Top Notch Toys - September 2021

GCHP Timeless Stella By Starlight At Aero

Stella won 5 Group 1’s in a row in two weekends, Back-to-Back Best in Toy Show wins and then Back-to-Back All Breed Best in Show wins. Thank you judges Judith Brown (BIS), Molly Martin (BIS), Rodney Merry (Group 1), Fred Bassett (Group 1), Pat Hastings (Group 1), Alfred Ferruggiaro (Group 1), and Molly Martin (Group 1)

BRED BY: KYLE POTTS OWNED BY: KYLE POTTS & ALLYNID BUNTEN PRESENTED BY: LOIS DEMERS ASSISTED BY: MARINA ROSE

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Stella

#1 Long Coat Chihuahua All Systems *

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8/31/21

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WEEK IN, WEEK OUT HE’S IN THEWINNERS CIRCLE!

FLASH GROUP FIRST GREATER EMPORIA KC MR. JOHN CONSTANTINE GROUP FIRST WESTERN RESERVE KC MS. SHARON MASNICK

THANK YOU JUDGES FOR THESE GROUP FIRSTWINS: MR. RICHARDWILLIAM POWELL, MR. ROBIN STANSELL, MS. NIKKI RIGGSBEE, MR. GARY ANDERSEN, AND DR. JOHN IOIA

BRED OWNED AND HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO *AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7/31/21

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MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

WINNER OF MULTIPLE BIS 32 GROUP ONES AND CONSISTENT GROUP PLACEMENTS WESTMINSTER BEST OF BREED 2020 # 1 MALTESE 2019 (2020 NOT CAMPAIGNED DUE TO PANDEMIC)

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER # 1 8 TOY DOG WINNER OF OVER 30 GROUP ONES # 1 MALTESE ALL BREED * T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021 • 5

THESE GIRLS ARE ON FIRE!

RBIS OH Richard Miller GROUP 1 Robert Ennis GROUP 4 Alfred Ferruggiaro BISS Jason Hoke

GROUP 4 Robert Ennis BOSV Jason Hoke

GCHG Vista LaFleurs Lotus T’seas Mi NOHS BEST IN SHOW Thank you Judge William Stebbins

GCH Dazzles T’seas Mi Vista Hey Gigi GROUP 2 Thank you Judge Richard Miller

*AKC Stats as of 7/31/21

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VISTA LAFLEURS LOTUS T'SEAS MI G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N

#3 All Breed & Breed * #2 NOHS * #1 Long Coat Breeder/Owner/Handler *

Sacramento KC NOHS GROUP 1 Mrs. Diane Landstrom

South Bay Kennel Club GROUP 4 Mr. Johnny Shoemaker

Breeder/Owner/Handler Stephanie Schultes, Vista Chihuahuas, vistachis@gmail.com Owned and loved by Deborah Long, T’Seas Mi Chihuahuas, tseasmi1@gmail.com

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Thank you judge

“Beautiful exhibit with a compact body and good spring of rib. Pretty face with kind expression and large round eyes with a well- cushioned muzzle. Excellent movement both coming and going. This gal has so many good things going for her!” Dr. Margaret Reed

GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera Owned by Michele True, Co-owned with Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier candid photography by©SueBee Photography

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GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera

Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to Judge Mrs. Evalyn Gregory for including Bliss in the cut at Westminster Kennel Club. Congratulations to Best of Breed Winners and Westminster Kennel Club for putting on an extraordinary event. FLASH SARASOTAKENNEL CLUB 6/16/2021 JUDGE: Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman OS/BOBOH JUDGE: Mr. Gary L. Andersen SEL/BOBOH

GREATER VENICE FLORIDA DOG CLUB INC (2) 6/18/2021 JUDGE: Michael Canalizo BOBOH MID-FLORIDA CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL 6/19/2021 SWEEPSTAKES JUDGE: Gwendolyn Wells SEL/BOBOH

Is Making A Big Splash

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

14

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR/EDITOR BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Advertising Director/Editor bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

16

22

50

14 Toy Talk 16 Toy Box

36

Volunteers: The Backbone of the Sport Walter J. Sommerfelt

Bonnie Guggenheim

Del Gonzalez & Michelle Smith 42

Judging the Chihuahua Richard Miller

46 50 52 56 58

22 Living With Pekingese Susan Shephard 26 The Age of Rover A Conversation with Michael Hill Susan Shephard 30 A Legacy of Gold Susan Shephard 32 Candids: Lafayette Kennel Club Tom Weigand 34 My Dog is Limping... What Is the Problem? Sharon Masnick

Chihuahua From Head-2-Toe Joao Machado

Candids: Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club of Greater Houston & Toy Club of Greater Houston Anetrius Wallace

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

Judging the Pug Donelle Richards

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

Candids: IGCA National Specialty Tom Weigand

Index to Advertisers

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ON THE COVER

MULTI BISS/BIS GCHB TA-JON’S SUGA SUGA HOW’D YOU GET SO FLY @ KESANNA

Frankie was shown on a limited basis by his breeders, Dr. Diana Egnor & Tammy Simon, in 2018 & 2019. During that time, he won multiple Groups, a Best in Show and a Best in Specialty Show. Thank you to Mr. Randy Garren for Frankie’s Best of Breed win at our 2021 National Specialty and to Mr. Tim Lehman for his expert handling at this event. Thank you also to Mrs. Toddie Clark for his All Breed Best In Show in 2019, and to all of the judges who have awarded Frankie high honors. Excelling as a producer, he is now ROMX eligible. He is the sire of multi BIS/BISS GCHB Ta-Jon’s It’s Raining Sugar, who was the #1 All Breed Maltese in 2020. We are so very proud of this little guy’s accomplishments and look forward to seeing his future lineage looking spectacular in the ring.

