Top Notch Toys January 2019

C A N C H Q O C C L E ’ S S H I N E O N D A N C E

A Y E A R TO R E M E M B E R . . .

W e a r e t h a n k f u l a n d h o n o r e d t o b e r e c o g n i z e d b y t h e j u d g e s w h o h a v e p i c k e d h e r f r o m t h e l o v e l y b r e e d a n d g r o u p l i n e u p s t h i s y e a r !

y o r k s h i r e t e r r i e r b i t c h 2018 * no. 1 no. 4 B A L A N C E , MOV E M E N T & T Y P E o w n e r C H A R L OT T E PA R R I S H h a n d l e r DA RON N EWC OM B

b r e e d *

b r e e d e r s D E N I S E D R E X E L & A D R I A N G A R Z A

* T N T B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 1 1 / 3 0 / 1 8

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m u l t i p l e g r o u p p l a c i n g

C J M , C M , G C H B D R E X E L D O L C E D ON AT E L A

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*DN STATS AS OF 11/30/18

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*

*

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*

*TNT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/18

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LITTLE CHAMP WINS BIG IN FLORIDA!

CH Beauprix Legend of London enjoyed a sensational week in Orlando, winning

Best of Variety Blenheim & Prince Charles English Toy Spaniel

on 4 of the 5 days, and winning two placements in beautiful NOHS Toy Group competition!

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Richard LeBeau

BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLER

Michael J. White, MD

CO-OWNER

BEAUPRIX ENGLISH TOY SPANIELS Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Beauprix@Comcast.net Josh Krepps, Assistant

u p n d

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION TO EACH OF THE FOLLOWING JUDGES FOR RECOGNIZING CHAMP:

MR. RICHARD D. ALBEE BOV Space Coast K. C. of Palm Bay, Dec. 11th

MR. DESMOND J. MURPHY, Owner Handled Toy Group 3, Space Coast K. C. of Palm Bay, Dec. 11th MS. JOANNE (JAN) N. PAULK, BOV Brevard K. C., Dec. 12th DR. GENO SISNEROS, BOV and Owner Handled Toy Group 2, Central Florida K. C., Dec. 13th Breeder/Judge MR. DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON, BOV NOHS AKC Championship Show, Dec. 14th

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

ARAMEDIA

AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagrp.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103

18

28

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

44 64

TNT

48 52 54 58 60

70 70 71 72 73 74

14 This Month in Top Notch Toys

Top Notch Advertising Scott Toney

TNT Top Twenty Toys

BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Editor/Advertising Director 512-971-3280 bonnie@aramediagrp.com DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagrp.com JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III

18 From the 26 Toy Talk

Protect Your Local & Specialty Clubs Bonnie Guggenheim

TNT All-Breed System

Editor-in-Chief Joe McGinnis

Executive Editor Emeritus Chief Media Consultant editor@aramediagrp.com

Judging the Yorkshire Terrier Kathleen B. Kolbert

TNT Breed System

Bonnie Guggenheim

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMe- dia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express writ- ten permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publica- tion either editorially or in advertis- ing copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

28 The Biewer Terrier Debarah Billings

Evaluating the Yorkshire Terrier: A Breeder-Judge’s Viewpoint Jim Hupp

National Owner Handled System Top Toys

36 Toy Box

Simple Talk on the Yorkshire Terrier Standard Kathleen B. Kolbert

Advertising and Subscription Rates

44 AKC National

Championship Candids photos by Tom Weigand 64

Yorkshire Terrier National Rescue 2018 Patricia Kushnir, Linda

Index to Advertisers

Connor and Mary Elizabeth Dugmore

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Karson

10 months

Benitos Companeros Impuls

owned by Cathy Couture

bred by M. Kirschbaum and Klaus Vorderstrasse

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Gift from Nicoletta Pollini of Q O C C L E ' S Y O R K S H I R E T E R R I E R S I N I T A L Y

THANK YOU JUDGE VIRGINIA LYNNE ROCCO FINISHED HIS CKC CHAMPIONSHIP AT 13 MONTHS

Rocco CAN CH QOCCLE'S SHINE ON DANCE Professionally Handled by Kirsten McGregor Bred by Nicoletta Pollini • www.Qoccles.com Owned by Teresa Bell • www.KealohaKennels.com 16 • T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019

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SPREADING THE WORD FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III

When AKC first in- augurated Meet The Breeds® many were not sure what to think. Would Clubs par- ticipate? Would the fancy be support- ive? Would specta- tors come? As pretty much every- one now knows, this event has blown through the roof. Held twice a year by AKC (and now, on a smaller scale, by many all- breed clubs) MTB is a virtual hands- on learning experi- ence for the

general public and also for many of us with years under our belts. I never fail to come away with a newfound appreciation for numerous breeds and others tell me it works that way for them, too. This year at the AKC National Championship we had 171 booths up and running bright and early on Sat- urday and entertaining and educating people all weekend long. The num- ber of hours of volunteer work repre- sented here is staggering. I extend my congratulations and thanks to all the booth chairs and their teams for such a professional, responsible pres- entation of their beloved breed to those wanting to learn. Our judging team is always a col- lection of fine minds, people with a strong background and much experi- ence. In the top photo, this year’s panel is (l to r) Pete Green, Daniel Cartier, Sioux Forsyth-Green, Jacque-

