Showsight Presents the Newfoundland

q&a newfoundland

with Linda BerBerich, Meredith cavenna, Betty McdonneLL & Joan ZieLinski

excellence—not just the gorgeous head or the fasted dog in the ring. JZ: Bigger does not make for a better Newfoundland. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? LB: I so love this breed, I'm not a judge who wants to judge a hundred or so breeds, I feel I educate myself every time I walk into the ring. I love seeing a breed develop and talking with exhibitors about their beloved breed. This breed is so exceptional, with dignity, but in the same account would sit on your lap if given the opportunity—which I wouldn't mind in a minute. I'm the type of judge who loves all dogs, and if naughty, even better! MC: I love this breed. I love their beauty, their sweet tempera- ments with people and each other. When I see a good one with great breed type, size, bone and soundness, it gives me goose bumps. JZ: I do not see bad-tempered Newfoundlands. I never have, though there must be some. I see some that are mischievous and more difficult to train than others, but never mean nor nasty. I admire that about the breed. 7. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? LB: Well, many years back when I was a handler, I went to move a dog around the ring, and my shoe came flying off, and slid under the ring into the next ring and stopped right in front of the judge. I was mortified, and everyone had a good laugh, when I made it back to my place and my shoe was handed

back to me, from the other judge and steward! It turned out well though, I went WD, and we all had a good laugh. MC: I was judging a low entry breed that had an entry of two. There was a class dog and a special. I could see outside of the ring that there were two ladies with this breed. The owner of the class dog came in and showed her dog. She then explained to me that she was going to hand off her class dog to her friend who does not show dogs, so she could handle her special. She was a friend from work and she came to see the dog show and help her out. It took them a little while to switch armbands and bring both dogs back into the ring. The “new assistant” was delightful. She began to tell me how it was her first dog show, but that she has been to handling classes to help so she did know a “little”. It was obvious she was really enjoying the dog show and the day. She was chatty and all smiles. With the owner in front, the class dog started to give the inexperienced friend a little trouble, so the owner told her friend, “Just praise him and tell him he is a good boy and he will settle down.” With that her friend says loudly, “I know, and also rub his balls.” JZ: Regarding Newfoundlands, I watched a female breeder a very long time ago walking her Newfie from the benching area toward the ring. I was behind her. She had black hair, was wearing an all black outfit, sweater, shoes and pants and she was quite substantial in build. Next to her on a lead was her very large black male Newfoundland. Both were walking in the same manner, swaying from side to side like large black bears. I thought to myself, ‘Here we have the perfect example of a person who matches her dog.’

June NATIONAL SPECIALTIES (6.20-7.20) HOUND GROUP FEATURE I N O U R N E X T I S S U E

KERRY BLUE TERRIER SEALYHAM TERRIER PEKINGESE BICHON TIBETAN TERRIER

CHESAPEAKE BAY RETRIEVER COCKER SPANIELS (BLACK, ASCOB, PARTI) AKITA CANE CORSO BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG

AND INDIVIDUAL BREED FEATURES:

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