Handled by Tim Lehman & Tammy Simon

Owned by Tammy Simon & Diana Egnor

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by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor TOY TALK ETCETERA BREEDING GREAT DOGS IS A CREATIVE ART FORM

T he art of breeding good dogs is like any other art form; it takes time to learn. It also requires a devotion to what you feel is ideal based on the AKC Standard, strong determination, and the ability to interpret what your pedigree consists of. You also need to be able to apply your knowledge to the actual dog. In other words, to see the beau- tiful “art” you’ve created in the ring. Hopefully, winning! The successful breeder does not breed for financial gain. Instead, breeding is done for the genuine love of dogs, breeding as closely to the standard as possible, and for the satisfaction of accomplishment when observing a healthy, happy litter. It is so important to choose breeding stock with knowl- edge and to breed the individual female with the stud dog that is most likely to correct her faults. Breeders must be- come absolutely familiar and knowledgeable regarding the fundamental laws and principles of genetics, and with the

pedigrees they are working with. It is the wise breeder who has actually seen the dogs in the pedigree—and not just in photographs. Good luck with your next litter!

LISTED ARE SOME LONG-HELD PIECES OF WISDOM: 1. No dog is perfect.

2.Most dogs carry a recessive gene for nearly any fault. 3. Undesirable traits may remain hidden and can ap- pear when least expected. 4. Never forget that type, personality, markings, and temperament are inherited. 5. Puppies usually resemble the whole pedigree more than just the sire or dam. 6. You may have success through half-brother/sister breedings by doubling up on the traits you desire. 7. If you are working with an outcross, they should have good physical structure and no major faults. I’m always ready to talk Toys because inquiring minds want to know about your wins, and your plans! I’m here to help you showcase your next big winner. So call, text or email.

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512.971.3280

Submitted by Linda Evans

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

Submitted by Michelle Smith

Submitted by Del Gonzales

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog.

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bred by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER co-owned by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER

& JANE CHAVEZ Exclusively owner handled & presented by KAREN MARIE DUPRAT-FELDMAN Candids by BRIELLE MARIE DUPRAT

Moose

Thank you to all of the judges who have recognized and rewarded the quality in our Little Moose 8/5 Fort Steuben Kennel Assoc BOB / BOB OH Nikki Riggsbee 8/8 Mahong Shenango KC BOB / BOB OH Mrs. Polly Smith, Toy Group 1 Gloria Kerr, OH Toy Group 1 Barbara Alderman,

and OH BIS Nikki Riggsbee 8/28 Newtown Kennel Club BOB, BOB OH, OH Group 1 Timothy Catterson 8/29 Elm City Kennel Club BOB, BOB OH, OH Group 2 Mr. Alfred J. Ferruggiaro 9/17 South Shore KC BOB, BOB OH, OH Group 2 Timothy Robbins 9/18 South Shore KC BOB & BOB OH Dana Cline

AKC

platinum grand champion MBOB, MGrp Winner, MOHBIS, MOHRBIS Angelheart N Adorabull’s Moose On The Loose

ON HIS WAY TO 100 OH BIS

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ADVANCE GIFT SNOWAVALANCHE bronze grand champion

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Bred by Duoryadkin Oleg Owned by Donna Hannity Handled by Ashleight Rutzel

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LIVING WITH PEKINGESE by Susan Shephard

F or me, and for most Pekingese en- thusiasts, living with Pekingese is more than sharing your life with a dog. It is as necessary as breath- ing and drinking. Once you have been captivated by this diminutive Emper- or, there is no other dog that will do. My love affair began as a toddler with my Grandmother’s Pekingese, “Foot- sie.” I was allowed to interact with him (worship) as long as I didn’t com- plain if he occasionally gaveme a little pinch. And he did (pinch) and I didn’t (complain) as it was all worth it to be in the presence of such greatness. Today, and many years and Pekingese later, the love affair is as strong as it ever was. The Pekingese is a large dog in a small and very attractive package. Not only do they “lift” surprisingly

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“TODAY’S WELL-BRED PEKINGESE IS A WONDERFUL FAMILY DOG.

Like any small dog, Pekes are probably not a great choice for a home with toddlers, but they do well with older children, teens, and adults. Pekes are definitely a ‘people’ dog...”

heavy for their size, within that chest beats a heart surely as big as a lion. They are brave to the point of fool- ish—regardless of the size of their opponent. When ill or injured, they are stoic to the point of endanger- ing their own lives. They are quite intelligent, intuitive, and sometimes stubborn like a four-year-old tod- dler. They truly have this bigger than life personality. Living with Pekingese is one of the greatest joys of my life. My father once commented tome that they were charming little dogs in spite of their sense of self-importance. They are a dog that doesn’t require a lot of ex- ercise, although most love to chase a ball. Bring it back? Not so much. There are many fallacies about Pe- kingese, as everyone seems to have

an Aunt or Grandmother who kept a Peke back in the day, and those were always of the biting variety. Today’s well-bred Pekingese is a wonder- ful family dog. Like any small dog, Pekes are probably not a great choice for a home with toddlers, but they do well with older children, teens, and adults. Pekes are definitely a “people” dog; they require human interaction as much as they require fresh food and water everyday. Pekes do tend to bond strongly with their family, and will initially be cautious of those they don’t know. They are independent, strong-willed, and every one of them knows they have descended from Chinese royalty. Pekingese, just like people, have a va- riety of personalities. Some are out- going and have never met a stranger,

while others are aloof and take time to warm up to a new person. How- ever, once you get to know this de- lightful breed, they will capture your heart. As a whole, they are a cheer- ful little dog whose entire being exudes joyfulness. Pekingese are generally a healthy, long-lived, and sturdy breed. We are fortunate as we are not cursed with genetic conditions such as PRA, etc. Currently, the parent club has no recommendations for health test- ing. Breeders need to be constantly vigilant of potential breathing issues as with any brachycephalic breed. Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome (BAS) refers to a particular set of up- per airway abnormalities that affects brachycephalic dogs. Mildly affect- ed dogs will have noisy breathing,

