Top Notch Toys May 2018

MBISS GCH SONDRAS WHEN DOVES CRY AT KYLIN Dove

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B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y W I N N I N G G R A N D C H A M P I O N G R O V E S H I R E ’ S C L A S S I C S E N S A T I O N

Mahalo Judge Ms. Evalyn Gregory for recognizing her qualities.

OWNED BY: TERESA LYNN BELL | www.kealohakennels.com BRED BY: PRESTON & MARY LOU GROVES | www.groveshire.com

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K E A L O H A ’ S H I G H R O L L E R M A K I N G H I S S H O W D E B U T T H I S M O N T H !

BRED & OWNED BY: TERESA LYNN BELL www.kealohakennels.com PRESENTED BY: KRISTIE MILLER www.IntuitionShihTzu.com

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ON THE COVER

BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING

TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE ACKNOWLEDGED DOVE.

HOUSTON & TODDIE CLARK

Bred & Owned by: Linda Davi & Tammy Lodien

Shown Exclusively by: Tammy Lodien

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Dove

Sired by BISS GRW SOM GCHS PAMMAR I am I Said of Kylin Dam GCH SondrasRose Wont you Be Mine AKA Dove finished out of the 6-9 puppy class winning BISS and Group placement at 8 months. 2016 Orlando Best puppy Chinese Crested Specialty. Winning Reserve to 5 pt major 2016 Eukanuba at 8 months old. Multiple Group Placements as a puppy. Coming back out in 2017 as a special, 8 shows, 8 BOB wins, 6 Group Placements with a group 1. Number 12 all Breed in the Nation in only 8 shows. Multiple Group wins OH, Multiple Reserve Best in Show OH, Number 5 in the Nation OH in only 8 shows. First time out this year in 2018. One weekend, 3 Best of Breed Wins, Group 2 and a Group 3 with a very tough line up.

TOP 10 BREED & ALL BREED IN THE NATION * *TNT BREED AND ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/18

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TNT TOPNOTCHTOYS APRIL 2018 • VOLUME XXXIV, NUMBER THREE

AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512-686-3466 ext 102 Cellular 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagrp.com michael@aramediagrp.com 512-686-3466 extension 101 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512-686-3466 ext 103 MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679 512-686-3466 ext 104 Cellular 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

MBISS GCH SONDRAS WHEN DOVES CRY AT KYLIN D ov e

TABLE OF CONTENTS 8 COVER STORY 10 THIS MONTH IN TOP NOTCH TOYS 12 FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 20 TOY TALK Bonnie Guggenheim 36 CONTRACTS FOR SHOW PUPPIES by Lisa Curry, Esq. 40 TALES OF AN OWNER-HANDLER by Catherine Garretson 44 TOY BOX Candids of our Group Five Darlings 46 DERBYTOWN PEKINGESE CLUB HONORS EDNA VOYLES & BUDDY STEVENS

50 IT’S ALL ABOUT THE DOGS by Janice McGee 52 HALLMARKS OF THE SHIH TZU by Jo Ann White 54 AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT THE JAPANESE CHIN by Dale Martenson

TOP NOTCH TOYS Editor/Advertising Director BONNIE GUGGENHEIM 512-971-3280 bonnie@aramediagrp.com Director, Social Media & Web Site DANIEL CARTIER

58 TNT TOP TWENTY TOYS 58 TNT ALL-BREED SYSTEM 60 TNT BREED SYSTEM 62 NATIONAL OWNER HANDLED SYSTEM TOP TOYS 64 TNT COMING ATTRACTIONS 65 ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTION RATES 66 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________ EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS since Volume 1, Number 1 Chief Media Consultant JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III EDITOR@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. 221 Indigo Lane, Georgetown, Texas 78628. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

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O U R

Cadee

T Y A V A ’ S S U G A R F O O T ’ S EYE OF THE STORM Winning Grand Sweeps at the OVYTC-KY. Cadee is just start ing out but has some very nice wins to her credi t already! Cadee is pointed and has BOB wins and a BOB win over a ranked Special , al l from the puppy classes. WATCH FOR THE GIRL WITH PERSONALITY PLUS!

BRED BY Ava Tyree | TyAva’s Yorkies

OWNED/HANDLED BY Vicki Edwards | Sugarfoot Yorkies

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TOPNOTCHTOYS FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

Joseph Neil McGinnis III

In Other News... But of no less of importance to Toy lovers

Athrough in the Spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love (at least according to Alfred, Lord, Tennyson), this time of year you and I are agog at the possibilities of out- door shows! indoor shows! shows every direction in which you could toss bait! And yet I find my mind drifting back to frosty climes and the show that pretty much jumpstarts each new year: Westminster. I am thrilled to announce that on this very day the judging panel for 2019 has been released, to great