lyn Fogel, Zell vonPohlman, Cindy Stansell, Chair Joe McGinnis, Gayle Denman, Diana Skibinski, Michelle Scott, Mark Benson, Pete Scott and Rob Skibinski. Photo by Phil Guidry for AKC. Top winners in the Toy Group were first, the Chihuahua Club of America, second, the Pekingese Club of America, third, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club, and fourth, the Ameri- can Toy Fox Terrier Club. Again, my thanks to all involved for a tremendous event, and to AKC for the honor of chairing the event once again. And in February we’ll have the MTB event in conjunction with Westminster, another important affair. And so as we enter into 2019, we continue to spread the word about our dogs and the difference they can make in our lives. Of course, I don’t have to tell you that; you’re already a card-carrying member of the group that will promote and protect our breeds on into the future. I’ll see you next month. From all of us to all of you, the very Happiest of New Years!

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A B I S B I S S GC H B AZ T E X MA RC H - ON B UDDHA AND T H E C HOCO L AT E BOX

GROU P T WO • T R AV I S COUN T Y K ENNE L C LU B

Sidd and Larry are pictured above receiving a Group Two from Judge

Mr. Michael Canalizo at Travis County Kennel Club in Austin, Texas.

Thanks to Mr. Canalizo for recognizing Sidd’s breed type and correct movement.

A L L B R E E D *

B R E E D * *

Thanks to all of the judges who have recognized the quality of this dog.

OWNER/HANDLERS: LARRY & PENNY DEWEY, KATY, TX BREEDER/OWNERS: CHRISTINE SMITH, AZTEX MIN PINS & DAN BAYLESS, GREATJOBS@AOL.COM

*TNT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/18 **TNT BREED STATS AS OF 11/30/18

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Champion T Y A V A ' S J U S T M Y S T Y L E

Breeder AVA TYREE www.tyava.com | Handler TAMI KELLY yorkies@gmail.com | Owners TAMI KELLY & AVA TYREE

THANK YOU JUDGES FOR YOUR AWARDS & SUPPORT!!! #welovehertoo MR. BRADLEY JENKINS FOR KICKING OFF HER CAREER! Reserve Winners Bitch at YTCA National Specialty MS. SUSAN C. CATLIN FOR COMPLETING HER CHAMPIONSHIP! Winners Bitch at YTCNC Speciality

candids by

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BY A Mclaren tail!

IT’S

HANDLED BY: Barbara J. Beissel AKC Registered Handler, barbarabeissel@aol.com OWNED & BRED BY: Jody Roberts uptik18@yahoo.com

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# 1 SILKY TERRIER 2018 BREED * *AKC stats as of 12/13/18

Silver Grand Champion Mclaren FONTECHIA MCLAREN DEW TELL ME A TALE

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*

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 11/30/18

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TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

Welcome 2019! THE TOYS ARE READY TO WIN

T he AKC Royal Canin National Championship Showwas an awe- some fun-filled and exciting show with lots of surprises in the ring and at the events associated with this fabulous show. What an undertak- ing for the Show Chair and commit- tee—and they agreed to Host it again! This amazing show is also a shoppers paradise with items you see only at National Specialties, online or no- where else… Lots of credit cards were sizzling and cash was flowing at the vendors as we walked around. With over 4,000 dogs it was just the place to see the top-winning specials from all over the country, as well as up and coming youngsters just getting started. It was overwhelming in every way from size of venue to the number of exhibitors and dogs from over 20 countries with many languages spo- ken and beautiful dogs not seen in this country prior to this show. Many of the lovely class dogs will be seen in the specials ring for 2019 so they were carefully watched to catch a glimpse of what might be coming Lots of the class dogs and new specials were produced by top winning specials parents from 2017 and 2018 which proves a pedigree of quality comes shining through. Generation after generation of dogs that consistently reach top dog status speaks well for dedicated breeders with knowledge of their respective breeds who study pedigrees and are always searching to improve what they have accomplished.

M e e t i n g many of

you whom I only talk with on the phone was one of the best parts of this ab- s o l u t e l y f a b u l o u s show and for those I missed, let’s make plans for the Florida circuit or another show. Putting a face with a name makes TNT lots more fun for you and for me! February will be the start of 35 years for TOP NOTCH TOYS and I want to thank all of you who have contrib- uted articles, ads, breeder forums and supported the toy group through the years. The competition in Toys is very tough and getting more so each year. Call me and let’s talk about Toys! If you are planning to campaign your dog and you need a plan and a bud- get… I can help with great ideas on how to succeed. See you soon at a show somewhere! Let me know about your exciting wins, newpuppies and ideas. Remem- ber, inquiring minds want to know. Have a wonderful, healthy and win- ning 2019. Enjoy the Progressive Toy dog show, the Specialties the Flor- ida Circuit and lots of other shows around the country. Showcase those wins for the February Westminster issue that will be seen in hotels, ring- side and exciting places in NYC.

