Showsight Express - February 23, 2022

WIDELY DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY REASONABLE • RELIABLE • REALLY REALLY FAST!

Multiple Best in Specialties Multiple Supported Shows Multiple Group Placings From the ECSCA Standard Expression –Soft, melting, yet dignified, alert, and intelligent.

OWNED BY Lynda & Robert Gall Pamela Morgan

VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO HANDLERS Laura King & Robin Novack

ASSISTED BY Sam Hanle & Trey Behm

BRED BY Lynda & Robert Gall and Debra Pitchford

SPANIEL (ENGLISH COCKER)

Southern California Sporting Dog Fanciers Group 2 (580+ Sporting Dog Group) - Ken Murray (Pictured) Kennel Club of Palm Springs Group 2 (540+ Sporting Dog Group) - Paula Nykiel (Pictured) Seattle Kennel Club

IWS All Systems *

Sporting Dog *

All Breed *

Group 3 - Patricia Trotter Gig Harbor Kennel Club Best in Show - Linda Reece (Pictured) Gig Harbor Kennel Club Group 1 - Robert Robinson (Pictured) Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers, Inc Best in Show - Patricia Trotter (Pictured) Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers, Inc. Group 1 - Charles Olvis (Pictured) Dog Fanciers Association of Oregon, Inc. Group 3 - Elaine Lessig

*AKC Stats as of 1/18/22

SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

M B I S N B I S S M B I S S G C H B

C G C T K N Breeders: Colleen McDaniel & Stacy Duncan Owners: Stacy Duncan & Cat Shelby Handler: Stacy Duncan

Charm

M B I S S B I S G C H S C H

R E H - P I N ’ S I A M C H A R M E D F O R C H E R I S T A R

Breeder/Owner/Handler C H E R I E M C D A N I E L Cheristar Miniature Pinschers

Thank You to All the Judges Who Have Been “Charmed” by Our Girl.

E X C E P T I O N A L B R E E D T Y P E , S U P E R B T E M P E R A M E N T & E X Q U I S I T E M O V E M E N T . the bitch with

POODLE (STANDARD)

*DN STATS AS OF 12/31/21 BRIARD

*

SCOTTISH TERRIER

S loane BIS RBIS MBISS GCHB CH

POOLE’S IDE SARGEANT SLOANE CD RN MX MXJ MXF

SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

BEST IN SHOW WINNER • MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER

Irish WaterSpaniel NUMBER ONE Sporting Group ** TOP FIFTEEN FOR 2021 ALL SYSTEMS *

THANK YOU JUDGE CINDY C. LANE FOR RECOGNIZING SLOANE IN THE GROUP

Presented by Joanne Thibault Owned by Stephanie O’Reilly and Gregory M. Siner Bred by Poole’s Ide - Gregory M. Siner and Samuel A. Jenio

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 12/31/21

**AKC STATS AS OF 12/31/21

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S D E N N Y M O U N C E & H O U S T O N C L A R K F O R T H E S E I N C R E D I B L E W I N S F O R O U R B O Y .

W E A R E L O O K I N G F O R W A R D T O A

WONDERFUL 2022

Owned by Julie Caruthers, Diane Nelson & Jennifer Zingula Bred by Collette Jaynes, Lana Levai & Marcia A. Long

Jetoca Kennel Handled by Ginny Kincer

SPANIEL (CLUMBER)

2 0 2 1 S E L E C T D O G W E S T M I N S T E R

2 0 2 1 A O M A T T H E

A K C N A T I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P

BOOM G C H J A Z Z I N T O T H E B E A T A T B I G B O O M

GCHp Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend MB I S MR B I S MB I S S Samburu

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

#1 #8 RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK* HOUND* 2021

EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY FRANK MURPHY

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS

BRED BY LYONNESE KENNELS

*AKC STATS AS OF 12/31/21

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND GRATITUDE TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED SAMBURU. WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING WHAT 2022 WILL BRING US.

THE OWNER HANDLER

JENNIFER REDFERN

our property. My dad took him to our grandparents’ vet. “Pup” lived with us for eight or nine years before crossing that Rainbow Bridge. Our next pet was a Samoyed, “Queenie.” Dad brought her to us from Alaska where he had delivered hay. Queenie lived with us for seven years before succumbing to complications from cancer. Then I met my first husband who had a young St. Bernard puppy named “Max.” Since then, we’ve owned an English Cocker Spaniel that was stolen from our yard; then a Shetland Sheepdog. Travelling back and forth to Germany with the military, we came across many purebred dog enthusiasts and had friends in one of the German Shepherd clubs. While sta- tioned at Ft. Lewis, Washington, near my hometown of Puyal- lup, I began going to the Winter and Summer AKC Clusters at the Washington State Fairgrounds to watch the shows that are held there. Before I knew it, I was holding dogs for people who were rushing in and out of show rings. I was thrilled to be involved in some capacity. I retired from the military in 2010, and a few months later, my heart dog, a Lhasa mix, passed away. My husband soon decided that we needed another dog. He liked the Min Pin mix that our son and daughter-in-law had. The Puyallup Winter Cluster was going on, so I headed down to the show to seek out Miniature Pinschers. I fell in love, however, with a Border Terrier. (My husband was not a fan.) Well, the next day, I met what I thought at first was a Doberman puppy; I was quickly corrected by the owner. The handsome black and rust-colored male was, in fact, a German Pinscher. On the third day of the cluster, I took my husband to meet this boy. At that time, the breeders asked if we would be willing to adopt their foundation girl and, before we knew it, we had a new pet dog. I continued to visit the Puyallup shows for a few years and stayed in touch with “Bahn’s” former owners. They were pleased with how we were doing with her and asked me to raise their next pick-of-the-litter male. The catch? He had to be made available for shows. In October of 2013, I entered the show ring at Ridge- field for the first time as the owner of a future champion. GCHS Immer Treu v Oakwood Braveheart, aka “Winston,” has taken me on an amazing ride. He is a hard-working boy with a nose for scentwork. He wants to please, and we have achieved titles in Nosework, AKC Scent Work and Barn Hunt, as well as in Obe- dience and Rally. Winston has his International Championship and Gold Championship with IABCA and his UKC Champi- onship. We even accomplished his CGC, CGCA, and CGCU as well as his ATT and Farm Dog Certification. Winston enjoys hunting rats and mice when we are at my sister and brother-in- law’s family farm, and he shows instinct for pushing cows. 2. How many years in dogs? How many as an Owner Handler? I have only been involved in the sport of dog shows and per- formance events for eight years. For all of those years I showed my own dog. I have competed in the Owner-Handled com- petition for seven years with two German Pinschers, “Win- ston,” and his daughter, GCHB Oakwoods Chanel No. 5, aka “Gabi.”

