Showsight Presents The Portuguese Water Dog

WATER DOG PORTUGUESE

Let’s Talk Breed Education!

THE FOLLOWING IS A HUMOROUS (BUT PRETTY ACCURATE) DESCRIPTION OF WHAT AN OWNER CAN ACTUALLY EXPECT FROM LIFE WITH A PWD. WHAT IS A PORTUGUESE WATER DOG, REALLY?

COURTESY OF THE PORTUGUESE WATER DOG CLUB OF AMERICA

F irst, the Standard’s actual words, and then a look at those words in another light. Known for centuries along Portugal’s coast, this seafaring breed was prized by fishermen for a spirited, yet obedient nature, and a robust, medium build that allowed for a full day’s work in and out of the water. The Portuguese Water Dog is a swimmer and diver of exceptional ability and stamina, who aided his master at sea by retrieving broken nets, herding schools of fish, and carrying messages between boats and shore. He is a loyal companion and an alert guard. This highly intelligent utilitarian breed is distinguished by two coat types, either curly or wavy; an impressive head of considerable breadth and well- proportioned mass; a ruggedly built, well-knit body; and a powerful, thickly based tail, carried gallantly or used purposefully as a rudder. The Portuguese Water Dog provides an indelible impression of strength, spirit, and soundness. EXPRESSION Steady, penetrating, and attentive. TEMPERAMENT THE REAL STANDARD GENERAL APPEARANCE An animal of spirited disposition, self-willed, brave, and very resistant to fatigue. A dog of exceptional intelligence and a loyal companion, it obeys its master with facility and apparent pleasure. It is obedient to those who look after it or with those for whom it works. WHAT IT REALLY MEANS GENERAL APPEARANCE Notorious as a brawler for centuries along Portugal’s coast, this seafaring breed was prized by fishermen for a pushy nature and a robust, medium build that needed the mental and physical demands of a full day’s work in and out of the water to reduce its energy level to one that allowed it to hear and obey its master’s commands. The Portuguese Water Dog seeks and loves to splash and wallow in mud, water bowls, toilets with open lids, and any liquid—water, paint, etc. It does this with great finesse and stamina, unendingly, while aid- ing its master by retrieving any item that it sees and wants to carry, regardless of size, delicacy, or ownership. Its incessant retrieving instinct leads to a dog that must have something in its mouth to carry, chew on, or swallow, whether that item is edible or decorative, such as furniture.

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WHAT IS A PORTUGUESE WATER DOG, REALLY?

“A DOG OF EXCEPTIONAL ABILITY TO MANIPULATE PEOPLE AND ITS ENVIRONMENT, ANDASTRONGDESIRETOLEAD, MAKES IT INCESSANTLY DESIRE TO BE AROUND HUMANS WHOM IT CAN BEND TO ITS WISHES.”

He is a clinging companion and an incessant alarm barker. This highly manipu- lative breed is distinguished by two coat types, either curly or wavy, which require extensive grooming (bathing, brushing, combing, detangling, etc) far in excess of the time that would be spent vacuuming up dog hair. If not groomed regularly, small amounts of dirt, twigs, dust, mats, and other yard matter “Velcro” themselves to the unruly coat until being redistributed in the home; a common PWD owner decorating trend referred to as “bringing the outside in.” It has an impressive head of considerable breadth and well-proportioned mass, which it uses for head and body rams; a ruggedly built, well-knit body, which enables it to counter-surf and jump onto tables and over fences; and a powerful, thickly based tail, carried gallantly or used purposefully as a rudder or to clear items off coffee tables and destroy Lego constructions built on the

floor by children. EXPRESSION

Direct, rude, and demanding. The Portuguese Water Dog likes to be at eye level with humans, resulting in an almost un-extinguishable jumping-up greeting behavior. TEMPERAMENT An animal with a mind of its own, brash, with ADHD. A dog of exceptional ability to manipulate people and its environment, and a strong desire to lead, makes it incessantly desire to be around humans whom it can bend to its wishes. If trained by a person with patience, superior intelligence, and unilateral focus, it will obey its master with facility and apparent pleasure until it decides to test or until it devises an alternative worth trying. COAT AND THE ‘HYPOALLERGENIC’ ASPECT The low shedding quality that attracts many to this breed also means that they need grooming. They should have a single coat of hair (most breeds are double-coat- ed) that keeps growing. It needs to be brushed and combed regularly and clippered periodically. How often depends on your preferences and the growth rate for the individual dog. No matter what, a Portuguese Water Dog will require a good bit of grooming time from you. Since they shed very little (but they do shed—all mammals shed at least a little), they are often better suited than other breeds for people with allergies. However, it is suggested that if you have severe allergies, you spend time with adult PWDs before getting one. Many people are allergic to Portuguese Water Dogs. Please be careful. Look up “hypoallergenic” in the dictionary: “Having a decreased tendency to provoke an allergic reaction.” It does NOT mean non-allergenic. People can be (and are) aller- gic to all breeds of dogs. Nothing is more upsetting, to the buyer, breeder, and pup, than having to return a pup because of a family member’s allergy! It’s tough for all concerned. Spend time with the breed before bringing one into your home as a family member. Allow the allergic person to bury their nose in the dog’s fur and really give it a chance for a reaction.