anticipation, many hearty cheers and—hopefully—very flew slammings of fists on desks or smashings of crystal filled with gin. I’ll concentrate here on the people who will adjudicate over Group Five, our first and foremost inter- est, at all levels in this show-of-shows.... JUDGING BEST IN SHOW is none other than our good friend Peter Green, a gentleman with a wealth of knowledge over all breeds, and a sixty-year track record of excellence We congratulate him on this additional feather in the cap already overwhelmed with accolades. GROUP JUDGING sees another roster of uber-talented arbiters: Ms. Patricia Craige Trotter of Carmel, California will judge her beloved Hound group; Ms. Sharon Newcomb of Sante Fe, New Mexico will share her expertise in Toys; Mr. Mark R. Kennedy of Murrysville, Pennsylvania will evaluate the Non-Sporting group; and Ms. Peggy Beisel- McIlwaine of Ann Arbor, Michigan, will preside over the Herding group. Doug Johnson of Bloomington, Indiana will handle Sporting Group, Mr. James Moses of Wentzville, Missouri will tackle the Working group; and Ms. Christine Erickson of Mesa, Arizona will judge the Terrier group. Of the twenty-three individua breeds eligible for Westminster next year, the panel has: Mr. Michael Canalizo of Mill Neck, NY: Toy Poodles. Ms. Evalyn Gregory of Louisville, KY: Chihuahuas (both Varieties), Papillons, Pekingese, Pomeranians, Shih Tzu. Mrs. Rita Holloway of Newark, DE: Affenpinschers, Brussels Griffons, Chinese Cresteds, English Toy Spaniels (both Varieties), Havanese. Ms. Elaine J. Lessig of Clinton, NJ: Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Italian Greyhounds, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Miniature Pinschers, Toy Manchester Terriers. Mrs. Cindy Vogels of Greenwood Village, CO: Pugs, Silky Terriers, Toy Fox Terriers, Yorkshire Terriers. So now that THAT’s out of the way, we can concentrate on the job at hand: doing our very best at every show we attend. Until next month, I hope to see you at ringside!

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At ROYAL CANIN ® , we obsess over purebred dogs—and the perfect nutrition for each of them. ROYAL CANIN ® formulas are developed with your breed’s unique needs in mind for superior muscle tone, coat health and digestion. As a breed expert, you know the right nutrition can unlock the magnificence inside your dogs, and so do we. A Major Win for Breeders Join the Crown Partners Rewards Program Today! my.royalcanin.com THE FINISHING TOUCH.

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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*TNT Breed & All Breed 3/31/18

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RANKED # 3 CAVALIER *

BISS, Multiple Toy Group Winner GCHS CHWynDancer Silver Lining

Ms. Shalisa Neely | GROUP 2 Santa Clara KC

Mrs. Ann Bolus | GROUP 3 Golden Gate KC * TNT breed stats as of 03/31/18

Mrs. Shelly Hennessy | GROUP 1 Oregon Trail KC

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BISS, Multiple Toy Group Winner GCHS CHWynDancer Silver Lining

Thank you Mr. Desmond Murphy for Best In Specialty and to the many judges who have honored Cooper. BEST IN SPECIALTY WINNER

BEAUTIFULLY PRESENTED BY MR. LUKE SEIDLITZ & TEAM OWNED BY SUSAN BARRETT, DVM • WynDancer Cavalier King Charles Spaniels • wyndancercavaliers.com BRED BY DR. SUSAN BARRETT, DVM • www.wyndancercavaliers.com • wyndancercavaliers@yahoo.com

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AS THE YEARS GO BY, OUR WONDERFUL FAMILY GROWS! ETCETERA

by BONNIE GUGGENHEIM TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

O ne kind of family involves the friends you make over the years that you have met at shows, club meet- ings. You have undoubtedly worked on committees and assisted with shows to learn about how shows and the dog world functions. Our dog show fam- ily acts as a shelter from the attacks of Mother Nature when things go wrong with a new litter or an aging Dog you love is headed for the Rainbow Bridge.

Try to develop friends in another breed or group so you can learn about another breed and give yourself a bit of breathing space when things get heat- ed ringside. Friends in other states are important because you can visit, learn about dogs in their area, attend shows with those friends and see different parts of the country. Then there is your dog family friends who are often co-owners who share experiences, delight in your wins as

you do in theirs and you have some- one that can help you ringside or plan a campaign for an outstanding young- ster. These friends will enjoy socializ- ing puppies, cheer for you at shows and help you remain calm when things get way too hectic. They will be there to remind you to laugh and not take win- ning or a loss too seriously. Choose your friends and associates carefully as you are always known by the company you keep. In time you may even find this dog family becomes intertwined with your real family. If you remain “in dogs” these people may be friends in ten or twenty years if you are fortunate and take care to preserve those friendships. I wish you true friends in this sport of dogs and remind you to be a true friend. Remember to congratulate all who win—friend or not. An intensely competitive exhibitor once told me that it was the friendships and dinner at good after shows that was her biggest reason for going to dog shows! Believe me she entered to win! None of us enter to lose, we all want to win, but the long lasting friendships and the dogs are way more important in the long run. Thank you for your loyalty to TNT , the all Toy magazine that is a collectable and often used as a reference. Call, text or email with your exciting wins or to place an ad to celebrate your success in the ring. Remember—inquiring minds want to know. Bonnie bonnie@aramediagrp.com 863.738.8848

“CHOOSE YOUR FRIENDS AND ASSOCIATES CAREFULLY AS YOU ARE

ALWAYS KNOWN BY THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.”

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GCHP LAMPLIGHTER’S TATTLE TAIL Defining an American Tail

Tatty

America’s Only

P L AT I N UM S I L K Y

S I L K Y 2 0 1 3 1 # BREEDERS: Barbara Beissel & Mark Benson OWNERS: Barbara Beissel, Mark Benson, James Dillman & Janet Aslett

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BROOKVIEW

TOP 5 NOHS *

CHIC #123019 OFA Eyes - NORMAL

OFA Patellas - NORMAL | prcd-PRA - CLEAR

B R O O K V I E W Y O R K I E S E A R N T H E I R C H A M P I O N S H I P S F R O M T H E B R E D B Y C L A S S & A R E E X C L U S I V E L Y B R E E D E R - O W N E R H A N D L E D B Y M A T I N A E . J O H N S O N T H R O U G H O U T T H E I R C A R E E R S . YTCA TOP DAM 2017, YTCA TOP SIRE 2017, YTCA TOP BREEDER 2017 & BKC BREEDER OF THE YEAR

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*AKC NOHS stats as of 4/17/18

YORKSHIRE TERRIERS

G C H C H B R O O K V I E W ' S E V E R D E A N Y V A R I

GCHB CH TAPYOCA’S YANCEY AT BROOKVIEW (Y TCA TOP SIRE 2017) x MBISS GCHG BROOKVIEW’S REBEL YALE, ROM (Y TCA TOP DAM 2017)

SHE IS TYPE

SHE IS MOVEMENT SHE IS . . .