I am from Puyallup, Washington. I am the granddaughter of dairy farmers and I showed dairy cattle in 4-H. I attended Wash- ington State University, but left to join the military in order to pay for further education. I eventually graduated from University of Maryland European Campus with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management and Management Studies. After retirement from the US Army, I earned a certificate as a Master Gardener with Wash- ington State University. (I am definitely a WSU Fan.) I am married, with two adult children. My husband and I were both in law enforcement in the US Army and we both retired as Chief Warrant Officer Five. We both served in the Military Police and US Army Criminal Investigation Command as Special Agents. We have both led very competitive lives. I was the first female CW5 Military Police, serving as a CID Special Agent. We worked alongside Military Police Working Dogs and we appreciate the relationship between a dog and its adult partner. One of my sisters is also a German Pinscher owner and an Owner Handler. Our daughter served in the Army for six years in Civil Affairs, serving two tours in Kuwait and Iraq. She is a dog lover too. Our son is an accomplished chef. I am a lay minister and pastor. My dog, “Winston,” is not only a show dog, he was also raised along- side our transient population that we feed in an outreach program through our church. I believe in the healing properties that our canine companions can provide. Winston is one of those special dogs; he senses when to turn off the guarding instinct and become a stabilizing presence for a person in distress. I saw this with an autistic boy who had Winston’s head in a vice grip, and another time when he led me to a woman having an emotional meltdown in a parking lot where he placed his head in her lap until she could get herself together. I see other dogs doing similarly great things, with little prompting or notice from passersby… even at dog shows. I love the community the dog world has brought me to. 1. When were you first introduced to the sport of purebred dogs? To your breed? Since my childhood, we have owned purebred dogs. Our first dog was a Sussex Spaniel who wandered, in bad shape, onto

THE OWNER HANDLER JENNIFER REDFERN

“I believe the Owner Handler is a huge contributor to the overall sport of dog shows. Among those of us who are breeders and dog fanciers, some of us have children who are not competing as Juniors but are Owner Handlers.”

3. Do you attend show handling classes? Have you attended any handling seminars? In the beginning, I attended quite a few handling classes on a weekly basis for several years. Later, it became more difficult so that I have often resorted to YouTube videos with Will Alexan- der, Eric Salas, and lately, Amy Booth. I attended one workshop, which was a combination handling class and canine fitness. I am also a huge fan of the Dog Show Mentor program led by Lee Whittier. 4. Have you found virtual learning tools to be helpful? Classes? Videos? Websites? Social Media? In recent years, I have found YouTube videos to be very helpful. (Not so much when I first started.) I was not raised in the AKC world of dog shows, but I am finally grasping the language so that now the videos are helpful. I have not participated in online handling classes. The Dog Show Mentor program has been extremely helpful. Lee brings on some great speakers not only from the dog world but also in the area of goal setting; building self-confidence; focus; self-image; and building self-worth. She has built a community of Owner Handlers who reach out to one another at shows, and on Facebook in groups, to share good news and lessons learned. 5. Do you compete in the National Owner-Handled Series? Are rank- ings important to you? I do compete in the National Owner-Handled Series. Rankings are important. They help to keep us motivated as the competi- tion becomes more challenging. 6. Is it a challenge to compete with your breed(s) as an Owner Handler? It is a challenge to compete as an Owner Handler with my breed, the German Pinscher. We are a low entry breed that is not seen at every dog show. 7. Are you intimidated by the Professional Handlers? By the Judges? I was very intimidated by the Professional Handlers for many years. I am finally becoming more comfortable competing against them and have received helpful tips from several along the way. I still feel a little intimidated by many of the Judges. However, as I’ve become more involved in a few dog clubs by set- ting up shows and volunteering to ring steward, I interact more with some of the Judges who are also club members. I find them to be a great resource for my own improvement in this sport.

8. Who have been your mentor(s) as an Owner Handler? The breeders of my dogs were my first mentors, and then the people providing handling classes and puppy classes. When I began competing in the National Owner-Handled Series, I soon developed a core group of fellow competitors who shared tips and tricks. We supported—and still support—each other. I became more involved in our parent club, and at our national specialties my group of mentors broadened some more. A fellow Owner Handler introduced to me to Dog Show Mentor, which is of great help to me. 9. How important is the Owner Handler to the future of the dog sport? I believe the Owner Handler is a huge contributor to the overall sport of dog shows. Among those of us who are breeders and dog fanciers, some of us have children who are not competing as Juniors but are Owner Handlers. I believe that we outnum- ber the Professional Handlers at most dog shows, and some of our group members are highly competitive in the variety Groups and in Best in Show as well. 10. What are your goals as an Owner Handler? Is there a victory that has eluded you? My primary goal is to have fun with my dogs while training and showing them. Of course, I would love to earn the ultimate prize on any given day—Best in Show. However, my current goal is to learn to train and show my dog so that judges appreciate his soundness, conformation, breeding, and conditioning, and say that he is the best German Pinscher they have seen. Variety Group Placements and Best in Show have eluded me, but I have not quit competing. I am still learning. So, I can say the victory is not yet lost... it is still out there. I am still on the journey. 11. Is there a funny story that you can share about your experiences as an owner-handler? Oh my! Winston is such a funny boy, but he can also be quite serious where my medical needs are concerned. He loves to bow and will do this when he thinks the judge might feed him. How- ever, on more than one occasion, he has turned away from the judge and started pushing his nose in my face. At first, I was very frustrated by this until I realized that he was warning me that my blood sugar was “off.” We have since done some testing and training, and confirmed that his behavior is his alert for blood sugar issues. Lesson learned: Make sure to eat a proper meal before going into the ring.