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title is attained. Several years ago, I showed a 14-year-old veteran bitch. Well, “Busy” hadn’t forgotten her old tricks; whenwe camebackup thediag- onal mat to the judge, she walked into her stack, and within five seconds, she stomped her foot and “woo—wooed” the judge. She had been out of the ring for at least 12 years at that point. Yes, she absolutely was Best Veteran that day! Who would have ever said no to that? My husband took our first homebred champion, “Widget,” to work with him everyday for 12 years. After Wid- get passed, “Baby Grace” filled the position, and after she passed earlier this year at 14 years old, the mantle passed to “Fiona.” They are also reg- ulars at Home Depot and Lowes. His office dogs have always been great ambassadors for the breed as they are out in public and seemingly thrive on the attention. In closing, I feel so blessed to have had these little dogs inmy home and inmy heart for all these years. What started as a love affair with a little exotic dog many years ago has bloomed into an all-consuming passion. I cannot imaginemy life without the dogs. I am grateful that every day I am blessed with so many little flat faces, and ev- ery night I go to sleep serenaded by Pekingese snorts and snores. What could be any better than that?

especially with exercise, and most will snort when excited and snore when relaxed or asleep. Severely affected animals have more pro- nounced airway noise, appear to tire easily with exercise, and may col- lapse or faint after exercise. Symp- toms are often worse in hot or humid weather. Because of conscientious breeders, this symptom is seldom seen in the show rings anymore. Other health concerns include Inter- vertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) and sebaceous cysts. Pekingese require regular grooming. A dog with a correct, harsh outer coat will generally only need to be brushed out once a week. They do benefit from regular bathing. If you have trained your dog to be groomed on the table, and on his back, he will en- joy the grooming and the time spent with you. Nigel Aubrey Jones of St Aubrey Els- don fame said, “Breeding Pekingese is not for the fainthearted. It is prob- ably the most difficult of all breeds to produce consistently.” I know this to be the absolute truth. C-sections are more the rule than the exception, and at times, the puppies can be dif- ficult to rear. Show breeders gener- ally run puppies on for 4-8 months to assess quality. Pekingese generally enjoy the shows and even enjoy them long after their

“PEKINGESE REQUIRE REGULAR GROOMING. A DOG WITH A CORRECT, HARSH OUTER COAT WILL GENERALLY ONLY NEED TO BE BRUSHED OUT ONCE A WEEK. THEY DO BENEFIT

FROM REGULAR BATHING. IF YOU HAVE TRAINED YOUR DOG TO BE GROOMED ON THE TABLE, AND ON HIS BACK,

he will enjoy the grooming and the time spent with you.” 24 • T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021

BRONZE AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

DEBARAH BILLINGS WWW.WINDSONGBIEWERS.COM

History Making Group 1!

© HAN ‘21

#1 Bitch Breed & All Breed * #2 Breed & All Breed * Thank You Judge Richard Mullen for this Historic Honor Appreciation to Susan Giles, Handler

*AKC stats as of 8/31/21

NEW BRONZE GRAND CHAMPION

GCHB CH WINDSONG’S SOMETHIN’ TO TALK ABOUT

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THE AGE OF ROVER A CONVERSATION WITH MICHAEL HILL

by Susan Shephard

W ho would have thought that a semi-casual inquiry about using CH Wendessa Crown Prince in an already success- ful breeding program would have resulted in Michael Hill purchasing what has probably been the most pre- potent sire of the decade? After seeing Mr. Ed Jenner’s CH Wendessa Crown Prince at the Cana- dian Kennel Club Centennial Show in 1988, Michael Hill of Akarana Pekingese was rather impressed. “A grand and shapely body, firm and sturdy construction, and the desired tailset and carriage, and a great atti- tude.” Uncertain as to where to go for an outside breeding, as CH St Aubrey Laparata Dragon had died, Michael inquired about sending a bitch to Crown Prince. When asking about what Crown Prince had produced, Mr. Luc Boileu mentioned that he had sired a nice dog that had finished at the Chicago International Show with a Group Two. As Mr. Jenner and Mr. Boileu were keeping the litter sister, and concentrating on Crown Prince’s career, this young dog, CH Knolland Red Rover, would be staying home. At that time, Michael Hill asked if the dog might be available for sale. “….a few months later I met Luc under the tenting at a dog show and he pointed to the wire crate where the most beautiful, rich red dog was resting in a glorious cloud of coat and black fring- ing, intense pigment, and the blackest of eyes. I’ve never reached into my

pocket and given anyone a check so quickly in my life. Luc was sure that I should take him out for a walk first. I wasn’t… he might change his mind!” And, the Age of Rover began. What a classic pedigree this was! Six lines to Dragon in five generations through six DIFFERENT dogs, with the combinations of half brother- sister, grandsire-granddaughter, and a grandson-daughter. On paper, it was flawless. Simply from looking at the pedigree, one would assume that what Rover would produce [would be]

typical of his relatives. When Rover arrived in Canada, he had already sired two litters; Knolland Red Robin and Knolland Red Rueben, both des- tined to become champions and great producers in their own right, and what was to become Roger and Judy Sankey’s first homebred champions, Sanrae Second to None, Sanrae Head of the Class, and Sanrae Delta Dawn, all of which have gone on to produce champions. “I quickly realized that it was not that there were one or maybe two good puppies in a litter, but that “And, the Age of Rover began. WHAT A CLASSIC PEDIGREE THIS WAS! SIX LINES TO DRAGON IN FIVE GENERATIONS THROUGH SIX DIFFERENT DOGS, WITH

THE COMBINATIONS OF HALF BROTHER-SISTER,

GRANDSIRE-GRANDDAUGHTER, AND A GRANDSON-DAUGHTER. ON PAPER, IT WAS FLAWLESS.”