Yvari

YTCA Top Breeder 2017 BKC Breeder of the Year MatinaE. Johnson

ALWAYS BREEDER- OWNER HANDLED BY:

BROOKVIEW YORKSHIRE TERRIERS www.brookviewyorkies.com

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Juno

B R E D B Y PAMELA JODOIN & DIXIE HAYNES

OWN E R H A N D L E D B Y PAMELA JODOIN

A L S O H A N D L E D B Y ALYSHA MARGARIT

H A N D L E D I N T H E U S A B Y DEVON KIPP

PAMELA JODOIN: HOME: (780)968-4049 | CELL: (780)235-4048 | PAMJODOIN1@GMAIL.COM | MYDREAMSHIHTZU.COM

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R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

American Grand Champion BPIS CAN CH MYDREAMS LOVE IS IN THE AIR

R B I S G R O U P O N E G R O U P TWO G R O U P T H R E E G R O U P F O U R Thomas Gomez Sandra Walker, Luc Boileau, Mrs. Tomas Gomez & Carolyn Taylor John F. Booth, Timothy S. Robbins & James Fehring Linda Hurlebaus Fred Bassett Thank you Judges for the Group placements All at the young age of 15 months

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©ERIKA VENCI PHOTOGRAPHY

THANK YOU JUDGE RODNEY R. MERRY FOR THE WIN!

Always Breeder/Owner Handled by KAREN A. WARNCKE HAVANESE TREASURES | HAVANESETREASURES.NET | HAVANESE TREASURES GCHB TREASURES PLAYING WITH FIRE

PHOTO CREDITS TO ERIKA VENCI PHOTOGRAPHY AND BOOTH PHOTOGRAPHY

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grand champion

CH ALURA MARCHWIND VICTOR BYWARWICK X CH MARCHWIND SWEET BYE N’ BYE MARCHWIND SWEET VICTORY

this young lady

in the specials ring is burning it up

PRESENTED BY Justin Smithy FOR MARCHWIND KENNELS WITH 2 GROUP TWOS & 4 GROUP THREES # 2 ALL BREED*

she demonstrates correct lift & topline,

elegance & femininity

*TNT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/18

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“ Timeless Perfection ”

T H E TOU C H E C H I N

owned by KATHY JURIN, JANE MARTENSON & DAN PALANTINO

bred by DALE MARTENSON & ALY BELL

exclusively handled by DAN PALANTINO

©photos by JANE HOBSON

WE E X T R E M E LY A P P R E C I AT E A L L T H E J U D G E S WHO H AV E R E COG N I Z E D T H I S E XQU I S I T E YOU N G TOU C H E BOY !

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Miyagi C H AM P I ON TOU C H E - KA R I X KA R AT E K I D

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*TNT stats as of 3/31/18

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g r a n d c h a m p i o n

Sette’s Fortunato “Lucky” come il Numero Sette

exclusively handled by Victor Helu | Our appreciat ion to judge Sandra Lex for this prest igious win everything’s coming up lucky seven!

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CONTRACTS FOR SHOW PROSPECT PUPPIES

by LISA M. CURRY, ESQ.

T he sale of a show prospect puppy is a matter of contract, even if never put in writing. An oral (unwritten) agree- ment, to exchange something of value for money or for something else of val- ue, is still a contract. A show prospect contract can be complex and therefore difficult to pre- pare. A breeder is trying to predict (and ensure) that the pup will succeed in the show ring in 6, 12 or 18 months, and then succeed in breeding; this is never a sure thing, particularly when the puppy is going to a new home and virtually all aspects of the dog’s life are out of the breeder’s hands. Even with the best puppy, there is a risk that the buyer will not achieve the dog’s potential—out of ignorance, neglect, or just through poor decisions. Many factors must be considered, and optimally, addressed in the contract. Since a breeder’s career depends on the success of what they breed, you’d think that they would try to maximize the chances of each show prospect suc- ceeding, including spelling out what the Breeder and Buyer will need to do, to make that happen—and what the parties will do if something goes wrong. Too many times deals are struck for show potential puppies, without a full disclosure of the expectations of each party, of what could go wrong, and of what the parties will do about it, if it does.

VAGUE CONTRACTS ARE PROBLEMATIC CONTRACTS Contracts that lack specificity of important terms, contracts that aren’t in writing and those made without ade- quate forethought about what can and probably will happen, are all inherently problematic. Consider this example: • Seller says to Buyer of a lovely young pup, “It’s yours for $2000, and if it turns out nice, you can show and breed it.” Buyer says, “Great,” pays the money, takes the puppy home. Was that a contract? Yes, although a rather poorly formed one—for several reasons.

• First, it was not in writing. Down the road, these parties have no way to prove what the terms were. Breeder might later deny he gave permission to breed or to show it. Or, the dog “turns out” to have several undesirable inheritable conditions, but Buyer wants to bred it anyway, denying there was any condition about it turning out. • Second, what does “it’s yours” mean? When it’s time to regis- ter the puppy, will Breeder say, “I will be co-owner because (a) that’s how I always do it, (b) that’s how everyone does it or (c)

“EVEN WITH THE BEST PUPPY, THERE IS A RISK THAT THE BUYER WILL NOT ACHIEVE THE DOG’S POTENTIAL— OUT OF IGNORANCE, NEGLECT, OR JUST THROUGH POOR DECISIONS.”

