Top Notch Toys February 2017

G C H B T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K

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eek! Malcolm Morgan-

A M B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N M B I S / M G C H / M U L T I C H

Pearl won BOS at the American Kennel Club National Championship week!

Judges Mr. Malcolm Moore and Mr. Gareth Morgan-Jones!

OW N E D B Y : C Y N T H I A L E E | i L O V E M A L T E S E B R E D B Y : V E R O N I C A & A L A N F A W C E T T | A L W A Y S M A L T E S E H A N D L E D B Y : T O N I A H O L I B A U G H | R H A P S O D Y M A L T E S E

H A N D L E D B Y : E D G A R C R U Z G U E V A R A

A S S I S T E D B Y : V E R N O R O V A R E S U G A L D E

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Grand Champion Brylee’ s Heavenly Walkin’ On Cloud Nine HEAR YE! HEAR YE!

No. 1 Breed HAVANESE *

"T he Walker Diptych "

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T he King of the Mountain... Officially!

©Kurtis Photography

It is good to be King! Owned By: DR. DUNCAN SIMMONS & BONNIE SIMMONS Bred & Owned By: MICHELLE ABELS Presented By: HARRY BENNETT & S. D. ROWAN, JR.

*TNT breed stats as of 12.31.16

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IN LOVING MEMORY

DUANE C. DOLL 1/17/39 – 7/19/16 Co-Founder, Publisher and CEO Since 1983

Executive Editor JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS Editor BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Managing Editor CORTNY WHITE Ad and Editorial Design

JOE McGINNIS, DIANE GREENE-WALSH, CORTNY WHITE, ERIKA RUTHERFORD, MELISSA BORDOVSKY AND KELLI LAW Advertising BONNIE GUGGENHEIM 863.738.8848 • bonnie@dmcg.com PRODUCTION OFFICES 8848 Beverly Hills, Lakeland, Fl 33809 Office Manager Subscriptions and Circulation MICHAEL VERAS 863.816.8848 • michael@dmcg.com Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations SAMANTHA ADKINS 863.816.8848 • samantha@dmcg.com

G C H B T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K

Girouard Front Cover.indd 1

1/27/17 4:53 PM

On the cover: GCHB TAMARIN TAILBACK Affenpinscher, Owned by Doyle & Carol Girouard

Director of Web Development National Distribution Manager DANIEL J. CARTIER 615.618.4797 • daniel@dmcg.com Production Manager DIANE GREENE-WALSH

26 FROM THE EDITOR by JOE MCGINNIS

36 TOY TALK by BONNIE GUGGENHEIM

50 FALSE PREGNANCY OR PSEUDOPREGNANCY IN DOGS by ERNEST WARD, DVM

52 TNT TOYBOX

54 PROTECT YOUR LOCAL & SPECIALTY CLUBS by BONNIE GUGGENHEIM

57 HISTORY OF THE POMERANIAN by CATHY DRIGGERS

59 JUDGING THE POMERANIAN by FRED C. BASSETT

61 LIVING WITH THE POMERANIAN by VICTORIA OELERICH

64 LOOK! IT’S A POMERANIAN! ISN’T IT CUTE? by BARBARA MCCLATCHEY

65 THE POMERANIAN: NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE! by BARBARA MCCLATCHEY

68 TNT TOP TWENTY

68 TNT ALL BREED SYSTEM

69 TNT BREED SYSTEM

69 TNT OWNER-HANDLER SYSTEM

71 ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTION RATES

72 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

G C H B T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K

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IF SOMEONE TOLD YOU THAT

OF THE TOP 100 * SHOW DOGS EAT THE SAME BRAND OF FOOD Would you ask what it is?

HELPS KEEP SKIN& COAT IN EXCELLENT CONDITION

HELPS MAINTAIN

SUPPORTS IMMUNE SYSTEM DURING TRAVEL & COMPETITION

HELPS OPTIMIZE OXYGENMETABOLISM FOR INCREASED STAMINA

IDEAL BODY CONDITION

proplansport.com SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT PET SPECIALTY RETAILERS *AKC Top Dogs SM All Breed Competition through December 31, 2016.