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© Savan Photography

B I S S W I N N I N G D O N ’ T B E M A D AT M E Misty Meadow’s MaDonna

Bred by: T U U L A L E H T I N E N - C O C H E T T I Italy, Rome

Owner-Handled Exclusively by: R A C H E A L M I L L E R

© Savan Photography

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“I made Rover as available as possible and at a moderate fee. MY PARENTS HAD TAUGHT ME THAT AS A BREEDER, ONE HAS A RESPONSIBILITY TO THE BREED WHEN ONE IS IN A FORTUNATE POSITION TO MAKE THE RIGHT ANIMAL AVAILABLE TO SUITABLE BREEDERS.”

stay in England, he managed to leave his mark; there were six consecutive generations of English champions descended from Rover, with the sev- enth generation in the wings at this original writing more than 18 years ago. On another interesting note, Rover himself carries Pekehuis blood through two bitches. What about Rover as a companion and housemate? “His most endearing quality is his bloody-minded strength of character and attitude. When he has something fixed in his mind, he cannot be swayed from it. Of course, this is exactly what I love about the breed. I love Pekes of infuriatingly strong character, the ones who want their own way and take great deter- mination to get under control for the ring. But, Rover is a quietly loving dog. Not demonstrative in nature, he nevertheless enjoys being hugged and cuddled and a gentle game.” What else can you say about such a grand little dog? He was well-loved by Michael Hill, and his intense person- ality captured the hearts of most who came into contact with him. I had the privilege of meeting Rover years ago, and make no mistake; it was a little red dog that ruled the Hill household in Toronto. On July 22, 2000, the Age of Rover came to an end. At just a few days past his 13th birthday, Rover departed this life. But, what a legacy this one little red dog left behind! Michael commented “…I have had many messages from all ‘round the world, literally. I take much comfort in seeing him in the wonderful de- scendants bred by so many talented and caring breeders who have his blood. My personal loss was no more nor any less than others who’ve lost their much-loved companions and suffered the same sadness. Just that Rover was more of a public dog.” The Pekingese fancy owes a debt of gratitude to Rover’s talented breeder, Ed Jenner, and to his owner, Michael Hill, for making Rover available. Rover, you are sorely missed. But we will see you for generations yet to come.

entire litters were quality. To date, it looks like there have been eleven All- Champion litters sired by Rover.” Much can be said about how a sire of this magnitude occurs. Possibly, it is a combination of being the right dog at the right time and in the right place. As to the right place, some may not have considered a small kennel in Canada the right place, but it certainly did not deter many American and Cana- dian breeders from sending their best bitches to be bred to this little red dog. “I made Rover as available as possible and at a moderate fee. My parents had taught me that as a breeder, one has a responsibility to the breed when one is in a fortunate position to make the right animal available to suitable breeders. There are some that do not share that thought, and I can well understand their viewpoint and rea- sonings behind it, but I do think we must cast our thoughts to where the breed would be if dogs such as CH Dragon had not been made available, or in Great Britain, CH. Ku Jin or CH Yu Yang.” The Akarana kennel is not one to keep a dog out on an extended show career. In spite of this, Rover finished his Canadian championship with three Group Firsts and an All-Breed BIS. The following year, he was #2 Toy dog in less than half the number of shows as the #1 and #3 Toy dogs. He also captured the Toy Group at Canada’s Show of Shows. Twice, he won the Group, with his daughters taking Best Puppy in Group. When asked to talk about Rover as a show dog, after a few snorts and rolled eyes, the response I got was; “Wonderful and… infuriating! He

was never out of coat. I am not a fan of trimming, but every five or six weeks, I would have to get rid of an inch or so of coat and have it appear that Rover had not been anywhere close to scis- sors. Rover was always calm and self- contained. He has one speed and one style, and nothing, absolutely nothing would change that. He would never drop his tail, never move faster, and never move slower. He was so con- vinced of his self-importance that he took the most arrogant of attitudes.” Looking at the total number of pup- pies produced by Rover, and keeping inmind that not all of his puppies have been exhibited, somewhere in excess of 70 percent or 104 have finished their championships. His children lay claim to fifty-one Canadian Champi- onships, one English Championship, fifty-two American Championships, ten American Group Firsts, eighteen Canadian Group Firsts, five Ameri- can All-Breed Bests in Show, seven Canadian All-Breed Bests in Show, eleven Bests in Specialty Show, and three Pekingese Club of America Bests of Breed. His accomplishments in England were not so much in the show ring, but in what his son, Am. Can. Eng. Champion Rodari Orient Express produced. “Bobby,” who completed his English title very quickly under the guidance of Winifred Mee, sired Eng. CH Tenling Golden Arrow of Pekehuis—Sire of the Year for four years—who went on to sire Eng. CH Pekehuis Pure Gold, another Top Sire of the Year. Sadly, Bobby’s exposure as a sire was cut short by his breed- er’s decision to sell him to the Ori- ent. However, even with such a brief

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Introducing

CH ENCHANTE’ S BOSTON CREAM PI

MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING 2020 - AFFENPINSCHER #9 AFFENPINSCHER 2020 *

“Flash” Best Of Breed Bryn Mawr KC and Saratoga KC

Thank you to Judges Jackie Rayner and Nancy Smith Hafner

Owner: SallyAnn Tietsworth

Breeders: Cameron Riegel/Barry Leece/ Wendy Galbreath

Handled by: Lexi Schlott

© BS PHOTOGRAPHY

*AKC STATS 2020

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WHAT STARTED AS A TEENAGER’S PART-TIME JOB, TURNED INTO A LIFELONG PASSION, FOR WINIFRED MEE. A LEGACY OF GOLD

by Susan Shephard

(First published in Orient Express , a publication of Aramedia Group, approximately 18 years ago.)

