Showsight Presents the Vizsla

Navigating the Vizsla DISQUALIFICATIONS

BY TAD WALDEN

D isqualifications in the Vizsla are contained in four general areas: size, nose color, coat length, and white. The breed has height preferences for male and female dogs. Male height at the top of the shoulder is preferred to be 22" to 24", but there is an allowable 1.5" boundary up or down, providing for a total height range within the Standard of 20.5" to 25.5". The female pre- ferred height is 21" to 23", with the same 1.5" up or down allowable, which creates a total boundary of 19.5" to 24.5". The breed strives to maintain its moderate size. All things being equal, when judging the breed, the prefer- ence is to reward dogs within the preferred height boundary. However, this does not mean that judges should reward poorly constructed dogs within the height standard at the expense of a well-constructed dog that appears above 24" and under 25.5", for example, if it is a male dog. Judges trained in proper wicket examinations should be aware of the preferred and allow- able heights as well as the height disqualifications. A black nose and long hair are fairly easy to determine in the breed. Just make sure that you are not penalizing darker freckles on the nose as a result of sun exposure. The accompanying photos on this page are examples of a black nose and long hair in the breed. Black noses and long hair are rare, but they can exist. Long hair, although rare, can show up in the breed. Long hair is silky and resembles that of the Irish Setter or Long-Haired Weimaraner. The more difficult and challenging aspect relative to breed disqualifica- tions is determining the acceptable [amount of] white. When it comes to white, there are boundaries, and any white outside of these boundaries is a disqualification. Anyone examining for white must have a full understand- ing of canine anatomy. Elbows, forechest, and toes are anatomical points used in determining boundaries for allowable white. The two most common areas where white appears are the forechest and feet. The toe is comprised of three phalanges; distal, middle, and proxi- mal. White extending beyond the proximal phalange is a disqualification. Understanding that the white boundary will not be a straight line, but follows the anatomical points of the bone structure, is important when evaluating whether or not the white is acceptable. The illustration on the following page denotes the white boundary on the toes.

A black nose on a Vizsla is a disqualification.

“DISQUALIFICATIONS IN THE VIZSLA ARE CONTAINED IN FOUR GENERAL AREAS: SIZE, NOSE COLOR, COAT LENGTH, AND WHITE.”

Long hair on a Vizsla is a disqualification.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2021 | 321

Powered by