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Rule #2: When you plan to sell a show prospect, write out a list of “what ifs”, including every nightmare you can imagine with a co-owner on a show prospect, that would feel like a real “deal breaker” to you. For example: what if the buyers refuse to show or breed it; they don’t give it proper vet care; they use it to breed “designer dogs”; they sell it to someone else without telling you; they spay or neuter it without telling you; they move five states away; they die or become permanently disabled. Then read your contract again (or start to write one, if you don’t have one). See if your contract addresses those topics. Ideally, your contract (a) prohibits the buyer’s actions that would cause the trouble, (b) mandates what must hap- pen, and (c) carries a substantial and clear negative result when the wrong thing happens—for example, if Buyer breeds the dog without your permis- sion, you have the right to reclaim the dog and receive $5000 in liquidated damages. If you don’t set forth the liqui- dated damages, you will probably have to go to court to prove your damages. Of course, you need to be sure the rem- edies you put in your contract are allow- able under law, so you should consult an attorney versed in dog law, to final- ize your contract. Having a discussion about all even- tualities that could occur is a good way to find out some new facts about your prospective buyer and their expecta- tions. Better to learn this before they take possession of your show prospect puppy, than after. It’s been said that “an ounce of pre- vention is worth a pound of cure.” This certainly applies to selling show pros- pects. Do your homework, and have those difficult discussions with your prospective buyer before you place your pride and joy in their care, poten- tially losing that dog as an opportunity to perpetuate your breeding program. The little effort it takes to prepare a proper contract is small compared to what you stand to lose if a sale of a show prospect goes bad. Lisa Curry represents clients in state and federal courts and before the AKC. She also raises and shows AKC dogs. You can review her articles at www.lawfordogs.com. Lisa can be reached at 201-400-7407 or LCurry@lawfordogs.com.

I have the papers and you don’t.” This is known to happen and it creates huge problems stem- ming from unwanted and poorly formed co-ownerships. • Third, what does “if it turns out” mean? Who decides whether the puppy turned out? And at what age is it decided? Who pays for health testing that the Breeder demands? And if he doesn’t “turn out,” what happens? Does the dog get neutered? Does Breeder take him back and give Buyer another one? • Fourth, “you can show and breed” is extremely vague. The parties have no guidance on who pays entries, who pays for a handler, or whether Breeder can handle the dog himself. Similarly, assuming the parties get the dog finished they still have no framework for issues like when can it be bred; who picks the breeding partner; and if female, who pays stud fees, and who owns the puppies. This particular kind of dispute over a bitch often ends up with the Breeder refusing to sign off the litter—either for spite, or until he gets a puppy back (or whatever else he may be seeking). Vague contracts with unanswered questions like these cause many dis- putes over show dogs. However, even if the parties do have a full discussion and make a detailed agreement about the dog’s future, the same type of ques- tions arise when the parties fail to put their agreement in writing. People for- get what they said; they wish they made a different deal; they refuse to admit

what they agreed to. Not being able to prove what your agreement was is almost as bad as never having made the agreement in the first place. RESOLVING THE ISSUES: COSTLY AND DIFFICULT The AKC is usually no help in these issues: it is a pedigree registry, not a forum for ownership or breeder/buyer disputes. Breed clubs, similarly, have no role in such disputes unless, perhaps, one party has transgressed the club’s ethical code; even then, the complaints usually go nowhere. Sometimes the disputes go to court, which usually means each side will spend more than the puppy cost, and the puppy will be past breeding age by the time the dispute is resolved—if it ever is. Frequently, such disputes are never fully resolved. As a result, the dog may be neither shown nor bred, while the parties end up with lingering hard feelings and lifelong grudges (even vendettas) played out in social media forums and/or at dog shows. Even with- out a court trial or AKC bench commit- tee, a dog-related dispute can be “tried” in the ‘court of public opinion’ in this fashion. The loser in such a battle is often forced to pay a high price in terms of reputation. AVOIDING THE PROBLEMS IN THE FIRST PLACE To minimize such problems, a few common sense rules apply. Rule #1: Know your state laws regarding puppy sales and consumer fraud as it applies to the sale of dogs. If you don’t know the law or how to fol- low it, consult a lawyer.

Top Quality Dog Housebreaking

602-485-5490 www.bellybands.net Cus tom orders welcome S ince 2003 Very adjustable & comfortable Soft & gentle on show coats Won’t tangle hair In stock; quick ship for boys & girls Belly Bands

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TALES OF AN OWNER HANDLER by CATHERINE GARRETSON

I can remember the first time I followed the gymnastics com- petition at the Olympics. Prior to that time, the United States was not very competitive in the sport. But that year a pixie-sized American named Cathy Rigby caught the nation’s attention. She wore her blonde hair in short pigtails that looked like some- one had docked the buns on the sides of Princess Leia's head. Cathy wooed the audience with her floor exercise and amazed everyone with her spirited performance on the uneven bars. But it was her routine on the balance beam that sent me to the gym. She caught and held your attention because she made it look interesting. She made it look fun and, especially, she made it look easy. For the next year I often practiced my balance beam routine. I pretended that I was at the Olympics. I strutted across the balance beam with my chin held high. I jumped, I turned, I did a split and then I did my dismount. But I was not stupid. I did not try to do a back flip or, for that matter, a front flip. No, I knew that she had spent years develop- ing her craft and I was not going to rep- licate her abilities in just a few months. I appreciated the amount of hard work, experience and talent that propelled her to the Olympics. I could pretend I was her, but I knew I was not. Years later I started exhibiting at dog shows with my Shih Tzu named Gatsby (GCH McKnight's Golden Reputation). My oldest son would accompany me on the trips to the shows, which he called “Driving Mr. Gatsby.” As a newbie, I had my share of triumphs and mishaps. Well, actually, I had more than my share of both. Initially I did not groom in the grooming room because I was sure that if anyone watched me groom, they

