es him as one of the greatest Toys of all time,” the 1938 book reports. ENGLISH TOY SPANIEL Information is scant on the Celamo Kennels of Rochester, New York, owner of the English Toy Spaniel Ch. Bridegroom of Celamo. What is clear is the handsome dog that appears in the AKC Blue Book is a Blenheim, one of four accepted colors of this “comforter spaniel.” Named for the English country house of the Duke of Marlborough in Oxfordshire where a line of red-and-white Spaniels had been bred, this variety wears deep red or chestnut markings that are evenly spaced against a pearly white ground. The Blenheim’s soft and appealing expression is accented by red ears and cheeks, and the blaze of white that ex- tends from his well laid-back nose to his high and well-domed skull gives the variety an aristocratic look. It is unclear, however, if this early Ameri- can champion possessed the attrac- tive “Blenheim Spot” atop the center of his skull that is still coveted by ad- mirers of his breed today. YORKSHIRE TERRIER The progeny of the outstanding York- shire Terrier, Ch. Petite Byngo Boy, determined that he would have enor- mous influence in the American Toy Group. His breeder, Mrs. Goldie V. Stone of Columbus, Ohio, was an ear- ly proponent of Yorkies in the US. Her Petit Kennels was established on the pairing of the homebred Byngo Boy to Madame Be You, a bitch produced

Ch. Little Sahib (Sealand Career x Little Rajah’s Pearl)

Ch. Bridegroom of Celamo (Bucks Boy x Fanda)

Ch. Petite Baby Jill and Ch. Petite Wee Wee (Ch. Petite Byngo Bay x Madam Be You)

The 1938 AKCBlue Book of Dogs offers today’s preservation breeders a depend- able blueprint for managing a breeding program and promoting purebred dogs. The only difference between today’s participants and the fanciers of yesteryear is the society in which dog shows are held and kennels established. Gone are the days of 100 dog operations and four-dollar entry fees. Gone too is a general pub- lic clamoring to see purebred dogs in person. In its place is a computer literate society that embraces dogs that appear online—not necessarily in person. For the future of purebred dogs in America to be assured, today’s breeders would do well to find inspiration from the dedication of breeders of yore, even as current technologies are embraced. Though they may have had greater means, 20th cen- tury breeders did not have what today’s breeders have—a sense of urgency.

Niki v. Zwergteufel (Osko v. d. Franziskusklause x Dolli)

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THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT, WINNING FROM Coast to Coast

T H A N K YO U J U D G E B O B H U T TO N

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OWN E D B Y S H E I L A WE I S M A N WA L K E R H A N D L E D B Y A L I S O N G R E E NWA L L G R AY G C H B O N E F I N E D AY S L I P E T S K I H O Z E R

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T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020 • 39

BREEDING WITH INTENTION

by Celeste M. Gonzalez SIXTH IN A SERIES

T his series is a discussion about the natural tension that exists between how we view show dogs, field/working dogs and dual-pur- pose (show and work/field) dogs. The dog grouping last discussed was the Spitz members of theWorking Group. This month, we will explore those questions for other functional group- ings within the AKC Working Group. How does the evolved morphological form relate to past and/or current function? How and why is it that some breeds have developed different types for field/work and show? What are the actual or perceived similarities and differences between the purebred show dog and field/work dog? What have breeders done to breed dogs that can do the job for which they were in- tended, if it still exists, and if not, what simulations exist that are as close to the original intent as possible? Before standards were written for the Working Group breeds we recognize today, dogs were already being used and selectively bred to perform cer- tain work. Multiple factors impacted the development of these breeds and their continued evolution, includ- ing geography, climate and terrain, culture and customs, as well as type of work to be performed. Within this Group, we find breeds that serve as flock/livestock guardians, human/ property guardians, farm dog/draft dog/watchdog, sled dogs, and other purposefully evolved dog breeds working in various jobs via snow, wa- ter or big game hunting. In so many cases, the original purpose of the breed has been supplanted by tech- nology and machinery, enabling man