By 1987, Sir Guy was a Cham- pion, #1 Pekingese, and Best of Breed at Crufts. In his ca- reer, Sir Guy won 37 CC’s un- der different judges, was Top Pekingese in 1987 and 1989, BIS UK Toy Dog - 1989 and 1990, Supreme Best in Show, Birmingham National - 1989. When asked to talk about her most memorable early show wins, Winnie replied, “My first CC with Petula was March 3, 1972, a day that will live with me for the rest of my life! CH Sir Guy won the Supreme Best in Show at the 1989 Birming- ham National, was BIS at the United Toy Dog Show 1989 and 1990, and was BOB at Crufts, 1987.” To date, Winnie has won 152 CCs. In 1990, a CH Knolland Red Rover son came to England that would influence the direction of Pekehuis. American/Cana- dian Champion Rodari Ori- ent Express was campaigned to his English championship by Winnie. He finished his English championship within four months. “Bobby’s” pedi- gree traces back to Pekehuis breeding on his dam’s side. His g-g-g-grandmother was St. Aubrey Pekehuis Sun- crush, whose mother, Pekehuis Shah Perle, was CH Pekehuis Petula’s dam. Before Bobby’s

W innie began her career with Pe- kingese with Mrs. Ethel B. Par- tridge of the Pekehuis affix. It was during her apprenticeship with Mrs. Partridge that her natural affinity for grooming and training the Peking- ese came to light. To this day, Winnie has proven that commitment, hard work, patience, knowledge, and a deep level of communication with the dog are the keys to success. For nearly 30 years, Winnie cared for and showed Mrs. Partridge’s dogs un- der the affix PEKEHUIS. Winnie won her first Best in Show at Open level in 1963 with Pekehuis Cherokee of Chintoi. Nine years later, in March of 1972, she won her first Championship Certificate with St. Aubrey Pekehuis Petula, with an entry of more than 400

dogs. “Petula” won her third of 35 CC’s the following year. Petula was the Top Pekingese in 1973 and 1976, and Top Pekingese Bitch in 1975. Petula still holds the record for Pekingese bitch CC’s. (Note: CH Petula took 1974 off for maternal duties, producing CH Pekehuis Petal.) In 1982, Winnie bought a Micklee Ro- meo daughter. This bitch was bred to Pekehuis Prince Consort and produced three bitch puppies. One of these girls was bred to CH Some Man of Lotus- grange and produced CH Pemyn Some Guy, who produced CH Pekehuis Sir Guy. Another of the girls was bred to CH Sir Guy and produced CH Peke- huis Sheer Elegance at Tenling. At Mrs. Partridge’s death in 1985, Pekehuis was transferred toWinnie.

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departure from England, Winnie bred him to Pekein Tula Shaha of Pekehuis, a Sir Guy granddaughter. One of the bitch puppies is Inter- national Champion Pekehuis In- spiration, and handled by Winnie, a two-time Best of Breed winner at the International World show. She is owned by Sergio Calandra of Italy. The dog puppy grew up to be CHTen- ling Golden Arrow of Pekehuis. Affec- tionately known as “Duke,” Golden Arrow won his first CC at 11 months old. Duke continued his winning ways by becoming the Top English Peking- ese in 1993, 1994, 1995, and 1996. Duke was awarded a total of 28 CCs. Duke has proven himself [to be] not only the consummate showman, but also a sire that will go down in the history books as one of the “Great Ones.” One of his first sons was Eng- lish Champion Pekehuis Pure Gold of Tenling. “David” finished his champi- onship promptly and then went home to become England’s Top-Producing Sire* for 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, and 2001. Another son (bred by Anthea Everitt), English Champion Kushan Debt of Honour to Pekehuis, has pro- duced several English Champion off- spring and is the littermate to Betty Tilley’s (Pleiku) American Cham- pion Kushan Gold Ransom of Peke- huis. May Robertshaw’s early Duke son, CH Lotusgrange Arrow Ex- press, completed his Championship by winning Best of Breed at Crufts under Terry Nethercott in 1996. One of Duke’s more memorable sons is Crufts 2001 Best of Breed/Group One, 2002 Best of Breed/GroupOne/ Reserve Best in Show, and Crufts 2003 Best in Show winner, English Champion Yakee Dangerous Liai- son. Piloted by his owner/handler/ breeder, Bert Easdon, “Danny” be- came the first Pekingese in the his- tory of the breed to win Best in Show at Crufts. (A side note: A Duke son or grandson has been BOB at Crufts for five consecutive years, beginning with Anthea Everitt’s Duke grand- son, English Champion Kushan Mad About the Boy in 1999.) Duke’s most recent English Cham- pion is Champion Pekehuis Seeking