“SHE CAUGHT AND HELD YOUR ATTENTION BECAUSE SHE MADE IT LOOK INTERESTING.” 40 • T op N otch T oys , M ay 2018

K R I S P I N L I L C A E S A R CAESAR Best of Breed over Specials, 4 pt. Major, Troy KC Thank you Judge Cindy Vogels

Caesar is Owned, Handled & Loved by MJ Held 1442 Orchard Park Road West Seneca, NY 14224 | 716-675-4497

T op N otch T oys , M ay 2018 • 41

would conclude that I did not know what I was doing. So I would groom him in the hotel room then drive to the show with him fully groomed. Static seemed to be my worst enemy. It lurked at the shows ready to pounce on Gatsby at the most inappropriate time—which usually was at ring-time. Even his hair- brush seemed to be on the side of static! Over time I learned how to deal with this but in the first year or two it gave me fits. The first time I groomed in the grooming area was at my first Shih Tzu national specialty. I finished his topknot and hoped no one had watched me do it. However, someone did watch me— and commented on my technique. A long time Shih Tzu breeder said, “I've never seen anyone do a topknot like that. But it looks great!” The compli- ment gave me a bit more confidence, and when I entered the ring later that day Gatsby was given an Award of Merit by Judge Michelle Billings. I tried to handle Gatsby in the ring as best as I knew how. I attended han- dling classes and studied dog shows on the internet. I watched the experi- enced handlers and I marveled at how they executed their craft. At times the dog and handler were poetry in motion. As the dog moved about the ring, the dog/handler pair seemed to be in per- fect synchronization. When the dog stopped, he stood still in a lovely stack, eager to give a warm expression to the judge. If he started to sit, a slight tug forward would bring him back into a stack. When placed on the table, the handler seemed to have three hands: one for the lead, one to show the bite and one to steady the rear if necessary. The really good handlers seem to know just how long to hold the dog in its stack before starting the trip around the ring. It also seemed they had two sets of eyes; one pair for the judge and one pair for the dog. As to the coat, they never seemed to have any problems. Static seemed to be far away. After a big shake, if that ever happened, the topknot stayed in place and any wispy strands were deftly moved back into place. It seemed to me that every hair of the drop coat fell per- fectly into place. Sigh! While I watched in awe, I was not discouraged. I knew that these experi- enced handlers, both professional and amateur, had spent years developing

their craft and I was not going to repli- cate their abilities in just a few months. I appreciated the amount of hard work, experience and talent that had pro- pelled them to the top of their game. They caught and held my attention because, like Cathy Rigby, they made it look interesting. They made it look fun and, especially, they made it look easy. I had a really nice dog that loved to show, but early on I was told “If you are going to owner-handle, your dog needs to be better groomed and better trained,” than the one with the profes- sional. I took that advice to heart and worked hard to learn how to handle and how to manage the coat. A number of kind exhibitors have shared tips on working with the Shih Tzu coat and I am indebted to them. Improving my handling skills also involved spending more time in the show ring. About the time Gatsby became a champion, AKC created the grand champion title. This gave us a new goal and encouraged us to continue showing. However, if Gats- by did not take breed, then we were finished for the day. I wish the National Owner Handler Series had been avail- able back then. Since Gatsby retired, I have shown many dogs, including his son, his sis- ter, his nieces and now his grand-niece, Odessa (GCH Indigo’s Ode to a Dream). I have gained some knowledge about maintaining and grooming the coat but I readily admit that I still find it chal- lenging. I have also learned that though there are certain tenets of handling, you need to individualize the handling based on your dog's personality. This is important because who knows your dog better than you? Odessa has been such fun to show. Of all the dogs I have shown since Gatsby, she is the one with a ring per- sonality most similar to his. I finished her myself as a puppy from the Bred by Exhibitor class, starting with a major at a Shih Tzu specialty. This was a great thrill. My first experience with the NOHS was also very exciting. That day Shih Tzu were the last breed to show. When Odessa won Owner Handler Best of Breed, the NOHS Toy Group was waiting on us to finish. Without time to touch up her coat, we rushed into the group ring, where the competition was stiff and the judge awarded first place to Odessa! I would like to be able to say that Odessa won Owner Handler Best

in Show her first time in NOHS compe- tition. Unfortunately, that honor went to the Borzoi. Still, it was a wonder- ful experience for both of us and gave us valuable experience in the Best in Show ring. I would say to anyone wanting to “do it themselves,” that it takes a lot of work to learn to show and groom a coated breed well, and that it helps a lot to have a quality dog with an easy-to-care-for coat that loves the show ring. I would also like to thank the many people that helped me along the way. There may still be times when it is best to employ the expertise of a professional han- dler. It is a beautiful thing to watch as your dog, groomed to the nines, glides around the ring under the experienced hand of a professional. Yet most of the time I will show my dogs myself and check the NOHS box when I enter. It is interesting and it is fun and I have got- ten a lot better at making it look easy... although it is not easy!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR In 1978 Catherine bought her first Shih Tzu. Nine years ago her first show dog, Gatsby, came into her life. Under her Indigo kennel name she has now bred several generations of champions. Recently her first home bred champi- on, Sonoma, tied for 2017 Top Produc- ing Brood Bitch. She is a member of the American Shih Tzu Club and the Vice-President of the FL-AL Toy Breeds Club. A college mathematics instruc- tor, she is married to Bill and has three sons—Stuart, Andrew and Charles.