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagrp.com 863.738.8848 Bake in a greased 8" x 11" pan at 325 degrees for 30 minutes. Cut into squares and store in the refrigerator. Makes an out- standing treat and you knowex- actly what is in it. You can sub- stitute liver or beef if youwant a different flavor. A NEW YEARS TREAT FOR YOUR DOGS! Chicken Squares Doggie Treats 1. 14 oz can chicken flavored canned dog food 2. 1 egg 3. 4 cups quick oats 4. 1/2 cup whole milk powder Combine dog food and egg first, pour into a bowl and add remaining ingredients. Slowly add warmwater. 5. 1/2 cup wheat germ 6. 1/2 cup warmwater

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*AKC NOHS STATS AS OF 12/26/18

Team Stryker would like to thank all of the Judges who found this Very Correct Yorkie

and awarded him in 2018, and the kind comments from our fellow exhibitors. We look forward to a successful 2019. Stryker #2 OWNER HANDLED * | A VERY CORRECT YORKIE! M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C I N G | B I S O H B I S O H G C H T YAVA’ S S U G A R F O OT ’ S S T R I K E F O R C E

BREEDER AVA TYREE | TYAVAS YORKIES

OWNER / HANDLER VICKI EDWARDS | SUGARFOOT YORKIES

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THE BIEWER TERRIER: A BREEDER’S VIEW

by Debarah Billings

O h Wow! What kind of dog is that? Can I take a photo? How do you pronounce the name? Is it full grown? Where do they come from? These are the questions from people that meet the Biewer Terrier for the first time, as noted recently by breed- er Casey Gilbert with Karisma Biew- er Terriers inWashington State. I was asked these same questions when I started my breeding program and Windsong Biewers with the Biewer Terrier nearly 10 years ago. My very first show was in Orlando Florida in 2009 and I fell even more in love with this little unique looking dog. My life’s goal never included be- ing a dog breeder, but it turned out to be my passion. I wanted to help pro- mote this wonderful little dog in order to get AKC recognition, so I began showing at every possible venue that would allow our breed to participate. The one question we all get is “How do you pronounce the name?” Here is your answer. Beaver like the animal! The breed originated in Germany so the “w” is pronounced as a “v”. I had a great mentor and traveled to seminars taught by the leading authorities on breeding good dogs. When my first litter arrived, I was amazed at how different the color pat- terns were for each puppy. The col- ors were correct, but the black spots

were in different patterns whichmade them even more unique. I kept the best structured puppy and moved for- ward, without regard to color place- ment on the back. As our breed prepares to move for- ward into Miscellaneous in July of 2019, breeders should be breeding toward the Biewer Terrier Standard with emphasis on health, structure, and temperament being the prior- ity. Biewer Terrier puppies can have a color fault such as a small amount of tan on a leg where the black meets the white, or black can sometimes run down the entire leg. Maybe the back doesn’t have any black or blue at all with a perfectly colored head with wonderful structure or perhaps the body has a perfect black saddle and great conformation, but the head color is very light. Some haveminimal tan spots on the toes. What would you choose if a litter has all these different color faults, but one puppy that has your ideal color has a high rear or roach back? I always choose structure over color and as our breed moves forward, I see the color becoming more uniform. Tammy Ryker with Strudl Haus Biewer Terriers says the breed causes so much excitement both to the public and fellow dog show enthusiasts! She gets inquiries fromCairn, Basset, and Chihuahua breeders. She plans her

first litter soon and is busy getting the health testing completed. The Biewer Terrier Breed panel includes DM, PLL, PRA, and Uric Acid. Patellas and Eye Certification with OFA are recommended by the Par- ent Club in order to receive a CHIC number. Several breeders are also do- ing Genetic Diversity testing which is another tool in selecting for a more diverse gene pool, but should never be the only tool utilized in planning your breeding pairs. Gayle Pruett started with the breed around 2004 and was a Yorkshire Terrier and Shih Tzu breeder before finding our breed. She also suggests not only the Genetic health testing but a Super Chem-Cast Blood panel before breeding.

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silver grand champion CH Angelheart N Adorabull’s Moose On The Loose

Moose

NO. 1 HAVANESE OH*

NO. 14 TOP 100 OH (OVER ALL)*

NO. 8 ALL BREED***

NO. 9 BREED**

ON HIS JOURNEY TO THE 2018 NOHS FINALS, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 2018 NOHS BEST OF BREED WINNER

bred by PAULA & BILL FRAZIER co-owned by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER & JANE CHAVEZ co-owned & exclusively presented by KAREN MARIE DUPRAT assisted by BRIELLE MARIE DUPRAT

THANK YOU JUDGES OH RBIS, BREVARD KC, FL - GABRIEL VALDEZ OH BOB, 2018 NOHS FINALS, FL - DOUGLAS JOHNSON AOM, AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP, FL - PAT LAURENS

*AKC NOHS stats 2018 **TNT breed stats as of 11/30/18 ***TNT all breed stats as of 11/30/18 candids by ©Brielle Marie Duprat

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Wolpert's YO R K S H I R E T E R R I E R S I T WA S A N OT H E R F U N Y E A R

Breeders/Owners/Handlers: Fred & Marcia Wolpert mwolpert2004@verizon.net

C H . WO L P E R T ’ S WATC H I N G M E CH. PASTORAL ALL EYES ON ME x. WOLPERT’S LOVING FOOL Watcher

Watcher shown finishing his cham- pionship with WD, BOB for a 4 pt. major at Upper Marlboro Kennel Club show under judge Kenneth Kauffman. He finished with5 BOB’s from the classes.

C H . WO L P E R T ’ S WATC H M E N OW CH. PASTORAL ALL EYES ON ME x WOLPERT’S LOVING FOOL Albert

Albert is shown finishing his championship at the York Kennel Club show under judge Mrs. Eva Berg. He was WD at th Delaware Valley Yorkshire Terrier Specialty show under judge Mrs. Lydia Hutchinson last August.