SAINT BERNARD

THE OWNER HANDLER

SUSANWATKINS

4. Have you found virtual learning tools to be helpful? Classes? Videos? Websites? Social Media? Virtual learning tools have come a long way and are helpful in a lot of ways. However, nothing teaches you and makes you improve as much as just getting out there in the ring! 5. Do you compete in the National Owner-Handled Series? Are rank- ings important to you? I have competed in the NOHS and also, in 2020, in the NOHS Finals in Orlando. We were ranked #4 in 2020, and in 2021 we also made the Top 10 at #7. I believe rankings are important, to see where you stack up against the competition. It is an honor to have the opportunity to compete in the NOHS and to make the Top 10! I am very proud to be an Owner Handler. 6. In which class(es) are you most likely to enter your dog(s)? Why? I currently show Diesel in BOB, and I am planning to start a young female later this year in the 9-12 Month Puppy Class. 7. Is it a challenge to compete with your breed(s) as an Owner Handler? I believe every breed has its own challenges. I’m proud of what I have accomplished with Diesel, and we continue to strive for the best with true sportsmanship. 8. Are you intimidated by the Professional Handlers? By the Judges? I am definitely not intimidated by them. I respect the Judges and Professional Handlers, and look up to them in many ways. Their dedication for what they do is admirable. 9. Who have been your mentor(s) as an Owner Handler? When I first started conformation, my primary Professional Han- dler taught me everything, and I’m forever grateful. I’m blessed that Professionals, along with Owner Handlers, saw something in me. I’ve come this far because of their guidance and my dedi- cation to this breed. 10. How important is the Owner Handler to the future of the dog sport? I think it’s very important, as an Owner Handler and a new breeder, to keep the breed to the standard. We definitely are the future of the dog sport. 11. What are your goals as an Owner Handler? Is there a victory that has eluded you? My goals are to always evaluate myself while improving in every- thing I do. Also, in the future, to show in NOHS with a Bred-By. 12. Is there a funny story that you can share about your experiences as an Owner Handler? There is not one particularly funny story. I love spending time with my dogs and with friends, and we always have fun. We try to make every show enjoyable for everyone!!

My name is Susan Watkins. My husband and I live in a small town in Pennsylvania. I help to run our excavation business dur- ing my “down time.” We have two Cane Corsos, “Diesel” and “Demi.” They are my life and my passion. 1. When were you first introduced to the sport of purebred dogs? To your breed? I have always loved purebred dogs. Their beauty and con- fidence are some things I remember noticing when I was watching the Westminster KC Dog Show as a little girl. I was first introduced to the Cane Corso by my husband in 2017. His nephew owned one and he said, “You have got to see this dog.” Needless to say, eight months later (after tons of research and looking for a breeder) we found our boy, Die- sel. We purchased him from our wonder breeders and friends, Jody and Amy Riley of Warren, Ohio. 2. How many years in dogs? How many as an Owner Handler? I have had dogs my entire life. In 2018, the Cane Corso became part of our family. Diesel was purchased as a home companion/protection dog. I started to show some interest in conformation, learning as much knowledge as I could, and so I decided to transform my companion/protection dog into a show dog. In 2019, I started out with a professional handler. I went on to doing the National Owner-Handled Series in 2020, earning most of Diesel’s grand champion points. I’m currently finishing his GCHB. 3. Do you attend show handling classes? Have you attended any handling seminars? Yes, I am a member of my local all-breed training club. I attend the handling classes that they offer with seasoned instructors. Attending a seminar is on my “to do” list. I plan on doing this in the near future. I love to learn and grow as a person, and with my dogs.

DEBRA FERGUSON THE BREEDER/OWNER HANDLER

“Breeder/Owner Handlers are the lifeblood of the sport. Without the Breeders who make a passion out of this sport, there would not be greatness.”

6. How important is the Bred-By Class to you? How important are specialities? I have finished many champions in the Bred-By Class. I have had several SBIS.

7. Is it a challenge to compete with your breed(s) as a Breeder/Owner Handler?

Of course it is a challenge to compete in any breed, and it is harder for a Breeder/Owner Handler to compete against Han- dlers because, frankly, Handlers are better trained and they usu- ally train their dogs better than some Owner Handlers. And they have a larger selection to pick from. 8. Are you intimidated by Professional Handlers? By the Judges? Professional handlers get to pick from the best of the best, whereas a breeder picks from the brood box. And because han- dlers can do a better job with a dog, my handler is currently showing my best dog. I am showing the second-best dog. Fortu- nately for me, both are very good examples of the breed. I won an award of Merit and Bred-By at the AKC National in 2021. 9. Who has been your mentor(s) as an Owner Handler? As a Breeder? L’Dyne Brennan, Tim Brazier, Dana Plonkey, Wendell Sammet; some of the greatest names in the Poodle world. I was very lucky. 10. How important is the Breeder/Owner Handler to the future of the dog sport? Breeder/Owner Handlers are the lifeblood of the sport. Without the Breeders who make a passion out of this sport, there would not be greatness. It is the intensity of the Breeder that provides us with the drive to do the research that determines how to breed a good front… or that straight shoulders restrict reach… and a tilted croup restricts the rear movement or a poorly set tail. 11. What are your goals as an Owner Handler? As a Breeder? Is there a milestone that has eluded you? My goal is to continue to breed a better dog. Not every puppy is an improvement. I am getting to an age where I will not be able to handle my own Special. I am sad to be “aging out.” Fortu- nately, I have a backup plan and will judge.