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WO L P E R T S ’ YO R K S H I R E T E R R I E R S

ALBERT Champion C H . PA S TO R A L A L L E Y E S ON M E x WO L P E R T ’ S L O V I N G F OO L

Shown above is our new show boy, Albert, finishing his Championship under judge Mrs. Eva E. Berg. Albert finished with 4 Majors including WD at the Delaware Valley Yorkshire Terrier Club Specialty under judge Mrs. Lydia Hutchinson. B r e e d e r s / Ow n e r s / H a n d l e r s : F r e d & M a r c i a Wo l p e r t | mwo l p e r t 2 0 0 4 @ v e r i z o n . n e t

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“KeKey” Submitted by Carrie Fletcher

“Jessie” Breeder, Owner, photographer Karen Warncke

Submit your cute photos to our TOYBOX department. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog.

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H A N D L E R : MICHELLE PAULIN

OWN E R : JANNA P. MORGAN

B R E E D E R S : MAXINE FOX, JANNA P. MORGAN & LOU A. NOVOSAD, DVM

P H OTO B Y K I T

EVRMOR INXS OF BLACKWOOD B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N

B N R A B C A T

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DERBYTOWNPEKINGESECLUB DEDICATEDITSMARCH2018SPECIALTYTOEDNAVOYLES ANDIRVINE(BUDDY)STEVENS

One of the highest accolades we can pay in our sport is the dedication of a show to a person or persons who did so much to make it possible. Two of these were Edna Voyles and Buddy Stevens, whose friendships to the Derbytown Club was tried and true throughout the years. Pictured above Is another: Katherine (Kitty) Schell, without whose work this club might have fallen into an unsalvageable abyss, is show with a very small part of her handiwork which includes all signage and trophies for each event. Not pic- tured is Sue Jeffries, Secretary, Treasurer and Show Chair to whom we owe a great deal. Happily, President Steve Hurt is pictured directly above. Without Steve ringside, it just wouldn’t be a Derbytown show.

Photos by Robert Skibinski for Booth above, clockwise from top left: BOB CH PEQUEST FEEL THE BURN Breeder/Owner/Handled by David Fitzpatrick, co-owned by Sandra Middlebrooks & Iris Love; WD BOW PEKEDEN BLACK SABBATH, Breeder/Owner/Hanled by Thomas Curley & Dianne Bell; BOS PEKEDEN PRIMA DONNA, Breeder/Owner/Hanled by Thomas Curley & Dianne Bell.

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C H T Y B E E ’ S G E T T I N G C O Z Y W I T H W E N R I C K

Our exciting Midnight daughter finished easily and is one to watch out for! “Cozy” has breed type, awesome style and loves to show off! B R E D B Y Karen Bey & Becky Mullins • OW N E D B Y Karen Bey, Becky Mullins & Wendy Paquette • P R E S E N T E D B Y Becky Mullins

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O U R S TA R S S H I N E !

Three times BOS at the most prestigious shows! 2016 and 2017 ATFTC National Specialties and the 2017 Royal Canin AKC Championship Show. 2017 Westminster AOM, Variety Group placing, NOHS Group Winning, NOHS Top Ten*, BOBs during National Specialty and Royal Canin Weeks as well.

©David Sombach

OUR THANK YOU TO THE JUDGES for the wonderful recognition you have given our young dogs!

*AKC NOHS stats 2017

SUSAN & STEVE THI BODEAUX KALLMEE KENNEL | HOME OF EXCEPT IONAL DOGS S INCE 1978, COCOA, FL

BOS Toy Manchester Terrier and BOVOH at the 2017 AMTC National Specialty! AES 2017 Royal Canin AKC National Championship Show, 2017 Westminster AOM, Multiple BOB, Variety Group Placing, Multiple NOHS Group Winner and prestigious wins so far in 2018 include BOV at Progressive Dog Club and Select at Westminster! CO-OWNEDWITH MADONNA LEE

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IT’S ABOUT THE DOGS

blood alcohol level the morning after a rather celebratory evening! The first time one walks into that show ring with their dog can be the beginning of a long and dedicated passion, or, it can be a short trip into the twilight zone of obscurity! Have we become so rapt into our own egos and self aggrandize- ment that we cannot look around and notice those who are new, shaky with fear, unsure in multiple ways? Could we just stop whining and reach out? Can we try harder to remember the reason so many of us are here? We continued because someone, a kind soul or more than one, shared enough joy of “the hair of the dog that bit him/her!” It can be an amazing and rewarding experience to watch another person succeed when we take the time to help, in some even small way, a new person! Today’s atmosphere is so charged with negativity, not just in our world of dog shows, but everywhere we turn, it is very easy to get caught up in every negative aspect of even the least of important factors! So quickly can we forget that it is not about us, it is about the dogs! Our parent clubs, our local clubs, or even AKC, is formed for one purpose to promote the health and wel- fare of our dogs, to keep accurate and open records regarding our dogs who give us joy unfettered, to hold educa- tional events and specialty shows in accordance with official rules and to openly and honestly do our best to eval- uate our breeding stock and to share this knowledge. Sure, the members make a club, but we are all there because of the dogs! This fact seems to be forgot- ten way too often. Members are far too often willing and insistent upon “biting the hand that feeds them”! If the need is for a kum-ba-yah society where nar- cissistic tendencies can be satisfied, perhaps a mirror factory would be the place to better serve that need! In recent times, due to a new posi- tion, I have learned that while being so busy delegating important duties