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C H .WO L P E R T ’ S P I C K - A - DA I S E Y EXMOOR’S EXTROVERT ROM x WOLPERT’S OOPS-A-DAISEY ROM Earlier this year Pickles was WB at the Watchung Mountains Yorkshire Terrier Specialty under judge Ms. Diane Ondo. Pickles is shown here going WB & BOB at the Upper Marlboro Kennel Club show finishing her championship under judge Mrs. Polly Smith and becoming champion no. 9 for Exmoor’s Extrovert ROM. Pickles

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R I N G I N G I N T H E N E W Y E A R W I T H

SILVER!

under judge Patricia Laurens where she completed her SILVER Grand. BOB AT THE 2018 AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

H A N D L E D B Y J E N N I F E R M I L L E R - F A R I A S A N D B R E E D E R - O W N E R D I A N E L Y N N H O R N B E C K E R

GLORY TO GOD

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SILVER GRAND CHAMPION C H A N G E L I N A R U B Y ’ S H E A V E N L Y D R E A M m u l t i p l e g r o u p p l a c i n g

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

Submitted by: Zoey Porter

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog.

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Spanky S I LV E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N O A K H U R S T ’ S G O O D M O R N I N G C A P TA I N A M E R I C A

Thank you Mrs. Olga Gange for the Group placement among tough Toy competition!

MULTIPLE NOHS BIS • MULTIPLE NOHS GROUPWINNER MULTIPLE NOHS GROUP PLACEMENTS MULTIPLE All BREED GROUP PLACEMENTS

OAKHURST • MARIBETH MITCHELL BOPP • BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLER • AKC BREEDER OF MERIT • YTCA TOP BREEDER 2017

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BEST BRED BY EXHIBITOR BEST OF OPPOSITE SEX

VETERAN DOG AKC/Royal Canin Orlando December 2018

BEST OF OPPOSITE SEX BEST VETERAN

Silly Terrier Club of Central Florida Orlando 2018

BREEDERS/OWNERS Barbara Beissel, Mark Benson, James Dillman & Janet Aslett BendillSilkyTerriers@juno.com

LAMPLIGHTER TATTLE TAIL P l a t n i u m G r a n d C h a m p i o n 40 • T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019

William

OWNED BY VICKI DOVELLOS & JANE MARTENSON

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C E N T E N N I A L F A R M S P R E S E N T S

PRACT I CAL LY P ERF ECT A “ C a t c h e r ” r e p e a t b r e e d i n g f o l l o w i n g f a m o u s f o o t s t e p s !

B r e e d e r & O w n e r E u g e n e B e l l a m y | C E N T E N N I A L F A R M S

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AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

Orlando, FL . December 15-16, 2018 photos by Tom Weigand, The Winning Image, and Editor

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G R O U P W I NN I NG & P L A C I NG G R A N D C H A M P I O N S K Y ’ S T H E L I M I T S L I P E T S K I H O Z E R

THE SKY IS NOT THE LIMIT IF YOU ARE REACHING FOR THE STARS!

Owned by: Tina Bregman, OneLove Chihuahuas | Bred by: Natalia Kostina | Handled by: Michelle Scott

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AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

Orlando, FL . December 15-16, 2018 photos by Tom Weigand, The Winning Image, and Editor

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TOP NOTCH ADVERTISING SIMPLE RULES FOR EFFECTIVE ADS b y Scott Toney, Midwood Japanese Chin

H aving spent almost 20 years as a commercial marketing execu- tive for a major bank, I have come to understand the value of an ef- fective marketing and advertising campaign. A comprehensive mar- keting campaign is a multi-pronged endeavor encompassing advertis- ing, public relations, media relations and community involvement, to name but a few. For the purposes of this article let’s examine the role of print advertising, and how you can ramp up the impact of your ads in v arious publications. PRINT VS. ONLINE ADVERTISING It’s no secret in the internet age that online publications and advertising have replaced many of our beloved publications including newspapers, periodicals and breed magazines. Internet advertising can reach a broader audience for less money, but it’s important to remember that the impact of an online ad can

be fleeting. For example, if an online ad has a clickable “call to action” like directing you to a 20% off coupon or a website where you can purchase goods or services, it is very effective, but also very temporary. For the type of meaningful, lasting impressions we are trying to make as dog breed- ers and exhibitors, nothing replaces advertising in print. BENEFITS OF PRINT ADVERTISING There is no better way to target a specific or narrow audience than print advertising. As dog breeders/ exhibitors, we are fortunate thawt we can send our message to as broad or narrow an audience as we like. For example, we can market in all-breed (Showsight) , Toy (Top Notch Toys) or specific breed publications (The Ori- ent Express) making our audience as broad or as narrow as we’d like. Print ads not only target your specific audience but are sustainable (publi- cations are permanent records, and

often valued reference guides), de- livered to loyal readers and can be repeated as often as you’d like. Your message can evolve from month-to- month as the story, history and wins of your dog grows. SOME SIMPLE RULES TO FOLLOW • Develop a look and feel for your “brand” and stick to it. As stated, you can create sustained impact by advertising on a monthly basis.

“PRINT ADS NOT ONLY TARGET YOUR SPECIFIC AUDIENCE but are sustainable...”