1. When were you first introduced to the sport of purebred dogs?

I found my first Poodle in a snowbank in Anchorage, Alas- ka, in 1966. I bought co-ownership of my first registered Poodle two years later. My father wanted to know which end I bought, the eating end or the pooping end. I cried for a week. 2. How many years in dogs? How many as an Owner Handler? As a Breeder? I started out as a Junior Handler in Alaska. Had my first litter as a young adult. 3. Do you attend show handling classes? Have you attended any handling seminars? I have been attending handling classes since I was a teen- ager. I am still attending handling classes 50 years later. I’ve attended many handling seminars. 4. Have you found virtual learning tools to be helpful? Classes? Videos? Websites? Social Media? Yes…must keep up to date. Virtual learning, however, does not give the opportunity for your teacher to mentor you. 5. Do you compete in the National Owner-Handled Series? Are rankings important to you? I have competed in the NOHS, and yes, the ranking is always important.

C ON T E A ND MU P P E T T HE P E R F E C T P A I R I NG I N 2 0 2 2 . . . anticipating a spring litter

Conte Multiple Champion throughout Europe International Multiple Champion Owners: WERNER & EVELYN RESCH KLAGENFURT, AUSTRIA Breeder: FABRIZIO NADA BERGAMO, ITALY

Muppet C H L O R I A N A D I V A L L E S C R I V I A

NUMB E R ON E A L L B R E E D * Owner: WENDY LEE MARGON Handlers: STEPHEN CABRAL & EMILY MONTOYA Breeder: DR. GUIDOBONO CAVALCHINI BERGAMO, ITALY

*AKC all breed stats as of 12/31/21

O U R ‘ F L O C K S ’ H E R D Y O U R S Temperament, Form, Function, Health

BERGAMASCO SHEEPDOG

B R E D B Y I S S I B A A S A L U K I S OWN E D B Y L Y N D E L L A C K E R MA N & S H A R O N K I N N E Y AMERICA’S TOP SMOOTH 2020-2021 SPECIALTY WINNING • MULT IPLE GROUP WINNING B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N Issibaa’s Llarkin

E X C L U S I V E L Y H A N D L E D B Y S T E F A N I E P E R R I N E

SALUKI

Red

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R . R A N D Y E . G A R R E N B E S T O F B R E E D SCOTTSDALE DOG FANCI ERS ASSOCIAT ION

HARRIER

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 11/30/21

EVERY OWNER HANDLER BEGINS AT THE BEGINNING STARTING FROM SCRATCH

BY DAN SAYERS

D o you remember your beginning “in dogs?” Maybe you were born into the sport and you’ve been accompanying your mother and grandmother to shows for as long as you can remember. Or may- be your first time in the conformation ring occurred decades ago when it took 35 dogs to make a 3-point major. Perhaps you were showing your breed in the Miscellaneous Class and helped to navigate its journey to full rec- ognition. Or it may be that you just got your start last year with your first show dog, and you’re still figuring out how to present your breed—or you’re trying to determine if your dog has what it takes to win. Whatever your current level of experience, it is always helpful to be reminded that no matter the particular details of your introduction, everyone who shows dogs begins at the beginning. Everyone exhibitor starts from scratch. IN THE BEGINNING At every dog show that’s ever been held, there has always been someone in the ring showing their dog for the very first time. It’s one of the sport’s more incredible aspects that newcomers compete in the very same arena as seasoned owner handlers and paid professionals. Even those second and third genera- tion youngsters make their debut alongside exhibitors with years—decades—of experience. And each and every exhibitor’s first appearance in the ring is, essen- tially, the same. The sweaty palms and shaking knees are symptoms that affect all rookies, no matter their age or their accomplishments outside the conforma- tion ring. Even retired executives who’ve managed thousands of people and millions of dollars can be reduced to a bundle of raw nerves when confronted with a willful puppy with little desire to stand for exam or gait in a straight line. The starting point for every exhibitor is positioned in the very same spot—at the beginning of each individual’s personal journey. And no matter the venue or the breed being shown (or the year in which that first entry was made), every exhibitor has to start somewhere… and that somewhere is at the very beginning.

“THE STARTING POINT FOR EVERY EXHIBITOR IS POSITIONED IN THE VERY SAME SPOT— AT THE BEGINNING OF EACH INDIVIDUAL’S PERSONAL JOURNEY.”

STARTING FROM SCRATCH

“THE ONLY GENUINE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TODAY’S ROOKIE EXHIBITORS AND NOVICES FROM THE PAST IS THE PERIOD OF TIME IN WHICH THEIR INTRODUCTION TO THE SHOW RING WAS MADE.”

and new. For the owner handler who’s just starting out, the happenings of the 20th century can seem like ancient history, and the ability to instantly gather information on a smart phone can make the need to sit around after a show to “talk dogs” as unlikely as it can seem unnecessary. How- ever, the most effective way for everyone to come together is to acknowledge our dif- ferent approaches to participating in the sport and to respect the old ways even as we embrace unconventional new ideas. After all, there’s no need to throw away the things that have worked in the past, and there’s no cause to “scratch” every new idea just because it’s never been tried before. The sport of dogs, and every recog- nized breed, will survive—and indeed, thrive—so long as today’s novice exhibi- tors seek guidance from experienced mentors, and veteran fanciers encourage newcomers by being open to new infor- mation and new technologies. Nobody in the sport functions in a vacuum. Everyone participates at the same events and every- one begins at the beginning.