and running my own life, wonderful people who volunteer to ‘give back’ to that which has given them pleasure and joy (that is showing their beauti- ful dogs)—well, their life just keeps on throwing them curveballs too! Life happens, we must adjust and accept that which we cannot change and real- ize not everything will always run on a perfect schedule and according to that which a few feel they are entitled to! Facts are never going to suit everyone but they will get done, things will move forward, with or without everyone hav- ing to think alike! So, things I’ve learned in thirty plus years: 1. Warm winsome ways of those who surround us will be the like- liest way to continue and increase interest in our sport. 2. Negative begets negative. 3. Judges don’t always choose the right dog—it is subjective and it is, after all, his/her decision based on their individual interpretation of the Breed Standard. 4. Share the knowledge you hold— it is not some huge secret or rocket science. 5. The dog world has short memo- ry—try not to absent yourself for long periods of time. Always, and I mean always, try to hold a high profile and presence at shows, particularly at Group ring wheth- er in the ring or simply support- ing the exhibits/exhibitors from ringside and do so with grace. 6. Do not bite the hand that feeds you! Always, always be gracious to judges and exhibitors alike. 7. Clubs do not exist to serve any person’s private advancement or private agenda. 8. You find you make lifelong friend- ships, near and far. 9. Promote good sportsmanship and 10. Last, but certainly not least— remember, it’s not about you, it’s about the dogs!

I t was the best of times, it was the worst of times! Oops—that line may well be a bit of plagiarizing! It could, though, most probably be a line many a dog fancier, one who participates in our sport, would love to use as their own—not because we may make millions, but because it is laden with a heavy truth and a great reality! The intent was to write an article brightened with levity! Spilling ink, twenty-six letters arranged into words to share very real experiences to bring you, the reader, the breeder, the han- dler, the judge, the exhibitors and club contributors along with our American Kennel Club, a bit of joy and sparkling light. In our daily challenges, each one of us simply wants to get it all right! An interesting thing happened on the way to the keyboard—life happened and surrounded us! Thirty-five years ago, I was blessed with my very first Shih Tzu! Many of you have been involved in this sport for much longer than I. The wealth of knowledge each of us carry into the show venues weekend after weekend is undeniably vast and magnificently important! So, the question is, what, exactly, are we as individuals, doing to educate, draw in, assist, promote, expand and share the vast and impor- tant knowledge of the world of dogs with any and all those persons who seek to learn? There’s the “hair of the dog that bit you” and it has nothing to do with your by JANIS McGEE

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Sidd and Larry are pictured receiving Group 1 from Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus at San Jacinta Kennel Club. SINCERE THANKS TO MRS. HURLEBAUS. THANKS ALSO TO GROUP 1 JUDGES: Mr. William R. Russell, San Jacinto Kennel Club & Mr. Rodney Merry, Brazos Valley Kennel Club

*TNT all breed stats as of 3/31/18

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SHIH TZU HALLMARKS

by JO ANN WHITE drawings by STEVE HUBBEL

I read a fascinating article in the March 2018 AKC Gazette by Bri- ard breeder and judge Denise Simenauer. She asked us to think about “the rewarding of dogs for their beautiful structure, movement and presence without regard for the breed’s hallmarks, which are what make the breed different from all other breeds.” Many of us believe that some judges and breeders are doing just this and rewarding the “generic dog” rather than valuing the distinctive features that are unique to that particular breed. This is especially easy to do if one is relatively new to judging or breeding, or lacks deep familiarity with the breed standard. Unfortunately, this can and sometimes does lead to the disappear- ance of hallmark features from much of the gene pool, especially those traits based upon a complex collection of recessive genes. It made me think about the char- acteristics that make a Shih Tzu a Shih Tzu. This is, first and foremost, a “head breed.” The Shih Tzu topknot has become a work of art and is often designed to camouflage a less-than-ideal head. It is therefore very important to judge a dog, or evaluate it for breeding purposes, by putting your hands on it. Is the head broad and round? We liken the Shih Tzu head to a softball when giving seminars. It should never be flat, or fall away behind the eyes. Are the eyes also large, round and dark, set well apart and looking straight ahead? Small or close- set eyes, or eyes showing an excessive amount of white, make it impossible for a Shih Tzu to have the desired warm, sweet, wide-eyed and trusting expres- sion that is one of the hallmarks of the breed. The muzzle should be short and

“THE SHIH TZU TOPKNOT HAS BECOME A WORK OF ART AND IS OFTEN DESIGNED TO

CAMOUFLAGE A LESS- THAN-IDEAL HEAD.”

square with good cushioning and set no lower than the bottom of the eye rim. The jaw should be broad and square and slightly undershot, although a missing tooth or misaligned teeth are generally not severely penalized. The stop should be deep, but without the wrinkle found on the Pekingese. The elaborate topknot often seen in the show ring can not only camouflage an improper head but also destroy the overall desired balance, particularly if the dog has a flat, low-set, or curled tail

rather than the desired teacup handle one. Excessively long necks are not desired and if they appear to be set in at a right angle to the back this is because the shoulders are incorrect. There should be a smooth transition from the neck to the shoulder to the withers. A Shih Tzu is not a pea-headed giraffe! Although the Shih Tzu is a toy breed in the United States, it is in the non- sporting group in most parts of the world. This is a sturdy breed, weighing more than one might think from just