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

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Smolder

MBISS GCHP MACH MARSHVIEW GREAT BALLZ OF FIRE RA MXG MJG T2B OF CA DCAT RATO CGC WWD GROM

Honey

GCHP OVERLOOK L ISI J I MEANT TO BEE ACT1 DN AOM AOE CGC

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

GCH OVERLOOK L ISI J I EVERYTHING WI LL BEE ALRIGHT S M O L D E R X H O N E Y

unwritten BUT ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE WI TH OUR STORY IS

-EL IZABETH NEWTON

AT JUST 23 MONTHS OLD. ONLY SHOWN 4 WEEKENDS IN 2021 . TOP 14 PWD 2021 *

Owned & Bred by Marilu Novy & CJ Favre Presented by Angela Chase & CJ Favre Columbus, GA & Cumming, GA

candids by © Phyllis Ensley Photography

*AKC breed stats as of 12/31/21

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Portuguese Water Dog THE VE R S AT I L E

W hen you consider the breadth of work that the Portuguese Water Dog did for the Algarve fisherman, the versatility as a breed should come as no surprise. Jules Asbed, breeder/handler of gen- erations of PWDs to the widest range of event titling says, “This breed has it in them to do anything. An individual of the breed will show dominant traits best suited for certain tasks, but the breed can and does do everything.” PWDs excel at Agility, Obedience, Rally, Scent and Nosework, Barn Hunt, FastCAT, Therapy, Tracking, Search and Rescue, Coast Guard Res- cue, Dock Diving, Truffle Hunting, Carting, Herding, Trained Service Dog Work, Weight Pull, and PWDCA Heritage-Based Water Work. The Portuguese Water Dog Club of America prizes and recognizes this versatility by encourag- ing owners with two event accomplishment award options. The Register or Merit, or ROM, is an AKC event-based award sequence. The Multiple Achievement Certificate (MAC) is a program that recognizes the many PWD owners and dogs who train and compete in a wider range of dog sports and activities, regardless of registry, area of com- petition, or title. Since 2014, PWDs with herding and carting (as well as the more obvious dock div- ing and alternate agility systems) have been recog- nized by the parent club through the MAC program. BY MARTHA RUSKAI

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THE VERSATILE PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

performance points. “Rixa” was also an exceptional Therapy Dog, with many hos- pital visits under her harness. The Portuguese Water Dog’s “fair nose” is showcased in Tracking, Scent Work, Nosework, Truffle and Sorel Mush- room Hunting, and most especially, in the exceptional work many do in Search and Rescue. A PWD, “Dutch,” was among the first to search Ground Zero. To read more about his work go to: http://www. eightpondfarm.com/narrativeWTC.html . Another PWD, handled by Connie Mil- lard, “Spider,” who also happens to be the litter brother of the aforementioned “Rixa,” excels in Search and Rescue and served as part of the Katrina recovery effort as part of Missouri’s Task Force. Spi- der is also an avid Sorel Mushroom Hunter in the woods near his home. Other PWDs serve in Search and Rescue and, in Europe, in the Coast Guard. It often comes as a surprise to many in the US that the FCI includes the Cao de Agua in Group 8: Retrievers/Flushing Dogs/Water Dogs [UK Gundog Group]. While not the most common of hunting dogs in the US, more than one Portuguese Water Dog has successfully assisted own- ers with fowl retrieving on hunting excur- sions. From Doug, breeder and hunter: “Caeli is an upland bird versatile hunter, will quarter, seek & ‘point’ and is ruthless in finding wounded birds.” Doug prefers to hunt grouse, but Caeli will retrieve big pheasants as well. She has persisted finding lost birds when his companions’ Retriev- ers, Setters & Spaniels quit trying. “When Caeli says there’s still a bird in there, there’s a bird in there!” When you think about the activities the dogs did for the fisherman, this versa- tility seems obvious. From the Portuguese history of the breed: For centuries, the tradition of using the water dog on fishing boats was firmly established over all the

‘Taylor’ at Gate

‘Forsythe’ Carting

An example of one very versatile dog is “Taylor,” Herding AHBA, Agility AKC and CPE, Rally UKC and AKC, Scent Work AKC and CPE, Nose Work NAC- SW, Barn Hunt, Obedience CDSP and AKC, Dock Diving UKC and NADD, which is recognized by AKC, AKC Fast- CAT, AKC Companion Dog titles, Farm Dog and CGC, and Portuguese Water Dog Club of America water titles Courier Excellent and Working Excellent. The Annual PWDCA National Spe- cialty showcases the versatility of the PWD and the desire for a “front- and back-titled dog” by starting with two days of two rings of water trials. Breeders and owners handle more than one hundred PWDs to water titles and in a Senior Water Show- case at PWDCA Nationals. Additionally, PWDCA Sanctioned Water Trials are held across the country annually. As many of our best breeders like to say, “The best way to evaluate a dog’s structure is to see them dripping wet and working.” During those years when suitable sites can be found, Tracking is often on the same weekend, with dogs participating in both Tracking and Water Work on the same weekend. Courier and Master level include a “reverse retrieve” in which the dog takes a buoy ball at the stern of boat and swims approximately 75 feet straight out to nowhere and drops on command upon the judge’s signal.