The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors. Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. Any other marks are property of their respective owners. Printed in USA.

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#

OWNED BY DOYLE & CAROL GIROUARD | BRED BY JACKIE & TERRY STACY, TAMARIN KENNELS

PRESENTED BY ALFONSO ESCOBEDO & ASHLIEWHITMORE

*TNT GROUP STATS AS OF 12/31/16 **TNT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/16 ***DN STATS AS OF 12/31/16

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O N T H E C O V E R

G C H B T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K

E MM I T T E N D E D 2 0 1 6 A S :

PURINA PROPLAN TOY DOG OF THE YEAR #1 TOY DOG* #1 AFFENPINSCHER** #10 DOG ALL BREEDS***

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MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING, RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING & BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING GOLD GRAND CHAMPION Fleur de Passy ™ Dauphin “Valentino”

Deepest appreciation TO JUDGES WILLIAM RUSSELL AND JEFFREY BAZELL. WHAT A FABULOUS START TO 2017!

Photo © Tom Weigand TO NOTED TOY AUTHORITY & ALL BREED BREEDER/HANDLER/ JUDGE BARBARA DEMPSEY ALDERMAN (LEFT) Thank you

“VALENTINO” IS LOVINGLY HANDLED BY: DR. ANITA LOPKER AND DIEGO & EVE GARCIA

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GOLD GRAND CHAMPION Fleur de Passy ™ Dauphin “Valentino”

1 # 2 # BREED * ALL BREED **

*TNT breed stats as of 12/31/16 **TNT all breed stats as of 12/31/16

RBIS BISS GCHG FLEUR DE PASSY ™ DAUPHIN, “VALENTINO,” A P R I N C E O F H E A R T S & M I N D S DEEPEST APPRECIATION TO ALL THE JUDGES FOR AN ASTOUNDING BREEDER-OWNER-HANDLER YEAR!

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Hotrod MOHBIS MBISS GOLD GCH H&H HOTROD GROUP ONE WINNER & MULTIPLE GROUP PLACEMENTS CHIC #114260 MERLE N/N

Long Coat Chihuahua Breed ** NO. 1 All Breed *** NO. 3 THANK YOU JUDGE EDD BIVIN

Owner Handled * NO. 1

H&H Hotrod SIRE OF MULTIPLE CHAMPIONS! Head out on the Highway

Michelle Herod, Breeder/Owner/Handler & Todd Harris 928-445-9371 | See us on Facebook at H&H Chihuahuas Stud services available | www.chihuahuaacres.com

*AKC NOHS stats 2016 **TNT breed stats as of 12/31/16 ***TNT all breed stats as of 12/31/16

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Coast to Coast, F lorida to California... FINISHING 2016 STRONG & STARTING 2017 WITH A BANG!

THANK YOU JUDGE CHRISTINE SALYERS ANDERSON

SEE HIM AT Westminister!

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FINISHED HER CHAMPIONSHIP WITH 3-FIVE POINT MAJORS AT 19 MONTHS.

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First weekend out as a Special

WA T C H F O R H E R I N N EW Y O R K S H E I S J U S T G E T T I N G S T A R T E D !

PATTI BISGARD, BRIDOG10@VERIZON.NET | PRESENTED BY PAM LAPERRUQUE

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Gold Grand Champion ZONA ROSA’S I’LLTAKE MANHATTAN

# 1 H A V A N E S E Bitch All Systems 2016*

Judge Mrs. Sari Brewster-Tietjen

Judge Mrs. NeenaVan Camp

Judge Mrs. Rosalind Kramer

Looking forward to her first full year

AS A SPECIAL IN 2017!