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looking at it. A good Shih Tzu should be well-boned and muscular, with a good spring of rib and a broad, deep chest. Although the elbows should be tight to the body, you should be able to insert your hand between the front legs. And speaking of fronts, the front feet of the Shih Tzu should touch the ground when it is moving. The dog that is strung up and raced around the ring may well have incorrect shoulders or be so short-backed that it has difficulty get- ting its front feet out of the way of its back ones. The gait should be smooth and flowing, with good front reach and rear drive and no bounce or roll. Of utmost importance in or out of the show ring is temperament. This is a friendly, affectionate breed, even a bit arrogant. If you are judging and talk to a Shih Tzu while examining it on the table, it might well respond by kissing you on the nose. For sure, the tail will be wagging! To learn more about our delightful breed, go to the American Shih Tzu Club website, www.shihtzu.org. A history of the breed and the Illustrated Guide to the breed standard, with its wonderful artwork by the late Stephen Hubble, can be found by clicking on About the Shih Tzu, while there are many articles designed specifically for breeders and judges under the Education tab.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Jo Ann White has been involved with the Shih Tzu since 1967. Past president of the American Shih Tzu Club and the Shih Tzu Fanciers of Central Florida, she is currently on the ASTC Board and runs the ASTC website. She has written several books on the Shih Tzu, includ- ing The Official Book of the Shih Tzu and is the long-time Shih Tzu breed columnist for the AKC Gazette. She has bred and/or owned many champion Shih Tzu, including the winner of the 2010 national specialty.

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THE JAPANESE CHIN by DALE MARTENSON

T he Japanese Chin belongs to the most ancient breeds of dogs known, having a history more romantic and interest- ing than any other breed. The actual origins of this breed are shrouded in obscurity but it was, no doubt, intro- duced from China more than 1000 years ago. In the first century A.D.—when the ancient city of Lo Yang was still the capital of China, the Emperor Ming Ti abandoned the faith of his fathers and was converted to Buddhism. This momentous event, which changed the whole course of Eastern history, proved a very important factor in the history of the little Chinese lap-dog. Lions and dogs—as well as all other animals—are closely connected with Buddhism. Though very few Chinese had seen real lions, these animals were to them the very personification of the passions and powers that Buddha had subdued and were therefore regarded with superstitious awe. There is a gos- pel saying: “The Lion is the king of beasts. Its power of increase is with- out limit. Similarly it may diminish (at will) and become like unto a dog”. It is said that the dog of the Buddha always accompanied its master through para- dise. Soon the lion became the most common figure in Chinese art. The Chinese artists had great difficulties in drawing lions as few of them could secure access to living models. It is said that the Chinese pilgrim Sung Yu was most surprised when he saw two lions at the court of Gaudhara, as these did not at all resemble the sketches he had seen in his native country. One day the lion faded from the pic- ture and the little lion dog took the place of the real lion and became the Emper- or’s supreme association with Buddha. The surest way to the Emperor’s heart was to present him with a dog. The Chinese cultivated in the dog a similarity of appearance not only to their idea of the lion of Buddha, but also to Buddha himself. Thirty-two superior

marks distinguish Buddha from other human beings, among others a little ball shining like silver or snow between the eyebrows. Hence this marking on the brow of dogs became known as the “mark of Buddha.” This is in reference to the spot on the top of the head of a Japanese Chin. Also referred to as “Bud- dha’s thumbprint”. Oh, and by the way this spot on the head is not to be espe- cially rewarded nor lack of it penalized in the show ring, but it’s neat to know the legend of it. The Chinese exalted the little lap- dogs to a height of almost religious ven- eration. The highest honors of the land were bestowed upon the dogs. There were “dukes” and “princes” among them and they were attended on by numer- ous personal servants. When these pets were taken out for exercise, they were carried in luxurious palanquins and were given daily baths and sprin- kled with sweet-smelling perfumes. They were fed on the daintiest of food and were constantly petted and pam- pered. For their beds, they were given luxurious carpets. The Chin were strictly secluded in the Court and there were different forms of punishment for the heinous crime of removing any of these from the Imperial Palace. Death by stoning was said to be mer- ciful compared with “death by ten thou- sand slices”. There was never any hope of pardon. The Emperor’s sovereignty was absolute. JAPAN Although the Buddhism from India reached Japan earlier, it was to China that the Japanese turned for instruction in their religion. Japan adored not only the religion of China, but also the art, literature and the social and political culture of the older civilization. Young Japan looked up to China with the greatest veneration until modern times. Those who studied in China were

dazzled by the wealth and power of the country they saw. With the arrival of the Buddhist phi- losophy to Japan, the cult of the lion and the lion dog spread to that country too. The Japanese carried their admira- tion for the lion dog to the same extrav- agant lengths, even extending it, at one period, to a glorification of all dogs of whatever kind. It is quite obvious that the Japanese Chin is a descendant of the imported Chinese Lion Dog. Under the Manchu rulers, the small “sleeve dogs” were tre- mendously in vogue. The little dogs were treated with exagerated reverence at the Japanese court. Like the Chinese Imperial dogs, the Japanese pets had whole staffs of servants and the highest of honors of the land were bestowed upon them. The precious little dogs were put in bamboo cages and were kept like birds. During hot weather a servant would sit beside the little dog to fan the flies away and put bits of ice into its mouth. No one was allowed to wake it when it was sleeping and there would be terrible consequences if some unlucky person stepped on a tail. When a dog died, reli- gious services were performed. For centuries the Japanese Chin were bred by Japanese noble families, jealously guarded by its master and mistress. For centuries it was closeted

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