This showcase of Heritage Water Work is followed by Agility, Obedience, Rally, and now, as many Scent, FastCat, Trick Dog, and other events as can be squeezed into the schedule and location. Many dogs go from the Breed ring to Obedience to FastCat on the same day. Also highlight- ing this versatility is SUPERDOG, a very special honor awarded at the end of the National Specialty. This honor recognizes the overall versatility of the Portuguese Water Dog. It rewards the capabilities and efforts of the individual PWD that com- petes in three or more events and accumu- lates the most overall points for placements and qualifying performance. To be eligible for SUPERDOG, dogs must be entered and compete in at least three of the seven possible areas of competition: Conforma- tion, Obedience, Agility, Water, Rally, and (if offered) Tracking and AKC Scent Work. Louise Mowbray, who has titled mul- tiple breeds in Obedience, Tracking, Con- formation, and Agility says, ”More than any other breed I have ever had, the PWDs have always been willing to learn what I ask of them.” Proof is found in the multiple VCD PWDs Louise has trained and han- dled with advanced water titles. None is more titled than VCCH MACH3 “RIXA” UDX3 OM3 RE MXC MJB2 MXF T2B THD CWDX and 2011 PWDCA Nation- al Specialty SUPERDOG, one of only a few to win SUPERDOG with exclusively

‘DeeDee’ photo by Olaf Christien

‘Oscar Crouch’ photo by Phyllis Ensley

photo by Dean Lake

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THE VERSATILE PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

Bubbles Side Jump. photo by Phyllis Ensley

photo by Phyllis Ensley

photo by Podrigo Pinto

Spider in USAR Vest. photo by Connie Millard

Tyre Tracking

Taylor Scent Work

“The Portuguese Water Dog is spirited yet obedient, robust, and of unexaggerated, functional conformation; sure, substantially boned and muscled, and able to do a full day’s work in and out of the water. ”

An animal of spirited disposition, self- willed, brave, and very resistant to fatigue. A dog of exceptional intelligence and a loyal companion, it obeys its master with facility and apparent pleasure. It is obedient with those who look after it or with those for whom it works. — PWDCA Standard

Portuguese coast, especially in the Algarve area, and the value attributed to the dog was beyond price. The fact that the dog was considered to be a member of the crew on the fishing boats, and his work was entitled to pay- ment equal [to that of ] any other fisher- man, clearly indicates how valuable the work of the dog must have been. In effect, what was expected of the dog is quite incredible; riding the ocean surf on the prow of the boat, keeping vigil to the sea, he would signal the presence of a shoal, warn the crew of sharks, and stand ready to jump and dive into the water to help place the nets or bring in the catch. Often, he would retrieve escaping fish from the net. Among other important tasks, he was expected to swim to shore, to bring back

messages or bring in food and drinking water, and this implied swimming a great distance in heavy currents and deep, cold waters. All of this work could only be per- formed by an intelligent, athletic, and independent dog that could make deci- sions under stress and conclude his work without assistance. Several histories of the exploits of the dogs in saving the lives of fishermen who met with accidents and on the verge of drowning are told by the fish- erfolk of the Algarve. pp 31-32 Molinari, C. (1993). The Portuguese Water Dog . Por- tugal: ELO-Publicidade, Artes Graficas.) The Portuguese Water Dog is spirited yet obedient, robust, and of unexagger- ated, functional conformation; sure, sub- stantially boned and muscled, and able to do a full day’s work in and out of the water.

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THE VERSATILE PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

“For some PWDs, the work that they excel in is as a Service or Therapy Dog. While not as “drive-y” a job, these dogs still use the exceptional intelligence, bravery, loyalty, and stamina repeatedly mentioned in the Breed Standard.”

The 2021 National BISS winner is breeder/owner-handled to Rally, Agility and Water titles. photos provided by author

Hospital Therapy: photo by Colleen Bragg

Reading Therapy: ‘Harvey,’ who also happens to be the 2019 SUPERDOG. They are versatile! photo by Amanda Ellery

with their people and enjoy participating in anything you throw at them. When you have a structurally sound dog, they should excel in both the performance AND con- formation rings. These are ‘working’ dogs and should be built, physically and men- tally, to complete many tasks in a day’s work. That’s something we, as breed- ers, should always strive to produce. We don’t want to lose the ‘working’ in our ‘working dogs.’” In short, it is important to remember that the PWD NEEDS a JOB to DO— usually more than one! They can shift from activity to activity in the blink of an eye. I cross-train for Water Work in the Obedience rings and Agility field. Several of my dogs got bored with “running water drills” and so we had to make up alternate activities to maintain interest. The Por- tuguese Water Dog is limited only by the handler’s time and interest. The breed can, and will, do anything.

For some PWDs, the work that they excel in is as a Service or Therapy Dog. While not as “drive-y” a job, these dogs still use the exceptional intelligence, bravery, loyalty, and stamina repeatedly mentioned in the Breed Standard. Many of these dogs also hold multiple titles. “Deja” is follow- ing in his sire, Jack’s, versatile footsteps. In addition to his Service Dog work, “Jack” was titled in Conformation, Agility, Obe- dience, and PWDCA Water Work. Deja, while learning to serve as a fully trained Service Dog guide, has also been training for Water Work, and has earned his breed Championship. (He enjoys FastCat as a way to relax!) Here’s a quote from the breeder of the 2021 National BISS GCHP MACH “Smolder” RA MXG MJG T2B OF CA DCAT RATO CGC WWD GROM: “What I love about this breed is they are such willing workers that are up for any- thing! They love nothing more than to be

‘Deja’ FastCAT

Martha Ruskai is a PWDCA Water Trial Judge with over 30 years in the breed. She owner- handles in Conformation as well as Obedience, Agility, Tricks, and of course, PWDCA Water Work, with two Courier Excellent-titled dogs… and one getting closer. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

‘Deja’ Conformation

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WATER DOG SUBMITTED BY THE PWDCA PORTUGUESE

T he Portuguese Water Dog worked on fi sh- ing boats all along Portugal’s coasts. Th is well-balanced working dog was prized by the fi shermen as a working companion and guard dog. He lived on the boats where he was taught to herd fi sh into nets, to retrieve lost tackle or bro- ken nets, and to act as a courier from ship to ship or ship to shore. Th e advancement in technology to motorized boats and ship to shore radios have replaced many of the essential tasks the Portu- guese Water Dog was asked to do.