to do the dogs’ work faster and more efficiently at times. Still, there are dedicated breeders who continue to breed quality specimens that demon- strate the individual breed’s working abilities where the actual work, or a simulation, exists. TheFédérationCynologique Interna- tionale (FCI) has divided this group- ing of dogs—all found in the AKC Working Group—mainly into two dis- tinct groups: Spitz (FCI Group 5); and Molossian (FCI Group 2). Two of the breeds, Komondor and Kuvasz, fall into FCI Group 1 (Herding, Sheep- dogs). The Portuguese Water Dog falls into FCI Group 8 (Retrievers, Flushing, Water Dogs). Neither the Chinook nor the Boerboel are classi- fied or recognized by the FCI. Five of these breeds (Cane Corso, Doberman Pinscher, Giant Schnauzer, Rottwei- ler, and Boxer) are subject to working trials. For these breeds, their working ability is commonly demonstrated via IPO/Schutzhund. Internationale Prüfungs-Ordnung (IPO) is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles. Within the Working Group, the Black Russian Terrier, not named in FCI as subject to working trials, also partici- pates in IPO/Schutzhund. The pur- pose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are a strong desire to work, courage, intelligence, trainability, a strong bond with the handler, perseverance, protective in- stinct, and a good sense of smell. The various levels of Schutzhund working trials encompass tracking, obedience, and protection. There are various

Schutzhund associations within the United States, some focusing on one or multiple eligible breeds. In this installment of the series, the flock/livestock guardian type dogs of the AKC Working Group (Anato- lian Shepherd Dog, Great Pyrenees, Komondor, Kuvasz, and Tibetan Mastiff) will be explored. None of the breeds discussed has a working certification requirement in their native countries. Three of the five breeds mentioned above are found in FCI’s Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer—Molossoid and Swiss Mountain and Cattledogs, Section 2.2 Mountain sub-type within the Molossian type (Anato- lian Shepherd Dog, Great Pyrenees, Tibetan Mastiff). Two of the five breeds (Komondor and Kuvasz,) are classified as belonging to FCI Group 1: Sheepdogs and Cattledogs (except Swiss Cattledogs). Section 1, Sheepdogs, includes the Komondor and Kuvasz. The Anatolian ShepherdDog (Anato- lian), a livestock guardian, originated in the Anatolia region of Turkey. In June of 2018, Anatolians were co- alesced into one registry with the genetically indistinguishable (same breed) Kangal Shepherd Dog as one FCI breed by the Turkish Kennel Club, and are now known as the Kan- gal Shepherd Dog. Prior to the join- ing, the only distinguishing charac- teristic was coat color. It is reported that dogs of this type ex- isted over 4,000 years ago. However, the breed was developed over time to meet specific needs, climatic condi- tions, and lifestyles. It had to tolerate

40 • T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020

immense areas of land and flocks or herds!) However, the parent club website maintains a list of Pyr breed- ers who breed livestock guardian dogs. Much like other working dogs, the coat of the working Pyr does not often see a bath or brush. The show dog, on the other hand, is kept bathed, brushed, and unstained by foliage or dirt. To that end, too many show dogs are shown with coats blown-out via forced air, giving an unnatural or “stand-off” look to the coat. The two Hungarian breeds of live- stock guardian dogs, the Komondor and the Kuvasz, were developed in- dependently. A Komondor-type dog was brought to the Hungarian region by the Cumans in the 12th and 13th centuries, and a Kuvasz-type dog was developed by the Magyars circa the 9th century. A declared Hungarian national trea- sure in its native country, the Komon- dor is a livestock and property guard- ian. The breed is related to the South Russian Ovcharka, Puli, Pumi, Mudi, and Polish Lowland Sheepdog. It is used primarily in the regions of lower elevations with drier climates. The corded coat of the adult Ko- mondor provides protection against predators, weather, and vegetation. The coat of a working Komondor looks much like that of a sheep from a distance, allowing the dog to blend in with and look like its guarded flock of sheep. In the US, the breed is sometimes used as a guardian of sheep or goats against predators such as coyotes, cougars, and bears. The breed has a natural tendency to pro- tect farm, ranch, and its human and animal inhabitants. With such numbers representing the breed in the show ring, it is dif- ficult to ascertain whether there has been morphological, type or style departures from those dogs used in everyday guardian work. Certainly, the show dogs we see are tidied up considerably as compared to their working coun- terparts. The question is whether the cords on a working specimen are allowed to grow to such lengths

