Showsight Presents The Keeshond

k ees h ond

Q&A

dog shows, matches and Junior Handling with my daughters, I started judging Keeshonden in 1993 and Papillons in 1996. I love every minute and now judge all Non-Sporting breeds and 9 Toy breeds. 2. What five traits do you look for, in order, when judging Kees? Outline, head, color contrast in coat, COAT TEXTURE and soundness. 3. Do you see incorrect color or coats, including excessive trimming, in the breed? Too much product, too much trimming. 4. What shortcomings are you most willing to forgive? What faults do you find hard to overlook? I am seeing too many close rears, hocks brushing and too much toeing in (or crossing in the front). I can forgive cosmetic errors, but the structural “deviations from the standard” are harder to live with. 5. How has the breed changed since you became involved with it? Do you see any trends you think are moving the breed in the wrong direction? The breed has less size differential now, bitches are way too small. Front angulation is another issue. 6. Can you describe Keeshond movement? Brisk, efficient. 7. Is there anything Keeshond handlers do you wish they would not? Moving too fast with the dog. 8. Name a dog not currently being shown that exempli- fies your ideal type. Aside from the spectacle trimming, Flakkee Jackpot was a great example. 9. Anything else you’d like to add? I love this breed. It used to have a low-maintenance coat—that has changed. MARY ELLEN MEYER MArkwright keeshonden 1. Please tell us about your back- ground in Keeshonden, including ken-

I have judged many specialties in various Non-Sporting and Working breed specialties. The highlight, so far, in my judging career was judging the Keeshond National Specialty. I am honored that I have been invited to judge again at an upcoming Keeshond National Specialty. When I am not involved with the dogs, I spend my time outdoors in my garden, reading, enjoy doing things with my grand- children and donating my time for community events. 2. What five traits do you look for, in order, when judging Kees? I look for a well-balanced dog that is correctly built with good front and rear angles; Good depth of chest with a well-rounded barrel; Moderate length of neck; A short- coupled body with a short loin; Correct coat texture and correct coat color; Correct moderate smooth and efficient movement. 3. What are the hallmarks of the breed? The hallmarks of the breed are dramatic coloration, spec- tacles, fox-like expression and distinctive double coat. 4. Do you see incorrect color or coats, including excessive trimming, in the breed? Our coat color has improved greatly over the years. We do not see as much tawny in our adult coats. However, it is becoming harder to find dogs with the correct Keeshond coat texture, the coats are either being too soft or too harsh. Being a Nordic breed, Keeshonden should be able to go out in the rain and snow and if their coat is correct the snow and rain should not weigh down the coat. 5. What shortcomings are you most willing to forgive? What faults do you find hard to overlook? The shortcomings I am willing to overlook, in no par- ticular order, are a slightly more rounded eyes, lighter eyes than what our breed standard calls for, ears that are a little larger than what they should be, size especially if this is the best dog in the ring that most fits the breed type. The things I find the hardest to overlook are dogs that are not balanced, dogs lacking the dark lines which form the spectacle, ewe necks, dogs that are unable to move correctly and that do not represent correct breed type, as well as those that have been severely scissored. 6. How has the breed changed since you became involved with it? Do you see any trends you think are moving the breed in the wrong direction? The breed has gone through many changes and phases. I feel over all the breed has improved greatly. There seems to be a trend that bigger is better right now. We have dogs that are getting too large and also carrying exces- sive heavy bone becoming more Chow-like in style. Many judges are putting up Keeshonden based on how much coat they carry verses how are exceling in correct breed type. There is more to the breed than just their coat. We are getting too over coated with many of our dogs, which leads to exhibitors having to sculpture the entire dog because of the length of the coat. I go back to what I mentioned earlier—this is a Nordic Spitz breed and the under coat cannot hold up the excessive coat length. If these dogs were out in the snow the coat would be

nel name, highlights, judging experience. I am originally from Wisconsin and relocated to Dayton, Tennessee after my retirement. I started in dogs back in 1964

showing in obedience. I purchased my first Keeshond in 1971 exhibiting in obedience and conformation. My kennel name is Markwright Keeshonden. I have bred well over one hundred champions of record, producing Best in Show, Specialty winners and group placing dogs. I starting judging in 1999 and currently judge all of the Non-Sporting Group, and some Working and Toy breeds.

t4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& / 07&.#&3 

Powered by