mall. Times do change, of course, and every novice exhibitor is a direct reflec- tion of the (changing) times. For exhibi- tors who are today’s newly-minted owner handlers, the sport has likely been intro- duced through online searches or a post on social media. SCRATCH THAT? Among the many qualities that make being involved in the sport so reward- ing are the sustained connections that are maintained to breeders, handlers, judges, venues, and dogs of the past. The very action of researching a pedigree or plan- ning a litter helps to keep current exhibi- tors connected to those influential prede- cessors who worked tirelessly on behalf of their breeds and for the betterment of the sport. The only genuine difference between today’s rookie exhibitors and novices from the past is the period of time in which their introduction to the show ring was made. For those who have “been around” awhile, there’s often a temptation to cling to the way things used to be and to deride anything and everything that’s novel

THE DOGGONE DECADES Yet, for all the similarities that exhibi- tors share as part of their personal genesis in dogs, there’s one obvious distinction that determines the course of every own- er handler’s journey and their ability to participate—and succeed—for years to come. Each and every exhibitor is strongly influenced by the period of time in which they began their involvement in the sport. Those who grew up in the ring during the 1940s and ‘50s have a direct connection to the all-breed judges of yore as well as to many of the breeders who helped to estab- lish their breeds in this country. Exhibi- tors who entered the ring in ‘60s, ‘70s & ‘80s remember the days of stand-alone dog shows with big entries that were built largely with the hope of finishing champi- onships rather than breaking records. And those exhibitors with ten, twenty or thirty years of experience might admit that their introduction to the world of purebred dogs began by responding to a classified ad in the Sunday paper or by peering through a pet shop window at the local shopping

BIO Dan Sayers has been an Owner Handler since 1985 when he showed his first Irish Water Spaniel (IWS) in Conformation. He’s shown a variety of breeds, and has handled IWS, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and Sussex Spaniels to many Specialty and Group wins. Dan is a member of the Dog Writers Association of America and has contributed to a variety of print and digital publications, including the AKC Gazette, Dogs in Review, Sighthound Review, and Best in Show Daily. He is currently on Showsight’s editorial staff and is the co-host of Ring-Ready Live! with Lee Whittier. Dan attended Drexel University in Philadelphia where he earned a BS in Design, and he later received a Certificate in Graphic Design from the University of the Arts. As a designer and artist, Dan has produced dog-related works in a variety of media. He provided the artwork, editorial content, and digital page layout for the Irish Water Spaniel Club of America (IWSCA) Illustrated Standard, and his illustrations bring to life the words of the award-winning Encyclopedia of K-9 Terminology by Ed and Pat Gilbert. Dan has also judged at a variety of shows, including Sweepstakes at the Westbury Kennel Association, Morris & Essex Kennel Club, and two IWSCA National Specialties.

BREEDER OWNER LINDA BARCHENGER & RONALD RANDALL – LORIEN OES SHOWN BY BREEDER LITA LONG – BLUE PANDA OES SHOWING IN A RING NEAR YOU

OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H

B C A T , I T Ralph

Being awarded Best of Breed under Barbara Alderman and earning his silver GCH title. “What truly lovely example of the breed, I should know, I showed a lot of them” she said. Thank you for this lovely win. BOS under Emily Barnhart at the Sunshine State Herding Show in Florida. Such a nice win with stiff competition. Ralph continues to gather fans and friends with his showmanship and lovely easy way of going in and out of the ring, impressive head, body with crisp coat and outline that describe true breed type.

MINIATURE SCHNAUZER

*

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 11/30/21

#1 #3 SLOUGHI NOHS * SLOUGHI BREED & ALL BREED **

*AKC NOHS STATS AS OF 1/7/2022 **AKC STATS AS OF 12/31/21

SLOUGHI

AAFIQ ALMABOUB IN AAF IQ BRED BY NANCY LOVELADY INT. CH AND AM. CH QALB ELSSAD BAGIR EL QAMAR X CH KAMEA MAHANAJIM OWNED BY KIM BROWN AND NANCY LOVELADY

setting the gold standard

OF THE 2021 GSPCA NATIONAL SPECIALTY SHOW NATIONAL SPECIALTY MATURITY MULTIPLE BEST OF BREED WINNER Best of Breed Winner

PRESENTED BEAUTIFULLY IN THE RING TO THIS HONOR BY HER CO-BREEDER TINA PARKER-CRAIG

THANK YOU TO JUDGE MRS. HEATHER BRENNAN AND TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED OUR BEAUTIFUL GIRL

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

CH SHOMBERG’S ANYTHING COULD HAPPEN GCH CH MI KARMA N SANDY CREEK ONE MAN BAND (BOWIE) CD BN RE JH DM DS CGC X CH SHOMBERG’S TOO MARVELOUS FOR WORDS (KEELY) RM SH GSPCA VC CGC Ellie National Specialty Champion owners EVAN TZANIS & DR. NIA TATSIS breeders KAHLA ENNIS, SHARON DATTILIO, TINA M. CRAIG & BRENDA MAHONEY handler JOANNE THIBAULT

For the Love of the Game THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MAN AND THE SPORT THROUGHOUT HISTORY