as seen in a mature specials dog/ bitch, or are kept naturally or forc- ibly trimmed to accommodate a working environment. The Kuvasz, like the Komondor, was also developed in the Hungarian re- gion. It was used primarily in the damper, higher elevations as a live- stock (sheep) guardian and guardian of large estates. During WWII the breed was decimated. With less than 30 dogs remaining, the breed was re- vitalized through the efforts of dedi- cated Hungarian breeders and a few others throughout Europe. The breed is characteristically inde- pendent and protective. This writer’s early exposure to a friend’s Kuvaszok during her college years left an in- delible imprint of the protective and vocal nature of the breed, as well as what working dogs’ coats looked and felt like. The peculiar coat pattern, with the head, ears, and paws of short, smooth hair, and body coat consisting of a fine undercoat and guard hairs, resembles a lamb or sheep in appear- ance—but not texture. The body coat may be quite wavy to straight. The breed is found in small numbers in the US and [any] departure in type and style from those in its home country cannot be ascertained. What is cer- tain, however, is the difference in coat between those dogs being shown and those dogs serving a guardian life- style. The latter’s coat tends to look more like the aforementioned lamb, while the former’s is oftenwashed and blown-dry so as to erase any of the characteristic waviness and crispness of the guard hairs. An open coat, such as is often seen in the show ring, is not protective from the elements. Various pieces of artwork from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) depict the Tibetan Mastiff much like the breed we see today. The term “Mas- tiff” is a misnomer as applied by the English to these large dogs found in the Himalayan region when, in fact, they are locally known as Himalayan Mountain Dogs. Of peculiar inter- est is the Tibetan Mastiff’s tolerance to hypoxia due to a genetic hemoglo- bin adaptation. Keep in mind that air T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020 • 41

hot, dry summers and cold winters, semi-nomadic movements with the seasons, and guarding flocks of goats and/or sheep that moved great dis- tances on the central Anatolian pla- teau of Turkey. It was and is expected to guard flocks without direction or human assistance. Working in trios, they are expected to guard a flock against predators, including wolves and coyotes, attacking the predator(s) when needed to defend the flock. To this day, they can be found guarding flocks in rural areas of Turkey as well as many areas in the US. The Anatolian has retained its func- tional characteristics and there are no discernible type differences between those used for work and those that are shown. Of course, the working dogs don’t encounter a bath and brush as often as the show dog, so coat den- sity differences may be seen that are beyond seasonal. Known as the Pyrenean Mountain Dog in its native land area straddling the south of France and north of Spain, in the US the breed is known as the Great Pyrenees (Pyr). Pup- pies intended to be working guard- ian dogs are raised with their flock of sheep and form a close protective bond with them. Their needed agility allows them to easily go up and down steep Pyrenean mountainsides in the continual guarding of their flock. In the US, they can be found guarding goat herds and sheep flocks, working in trios, braces, or singly depending on herd/flock size. What is com- mon to each working guardian Great Pyrenees is an extreme devotion to the flock/herd and an alertness to danger that belies their quiet de- meanor. When a predator is spotted, the Pyr(s) move toward the predator and sound warning barks to keep the predator away. If the predator insists, the Pyr(s) defend the flock/herd. Pyrs have, by and large, retained the characteristics of their immedi- ate Pyrenean ancestors. However, their guarding ability is not formally tested through the parent club. (You can imagine that tests would take days and days per dog, and require

PEOPLE ARE PAYING ATTENTION!

has decreasing oxygen saturation the higher onemoves into the atmosphere, i.e., up to high-mountain grasslands. This primitive breed was long used by nomadic Himalayan families as nocturnal guards against preda- tors and livestock thieves. They are known as fearless protectors of the family and their possessions, and occasionally found as watchdogs in Tibetan monasteries. The breed displays two distinct types that can occur in the same litter; the “monastery” type and the “nomad” type. Themonastery type is described as taller, heavier, and more heavily- boned, with more facial wrinkling and haw than the “nomad” type. The larg- er, heavier “monastery” type is used in more stationary jobs versus the more active jobs of the “nomad” type, which is better structured and well-muscled. While the breed is shown in Western countries under one standard, the In- dian standard separates the breed into two varieties; the “Lion Head,” which is of smaller stature with quite long hair from the forehead to the with- ers (the mane), and the “Tiger Head,” which is of larger stature and displays shorter hair. Tibetan Mastiffs exist in relatively small numbers in the US. How- ever, they are almost indistinguish- able from those remaining dogs still used as guardians by nomadic fami- lies and maintained as watchdogs in monasteries. Are we paying attention to the origi- nal intent of the breed when observing it? How conscious are we of these real and perceived differences when we make our judging decisions, be they in the show ring, working trials, water work or in breeding? Is there a diver- gence in type or morphology? What are we doing, as breeders and judges, to close the gap? I’ll look forward to your commentary and questions on this article, as well as the ones that follow in this series. Feel free to send your comments to info@ aramediagroup.com or to me at jolly- timehounds@northstate.net .

