Showsight Presents The Bichon Frise

ThoughTs on The Breed: BICHON FRISE LORAINE BOUTWELL

MIMI WINKLER I am from Somers, New York. Outside of the dog world, I have been judging gymnastics since 1976. I’ve been involved with dogs my entire life. I’ve been showing dogs for 28 years and judging for 9 years.

I lived in Kansas and Missouri all my life until I moved to Scotts- dale, Arizona around five years ago. I keep busy with my judging, read- ing and learning desert gardening. My late husband Vic and I started in dogs with our Brittanys in Field Trials. We attended our first dog show in 1954 with our Brittany puppy winning a five-point major!

1. Describe the Bichon Frise in three words. LB: Happy, sturdy and white powder puff. AP: Fun, fun and fun! MW: Happy, carefree and independent.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? LB: I must have a pleasing head with round, dark eyes that are properly placed with correct pigmentation and a black nose creating an equal lateral triangle. The ears frame the face. I also must have a correct double off standing coat trimmed appropriately and a balanced dog with reach and drive with a level topline. Also, the high set tail should reach halfway to the withers. AP: Halos, good balance, good coat and good tail-set. MW: Type, temperament and soundness. 3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? LB: Some of the trims are a bit exaggerated, but that is not genetic so not a concern, I prefer a moderate trim. AP: Depending on the area of the country, heads are becom- ing exaggerated. I have seen a marked change in the shape of the back-skull and the muzzle. Length of neck is also changing. MW: Shortness of back and length of leg. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? LB: The Bichons of today are so much better is in so many ways. They are now of proper size and outline with prettier and correct expressions, and they have much better coats.

We forgot about Field Trials, although my husband still hunt- ed with our Brittanys. After being successful with our Brit- tanys, we branched out into other breeds, including Bichons. My husband became an All Breed Licensed Handler in 1964. We handled until 1980 when we started judging.

ANGELA J. PORPORA

I live in a small town in the southern tier of New York state, not far from Binghamton, around 200 miles northwest of New York City. Prior to retirement and my move to this area in 2006, I lived 50 miles north of NYC. Outside of dogs I am a retired independent insurance agent. But to keep me busy today, I drive for a local com-

munity action agency. (In a few more words, I drive Medicaid recipients to their doctor appointments.) I’ve been involved in the dog world for forty years. I’ve been showing dogs for 30 years and have been judging for the past 18 years.

4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& + 6/& t

Powered by