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

Th ese tasks required the dogs to be excellent swimmers and seafarers. Dogs were capable of diving underwater to retrieve fi shing gear and to prevent the escape of fi sh from the nets. Constant swimming and working with the fi shermen accounted for the remarkable muscular development of their hindquarters. As not- ed in the breed standard, this dog of excep- tional intelligence and loyal companion- ship served its master well. Our standard states: “pasterns are long and strong” and “metatarsus long...” Th is structure helps the breed to be an e ffi cient and productive mover in the water. Th e fi rst written description of the Por- tuguese Water dog is dated 1297, and con- cerns a monk’s report of a dying sailor who had been brought out of the sea by a dog that had a “black coat of rough hair, cut to the fi rst rib and with a tuft on the tip of the tail.” Due to this description, many early writings referred to the breed as the “Lion Dog.” Even today, you will still fi nd the breed in one of two acceptable clips; the Lion Clip or the Retriever Clip. Th e Portuguese Water Dog is smart, energetic, loving, mouthy, and needs a lot of attention and training. In fact, channeling the stamina, intelligence, and exuberance

of the dynamic PWD is highly rewarding (although a noteworthy challenge for any dog fancier). As with all Working breeds, having a place and responsibilities in the home makes for a happy PWD. Th eir favor- ite spot will always be by their master’s side. You can fi nd this breed competing in most all dog sports; agility, obedience, ral- ly, scent, tracking, dock diving, fast track, fl y ball, barn hunt, freestyle, carting, trick dog, parkour, weight pull, and herding. PWDs have been trained and certi fi ed as Search and Rescue Dogs. Many of you may recall “Dutch” and his owner/trainer who worked the World Trade Center aftermath. Dutch was cross-trained for live and cadaver search, making him an extremely valuable asset during those trying days. Th e PWDCA has its own sanctioned water trials that mimic many of the jobs they were once prized for in Portugal. It is an amazing sight to see our dogs still per- forming what were once vital functions for the fi sherman. We encourage anyone inter- ested in our breed, or in judging, to attend a water trial to understand the importance of the proper structure needed to complete these important tasks. Dates and locations can be found at PWDCA.org.

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SELECTING THE CORRECT PORTUGUESE WATER DOG A JUDGE’S CHALLENGE!

BY MARYANNE B. MURRAY CHAIRMAN, BREED STANDARD COMMITTEE Portuguese Water Dog Club of America

K udos on being selected to evaluate one of the official National Treasures of Por- tugal. Allow me to present for your consideration certain aspects of this breed which make it distinctive, celebrated and genuinely worthy of respect and admiration. As you enter the ring for your Por- tuguese Water Dog judging assign- ment, there are three rather meaning- ful words which must serve as your mantra when deciding the ideal in this breed. Those words are—STRENGTH, SPIRIT and SOUNDNESS. These three embedded characteristics are key to the essence and the raison d’etre of this working water wonder and underlie the totality of a correct Portuguese Water Dog. Imagine yourself drowning in the rough, open ocean and ask yourself— which of these dogs before me exhib- its the innate power, the true grit and the core vigor to swim out and save my life? Is it the dog with minimal muscling and a timid temperament or is it the one with the long neck, the short hocks and the cute, mincing steps? Your decision is important—and you’re right —nei- ther of these dogs fits the description of a spirited, strong and brave lifesav- er! A correct Portuguese Water Dog will provide an indelible impression of STRENGTH, SPIRIT and SOUNDNESS. Find that dog in your line-up and you will have done a commendable job of assessing this remarkable breed. STRENGTH The word “strong” is used in the Por- tuguese Water Dog Breed Standard ten times and the word “muscled” is used seven times. Other descriptive adjec- tives include powerful, rugged, robust, substantial, solid, well-developed and well-knit. This is a strong dog. This was

Able to do a full day’s work in and out of the water.

“AS YOU ENTER THE RING FOR YOUR PORTUGUESE WATER DOG JUDGING ASSIGNMENT, THERE ARE THREE RATHER MEANINGFUL WORDS WHICH MUST SERVE AS YOUR MANTRA WHEN DECIDING THE IDEAL IN THIS BREED. THOSE WORDS ARE— STRENGTH, SPIRIT AND SOUNDNESS.”

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P O R T U G U E S E WAT E R D O G S MULTIPLE GENERATIONS OF CONFORMATION AND PERFORMANCE DOGS • FORM & FUNCTION IS OUR FOCUS OWNED & BRED BY MARI LU NOVY & CJ FAVRE • PRESENTED BY ANGELA CHASE & CJ FAVRE COLUMBUS, GA & CUMMING, GA

BVIS GCH BELALUNA FERNCLIFF JACKSON BN RA JWD AOM AOE TOP TWENTY, FATHER TO HONEY AND STINGER GRANDFATHER TO HOPE, BUZZ AND RIKKE JACKSON FOUNDATION

BEE FOUNDATION BITCH

GCHB AVIATORS BLACKJACK DRAMA QUEEN AT OVERLOOK CD RE NAP NJP OPF TKI CGCU WWDX GROM MOTHER TO HONEY AND STINGER GRANDMOTHER TO BUZZ, HOPE AND RIKKE

HONEY

RIKKE

STINGER

GCHG OVERLOOK L ISI J I MEANT TO BEE DN ACT1 AOE AOM TOP TWENTY MOTHER OF HOPE AND RIKKE

GCH OVERLOOK L ISI J I EUREKA SHOW ME THE HONEY OWNER HANDLED BY DAVE PARKER HONEY’S DAUGHTER

CH OVERLOOK L ISI J I BEE STI LL MYHEART AX AXJ OF CGCU WWD HE IS THE FATHER OF BUZZ

© O. CHRISTEIN

BUZZ

HOPE

GCH COVE’S END CHRISTMAS SPIRIT AT OVERLOOK TOP TWENTY HE IS STINGER’S SON

OVERLOOK L ISI J I EVERYTHING WI LL BEE ALRIGHT JWD HONEY’S DAUGHTER JUST STARTING HER SHOW CAREER

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

Off square; slightly longer than tall.