The following commentary was received from a very long-time Alaskan Malamute breeder/ex- hibitor/sledder/judge regarding the fourth in the series inclusion on the breed: Because Alaskan Malamutes no longer have to survive in Arctic conditions, some “survival char- acteristics” are being lost. 1. The Malamute standard calls for a scissors bite and large teeth. This was necessary to eat a frozen hunk of meat when it was tossed to them; and this also frequently included bones. Bad bites, missing teeth, and small teeth are being overlooked by judges and ignored by breeders. 2. Cat feet are pretty, but wrong for the breed! They work just fine in a show ring, but will punch down through the snow. Large feet must be kept and, although the standard does not give the shape, if you look at working sled dogs in the Arctic for the past 200 years they all have large feet—and the two middle toes are longer than the sides; to borrow a common phrase, “snow shoe foot.” 3. Another problem is the over-angulation in the rear with hocks flying up in the air or not being extended when moved into gaiting position on the ground under the dog. Wasted motion is wasted energy. With food so scarce in the Arctic, a dog that used his energy (food) for unnecessary movement would soon be dead. 4. A theory about the stop, or in the case of Malamutes, the lack of it: “The topline of the skull and the topline of the muzzle show a slight break downward from a straight line as they join.” Both the SiberianHusky and the Samoyed standards call for a “well defined” stop. A slight break downward is not the same as a well-defined stop. If the stop is observed on all the land mammals that live in the high Arctic in winter, none have a stop; wolf, fox, polar bear, rabbit. Since the Samoyeds and Si- berian Huskies belonged to reindeer herders, they would have had to migrate south for the winter in order find food for the reindeer. The Malamute stayed in the high arctic all year round, sleeping outside in temperatures up to 40 and 60 degrees below zero in snow and wind. Any indentation on the body would be subject to collecting snow and freezing there.

42 • T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020

National Specialty Winner 2019

Royal Canin’s Biewer Terrier Puppy of the Year 2019

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Multiple Best In Miscellaneous

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WINDSONG’S WHEN THE THUNDER ROLLS CM2

T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020 • 43

CHECKING THE PUG HEAD WHAT YOUR HANDS SHOULD DO TO CORRECTLY EXAMINE A PUG’S HEAD

By Donelle Richards

1. Place your fingers behind the ears and your pinkies under the head, and use your thumbs for the examination of the head.

2. Move your thumbs around the head to feel the full, large, round head.

3. Feel for good width of jaw. You can also feel if the jaw is wry. The width of jaw should ideally be near the outside edge of the eye.

4. Put your thumb in from of the mouth to feel the slightly under- shot bite. Be careful to not block the nasal passages.

5. You have now successfully examined the Pug head.

44 • T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020

T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020 • 45

T he Pug is, perhaps, one of the eas- iest of the Toy breeds to judge. He is one of those “what you see, is what you get” dogs. He is a clown that picks the worst times to embar- rass his handler, and he enjoys every minute of it. The words to remember are “round head, square body, and curly tail.” This is a square breed, not literally, of course, but when we look at a Pug from any angle you should get the im- pression of squareness. From the side, front, and rear, you should see a cob- by, well-muscled dog. It is important to remember that the level topline is echoed by the underline; no sloping toplines and no tuck-ups. I recommend letting the dogs go around first, then your first impres- sion is of them moving naturally and not posed into position by the handler. When the dog is set up on the table, stand back and look from the side to ascertain the correctness of the body shape. When you approach from the Look at the head from the side. While it is flat, it is not perpendicular be- cause of the slightly undershot bite. Some Pugs have an exaggerated over- the-nose roll. If this is so great as to detract from the flat face, you should consider this in your judgment. The ears are soft, small, dark, and trian- gular. The two acceptable types are the button (preferred) and the rose. A rose ear on a Pug does not expose the inner burr, such as in the Bulldog, but JUDGING THE PUG by Charlotte P. Patterson front, look first, and then put both of your hands around the head, using your thumbs to feel skull structure under the folds of skin. This also helps the dog to stand still. Please keep in mind that he has no muzzle to protect his eyes and does not appreciate the judge who covers his eyes while examining his teeth. The parent club video shows how to examine the bite with the flat of your thumb to ascertain that he is slightly undershot. The Pug Dog Club of America has repeatedly asked judges not to open Pug’s mouths. The head is round, and if you drew a line across the face it should touch the tip of the ears (when alert), bisect the eyes, and touch the top of the nose. Remember that one of the most endearing traits of this breed is his dark, round eyes. A light-eyed Pug is not desirable and does not have the proper expression for the breed. The head wrinkles around his face, covering his brow and looping over his nose, contribute so much to his characteristic expres- sion. At this point, if judging a black Pug, you must look closely to see those wrinkles, but they are there.