P R E S E N T E D B Y D A V I D & K R I S T Y N S T O U T B R E D B Y M A R I A E L E N A P E R E I R A O W N E D B Y M A R I A E L E N A P E R E I R A & S U Z A N N E R . P E C K

*all systems as of 12/31/16

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Best of Breed 2016 AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP THANKYOU JUDGE DR. GARETH MORGAN-JONES

Brooklyn T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 19

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PLAYBOY FINISHED HIS AKC CHAMPIONSHIP IN 3 SHOWS UNDER 4 JUDGES— 3 OF THEM BEING MAJORS:

THANK YOU JUDGEWILLIAM USHERWOOD

THANK YOU JUDGE DR. ROBERT SMITH

THANK YOU JUDGE DONNELLE RICHARDS

THANK YOU JUDGE JUNE PENTA

Owner Handled by: Barb Rorie King Owned by: Barbara Rorie King & David King | Bred by: E. S. Kokha

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© image by Dearil

Ch Magic Country Playboy

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Manny Grand Champion HEART 2HEART ’ S DADDY ’ S B I G FELLA ©Shaggy Dog Photography 2 0 1 6 H A V A N E S E C L U B O F A M E R I C A N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y [ ] Many thanks to Judge James E. Frederiksen for this very special honor! p r e s e n t i n g Proudly B R E D , O W N E D & H A N D L E D B Y Mrs. Tracey Rives T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 29

©Mary King

Grand Champion Moonshadows Tail of Super Bowl 49

Thanks to all the judges who made 2016 a fun ride! Watch for Brady in 2017...

l e t t h e f u n b e g i n !

Owners: Donna Bledsoe & Ken Lambert Handlers: Ken Lambert & Trish Kulessa Breeder: Maggie McKinley Keuser

no. 20 breed * | no. 6 all breed ** 2016 final statistics

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*TNT breed stats as of 12/31/16 **TNT all breed stats as of 12/31/16

Grand Champion Multi CHampion B-Boy of Angela White KR B-Boy We are so proud of B-Boy’s achievements so far in the US. Thank you Tonia & Edgar for making our boy shine! Thank you Judges Mr. Raymond Filburn & Mrs. Debbie Campbell-Freeman!

Owned by Laurence Didier | France Bred by So Hyang Kim | Angela White Maltese Handled By Tonia Holibaugh | Rhapsody Maltese

Handled by Edgar Cruz Guevara Assisted by Vernor Ovares Ugalde

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GCHS ENGA’S KING KOMPIS

SILKY 2016 1 # *all systems as of 12/31/16 ALL SYSTEMS

Kompis 34 • T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017

BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW SILKY TERRIER CLUB OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

OWNERS: Anita Bakseterveen & Mark Benson HANDLER: Barbara Beissel, barbarabeissel@aol.com

GRAND CHAMPION TREASURES PLAYING WITH FIRE

Always Breeder / Owner handled by KAREN A. WARNCKE , R.V. T. Havanese Treasures | havanesetreasures.net Havanese Treasures Multiple B E S T O F B R E E D W I N N E R

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by BONNIE GUGGENHEIM TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor A QUESTION, AN ANSWER AND YOUR THOUGHTS ETCETERA

W rite and submit an arti- cle on a topic you think is important, show off your finest Toys with your wonderful ads, check out your fel- low exhibitors with the different Toy breeds they show— Top Notch Toys is the place to get your message out to the fancy. This column is filled with questions for you to think about and email the answers for publication in the March issue of TNT. Send your responses and a bio photo to me at bonnie@dmcg.com. • What are your feelings on local clubs versus National clubs? • Your thoughts on some negative postings on Facebook? • What features or content do you most benefit from in TNT ?

• If you could send one message to your fellow breeders and exhibitors, what would it be? • What was your biggest blunder in the ring? The funniest thing you have ever done in the ring? • What do you most and least like to see in ads submitted by exhibitors? • What dream dog trip would you like to take in the next few years? Sooner rather than later? • What one important message would you like to send to judges? • What do you see other exhibitors do that drives you crazy? • Do you have other interests or hobby’s besides breeding and showing dogs? • What have you always wanted to ask a judge but were too afraid to ask?

