Showsight Presents The Belgian Tervuren

BELGIAN TERVUREN THE

1. Where do you live? What is your occupation? How many years in dogs? 2. Do you have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? 3. What first made you interested in the Belgian Tervuren? 4. In what ways does the breed differ from its Belgian cousins? 5. How important are carriage and proportion in the Tervuren? 6. Can you describe the breed’s coat color in detail? 7. What should judges look for in the Tervuren’s movement? 8. Is the Tervuren a “busy” breed? Does it like to have a job to do? 9. Would you consider the breed to be possessive of its people and property? 10. What’s the funniest experience you’ve ever shared with a Ter- vuren in or out of the ring? 11. Is there anything else you’ d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. JANINA LAURIN Janina Laurin is an

What first made me interested in the Belgian Tervuren? It’s the family passion. I’m second generation with my sister, Darlene, and my mother, Edeltraud—it’s Chateau Blanc kennels. In what ways does the breed differ from its Belgian cousins? All four standards have a variation in coat color, height, bite and nuanced differences in measurements. How important are carriage and proportion in the Tervuren? Incredibly important. It is a distinguishing characteristic that gives the breed its beautiful elegant silhouette and unbroken harmonious lines. There should be no question when you see a Belgian Tervuren that it is its own breed and not a bad mix of GSD/Collie cross or a common mutt-looking street dog. Can I describe the breed’s coat color in detail? It can be breath- taking, from rich fawn to mahogany, with a black overlay as if caressed in soot, and black masking on the head. The males will carry a bit more abundant coat and overlay than the females. It is double-coated with the outer coat being straight and harsh. It is natural in every aspect. The coat should require minimal grooming, and be clean and appropriate for either sex. It is and should be mostly a wash-and-wear coat as would be needed if the dogs were working. What should judges look for in the Tervuren’s movement? Clean, single tracking, with free full extension, reach and drive for a square dog. Anything that would make the dog unable to do its historical job as a working herding/farm dog should be penalized as, for example: minced steps, cowhocks, lack of upper arm. As a whole, the breed has a large group that still uses their dogs on work- ing farms or in herding competitions. Is the Tervuren a “busy” breed? Does it like to have a job to do? Yes. They are, but not obnoxiously so in its behavior. It is more alert and ready to go. A job may look very different these days. It may take the shape of games and tasks. A confident, biddable dog is mostly preferred. Would I consider the breed to be possessive of its people and property? It does love its people and, consequently, is very devoted. Hence, its reputation as more of an owner-handled breed or with those who know the dog individually well. They are excellent watch dogs and will alert you to a threat whether it is perceived or real. It is naturally aloof with those it doesn’t know well. This doesn’t mean shy. They should stand their ground. It just means they will not be overzealous if you aren’t in their circle of friends. The funniest experience I’ve ever shared with a Tervuren in or out of the ring? The day my now 15-1/2-year-old girl, Jessie, would not leave the side of a steward on the Figure 8 in Novice Obedience and started pawing her pant leg. I was mortified, but when the judge asked [the steward] if she had food in her pocket, I praised [Jessie] for her good nose. She had found remnants of a hot dog. The judge qualified us with substantial points off. I’d also like to share about the breed to judge the whole, study the silhouette, and penalize where appropriate according to the standard. This is a moderate, elegant, square, well-moving, confi- dent dog. Enjoy them, be patient in allowing them to excel in the conformation, companion or performance rings. ANITA ABORN Anita Aborn has been involved with Belgian Tervuren for more than 30 years. She has had the good fortune to attend many nation- al specialties within the US and abroad, meet with the pillars of the breed in Belgium and France, and learn from the top breeders in the US. She has bred Group-winning dogs and is active in >

AKC judge of BIS, the Herding Group and mul- tiple Working breeds, and a second generation dog fancier. She has judged the national specialties of all three Belgian breeds and Newfoundlands. She has been honored to judge the breed twice at Westminster,

at the AKC show, and will be judging the AKC/Royal Canin Bred- by Group 2020. Janina will also be judging the Tervuren national for the fourth time in 2021. In October 2020, she will be judging the first Belgian Lakenois national. In 2002, Janina accepted the inaugural AKC Herding Breeder of the Year award on behalf of Chateau Blanc Kennels (Edeltraud, Janina and Darlene). Chateau Blanc has produced over 250 champions, Best In Show, National Specialty and Specialty winners, Dual champions, herding and tracking champions, multiple HIT winners in all performance events in the States and Canada, including Schutzhund events, on a limited breeding program. Janina and her sister are actively show- ing in conformation, herding, obedience and tracking with their current dogs and continuing to breed Belgian Tervuren. She has served as the parent club’s AKC Delegate for over 20 years, Show- chair/Co-Chair Putnam Kennel Club, founding member and past President Berkshire Belgian Tevuren Club, past President of the American Belgian Tervuren Club, and member of Saw Mill Kennel Club. Janina is a founding member of the parent club’s Education Committee and has served on it since the mid 1980s. I live on a rural road surrounded by woods and hayfields about 10 miles from the UCONN campus. I’m recently retired now, but worked in the financial industry mostly. I’ve been attending shows and dog events since I was a child. Do I have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? My big hobby right now is renovating the family homestead while trying to keep to the two-year plan.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2020 | 219

Powered by