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P O R T R A I T Y O R K S H I R E T E R R I E R S

and h i s l i t t l e brothe r

G C H B P O R T R A I T S D O N ’ T G O B R E A K I N M Y H E A R T ELTON PRINCE P O R T R A I T S L O Y A L D E F E N D E R

Proudly shown by JUDY MARKSBURY breeder-owner-handler www.visithappytails.com Lanesville Indiana Breeding to the AKC standard healthy beautiful dogs .

© Ted Prescott

A L L Y O U N E E D I S L O V E . G O O D L U C K T O E V E R Y O N E I N N EW Y O R K ! ! !

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“IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO CREATE A ‘BRAND’ OR A LASTING MESSAGE OR

IMPRESSION ABOUT YOUR DOG (OR ANY ‘PRODUCT’) print ads have proven time and again to be the best way to do this.”

Don’t lose your kennel or your dog’s identity by having radically differ- ent looks each month. Work with a graphics person or the ad contact of your favorite magazine to identify key elements that you will consis- tently use in your ads such as a font (clear and large enough to be easily read!), color palette, logo, and boil- erplate language. For example, con- sistently using the same signature information such as: a. owner/breeder/handler info b. Logo c. Tagline d. Contact info including email address, web or Facebook URLs, etc. • Make sure you deliver pertinent in- formation. What is the dog’s name? Who is handling the dog? What judge is pictured in the photo? Where was the dog shown? What do you want your audience to know about this dog; i.e. that he’s #1 in the country, cleared for knees, hearts and eyes, youngest to ever win a national specialty, available at stud, etc? • Use high-quality, true-to-life pho- tos. Make sure your photo is at least 300dpi and shows your dog at a flat- tering angle. Small technical flaws in the photograph can be photo- shopped, but never at the expense of altering the true look of your dog.

You want your dog to wow fellow exhibitors and judges when seen in person and not be a big let-down from an artificially created illusion of them. • While it’s important to have a con- sistent look and feel for your ads as far as stylistic elements, remember to mix up the photos and layout from time to time. Stacked show photos can become boring. A beau- tiful candid shot can really let your peers and judges see the dog’s natu- ral expression. If you want the dog and its handler to be recognized as a team, be sure to include photos of the dog and handler together. Don’t always use the standard lay- out of a headline at the top of the page, show picture in the middle, and boilerplate language at the bottom. Create visual interest by making the reader’s eye move across the page in different ways. Make them want to stop and study your ad. • Don’t over-do it! This is one of the most important pieces of ad- vice I can share. It’s tempting to use too many photos, too much copy or over-the-top, hyperbolic words when describing your dogs. Remember the old saying “less is more.” Make your words count, and don’t inundate the reader with too many superlatives when

describing your dog, their win or the competition they defeated. There is a fine line between a hum- ble “brag” and obnoxious boasting. Not every win was accomplished by “beating top specials” or un- der the country’s most esteemed judge. Choose your words wisely or after a while they will become only so much background noise. • Recognizing judges: Please respect the judge(s) by mentioning them by name (spelled correctly please!) and extending your thanks. Re- member, the thank you is not be- cause the judge “gave” you or your dog the win. The appreciation is for their hard work and dedication in honor of our sport and for their upholding and recognizing the breed standard. CREATING YOUR BRAND Print advertising creates a perma- nent record of your message that can be accessed over and over again by multiple people. If you are looking to create a “brand” or a lasting message or impression about your kennel, dog, or any “product,” print ads have prov- en time and again to be the best way to do this. Take your time to place clear and compelling ads on a regular basis and you will be surprised at the positive results.

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T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019 • 51

PROTECT YOUR LOCAL & SPECIALTY CLUBS

by Bonnie Guggenheim

H as your kennel club ever been sued? Have you had an exhibitor fall in the ring? A judge slip en- tering the building? A dog bite a child? A spectator who paid to attend your show is knocked over by an ex- hibitor with crates on a dolly? In any of the situations, liability could be the determining factor in what happens to your kennel club, unless you are properly insured by a Com- mercial General Liability policy with adequate limits to protect your club, the venue and your officers, directors and volunteer working members. Next concern is your treasury. Big or small, you must have funds to put on your show which includes payment to judges, the superintendent, lunches or dinners for judges and members, raffle or auction expenses and all the many other costs involved with put- ting on a show. A Fidelity Bond policy would protect your kennel club, your directors and show chair, plus give your members confidence that the money earned by the club is protected

“IN ANY OF THE SITUATIONS, LIABILITY COULD BE THE DETERMINING FACTOR IN WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR KENNEL CLUB, UNLESS YOU ARE PROPERLY INSURED BY A COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY POLICY WITH ADEQUATE LIMITS TO PROTECT YOUR CLUB, THE VENUE AND your officers, directors and volunteer working members.”