the Gold, just finishing this past summer. Besides producing Champi- ons for Pekehuis, Duke has produced Champions for the following English kennels: Lotusgrange, Fearnvale, Kettlemere, Joleth, Pleiku, Akarana, St Sanja, Yakee, Kushan, Johnsville, and Brentoy. Betty Tilley (Pleiku) pioneered the Golden Arrow blood in North America. She made several trips to England in 1994 and ’95, and noted that the dogs that caught her inter- est besides Duke himself were sired by either Duke or his son, Pure Gold. She decided that was the direction she wanted to take with her breeding pro- gram. Several attempts to buy a Duke daughter fell through, but on a return visit in 1996, Winnie took Betty to visit Anthea Everitt. Anthea had a litter of three seven-week-old males sired by Duke out of a Pure Gold daughter. The puppies were linebred to Duke, and Betty purchased one of the males, keeping her fingers crossed that he would be what she was looking for when the puppy was old enough. Winnie took him home along with his litter brother, “Danny” (CH Kushan Debt of Honor to Pekehuis), and kept the puppy until he was old enough to travel to America. The seven-week- old pup turned out to be American Champion Kushan Gold Ransom of Pekehuis. “George” gained his title quickly and returned home to Pleiku. After a few litters, Betty noticed the resulting puppies were of exceptional quality and consistency. He had also sired several litters for other breed- ers, and the results were consistent with every breeding. After two unsuccessful attempts to import chilled semen from Duke (due to Customs), Betty bought a puppy (a Duke grand-daughter) from Win- nie; American Champion Pekehuis Pleiku Gold. When bred to this Duke granddaughter, George produced the first Pleiku All-Breed Best in Show dog; American Champion Pleiku Gold Reserve. The littermate also finished her title quickly; American Champion Pleiku Gold Collection. Betty also owned her litter sister, Pekehuis Gold Exchange for Pleiku, who remained in

England until she was old enough to breed toDuke. This breeding produced American Champion Pleiku Golden Express, American Champion Pleiku Golden Regalia, and Pleiku Golden Design. Gold Exchange was bred to George for her next litter, and that pro- duced American Champion Pleiku Gold Lace for Pekehuis and Pleiku Pe- kehuis GoldRibbons Pekehuis. In order to widen the gene pool, but continue linebreeding on Duke, Betty imported the Duke grandson, sired by English Champion St Sanja Step By Step ROM (a Duke son), Ameri- can Champion Yakee Forward Step At Pleiku (David). At his first show in America, he won a BISS at 11-1/2 months. He is proving to be a prepo- tent sire, and like his sire and grand- sire, he will soon be a qualifier for his ROM. His most notable get to date has been Dr. Ceri Sveilich’s American Champion Pleiku Kerimere Stepping Out, the puppy bitch that was Win- ners Bitch all three days of the 2002 Rotating National Specialty, and who has since added two Bests in Special- ty Show to her title and is currently ranked #10. George’s titles now include PCA’s Register of Merit status and Sire of Distinction. He is also currently list- ed in Dog News as the top sire and his list of Champion and Group-winning progeny continues to grow. To date, Duke has produced 14 Eng- lish Champions, with several others very close to their English titles. Duke is the first English Pekingese, while still living in England, to qualify for Pekingese Club of America’s Sire of Distinction award. At last count, he has 12 American Champions to his credit with others, again, close to their titles. At age 11, Duke was Eng- land’s Top Pekingese sire* in 2001, 2002, and at this writing, is currently leading the race for Top Sire of 2003.* Now, close to his retirement, Duke leaves a legacy of gold not only at Pe- kehuis and in England, but world- wide. His children and grandchildren are leaving their stamp on the face of Pekingese. Duke will be long-remem- bered for his positive contributions to the breed. T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021 • 31

LAFEYETTE KENNEL CLUB

Lebanon, IN . September 15-19, 2021 photos by Tom Weigand

32 • T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021

SPECIALTY WINNING GCHG JOLI REIGNON JUST KIDDING

JOJO FOLLOWS UP HIS EXCITING WIN AT WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB TOY GROUP 4TH AND 3 BOV WINS AT THE PRESTIGIOUS SANTA BARBARA WEEKEND

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING JUDGES Ms. Janet Allen-Best of Variety and Group 4, Mr. Robert Widden-Best of Variety, and Mrs. Cindy Vogels-Best of Variety

JOJO IS BEAUTIFULLY PRESENTED BY VALERIE NUNES-ATKINSON Owned by Lois Magette and Pamela Magette Bred by Lisa Knop, Janet Lange Moses, and James Moses

T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021 • 33

MY DOG IS LIMPING... WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? By Sharon Masnick

L imping or lameness is a common sign of bone or joint disease, but muscle or nerve damage can also cause lameness. Weakness or pain is indicated in the leg involved. The term luxating means “out of place” or “dislocated.” There are many reasons a dog might limp. Some cases might resolve with a few days’ rest, or treatment by a veter- inarian may be needed. I will discuss several possible causes. Many Toy or small breed dogs have a genetic predisposition for a luxating patella. When the patella luxates, the dog will have difficulty bearing weight on the leg. First, a dog could step on a sharp rock, a piece of glass or a thorn. Dogs walk around on their bare feet, so a foreign object could burrow into the skin and fester. This could require lancing to remove. Second, a toenail injury can be quite painful. Torn or broken nails may require veterinary attention. It is im- portant to keep dog’s nails trimmed to prevent injury.

Third, a common reason for limp- ing is overexertion. This could cause muscle and joint soreness. This type of limping will probably be mild and the dog will recover in a few days. Fourth, trauma couldbe the result of an insect bite, an insect sting, soft tissue injury or a broken bone. Dogs can slip or land “funny” and the result could be a ligament tear. In this case, a physical examand x-raywould be in order. Fifth, a luxating patella can occur when a dog’s kneecap moves out of its natural position. This condition can be inherited or acquired by trauma. The kneecap is a small bone that pro- tects the front of the stifle joint. Liga- ments anchor it in place and it slides in a groove in the femur. The signs of a slipped kneecap are difficulty with straightening the knee, pain in the stifle, and a limp. To correct this con- dition, treatment involves surgery to deepen the groove. Many small dogs live with this condition, and it doesn’t result in pain or arthritis. Adog’sluxationisgradedbyveterinary specialists from grade 0 to grade 4.