I t is February 2022 and winter sports are about to take center stage with the Winter Olympic Games, being held this year in Beijing, China. Many of the athletes have been training their entire lives for the opportunity to compete in the Olympics and to fulfill their dream of an Olympic medal. They compete because they love their sport and they love the competition. As the athletes train and dream, the outside world of COVID and world politics again tries to use the Olympic Games themselves to promote various agendas not related to the sports themselves. It is unfortunate, but in the world in which we live, agendas have taken over many of life’s simple pleasures. We have seen it in our own sport, with COVID shutting down many shows for over a year. Meanwhile, the states and various politicians continue to have an impact on many shows as we move forward into the future. This reflects on how the world today has put restrictions on what we can do and how we can do it. In spite of all the interference by outsiders, the Olympic Games (much like our sport of purebred dogs) is about people from all over the globe training and compet- ing—simply because they love it. THE EARLY HISTORY OF SPORT I think it would be safe to say that since man’s earliest time, there has existed some type of competitive sport. It may have originated from something as simple as a foot race between two children or possibly a hunting competition between two hunters in a tribe or a family. But it is likely that man has always had a competitive instinct to be the best at something. When looking at the history of various types of organized sports or competitions, you can go back to ancient times and start with the Olympic Games. Though its history is part of many myths and legends, the origins of the Olympics are believed to have taken place in Olympia, a district found in Southern Greece. The Games are better known as Olympiads (an Olympiad was considered the four years between Games). They began in 776 BCE and took place at least two decades before the founding of Rome. The founding of Rome can be dated “OL. 6.3” or translated as the third year of the 6th Olympiad. It is believed that the ancient Olympic Games lasted for about 10 centuries until 391 AD, when Emperor Theodosius I ended the ancient Games. For the Ancient Greeks, the Olympics were not just about sports. They also served as a religious event held on the temple site of Olympia, which was dedicated to Zeus. The site held a gold and ivory statue of the king of the gods. The statue, by the great Greek sculptor, Pheidias, stood 42 feet high and was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The main sporting events in those early Olympic Games were: Boxing, Discus, Equestrian Events, Javelin, Jumping, Running, Wrestling, and other events that were added or removed over the history of the Games.

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

Gidget B I S M R B I S N B I S S M B I S S G C H P O S E Y C A N Y O N C L A S S I C W E A R S S H A L I M A R B C A T

Breeding envisioned by: T R I C I A S T A N C Z Y K & J E N N I F E R J O H N S T O N

Breeder Owner Handled by: T R I C I A S T A N C Z Y K Owned by: R U S S & T R I C I A S T A N C Z Y K , J E N N I F E R J O H N S T O N & J O E PA V L I C

PARSON RUSSELL TERRIER

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MAN AND THE SPORT THROUGHOUT HISTORY

THROUGHOUT HISTORY, NEW GAMES, SPORTS, AND AREAS OF COMPETITION HAVE FILLED OUR LIVES TO THE POINT WHERE YOU NOW HAVE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF VARIOUS CLUBS, LEAGUES, AND LEVELS OF SPORTS THAT INCLUDE PEOPLE OF ALL AGES, NATIONALITIES, AND DEGREES OF ABILITIES—FROM AMATEUR TO PROFESSIONAL.

American football as we know it can be traced back to early versions of rugby football. Walter Camp, a Yale University athlete and coach, is considered the “Father of American Football.” Camp introduced many changes and set rules for the line of scrimmage, and for down and distance, as well as additional rules for passing and blocking that led to the game we have today. Golf can be traced to Scotland during the 15th century. It was the golf course at Leith (near Edinburgh) that first published rules around 1682. Nearly a century later, in 1754, the St. Andrews Society of Golfers was formed. The Society began annual com- petitions based on the rules established at Leith. Stroke play was introduced in 1759 and the first (now standard) 18-hole course was constructed in 1764. Throughout history, new games, sports, and areas of competi- tion have filled our lives to the point where you now have hundreds of thousands of various clubs, leagues, and levels of sports that include people of all ages, nationalities, and degrees of abilities— from amateur to professional. SPORT AND OUR CANINE COMPANIONS Did you know that “lure coursing” is probably the oldest of all sports done with a dog, and its popularity can be traced to both the ancient Greeks and Romans? In fact, by the Middle Ages, owner- ship of sighthounds in most countries was prohibited by law for all but the aristocracy. England’s King Canute passed a law that said Greyhounds could not be owned by any person inferior to a gentleman in rank. By the reign of Elizabeth I, coursing was so popular that Elizabeth directed her Earl Marshal to develop the first rules for coursing. The resulting book, The Laws of the Leash , laid out how gazehounds should be handled on the course and how to judge which dog won the match. Dog shows as we know them would not arrive until the middle 1800s, even though breeders and owners probably had a variety of ways in which they compared their stock. It wasn’t until 1859 that the first English dog show was held in Newcastle, Northumberland, England. The best-known show in England is Crufts, which has been held annually since 1886—nine years after the inaugural Westminster Kennel Club dog show. The first formal dog show in the United States was held in 1877, sponsored by the Westminster Kennel Club in New York City, and is still today probably the most well-known show in the world of dog shows. Thinking about all sports, Westminster is the second- longest continuous sporting event in our country, second only to the Kentucky Derby. Also, just like the Derby, when COVID

ROME: GLADIATORS, CHARIOTS, AND THE CIRCUS MAXIMUS

It is known that the Romans were great fans of sports of all types. In the 6th century BCE, the “Circus Maximus” was a char- iot racetrack built in Rome. It was used for all types of Roman games and gladiator fights. It is believed to have hosted its last chariot races in the 6th century. As with many ancient buildings and towns, mother nature ultimately covered the Circus Maximus over numerous centuries. The site was partially excavated in the 20th century and then remodeled. Today, it continues as an impor- tant public space, hosting music concerts and rallies. During the 1st Century AD, following a fire in 64 AD, the Circus had an estimated capacity of 150,000-250,000 spectators. Just think about the largest stadiums in the world today and think about that in comparison. Most of the documented history of sport, going back at least 3,000 years, shows us that early sports often involved the preparation for war or training as a hunter. It was, however, the Ancient Greeks (with the first Olympic Games in 776 BC, and later, the Romans) who introduced formal sports competitions to the world. SPORT IN THE MODERN WORLD Throughout the many centuries that followed those early games, a variety of sports and competitions grew throughout the world. Cricket, for example, originated in South-East England some- time in the late 16th century, and by the 18th century it had become the National Sport of England. Alexander Cartwright of New York is credited with creating the baseball field in 1845 as we know it today. Mr. Cartwright and the members of his New York Knickerbocker Base Ball Club devised the first rules and regulations that became the accepted standard for the modern game of baseball. Believe it or not, the first formal rules for basketball were devised in 1892. Initially, the players dribbled a soccer ball up and down a court of unspecified dimensions, and baskets were first introduced a year later in 1893. The origins of rugby can be traced back over 2,000 years to a Roman game called “harpastum” (from the Greek word for “seize”). But unlike soccer, in which the ball is propelled by the foot, in rugby it is also carried in the hands.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIM FOLEY