A solidly built, muscular body.

a dog used in rough, open ocean waters to retrieve nets and gear, to herd schools of fish, to carry messages between boats, to guard the catch and often to save the life of an overboard fisher- man. This canine crew member had to be solidly built, with well-developed muscles and strong, substantial bone. He needed a strong, fairly short neck and strong jaws to give him an advan- tage when dragging items through the water. Broad, well-flared nostrils for air intake and a broad, deep chest opti- mized his lung capacity for swimming distances. The dog you seek as closest to the ideal will be strong, rugged, sol- id and very muscular. Can you tell just by looking which dog that is? NO! You MUST put your hands on these dogs and feel for what your eye cannot discern. Get through and under the stylized presentations and feel for a dog of sub- stance and STRENGTH. A clean, well groomed dog is desirable and pleasing to the eye—the hands, however, must

on a loose lead to accurately determine his joie de vivre. His movement is fluid and easy, proud and happy. Head held high and tail carried up and gallantly with his “flag” flying. Remember, car- riage can be telling! Without a spirited nature, you do not have a correct Portu- Hard work requires this breed to be structurally correct, physically and temperamentally healthy, in fit, robust condition, having all the proper parts and all of the moving parts performing their functions in a well-balanced, fluid manner. Brains and brawn—a combina- tion which testifies to a correct Portu- guese Water Dog and his noble working heritage. If there is reasonable doubt that a dog in your ring is unsound thus unqualified and/or unable to perform the strenuous historical tasks asked of him, then please, do not reward this lack of soundness. Generic dog faults abound in the AKC breed rings for all breeds—allow an unsound Portuguese Water Dog to walk from your ring with championship points and you have done a major injustice to the breed and its future. The sport of purebred dogs is intended to determine the very best specimens of a breed in order to breed the best to the best to get the best. A SOUND dog is a universal application— Portuguese Water Dogs are no differ- ent—hale and hearty, robust and rug- ged—choose the strong, spirited and sound dog as closest to the ideal. guese Water Dog. SOUNDNESS As the triple S mantra of STRENGTH, SPIRIT and SOUNDNESS embeds itself in your mind, it’s now time to let go of any biases for or against coat type, col- or and clip. They are visual diversions and may serve to boggle the mind as there are, when combined, countless

be the final authority on the solidity of the underlying construction. SPIRIT To be capable of the work required of him, the Portuguese Water Dog must be quite spirited and brave as well as obedient and loyal to his master. His intelligence, never to be underestimat- ed, contributes to his energetic nature and his successful work history. His exceptionally broad skull protects the source of that extraordinary intellect— always alert and ready for orders. The eyes provide clues - consider his steady and penetrating expression as a natural reflection of his attentiveness and per- haps, his assessment of you! Whether a hardy, handsome male or a lovely, pleasing bitch—be certain the dog is “on the ball” and “tuned in” to his sur- roundings. A correct Portuguese Water Dog is a lion-hearted and plucky force of nature—the embodiment of spirit and intelligence! Be sure he is moved

“A CLEAN, WELL GROOMED DOG IS DESIRABLE AND PLEASING TO THE EYE—THE HANDS, HOWEVER, MUST BE

THE FINAL AUTHORITY ON THE SOLIDITY OF THE UNDERLYING CONSTRUCTION.”

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Exceptional breadth of topskull.

variations. Let them go! The triple S’s are to be your guide. In your capacity as an AKC Judge, you already know basic canine structure and movement and what constitutes generic and almost universally applicable faults for all dogs. Need I mention that cow hocks, elbowing out, crabbing, moving close, sickle hocks and shyness are undesir- able in the Portuguese Water Dog? I didn’t think so. As an AKC Judge who takes his/her adjudication assignments to heart, you will have already com- mitted the Breed Standard to memory and most importantly, you will be look- ing for the Portuguese Water Dog that exudes the triple S’s. Specific characteristics, under the triple S banner, which are important for breed type are what you need on your “cheat sheet”. You can’t be expected to know the breed as well as some- one who owns and breeds them but you are expected to be familiar with what makes a Portuguese Water Dog unique. Your ideal will have the follow- ing. Overall look; slightly off square, robust and structurally unexagger- ated. Movement; balanced, effortless, free-moving and never forced to cover more ground than he should. Structure; relatively short neck, deep chest, well- sprung ribs, broad, strong back and level topline, short loin, tail thick at the base and set on slightly below the line of the back, powerfully muscled hind- quarters, rear legs parallel to each other and straight, angulation in balance with

front assembly and a long rear pastern. Head; NO—this is NOT a head breed but the head is an important aspect of breed type with an exceptionally broad skull, a substantial muzzle with a very strong jaw, eyes set well apart and obliquely, a definitive stop, ears set well above the line of the eye and a promi- nent forehead with a central furrow you can only feel. Height at the shoulder is quite variable and acceptable so please, don’t discount a smaller dog or bitch of quality nor reward a large dog because it looks impressive. The triple S compo- nents apply to the whole package and how it manifests these vital characteris- tics. The Portuguese Water Dog—heads up, tails up—an honest, able and sure tour de force! A matter I must mention is that the Breed Standard lists seven Major Faults which, in the rest of the world, are considered to be Disqualifications. The AKC discouraged the Portuguese Water Dog Club of America from having these Disqualifications in its Standard and you need to know that when I say “dis- couraged” I’m being diplomatic. Please, Judges, pay attention to these Major Faults. Undershot dogs are becoming Champions; shy dogs, droopy tailed dogs, dogs refined in muscle and bone and snipey muzzled dogs as well are being rewarded with points. That is not appropriate in today’s breed ring. That is not appreciated by the dedicat- ed caretakers of the breed. Seeing dogs with major faults become CH’s and then