Grade 1: The patella is usually in a normal position but can be pushed out of place manually and popped back in to normal position. Grade 2: The pa- tella can be in a normal or luxated po- sition. The patella pops in and out on its own. Grade 3: In this case, the pa- tella is displaced out of the groove for a majority of the time. Grade 4: This is the most severe case. The patella is permanently luxated and cannot be manipulated back into the groove. Sometimes, a luxating patella can be treated with physical therapy and medication. If your dog’s condition is severe, with severe pain, surgery may be necessary. As always, consult your veterinarian. Ideally, because a luxating patella is usually considered an inherited con- dition, it’s recommended that dogs with this condition are not used for breeding. It is best to consider all fac- tors and strike the best balance of de- sirable and non-desirable traits when breeding. Again, it is always best to consult with your veterinarian.

My name is SharonMasnick, and I have owned a Pomeranian since I was 18. I began to be inter- ested in the entire Toy Group when, for 17 years, I handled the advertising and editorial for Top Notch Toys. I resigned in 2011 to pursue judging. I am now happy to say that I can judge BIS, the Toy Group, Junior Showmanship, Azawakhs, Shetland Sheepdogs, and several Non-Sporting breeds. I am a breeder-judge for Poms, Toy Fox Terriers, Japanese Chin, and Pekingese. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

34 • T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021

AND MANNY CH WINSOME-NIRVANA’S HIGH FIVE DOUBLE PLAY GCHG SYCAMORE’S NIRVANA-WINSOME’S A LEAGUE OF HIS OWN X CH NIRVANA-WINSOME’S MAKIN’ TROUBLE

FRANNY GCH WINSOME’S GOLD STANDARD X CH SYCAMORE’S “HELLO” DOLLY FOR NIRVANA-WINSOME NIRVANA-WINSOME’S CHAMPAGNE TOAST TO MANSFIELD

OWNED BY: JENNIFER SHERAK, ELOIS VELTMAN & VIRGINIA COX-FLATLEY OWNER-HANDLED BY: JENNIFER SHERAK MANSFIELD PUGS, STOWE, VT THE DYNAMIC DUO BRED BY: ELOIS VELTMAN & VIRGINIA COX-FLATLEY

T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021 • 35

VOLUNTEERS THE BACKBONE OF OUR SPORT by Walter J. Sommerfelt

M uch is often written and dis- cussed about this great sport and our world of pure-bred dogs. These discussions range from Judges, to breed Standards, to the rules and regulations, to the top dogs, professional and owner han- dlers, and of course the American Kennel Club itself. What is rarely discussed or consid- ered outside of the delegate body is the important role of the Local Ken- nel Club and the numerous volunteers it takes to keep them operating and providing quality competitive shows and trials for dog loving enthusiasts to compete in. Just think about for a minute. If there were no clubs would we still have shows and trials? Could clubs survive and thrive if they had to pay every- one that worked to put on their show? Would the AKC step in a start putting on the shows by themselves? I think not. There is no doubt inmymind that the many Volunteers throughout our country and the club they represent are truly the life blood of the sport. Now I ask you, Are you a Contribut- ing volunteer member of your local kennel club? Or are you one of those people that just take for granted that everything will be done, and you do not need to give back or contribute to your local kennel club and the sport in general. Volunteerism is generally considered an altruistic activity where an indi- vidual or group provides service for

no financial or social gain but rather to “benefit another person, group, or organization.” When I first started in the sport, I was very fortunate to have mentors that guided me to membership in my first All-Breed and breed specific clubs. Fortunately for me that first club was the Western Reserve Kennel Club in Cleveland, Ohio. In the early 1970’s it was considered one of the premier clubs in the country and hosted two of our largest shows, one in the Sum- mer at the Metropolitan Polo Field and one in Downtown Cleveland in December at the Convention cen- ter. I learned so much by belonging to the club. WRKC was at that time comprised of a membership with many of the Icons in the sport at that time. The club was a huge presence in the Greater Cleveland area and also made significant contributions to the Cleveland Public Library system with donations of a huge numbers of canine related books as well as hous- ing a complete library of the various stud books from not only AKC but many other registries throughout the world. Back before the internet, if one chose, he could go to the library and research those stud books to build a pedigree going back as many genera- tions as one wished to search. It was a club filled with great breeders, ex- hibitors, judges, and handlers. The meetings were held in downtown Cleveland at the YMCA right next to the old Cleveland Arena and the

meetings were always well attended and thanks to the efforts of the late Max Riddle and others we always had interesting and educational programs on a monthly basis. Part of your responsibilities as a member of this great organization was that you were expected to volun- teer and work at the two shows put on by the club. We were introduced to the concept that throughout the year you attended shows put on by other clubs and giving up showing at the local shows was your way of “giving back” to the sport. Volunteering was just a small part of the big picture of helping our sport to continue to grow and succeed. Throughout my career in this sport I have never lost sight of the concepts I was taught by the WRKC. Serving in some type of capacity at the local club level has always been a part of my life in every place I have ever lived. Throughout that time what I have observed is a tremendous change in attitude amongst the many people involved in our sport. While a great number of today’s exhibitors, judges and handlers will not join a club. These individuals are often amongst the first to complain about the judg- ing panel, the venue, the parking, and a multitude of issues without ever considering the fact that the show is being put on for their enjoyment by a number of volunteers that are not being compensated in any way for all they do to make it happen.