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“Coverage can be adjusted based on what underwriting can offer and the club budget.”

from theft or embezzlement. Anyone serving as a treasurer should also be bonded and the club should insist on a Position Bond so they are able to elect a new treasurer and know the insur- ance is in place; no specific name is re- quired. Your books should, of course, be audited with each change in the treasurer’s office. Depending on the amount of money and the financial circumstances of your club, the audit may or may not be a certified audit but could be per- formed by an outside source offering this service. Limits on a Fidelity (or Crime coverage) policy are deter- mined by the company underwriting the policy and the number of Board and kennel club members. Most im- portant in this determination is the amount of money in your treasury. Some companies will include your rescue funds (most do not) and some will include your funds for your Ca- nine Health Foundation accounts. Be certain to cover as much as the company will offer as the premiums for this type of insurance are very reasonable. If your assets were wiped out, could you put on a show? Back to the Commercial General Li- ability policy. Today it seems every- one is subject to allegations of liability that are a result of your dog show, pos- sibly your conformation classes and even Meet The Breed events hosted by your kennel club. For the CGL to cover any accident or injury, your club must be legally liable and negligence must be proven. The cost of defense even when you are found not liable is high and should your club be liable

for whatever reason, claims can be extremely high. The frightening part of this—and do check your club pol- icy and your homeowner policy—is each director and officer can be held personally accountable. An attorney hired to sue the club will include the venue, your officers and directors and anyone additional involved. I’m per- sonally aware a lawsuit that included the city the show was held in! Final insurance your all breed or specialty club should consider is Di- rectors and Officers Liability. As a general rule, this is the most costly of the types of insurance discussed, but personally, I would not serve as an officer or director of a club that did not carry it. This type of insur- ance provides coverage or protection from claims as a result of club activi- ties to include misleading statements, breach of duty, neglect, error or acts of omission. The company underwriting will have specific verbiage to clarify all coverage. Discuss all your needs with the agent or agency you decide to purchase your insurance from. You can request a quote so your board or members can vote on the amount of insurance your club needs to carry as well as discuss the various types of coverage. Coverage can be adjusted based on what underwriting can offer and the club budget. My reason for including this brief insurance lesson is simple. Unfortu- nately, several years ago, I was Show Chair of a fairly large and active all breed club that was accused of negli- gence in preventing injury to an ex- hibitor. The kennel club was sued, the

city, the large civic center and all of- ficers and directors of the board were personally sued. The person who claimed negligence stated that she stepped into the building and slipped on a wet floor falling and breaking several bones. She said there were no cones indicating a wet floor and no warning signs were posted—probably some dog relieving himself there was her comment. In reality, and there were several wit- nesses, she stepped out of her motor home in the parking lot and stepped onto a dolly she planned to load wire crates on to pull dogs into the build- ing. Her foot became entangled she went down. She then got up, loaded and pulled the dolly with dogs on it (in wire crates) and entered the building. Upon entering, she stated she slipped on the wet floor and was ultimately taken to the hospital as a result of the fall inside the building. Exhibitors saw her fall in the parking lot and others saw her enter the build- ing where she supposedly slipped and fell and stated she did not fall inside at all. Fortunately, this club had the ap- propriate insurance and no liability was assigned to the club or any of the members. She received no money and the claim was denied. It was a learn- ing experience for all concerned and one I discuss with every club I’m in- volved with. The person discussed later passed away in an auto accident. Protect your club, your members and your money—learn about insurance, club and personal liability and make sure you’re covered!

T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019 • 53

JUDGING THE by KATHLEEN B. KOLBERT, JUDGE Turyanne Yorkshire Terriers AKC Reg. YORKSHIRE TERRIER

A s a breeder since 1963, and a judge since 1979, I hope I can enlighten those who now judge, and those who hope to judge, this very controversial breed. As I go through my judging procedure I hope to make you aware of the breed char- acteristics that set this breed apart from the other toy breeds. These are coat, color and texture. The standard currently in use was approved on April 12 th , 1966. In my opinion it is a very good Stan- dard. Sadly, many of the Yorkshire Terriers exhibited today do not come close to meeting the criteria described therein. I will now relate step by step, the procedure I follow when judging my breed.

For themost part Yorkie’s do notmind being examined, however every once in a while one may go for you. Please bear this in mind when approaching each exhibit. I take the dog’s head in my hands and look for a rather flat head. The skull should not be too prominent or round. Similarly, the muzzle should not be overly long. The eyes should be of medium size and not overly promi- nent. Dark in color and sparkling with a sharp intellident expression. Oval shaped eyes are preferred, not round eyes. A large round eye is gen- erally found with a too round a skull. A “small beady eye” is highly undesir- able and detracts from expression. Ears are small and set high on the skull and not too far apart. Head color is darker at the roots than in the middle, shading to still lighter tan at the tips. You need to fan out the head hair to see the shading. There should be no sooty or black hair inter- mingled with any of the tan. Puppies are born black and tan are normally darker in color, showing an inter- mingling of black hair in the tan until they matured. Richness of tan on the head and legs are of prime importance in all adult dogs. Scissors bite preferred, size of teeth in direct proportion to size of dog. Lips, nose and eye rims should always be black. Next, I run my hands down to check the length of neck and lay back of shoulders, follow down the leg to

Having assembled the class I have the exhibits stand so that I may take a first look at each dog’s outline. This is each exhibits first chance to say tome, “I am truly typical of my breed.” I then take them around the ring in order to observe the ability of each to maintain the correct outline andover- all balance when moving. Additional- ly, I am looking for that confident and self-important air so important to the breed. I am now ready to examine each ex- hibit on the table. As I do so, I first check the side view of the dog for cor- rect proportions. A four-pound head on a six-pound dog is not acceptable. Next, go around to the front of the dog and look at them as they face you. Extend your hand and then approach.

“FOR THE MOST PART YORKIE’S DO NOT MIND BEING EXAMINED, HOWEVER EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE ONE MAY GO FOR YOU. Please bear this in mind when approaching each exhibit.”

