Belgian Tervuren Breed Magazine - Showsight

BELGIAN TERVUREN Q&A

conformation, obedience, herding, tracking, rally, agility, and scent work. She has been privileged to serve the Tervuren community in her local club at all levels, the American Belgian Tervuren Club as health education chair, and at nationals including the honor of judging sweepstakes. I live in Northern California and have had Belgian Tervuren since 1989. Do I have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? Travel and gardening. What first made me interested in the Belgian Tervuren? Their beauty, their versatility, their intelligence, and the fact they are a herding breed, important for assisting me with my sheep. In what ways does the breed differ from its Belgian cousins? All of the Belgian Shepherd dogs are so very talented. How important are carriage and proportion in the Tervuren? The Tervuren breed is an elegant breed characterized by its outline of a beautiful head sweeping into its neck and its square silhouette. To my eye, the breed can be identified just by its outline, so carriage and proportion are extremely important. They are always alert and present themselves with an air that demands one look at them. On the other hand, they can be silly and exuberant. Can I describe the breed’s coat color in detail? That would take a book. What should judges look for in the Tervuren’s movement? A smooth, easy, fluid side gait—it is not a big ground-covering gait with huge reach and drive, but rather a balanced, moderate gait with front and rear showing full extension. Coming and going the legs should converge in the center to single track, ideally. Is the Tervuren a “busy” breed? Does it like to have a job to do? Tervuren need a job to do. They need their mind exercised as much as their body. Would I consider the breed to be possessive of its people and property? Yes. The funniest experience I’ve ever shared with a Tervuren in or out of the ring? The time my girl opened the refrigerator by tugging on the dishcloth hanging on the handle, selecting and removing a single yogurt container, taking said yogurt container to her bed, carefully removing the plastic top, peeling off the foil covering in one piece, and then studiously licking out every last molecule of yogurt from the carton. LYNN BRANDENBURG I currently reside in South Carolina, but relocated from the Northeast. I’ve been actively showing dogs for over 30 years, but have had Belgians for over 40 years. I love traveling and have been fortunate to have attended many Belgian specialties (all four Belgian breeds/varieties are shown togeth- er) in Belgium, France, the Netherlands, the UK, and more. I’ve exhibited in several of them as well, with one of my dogs hav- ing Dutch and French titles. There’s noth- ing more educational than seeing the breed in its country of origin and learning from the longtime breeders and exhibitors there. What first made me interested in the Belgian Tervuren? The intelligence, beauty, grace, and athleticism of the breed. In what ways does the breed differ from its Belgian cousins? The only real difference is cosmetic. The Tervuren is one of four Belgian breeds in the US (AKC). Everywhere else in the world, the four are considered one breed with four varieties, differentiated only by its coat: color, length, and texture. The Belgian Sheepdog being black;

the Malinois being short-haired and similar in color to the Tervu- ren; and the Laekenois, similarly colored with a wavy/curly coat. How important are carriage and proportion in the Tervuren? Extremely important to have balance—moderately angled front and rear along with the proud carriage of a square dog, standing four-square, alert and inquisitive, ready for action. There should be a lovely arch of neck, flowing into the withers; head not stuck on the shoulder or ewe-necked. Can I describe the breed’s coat color in detail? There is an array of acceptable coat color ranging from a light, warm fawn to a rich mahogany. The coat should also have some black tipping, with the males generally having a bit more blackening than the females. There should also be a black mask, minimally to above the eye. What should judges look for in the Tervuren’s movement? A light, easy, graceful gait—not a hard, driving gait, nor an extend- ed reach and drive viewed from the side. Coming and going they should tend to converge towards the center. The topline should be level on the move with the tail an extension, not held high or hooked. Is the Tervuren a “busy” breed? Does it like to have a job to do? Yes, they are busy, especially pups. They are an active, intelligent breed that like to interact with their person. With proper exercise and training (herding, agility, tracking, etc.), they are wonderful companions and thrive on the interaction. Would I consider the breed to be possessive of its people and property? Yes. They are protective and possessive of their people. They often appear aloof to strangers until they deem you trustworthy! JONI L. FRESHMAN DVMMS DACVIMCVA

Dr. Freshman earned her DVM from CSU in 1984, her MS in 1988 and her DACVIM in 1990. She man- aged reproduction centers in Cali- fornia, Texas and Colorado prior to turning to consulting in that area (laboratory, writing, online, speaking, expert witness). She also has a house call practice limited to acupuncture, laser therapy, and bodywork.

Joni brought home her first Belgian Tervuren puppy in 1986 and never looked back. She bred her first litter in 1990 and has bred sparingly since that time. She has bred and handled a Group Win- ner; multiple Group Placers; HIT in herding, obedience, and agil- ity; and Eukanuba award winners. She bred and handled the 2013 number one O-HS Belgian Tervuren (also a NW HIT dog and the second Tervuren to earn the NACSW Elite Champion title) and the 2015 OFA Champion of Health Tervuren, who herself was invited to the Eukanuba [AKC National Championship] Invitational as a youngster, and as the number one preferred Agility Belgian Tervu- ren as a nearly 12-year-old dog. Joni had also been active in local breed clubs and the American Belgian Tervuren club in both officer and longtime columnist posi- tions (multiple DWAA Award finalist). She also is an AKC licensed judge of all four Belgian breeds, has judged many regional special- ties and the 2015 ABTC National Specialty. I live in Peyton, Colorado, which is in a rural area about 20 miles east of Colorado Springs. For over 36 years I have been a veterinarian, board certified in internal medicine with special dedi- cation to small animal reproduction and neonatology, in which I currently consult, but no longer see patients. I also have a house-call acupuncture, laser therapy and bodywork practice. >

220 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2020

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