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G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H

OWNER Linda Evans • BREEDERS Donna Jensen and Linda Evans

S E E YO U AT

T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021 • 37

“we all need to be thankful for these individuals AND ALL THEY DO FOR US.”

that has caused some members to sim- ply quit the club and the sport. The Late President George Bush used his “thousand points of light” initiative to showAmerica the value of the VOL- UNTEER in our society. He wanted everyone to understand the value in volunteerism and giving back. Earlier in this article I asked, are you a working volunteer member of your local kennel club? If your answer was NO my next question is why not? I am not naïve, and I know that person- alities and other issues exist in many clubs, but I also know that one person can make a difference. Being a Volunteer can be very reward- ing. For many years I had the pleasure of chairing the St Jude Showcase of Dogs in Memphis, TN. It was an in- credible event that truly made a dif- ference through our donations to that wonderful institution. It was a special event and I will be the first to admit that in some cases the situations were not ideal, but they were always work- able within reason. There were oc- casions when an exhibitor, spectator, judge and even volunteer would be up- set. My standard question was, Is your issue a minor inconvenience, or a per- sonal issue? If it either of these Iwill be glad to take you with me to St. Jude’s to let you meet the children that are dealing with a real problem for which this event is trying to assist. There is a huge difference between a small issue with parking, grooming, even judging and that of people dealing with issues of life, death, health and family. Please keep this in mind when dealing with the volunteers that have given so much of their time and talents to keep the show or trial going for you. Be sure to thank all the volunteers you encounter at the show. Please

In my opinion some of my fellow judg- es need to remember there is a huge list of available judges for any club to hire and we as judges should be grateful to those that thought highly enough of us to invite us. We need to show respect to the clubs’ volunteers as well as the exhibitors at the show. We as judges also need to remember that we are just one part of the show and appreciate the privilege to officiate there. If one is truly unhappy with the experience, he or she should just make a note of it to themselves and politely decline an invitation from that club in the fu- ture. There is no reason to be rude or disrespectful to any club member or volunteer. Having also been a show and cluster chair it continues to amaze me how rude todays exhibitors and handlers can be to members of the show com- mittee. In my opinion the two tough- est jobs at any show are parking and trying to control the grooming area. It seems that to many people the entry fee entitles them to park where they want, leave vehicles in the unloading areas for extended periods of time, try to take asmuch space as possible in the grooming area and save space for their friends regardless of what is published in the premium list. I have observed people trying to get into buildings be- fore the designated day or time, Refuse to stack crates, spread out as if they are entitled to however much space they want and when asked to consoli- date and be considerate they berate the club volunteer who is just trying to help everyone have an enjoyable day at the show. We all know it does not stop at just these few instances, but it is rather an ongoing sense of entitlement and bad behavior by exhibitors and handlers

It is very important to never forget that shows are put on and worked by unpaid volunteers. These individuals take time away from their families, their jobs and other interests to pro- vide shows and trials for all of us to participate in. we all need to be thank- ful for these individuals and all they do for us. In my capacity as a judge I have on oc- casion been embarrassed by the treat- ment of various clubofficialsbysomeof my colleague judges who complained about situations and issues that made them unhappy. In my experience most clubs try to do their best to be sure the judges, as well as all exhibitors needs are met. It Is also true that those clubs with memberships that include judges generally are a little more in tune with what makes for a good experience for the judges. Most judges just want a good line of communication, a nice clean hotel in a respectable area with hopefully an in-house restaurant and simple transportation to and from the airport and to the showgrounds. There are occasions when we will encoun- ter a club volunteer that has accepted the responsibility and has had no as- sistance or guidance in dealing with the care of the judges, and through no fault of their own or just trying to stay within a clubs guideline budget put judges in a less than ideal situation. It would be helpful for a club to remem- ber that the judges are at their mercy and are not familiar with the area. In many cases they do not have the trans- portation available to allow them any flexibility. When in those situations that are less than ideal, I always try to remember that they are volunteers and thank them for their efforts and when the time is right suggest a possible change to them for the future.

38 • T op N otch T oys , S eptember 2021

Mr. Sommerfelt has judged many of the most prestigious shows in the United States including the herding group at the 2014 Westminster Dog Show in New York City where he has judged on three separate occasions. Mr. Sommerfelt was the founder and chairman for the St. Jude Showcase of Dogs from 1993 until 2009, a unique event showcasing the world of purebred dogs. This special event was the largest collection of various dog events in one location, featuring an AKC all Breed Dog Show, AKC Obedience and Rally Trials, AKC Agility trials, (prior to AKC adding agility NADAC trials ) One of the largest Fly ball tournaments in theU.S.A., Herding and go to ground demonstrations, A main stage featur- ing performances by Canines from Television and the Movies, Freestyle, Demos by drug and various therapy dogs, A full room of booths for meet the breeds, over 50 AKC judges seminars annually, Lure coursing, A fun Zone for Children, and other dog related fun ac- tivities for the general public and their dogs. Over the years the event not only

raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the world-renowned St. Jude Chil- dren’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN, but also raised awareness of the many activities for people with their dogs as well establishing a voice for dog people in the Memphis area with regard to legislation. Many aspects of today’s AKC Royal Canin show can be traced back to the St. Jude event. Along with Carol his wife of 34 years they have bred well over 90 AKC Champions including Group, Best in Show and Specialty Winners, dual Champions and multiple performance titled dogs. During the past 40 years Mr. Sommer- felt has been active in a number of dog clubs and is currently the President of the Tennessee Valley Kennel Club. He is recipient of the AKC outstanding Sportsmanship Award and is also a ca- reer agent and financial planning spe- cialist withNationwide Insurance. The Sommerfelts’ have two grown children, both former Junior Handlers and they are still active breeders and exhibitors of the Vizsla breed.

“Clean Up” your area and pick up af- ter your dog. Accept the responsibility that goes with being a good exhibitor, judge and spectator and human being. Remember if there are no volunteers there will be no shows. And Lastly if you don’t belong to a club you need to, and you need to vol- unteer so we can all keep doing what we love with our dogs. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Walter Sommerfelt of Lenoir City, TN has been involved in the sport of pure- bred dogs since acquiring his first Old English Sheepdog in 1972. He is a for- mer professional handler as well as a breeder, and exhibitor of breeds in all seven groups, most notably Vizslas, OES, Pointers, Bearded Collies and Weimaraners. Judging since 1985 he is approved for All Sporting, Working, andHerding breeds and groups, Junior Showmanship and Best in Show and has had the honor of judging on four different continents.

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