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THANK YOU JUDGE MR. ALBERT EASDON, ENGLAND

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“A Yorkshire Terrier with a sensational coat that moves well and has a poor head, is simply a sound well-coated animal lacking true breed type.”

compare individual dog to the breed standard. Then I compare the dogs to each other and evaluate which individual dog best exemplifies the breed standard. Moving themall together again I make my placements. Keywords here are breed type and balance. Example: A Yorkshire Terrier that has a pretty head and face furnishing to the floor are truly wonderful when they are totally in keeping with the rest of the animal, with a good front, sound rear and level topline. Otherwise, all you have is a pretty head, lacking breed type. A Yorkshire Terrier with a sensation- al coat that moves well and has a poor head, is simply a sound well-coated animal lacking true breed type. Any Yorkshire Terrier, which is overdone in any department, has lost its overall balance and its true Breed Type.

make sure they are not out at the el- bows, forelegs are straight. Moving to the side, run my hands over the back to check for a level topline and a prop- er tail set. While at the side, I check coat color and texture and look for running tan. Running tan is when the tan extends down on the back of the neck or above the elbows on the forelegs and above the stifles on the hind legs. Moving to the rear I check for sound- ness of the rear legs, proper angu- lation, hind legs are straight when viewed from behind, stifles are mod- erately bent when viewed from the side. An over angulated dog will single tract while moving. A straight stifle or straight hock will cause a dog to be high in the rear. Placing my hands on the shoulders and drawing them back to the rear I can evaluate the body. We want a compact, well-bodied animal with a good spring of rib and adequate depth of brisket and fore chest. Overly long bodies or exaggerated short ones are both undesirable. The ideal spring of rib is oval in shape with sufficient depth to meet the elbows. At this point I have the dogs move in a triangle. My reason for a triangle is that I can see the rear going, the topline going across and the front as it returns, and when they stop in front of me I can see expression. When they are all back in line I like to stand in the middle of the ring and look at each dog carefully. I

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Iwas born and educated inConnecticut and hold aMaster’s Degree in Finance. Retiredas aBankOfficer after 30years of service. My involvement with breed- ing and showing began in 1963 after I was given a Champion Yorkshire Ter- rier for my birthday. This was not my first experience with dogs. My father raised Norwich Terriers and Smooth Fox Terriers. As an exhibitor and breeder of York- shire Terriers, Old English Sheepdogs, Pekingese and Shih Tzu. We have very successfully campaigned to Best In Shows. Winning World Champion with two of my Yorkshire Terriers. At the present time from Turyanne AKC reg. lines the following Breeders Casino, Gayelyn, Rembrandt’s, High Hopes, Fenway’s, Charizma, over 250 American Champion. In Europe and additional 30-40. Approved to Judge in 1979 and at the present time I judge Best In Show, the Toy Group and Non-Sporting Group and Junior’s. Active Member in the following Dog Clubs: Yorkshire Ter- rier Club of America, Judges Educa- tion, past treasurer. Yorkshire Terrier Club of Greater New York, Vice Presi- dent, Assistant Show Chairman. Past Treasurer. Naugatuck Vally Kennel Club, President, and past Treasurer. Progressive Dog Club of Greater New York, President.

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EVALUATING THE YORKSHIRE TERRIER: A BREEDER-JUDGE’S VIEWPOINT

by JIM HUPP

I n this issue of Top Notch Toys , they are showcasing the Yorkshire Ter- rier. As a breeder judge, I have been asked to share my viewpoint on how to evaluate the Yorkshire Terrier and in doing so, hopefully to assist new judges to the breed, with their future assignments. In the past 30 plus years, I have seen the Yorkshire Terrier go through many changes, depending on what was “in” at the time. I can remember the black, soft-coated dogs being the popular choice to exhibit. Then, the lighter blue, silk dogs became the col- or of choice. Every breeder and judge will have his or her interpretation of what the cor- rect type is for evaluating the York- shire Terrier. Because of the differ- ent type of Yorkies being exhibited today, as well in the past, many judges express that it is a difficult breed to judge. The Yorkshire Terrier standard de- scribes the breed as “a long-haired Toy Terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog’s high head carriage and confi- dent manner should give the appear- ance of vigor self-importance.” This statement gives one a mental picture of an adult dog, approximately three years of age.

The Yorkshire Terrier is born black and tan and the coat has a slow meta- morphosis from the black to tan pup- py to the blue and tan adult. I believe this time frame is the most difficult for judges to evaluate. As the Yorkie matures, the body coat may look black to a light blue, while the tan pattern, can go from a gray/ whitish color, before the rich shaded golden tan comes in on a mature dog. I have heard many new judges ask, “What is that whitish/gray color on top of the head?” This is why Judges Education, discussion with long time breeders and ring side mentoring is so important. The body coat of many puppies can look light and sparse. This coat can also be misconceiving, as this type of coat develops very slowly. The puppy with the heavier coat that appears black, yet has a good natu- ral sheen to the hair, can be mis- conceived as a poor coat texture to non-breeder judges. I have seen judges part the coat, at the shoulder area, to look for breaking of color toward the skin. This is fine, but the correct coat should always have a natural luster and sheen close to the skin in a younger dog and it will be the correct texture as an adult. The cute puppy with a heavy wooly coat will have no luster or sheen to the hair and the tan markings will be profuse and have a cream color. This type of coat should be severely faulted, as when

the dog matures, the body color will become a clerical gray and the shaded rich golden tan markings will be a cream/white color. Along those lines I personally feel that many judges put too much em- phasis on the wording “dark steel blue.” This is the ideal description in our standard, but even breeders have their own interpretations of what is the ideal color. The standard states “quality, texture and quantity of coat are of prime importance.” The coat is glossy, fine and silky in texture. When I am evaluating dogs in the ring and if I have a very nice balanced, sound moving dog, with overall Yor- kie type, which carries the blue and