go on to the whelping box and breeding careers because of inappropriate judg- ing decisions projects a dim light on the whole AKC judging process. The Portuguese Water Dog Club of Americahasworkedhardtopreserveand protect this praiseworthy canine. The essence of the breed has been staunch- ly maintained in its Breed Standard and 76 years after the original Standard was committed to paper, Portuguese Water Dogs continue to reflect the image and the spirit of their noble working ances- tors. Breeders have worked hard to fol- low the original blueprint and in doing so have preserved the integrity and uniqueness of this fisherman’s work- ing companion… a dog that exudes STRENGTH, SPIRIT and SOUNDNESS. Your educated assistance in our endeav- or, Judges, is greatly appreciated. BIO Maryanne B. Murray has been involved with Portuguese Water Dogs since 1979 as an owner, breeder, exhibi- tor and recently as a judge. She has produced numerous PWD champions under her BRINMAR kennel name. Maryanne is currently Chairman of the PWDCA Breed Standard Commit- tee and over the years has served as PWDCA President, Secretary, Direc- tor, Newsletter Editor and Chairman of numerous committees. She received a Maxwell Award from the DWAA and is currently working on documenting the history of the PWDCA.

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Eves-Cerf Testing is for PRA and other eye abnormalities. Pro- gressive Retinal Atrophy is an eye disease that will ultimately cause blindness as the dog ages. Optigen has developed a DNA test to determine if a dog is clear, a carrier or is affected. This test is used by breeders to avoid matching up dogs who might produce affect- ed puppies. For more information go to www.optigen.com . CERF exams are recommended annually to assess dogs for other forms of eye abnormalities. Juvenile Dilated Cardiomyopathy, (JDCM is an inherited fatal disease in young PWDs caused by a rare recessive gene, car- ried by both parents. Puppies from age six weeks to seven months can show this disease and die suddenly. There is no known cure or treatment for this condition. In 2007, the University of Penn Veterinary Medicine Research program developed a JCDM Linked Marker DNA test. PWDCA has required that at least one dog in a breeding pair be tested clear for JDCM. More information about this test is available at from PennGen and at the PWDCA website at www.pwdca.org . Addison’s Disease: This disease is found in both animals and humans and indicates that the adrenal gland has stopped produc- ing essential hormones. Once diagnosed, the disease is treatable. It is likely hereditary and can also be triggered by stress. Symptoms includes weight loss, vomiting, depression, lethargy, general weak- ness and shedding of hair. Understanding the potential for this dis- ease will save a PWD’s life. Hair loss Follicular Dysplasia: Some dogs will exhibit patterned hair loss between two to four years of age and it is thought to be hereditary. Hair may fall out in a spot on the body and may or not grow back. Most dogs who exhibit this condition are the product of breeding of curly to curly parents, although curly dogs have no greater incidence of this condition. Many breeders typically breed curly to wavy for optimum hair coats. There is no test available for this condition. Other conditions: The PWDCA web site describes other condi- tions but most of these are relatively rare. Because of the commit- ment by breeders, Portuguese Water Dogs remain one of the health- iest breeds and most live to be 14 15 years of age. For a new owner, their best bet is to find a responsible, experienced breeder who has a demonstrated track record of healthy dogs. If they are an AKC Breeder of Merit they have already met breeding and health testing requirements. The next step is to find an experienced veterinarian who understands PWDs and has treated them before. Finally, any good breeder will be an invaluable source of information about your dog’s-health and what to look for as your dog ages. Health

PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

BY MIKE AND CATHY DUGAN T the cost of their commitment to the breed. The PWDCA “strongly” recommends that any dog used for breeding should be at least two years old, be evaluated for hip dysplasia, tested for GM-1 status, Optigen screened for PRA and have an annual CERF test for over- all eye health. The PWD Health Registry is the best source of up-to-date and accurate information about the health of a particular dog, kennel or breeding program. As a new owner, you should always ask breeder if they participate in the Health Registry. If they don’t you might ask why not. he PWDCA has been committed for many years to extensive health testing by breeders to ensure that we produce the healthiest dogs possible. For responsible breeders, the additional cost of health testing is part of The Registry requires breeders to report test results for GM-1, Storage Disease. This is a rare disease and can affect both humans and dogs. It is a genetically transmitted fatal metabolic disease. Fortunately, there are DNA tests that will indicate whether your dog has the disease or is a carrier of the disease. The NYU Depart- ment of Neurology issues certificates after testing designating “N”, or non-carrier, “C” for carrier with an “L” or “A” showing that the dog’s rating is even more accurate because it comes from parents with good ratings. All dogs who will be bred must have this test. Orthopedics (Hips and Elbows), OFA and Penn Hip exams. These exams diagnose hip dysplasia if it exists. Dysplasia indicates that a dog’s hips have not formed perfectly and may be slight or severe. Dogs with severe hip dysplasia should not be bred although the dog may be physically fine with little pain or problems. OFA will not certify hips until a dog is at least two years old. PENNHIP can be done at four months.

“Because of the commitment by breeders, PORTUGUESE WATER DOGS REMAIN ONE OF THE HEALTHIEST BREEDS...”