Father

M U L T I P L E G R O U P 1 & G R O U P P L AC E M E N T S Carter

GCHG CH Lantana’s Sweet Talkin Man CGC THD

OW N E D B Y B A R B A R A E Y M A R D & S A B R I N A H E W I T T

OW N E D & B R E D B Y G A I L K R A L L

S H OW N B Y T E R R I G A L L E

Mother

Ketu

© M A L I N D A J U L I E N . C O M

G R O U P 1 & M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C E M E N T S

GCHS Primah Moment in Time

B R E D B Y C A R O L E Z I E R I S

TIBETAN SPANIEL

Son

R B I S , M U L T I P L E G R O U P 1 & G R O U P P L AC E M E N T GCHS Lantana’s Time to Talk at Bradmar CGC Speaker

OW N E D B Y B A R B A R A E Y M A R D , M E L I N D A M A R L E R , G A I L K R A L L & S A B R I N A H E W I T T

H A N D L E D B Y T E R R I G A L L E

B R E D B Y C A R O L Z I E R I S

© M A L I N D A J U L I E N . C O M

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MAN AND THE SPORT THROUGHOUT HISTORY

college, or university we attended, or possibly a team that has a favorite player on it. Maybe it’s just because we like the team’s name or logo. A SPORT MANTRA FOR ALL The Olympic motto is “Faster, Higher, Stronger—Together.” For centuries, the Olympic Games was a competition between amateur athletes of the world and the nations they represented. The Olympic movement’s creed was inspired in July 1908 and it reads, “The important thing in life is not the triumph, but the fight; the essential thing is not to have won, but to have fought well.” Read those words: “The important thing in life is not the triumph…” and a few words later, “…but to have fought well.” How many times in life has losing led to poor sportsmanship and harmful behavior that hurts others? If you have ever watched the “Special Olympics” you have probably witnessed some of the best sportsmanship on display, by athletes with limited capacities and a true love of just being able to compete. The Olympic creed can be traced to I Corinthians 9-24-27: “Do you not know that in a race all the runners run but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize.” The creed and motto are meant for the athletes to embrace the Olympic spirit, because thousands of athletes will compete with the vast majority having no hope of winning. Most know they don’t have the strength or ability to win outright, but the desire to compete and be a part of it satisfies their inner desires. As we know, the Olympics now feature professional athletes along with those athletes that are competing just because they love the game. Whether professional or not, most people in any type of com- petition are in it for “The Love of The Game.” THE ATHLETE IN ALL OF US For most of us, the sport of dogs is one of great passion and dedication. Just like the athlete in all of us, we do it for the love of the game. For many, the most difficult part of any sport is when you realize that you can no longer compete because of a decline in physical or mental capacity. I know. I played church league softball and basket- ball until the age of 50, when mother nature simply said, “It’s time.” In the sport of purebred dogs, we have a unique opportunity to continue to compete at a high level for a very long time. We see people of all ages, and those with a variety of athletic abilities and limitations, being able to compete on a somewhat level playing field. We have folks in motorized wheelchairs showing dogs, as well as people with other disabilities, competing regularly. For some exhibitors, when the physical strain of running becomes a problem, they simply go to a smaller breed so that they can continue to do what they love. Many people get into the sport of purebred dogs a little later in life. Maybe the children have grown and left the nest, so they are looking for a venue in which to compete with their four-legged friends. The venues and possibilities are endless: Conformation, Obedience, Field Trials, Agility, Lure Coursing, Dock Diving, Scent Work, Barn Hunt, and so on. We have an area of competi- tion to fit everyone—and every age—who wishes to compete regu- larly or on a limited basis. We often hear the naysayers proclaim that our sport is dying. I don’t believe that. Does it need a little adjusting? Better Sports- manship? Absolutely! I believe that as long as Man and his Best Friend enjoy the competition, the sport will continue… simply because of our “Love of the Game.”

threatened to end the streak, the WKC found a way to move the date, and the site, in order to preserve the history and traditions of nearly 150 years. Bird Dog field trials trace back to Britain in 1866, with Amer- ica’s first recorded field trial being held in 1874 near Memphis, Tennessee. In the early years, field trials were under the auspices of “The American Field.” SPORT: LIFE’S GREAT DIVERSION Most people have, at some point in their life, played a sport or became involved in something that kindled the competitive juices inside all of us. T-Ball grows into little league, high school, and possibly college ball, maybe the minor leagues, or in the rare instance, a major league career. For some who continue to love the game, there is slow pitch softball, fast pitch softball, men’s, women’s, and even co-ed leagues where one can continue to com- pete until they finally can no longer physically compete or choose to stop. The same is true in golf, basketball, and to a lesser degree, in football and some other sports. The number of events and competitions that are available to people today is mind-boggling. In addition to all the major sports, there are numerous games, cheer and dance competitions, and even a variety of hobbies that allow each of us to compete on some level for as long as we can. Most of these competitions give us a great opportunity to take our minds off work and other issues, giv- ing us a form of relaxation. Many people play golf and tennis well into their 80s and beyond. Man’s love of sport is universal and most of us have teams or individuals that we cheer for and attend games, or follow in many different ways. Our favorite team might be from the city where we grew up or currently reside. It could be the high school, THE CREED AND MOTTO ARE MEANT FOR THE ATHLETES TO EMBRACE THE OLYMPIC SPIRIT, BECAUSE THOUSANDS OF ATHLETES WILL COMPETE WITH THE VAST MAJORITY HAVING NO HOPE OF WINNING. MOST KNOW THEY DON’T HAVE THE STRENGTH OR ABILITY TO WIN OUTRIGHT, BUT THE DESIRE TO COMPETE AND BE A PART OF IT SATISFIES THEIR INNER DESIRES.