58 • T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019

the black and tan puppy to the blue and tan adult. The YTCA chose not to specify an age for color maturity. Unfortunately, this has caused a few Yorkies to be DQ’d due to judge’s in- terpretation. Only dogs of solid color, parti color, or unusual markings, that is not the blue and tan pattern as outlined in the standard, should be disqualified. In closing, I would like to add the positives of what I believe is being shown in the ring today. There ismore overall consistency in structure, coat texture and color. There are some Yorkies currently being specialed that are a very good representations of the breed, all in their own rights. There is no perfect dog; however, if a good topline is present, then we can evaluate other parts of the dog. I feel that Yorkshire Terriers being shown should be as sound as possible and a bitch should be of a size to be able to reproduce. If one can breed that perfect dark blue silk coat with the proper shaded gold- en tan, on a sound moving dog, then you have perfection and we should al- ways strive for that goal. Hopefully this article will be helpful in evaluating the Yorkshire Terrier. ABOUT THE AUTHOR My name is James “Jim” Hupp, I re- side in Kokomo. IN and I have been in- volved in the wonderful breed of York- shire Terriers since 1974. Along with my partner in the sport, Bret Walker, we have been fortunate to have bred BIS and BISS winners under the pre- fix of Exmoor. We have bred over 60 AKC Champions. I am an AKC licensed judge for all Toys, Jrs and BIS. I have been fortu- nate to have had the opportunity to have judged numerous Yorkie Spe- cialties, including the YTCA Na- tional and Roving Specialties, Re- gional Specialties, as well as, many toy dog clubs. I have made many long times friends in the sport of dogs and hope to continue more of the same in the future. T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2019 • 59

important to breeders that exhibit Yorkies, although it is vaguely dis- cussed in our present standard. The standard reads “forelegs should be straight, elbows neither in nor out. Hind legs straight when viewed from behind, but stifles are moderately bent when viewed from the sides. The hair may be trimmed to floor length to give ease of movement.” The AKC Judge’s Education Video and the Yorkshire Terrier Illustrated Standard does address proper move- ment and carriage. The Yorkshire Terrier that possesses proper struc- ture should move in a fluid motion. As a breeder judge I believe a good topline and good movement is of ut- most importance. When evaluating a potential show pup, most breeders are concernedwith a good topline. Sowhy not make that a priority when evaluat- ing your dogs in the ring? A Yorkshire Terrier, that canmove around the ring with a level topline, fluid movement, while carrying a flowing silky coat, is a sight to behold. I also want to touch on another im- portant area, especially for newer judges of the breed. I feel it is im- portant to give a bit of history about how and why the DQ was added in October 2007. DISQUALIFICATIONS: Any solid color or combination of colors other than blue and tan as described above. Any white markings other than a small white spot on the forechest that does not exceed one inch at its longest dimension. The reason behind the disqualifica- tion was the concern by the YTCA with off-color Yorkies, including, parti and solid colors, including gold, red or brown, being exhibited in the ring. The AKC will not deny registra- tions on color alone and there are cur- rently parti and solid color dogs be- ing registered as Yorkshire Terriers. The AKC wanted the YTCA to state an age when the Yorkshire Terrier was “mature.” However, as I mentioned earlier, the coat of the Yorkshire Terrier can take up to three years to mature from

tan pattern, I have no problem merit- ing a dog which has a lighter blue color Please do not let the dark steel blue wording consume your every thought and ultimately award an unsound dog based on the ideal color alone. There are two big misconceptions I hear and feel should be clarified per our standard. First is that a Yorkie is to weigh four to seven pounds. That might be a preference in general, but not worded in our Standard. Accord- ing to Yorkshire Terrier standard it simply states “Weight: Must not ex- ceed seven pounds.” This is where weight and height can be so deceiv- ing. A four pound and a seven pound dog is a big difference when both are exhibited in the ring, especially if they are in the same class. The keyword for proper evaluation is balance. If all the parts are in proper proportions and the dog maintains good type, I rec- ommend you should not get “hung up” on a smaller/shorter legged dog or a larger/taller dog, whichever the case. Secondly, some judges will fault a good overall Yorkie because the eyes are not almond or oval shaped. Our standard states: “Eyes are medium in size and not too prominent; dark in color and sparkling with a sharp, intelligent expression.” So please keep this in mind when evaluating the total dog. As a breeder-judge, I can certainly un- derstand one’s dilemma, as for breed- ing for that quality dog, it is a very dif- ficult to get everything in a nice, neat package; however, we should all strive for that perfection. In my opinion, when judging the Yorkshire Terrier, as well as any other breed, one should not place all of the emphasis on one area of the breed. Look at the overall dog and focus on the positive points in the breed, even if it is not your “personal” style. I de- spise the excuse, “if your class dog just had a little more face furnishings...” Providing the face furnishings are the correct texture and color, hair can al- ways grow. That alone should not be a factor in your decision, unless every- thing else is equal. Movement is something that is very

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