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , M AY 2019 • 285

THE PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

KAREN ARENDS

can accommodate more coat, and showmanship seeming to be a more common extreme than in previous years. I do think their “PWDness” is often lacking and they are becoming a show dog rather than a working dog.

5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed?

We recently moved to the town of Burleson, Texas, where we have more spare time and energy not having to deal with acreage. We are trying to slow down in our outside activities, using much of our time with for dogs—four over the age of 12 and needing extra attention. Whenev- er possible, we spend time with our family in various areas of Mis- souri and California, especially

I’d like judges—and breeders—to remember that PWDs should still be able to perform a day’s work. It’s taken many years to convince judges that we don’t have coarse Poodles, and although many nice dogs being shown are flashy and impressive, that’s not always the most correct PWD in the ring. PWDs are not an extreme dog in any way. Temperaments should never be aggressive or timid, and extreme angles, either restricted or over-angled, would prevent a true working dog from performing its duties for any length of time.

my most adorable grandson, Asher. I officially began my life with dogs in the early 1960s when I joined the newly formed 4-H Dog Care group in California and moved quickly into the world of obedience and soon after working some of the dogs with cattle and training young horses. I began showing in obedience in 1965, while helping a friend in the confor- mation ring, going into conformation with our first PWD in 1984. I have been judging since 2002 and enjoy having oppor- tunities to learn about and examine dogs closely in various areas of the country.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed?

I would love to see more judges attending water trials, in order to understand why PWDs move as they do and the necessity of a substantial body, strong will and athletic ability. 7. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? Many years ago I considered myself quite the dog trainer, but it didn’t take long for PWDs to bring me back to real- ity. With a young dog and a bitch in season, we headed off to the high desert of California. Showing outside was okay because I knew PWDs are always willing to please their people. Everything went fine until the recall. I was a bit concerned that the dog was coming in a bit fast, but he slid in at a sit—and, of course, humped my leg. Every- one thought it was very cute, but the judge wouldn’t consider it an official sit. KRIS COFIELL 1. What are the two most important traits you look for when judging the Portuguese Water Dog? Are you usually fi nding them or not? Type. Is the outline/silhouette correct for the breed? Structure/movement. Is the dog properly constructed so that it can do its intended job? I am seeing far more short backed dogs and/or high on leg. The breed standard calls for “Off-square. Slightly longer then tall when measured from the prosternum to the rearmost point of the but- tocks and from withers to ground.” 2. How important is grooming to you when judging the PWD? Could you judge a ring full of clean but untrimmed dogs? Could you fi nd the best specimen regardless of grooming? The PWD is a hands-on breed. There are many talented handlers, breeders, groomers who create a beautiful dog through absence or presence of coat. Muzzles that

1. Describe the breed in three words. Balanced, strength without coarseness and attitude.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? PWDs that lack any of the traits above will not be able to perform the tasks they were originally bred to do. Even though I want to see a substantial, strong, balanced dog with an attitude, being able to maneuver quickly, with excellent agility is also a must.

3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated?

My biggest concern is that many PWDs are becoming too pretty and flashy, with happy personalities in all situa- tions, and without the substance and determination to be considered a true working dog. Their lovely coats can help camouflage a PWD’s shortcomings. I’m concerned seeing PWDs being shown with their heads held up and back too far and taking short, quick steps, with an abun- dance of angulation in the rear, rather than the smooth, easy-flowing, powerful gait they need.

4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you fi rst started judging? Why or why not?

PWDs have improved over the last 10 years, especially their temperaments and soundness. Since that time there have been many changes with different extremes, depending on which PWD is most popular at the time. With each style there have been exaggerations, right now with flashy quick movement, a more refined body which

294 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , M AY 2018

WITH KAREN ARENDS, KRIS

COFIELL, LINDA FOWLER,

DAVID HADDOCK, VIRGINA

MURRAY, JOYCE VANEK & JANIS WATTS

1. Describe the breed in three words. Breed type, strength and substance.

are scissored in the Lion Trim with comb-able length of coat to give the appearance of substance. Robust build that when felt is not, etc. I had the honor of judging at a National Specialty in Sweden in 2007. With an entry of over 100, the majority of dogs were in very long coat with seven or ten bladed rears and muzzles. The more dogs you see in Lion Trims with full coat, the easier it is to understand what is happening under the coat when the dog moves. Again, ultimately you must put your hands on the dog to truly understand how the dog is built.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? 1) Strength; this breed should have the ability to work in the water tirelessly for a full day. 2) Balance; dogs with an effortless side gait, reach and drive on land and also perform well in the water. 3) Exemplary temperament; confident and happy worker with an endearing attitude.

3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? We continue to lose desirable angulation. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you fi rst started judging? Why or why not? I do not see any appreciable change in quality.

3. Do you believe a PWD should be muscled and strong? If so, why?

Of course. It’s a working breed! The dog should have bone and substance without being coarse. This is an athletic breed, capable of so much: water work, agility, tracking, obedience, etc. if you get an opportunity to see a PWDCA Water Trial it will give you an appreciation of why having a solidly built, muscular body is important. Again, avoiding becoming coarse and ponderous.

5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed?

Judges express great confusion about evaluating our breed, because of different trims, coat types, colors, size, etc. It saddens me to know that a number of them have trouble getting past all of the show to look at the dog underneath and not the trimmings. It is therefore, a true hands-on breed. A good PWD is correct whether they are a 17-inch bitch or a 23-inch dog, whether curly or wavy coated, whether black or brown, whether in a working retriever or lion clip or if they exemplify the standard spirited, yet obedient nature and a robust, medium build that allowed for a full day’s work in and out of the water. I would encourage judges and aspiring judges of our breed to make an effort to see these dogs work in the water to better appreciate the desirable physical attri- butes for the Portuguese Water Dog. Even as a breeder, who now works her dogs in the water, it was a learning experience for me.