Ch. WooWoo Serendipity (Winner of Three BIS) shows proper gait.

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T op N otch T oys , N ovember /D ecember 2020 • 47

apricot color. The trace is a thin line running from the occiput down the back. You will most often see this in young dogs. A wider black saddle or black hairs in a fawn coat should not be considered a disqualification. However, these can be considered a fault. If you are one of the judges who tells Juniors to show the bite on their dog, most of them will respond, “In this breed, we check themouth by running the flat of our thumb over the bite.” This is what they are taught to say and do not penalize them for responding in this manner. Just because this is a Toy breed, don’t forgive unsoundness. This is a tough little bundle of muscle and should always move soundly. When you see a Pug stop with all four feet in the right place and tail up—look carefully. When you see a Pug handler down on the floor, setting each foot and holding up the tail—look very carefully. Many Pugs are owner-handled and, therefore, sometimes you will have to forgive less-than-expert handling. But they know when someone knows how to judge their breed and, believe me, word will spread, either good or bad. Never forgive light eyes, bad bites, wry mouths, unsoundness, low- set tails or a dog that does not appear square. Square body, round head, and curly tail. It is a fun breed to judge and their antics in the ring will often amuse you. Enjoy!

Left: Ch. Ivanwold Diva of Riversong, Winner of 13 All-Breed Best in Shows. Below: 12-Week-Old puppy

rather appears to have a sloping fold rather than straight across the head as with a button ear. It often makes the head appear smaller. The muzzle is dark and wide with a noticeable chin. Some Pugs do gray on the chin and muzzle, and this is of no impor- tance. Whiskers may or may not be trimmed. The nose, black with open nostrils, is important to this brachy- cephalic breed. When the mouth is closed, you should not see tongue or teeth. On warm days, do not keep these dogs, particularly blacks, out in the sun at outdoor shows. They over- heat quickly with disastrous results. They will also pant heavily. The front legs are straight and placed well under. The Pug should have a chest. Some older dogs, especially males, may get a build-up of muscle on the outside of the legs, but the in- side of the legs should be straight. He must have enough length of neck to support the head and, if the shoulder construction is correct, he will not appear as if his head is sitting right on his shoulder. Also, correct structure will not allow him to have excessive lift of his front legs. Moderate bend of stifle is called for and the often-talked about “Pug roll” comes from his front movement, not his rear, and is not an exaggerated swagger. He should stand squarely with straight legs, level topline, and a tight- ly curled, high-set tail. He should gait

the same way—legs moving in paral- lel planes, firm topline, and the tail not bouncing with each step. This is a companion dog and is not meant to be run around the ring. He should trot by the handler’s side, preferably on a loose lead. They double track and should never be moved so fast as to converge to the center line of gravity. The tail must be high-set to continue that appearance of squareness. The Standard talks of a double curl as perfection. Rather than concentrate on the number of curls, you should see high-set, tightly-curled tails. Of- tentimes, the tail will curl on the side away from the judge. If so, look at the dog from that side as well. Please do not unroll the tail. There have been questions over the years about wrinkles down the Pug’s back. This issue is not dealt with in the Standard. The key here is to check the topline under those wrinkles to make sure it is level. Otherwise, it is up to you and how you feel about the wrinkles. As they age, they may also develop wrinkles over the shoulders. Coat texture is fine, smooth, short, and glossy. Blacks are black, some- times with some white on the chest. Oftentimes, you will see some rust in their coats from being out in the sun. The two colors accepted are black and fawn. All others are a dis- qualification. Fawn can range from a very light, buttery color to a dark

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Charlotte P. Pat- terson bought her first Pug in 1969 and began a love affair with the breed that lasts even today. She has been a breed- er, exhibitor, pro- fessional handler, and now, a judge. She considers it her great privilege

to be involved in the sport of dogs.

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