NEPTUNE A Team to Watch

& Oscar

GCH Piternyuf Deep Purple CGC

Our sincerest appreciation and thank you to all judges who have awarded Neptune’s fine type and quality. We are looking forward to seeing what 2022 will bring us. Owned by Teresa Gordon, TGordonTV@aol.com | Exclusively handled by Oscar Quiros Bred by Ksenia Semikova, Piternyuf Kennels, St. Petersburg, Russia

NEWFOUNDLAND

FOX TERRIER (SMOOTH)

INTERNATIONAL & AMER ICAN CH HEARTY’S WONDER BOY

Award of Mer i t f rom t he Febr uar y 2020 Met ropo l i t an NY Shih Tzu Fanc i er s spec i a l t y under judge Johnny Shoemaker.

SHIH TZU

“Thai” was only shown at a few shows in Januar y and Februar y of 2020 when he f inished his championship and at the end of the year at the AKC Nat ional Championship where he received an Award of Excel lence. We are look ing forward to seeing what 2022 wi l l br ing us!

From t he s t andard - “Idea l ly, he ight at w i t her s i s 9 to 10-1/2 inches ; but , not l es s t han 8 inches nor more t han 11 inches . Idea l ly, we ight of mat ure dogs , 9 to 16 pounds .”

Owner s : Les l i e LeFave & L Sarah Lawrence

Breeder : Papi tchaya Sukonoi

ESTABLISHED 1971 REG. AQUILON Great Pyrenees

EXCITEMENT STARTED WITH TIGER 1984-1998 TIGER

FCI, AKC, CKC, MEX CH AQUILON WIND AND FIRE, CGC TOP WINNING FEMALE 1988, GPCA AWARD

© JOHN KYER

1982 AQUILON JON LOUPE SAUVAGE (WOLF) 2000 CH AQUILON FIRE AND MAGIC (RUFFIAN) 2009 MBIS UKC GCH/AKC GCH AQUILON DOUBLE JUMP FOR JOY ( JOY) 2016 AKC/UKC GCH AQUILON DOUBLE EAGLE (PETE) OUR GPCA HOF PRODUCING DAMS:

BREEDER-OWNER SANDRA MCCRADY

GREAT PYRENEES

© JBHESS

AKC BISS GCH/UKC CH AQUILON FOR WIND AND FIRE NUBBIKINS

2010 - XXXX

#3 2020 BREED * * AKC STATS 2020

LINES FROM LINDA

J O S E P H E . G R E G O RY

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR P E R S O NA L I T Y P E R S O N I F I E D 1 9 2 8 - 2 0 2 2

George Alston, another of the dog world’s great legends, had this to say as we reminisced about Joe: “Joe Gregory was a great man; a true Southern Gentleman. He loved dogs and the sport of dogs, but most of all Joe loved people. Joe was a great handler with the softest hands I had ever seen showing a Boxer. You see, I first met Joe when I was 12. I was showing my Boxer, Barmers Talisman, in the classes. I was losing. My folks were going to hire a professional handler because they thought he was too strong for me. I was just getting over complications from Polio. Joe went to my folks and said, “Let me help George. I think he will be just fine.” Joe taught me how to show a Boxer with a “SOFT” hand. He taught me how to think in the ring; how to compete with the pro handlers. In those days, there were usually 10 or 12 handlers in the Open Dog Class and it took 37 males to make a major. With Joe’s help and guidance, I finished “Boomer” about six months later at the American Boxer Club specialty the day before The Garden. I was showing Boomer in Specials under Mr. Wagner of Mazelaine fame. I was then 14. He made it between Larry Downey with “Spark Plug” and me with Boomer. Joe was in the ring also. Joe kept telling me to do this and do that, and it lasted about 30 minutes between the two of us. Spark Plug won. Two days later, before Juniors, Joe found me to talk to me. He had heard that the other kids were making fun of my southern accent and he told me he used to have the same problem when he started as a handler. He told me not to let it bother me and to go in there and win. He said I was good enough. I did win Best Junior. It was 1954. From then on, Joe was always helping me and advising me. After I graduated from high school, I had an offer to work for Lina Basquette. I asked Joe, and he thought it was a good idea. Later, I went to work for Jane Kamp (Forsyth) and Joe just laughed and said, “It will be different, but go for it and learn more.” Later, when Joe became a Judge and I started handling, our friendship was still there. I never entered any dog under Joe because of our friendship, and I only showed under him in Groups and BIS; won some and lost some. Joe was a great judge. He was always helping young folks and new people in the sport. More people with the knowledge should do the same thing. When I retired from handling, it was Joe who encouraged me to do more teaching, which I did. Joe always said he could tell my students when they showed under him. Mary Ann and I send love to his son and daughter, Joey and Evalyn. Joe Gregory was a great man and I will miss him!” —George Alston W ith a hop, skip, and a jump, and a smile on his face, Joe Gregory delighted dog show exhibitors, as his love for our sport, the dogs, and the people shined through in his dynamic personality. To know him was to love him.

Forever the Handsome Gentleman... Joe celebrating Morris & Essex 2021. photos courtesy of Jean Edwards

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