4. Bigger and taller is not necessarily correct in PWDs as there is an ideal height quoted in the Standard. Are you seeing this in the breed and if so, why are the bigger, taller dogs are being rewarded?

The breed standard allows for a large range from the smallest/lightest bitch to the tallest/heaviest allowable dog. Judges must take the height of a dog in to consid- eration when judging bone/substance. Too frequently, judges go down the line-up and feel head and bone as a last determination and reward the dog who has the biggest head/bone. This is often the tallest/biggest dog. Head size and bone should be proportionate to the height of the dog, so biggest dog may not be most correct proportionately. Again, seeing a PWD work in the water gives you a far better idea of what is called for in the writ- ten standard. DR. LINDA M. FOWLER I live in Columbia, South Caro-

6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed?

Unfortunately, there probably isn’t enough room in just one article for me to share as much as I would like. DAVID HADDOCK I live in Nashville, Tennessee.

lina. I am presently retired; my career was in nursing and health care administration. It has been a pleasure to be involved in the sport of pure-bred dogs since 1976—as a breeder and exhibitor in conformation, rally, obedience and water work. I obtained first Portuguese Water Dog (male)

When I’m not dogging, I’m mak- ing money as an entrepreneur, investing in real estate and scuba diving. I have always had a dog and started in obedience and breed competition at age 14. My first obedience titled dog was an Alaskan Malamute, which I also handled to a breed champion- ship in the late 1970s. I obtained my first Portuguese Water Dog

in 1986 and a bitch the following year. In 1992, I was fully approved as the first PWD breeder judge and since have been approved to judge all Working breeds, Bearded Collies and Best in Show. It has been my honor to judge our National Specialty on three separate occasions, as well as a number of other Working breeds in Specialties.

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WITH KAREN ARENDS, KRIS

COFIELL, LINDA FOWLER,

DAVID HADDOCK, VIRGINA

MURRAY, JOYCE VANEK & JANIS WATTS

in 1989 and completed both a “UD” obedience title and a breed championship—one of the first to do so. I started judging obedience in 2001 and became a breed judge five years later.

“A GOOD ONE IS PLEASING TO THE EYE AND PRESENTS A BODY OF AN ATHLETE AND A WILL TO GET IN THE GAME.”

1. Describe the breed in three words. Impressive, spirited and marine.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? Slightly off-square; robust; well-knit; substantial in bone and muscle, yet medium in build; thickly-based and powerful tail; distinctively large head; alert and spirited; resistant to fatigue.

3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? Yes—the coat! Exaggerated grooming that

6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? A good Portuguese Water Dog has the traits listed

attempts to construct a picture of essential breed type does not alter the need for the essential traits listed above. Creative grooming to indicate breadth of top skull or a well-defined stop no more indicates correct form and function than wearing an NFL jersey makes you a good quarterback. In this breed, the profile will fool the casual observer who doesn’t put their hands on and into that coat.

above—all for good reason. A good one is pleasing to the eye and presents a body of an athlete and a will to get in the game. What distinguishes a good one from a great one comes from inside—the spirited disposition that is evidenced by confidence, stamina and that expression, which is uniquely the Portuguese Water Dog.

7. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show?

4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you fi rst started judging? Why or why not?

I showed my Breed Champion and Utility Dog “Tanner” to Michelle Billings at the 1993 National. At the time, he was one of only a few Portuguese Water Dogs to have completed all obedience titles available. After provid- ing comic relief in the obedience rings, we made our way to the breed ring, competing against 60 or so of the great dogs of the time and many professional handlers. During our examination, Tanner decided to pace on the down and back. Mrs. Billings looked over the dog carefully and requested, “Do it again.” On the second attempt, Tanner decided to jump up and down and grab the lead, creating laughter with his antics. Thinking I was done, Mrs. Billings raised her hand, walked around the dog and requested yet another attempt. On this go, Tanner was magnificent and received a nice round of applause (cynical crowd). Judge Billings approved as well, grabbed me by the arm and said, “Honey, this is a nice dog. Perhaps you would benefit from some obedience work.” VIRGINIA MURRAY 1. What are the two most important traits you look for when judging the Portuguese Water Dog? Are you usually fi nding them or not? Number one is always the head. I want my hand to have to stretch to cover their top skulls! And their muzzle should be strong and on the squarer side—not long and snipey! I also want good substance and bone. The breed

I clearly believe that Portuguese Water Dogs are healthier now, thanks to a fabulous commitment by our parent club and breeders. My concern otherwise is that too many exhibits are losing some of the essential breed characteristics that allow this dog to function. Our breed standard essentially calls for a robust, rug- gedly built dog of substantial bone and muscle—all in a medium build. We are seeing too many exhibits that simply grow hair and craft it in such a manner to create this profile. A Portuguese Water Dog should present an indelible impression of strength, spirit and soundness. Coat can’t do that! Fortunately, we have many strong lines among the breeding program that continue to produce dogs that satisfy both ideal genotype and phenotype. When you see a correct one—and especially if you can see it work— you understand why these traits are important and must be preserved.

5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed?

Here I go again, but you can’t judge this breed very well from the sideline and that includes staring at the dog in profile. New (and experienced) judges can be fooled by the various coat types and presentations. Look beyond the coat! Another thing—while they are swimmers, they are not fish! They are a wonderful breed of multiple util- ity. They must be agile, very discerning and very confi- dent. No shy dogs in the ring, please!

298 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , M AY 2018

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