Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen Breed Magazine - Showsight

Grand Basset Gri ff on Vendéen Q & A

“JUDGES NEED TO ATTEND TRAINING AND PARTICIPATE IN RINGSIDE MENTORSHIP EVENTS AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE AND KEEP THE STANDARD HANDY. We are seeing a lot of variation in size and type coming into the show ring and over-grooming is becoming an issue. These are rustic, casual looking hounds of medium size. The coat should be harsh, straight, and natural. Grands should not be over-abundant in fringe or furnishing, nor should they show signs of scissoring, clipping or over-stripping.”

CINDY & PHILIP WILT Cindy and Philip Wilt have been showing and breeding happy and healthy PBGVs and GBGVs for the past decade and have con- sistently produced some of the top show dogs, and beloved family members, in the country. We own Talus PBGV & GBGV and are located in rural Mobile County Alabama. Do we feel the average person on the street knows what the breed is? We very rarely have anyone recognize our breed for what it is. Most frequently we are asked if our dog is some kind of doodle. What qualities in the field also come in handy around the house? We live in the country and keep miniature cow, horse and chickens. Our Grands do a very good job of keeping our animals safe from predators. They keep a close eye on the surrounding woodland and sound a clear warning of trespassers. What about the breed makes them an ideal companion? GBGVs make a wonderful family pet, as they are gentle with children and tend to be laid back in the house. That being said, I don’t recom- mend Grands for first time dog owners, unless they are willing to consult a trainer experienced in hound breeds. As with any hound, Grands require a securely fenced yard to run and play in, and are not reliable off-leash, due to their strong hunting instinct. Grands do not tolerate harsh training methods or corrections. At what age do we start to see definite signs of show-worthiness? Our pups are born and raised in our home, and are lovingly condi- tioned from day one to be happy, confident and outgoing. Pups are evaluated for show potential at the age of eight weeks. The most important thing about the breed for a new judge to keep in mind? Judges need to attend training and participate in

ringside mentorship events as often as possible and keep the stan- dard handy. We are seeing a lot of variation in size and type com- ing into the show ring and over-grooming is becoming an issue. These are rustic, casual looking hounds of medium size. The coat should be harsh, straight, and natural. Grands should not be over- abundant in fringe or furnishing, nor should they show signs of scissoring, clipping or over-stripping. The best way to attract newcomers to our breed and to the sport? Participating in public education functions, such as Meet the Breeds, is a very good way to introduce the public to our breed. Grands are outgoing and friendly hounds, and their tossled appear- ance will steal your heart. Our ultimate goal for the breed? We strive to produce Grands that are first and foremost healthy and sound, true to their standard in type and temperament. Our favorite dog show memory? Winning Best of Breed at Royal Canin, over a large class of the very best Grands in the country, with a one year old youngster from our very first litter. GBGVs make exceptional, dedicated family members and lovely house dogs. When bred correctly, their coats are very low shedding and require minimal grooming when groomed regularly. They are easy to train, with positive and consistent training methods, and can excel in all types of performance disciplines. As with any medi- um to large breed, be aware of health issues, such as hip and eye challenges. I can’t stress enough about the importance of obtaining GBGVs only from reputable breeders who perform health screen- ings. Breeders recognized by the AKC parent club, GBGVCA, are committed to performing health screenings on their dogs prior to breeding, and only breeding dogs true to characteristics of the breed standard.

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