• Questions you would like to see in another issue? Remember, inquiring minds want to know! Send me your answers for the next issue along with any questions you might have for our readers. Keep our slogan in mind when allocating your advertising dollars: “DON’T GET LOST IN THE OTHER MAGAZINES, STAY FOUND IN TOP NOTCH TOYS!” Win lots more, love and enjoy your dogs and send adorable puppy pictures for the Toy Box. Bonnie bonnie@dmcg.com 863.738.8848

Have a wonderful time in February in NYC!

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Watch for

GRAND CHAMPION CHAMPION KNOCKOUT WHITE OWL Silver Grand Champion Dartan Wow Factor of Josam x Grand Champion Knockout Fireball Unlike any other.

Special thanks to Judges Stephanie Hedgepath, Fred Basset, Dennis McCoy, Dana Cline & Lisa Warren for awarding Izzie BOV to finish her GCH title in just 2 weekends of shows... AND ALL BEFORE HER F IRST BIRTHDAY!

Bred by: KNOCKOUT CHIHUAHUAS | PASSION FOR THE WHOLE DOG RACHEL K. GREEN | KNOCKOUTCHIS@GMAIL.COM A L L B R E E D I N G S T O C K O F A C L E A R . A L W A Y S B R E E D E R - O W N E R - H A N D L E D . W W W . K N O C K O U T C H I H U A H U A S . C O M T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 37

SHOWN COMPLET ING HI S CHAMP IONSHI P AT WI L LAMETTE TOY DOG FANC I ERS WI TH RESPECTED JUDGE JOE WALTON.

O W N E D , B R E D & L O V E D B Y G A R Y & V I C K I S T I L E S

K E E P E R O F T H E F L A M E CH SHAB R I ’ S MONTANYA DE OS I TO x GCH GENB ROOK ’ S P L AY I N ’ WI TH F I R E

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B r e a k i n g a l l t h e r u l e s

gCh Zhen’s that’s Who We are

Winners Dog 2015 aCCCC national

thank you Margot klingler for his 1st group placement with tara.

Breeders: Carol Clouse, amy thompson and Bill thompson owners: norma Feldman, Carol Clouse and kristina karraker handler: tara richardson Photos©Kathy Arnold 40 • T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017

BG’S LLADRO’S POPPY AMAPOLA

11-19 WB BOW | JUDGE WYOMA CLOUSS FROM THE 6-9 PUPPY CLASS

11-20 WB | JUDGE JANET ALLEN FROM THE 6-9 PUPPY CLASS

Poppy

owned by M A N U E L & C H R I S T I E M A R T I N E Z bred by B I L L B U R N S handled exclusively by C A R M E N R U B Y

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Wenrick’s N’ Palaquins They Call Me Mr. Bates Grand Champion

Watch for Bates in the ring with Michelle Jones in 2017.

Bred By: BARBARA L. BREM & WENDY PEGUETTE | Owned By: WENDY PEQUETTE | Professionally Handled By: MICHELLE M. JONES | Assisted By: MACKENZIE S. JONES

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looking forward to 2017 shows

THANK YOU DENNIS MCCOY

12.12.16 | SPACE COAST KC SELECT UNDER JUDGE RICHARD CAMACHO 12.13.16 | BREVARD KC BEST OF OPPOSITE UNDER JUDGE JASON HOKE 12.15.16 | AMERICAN TOY MANCHESTER CLUB SPECIALTY SELECT UNDER JUDGE DENNIS MCCOY FLASH Hutch!

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL OF THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED OUR BOY , S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY.

NEW PERF ORMANC E T I TLES ! BN ( BEG I NNER NOV I C E ) , RA ( RA L L Y ADVANC ED ) AND C A ( L URE C OURS I NG A B I L I TY ! )

HANDLERS : KAREN NEWMAN & LEW OLSON OWNER: LEW OLSON BREEDERS : MAX I NE FOX , J ANNA P . MORGAN & LOU A . NOVOSAD , DVM GCH EVRMOR INXS OF BLACKWOOD BN RA CA

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Colby AM CHAMPION SOUTH FORK’S Key to My Heart

Poetry in Motion

© Turley Photo

W H A T ’ S N E W ? Special Delivery from France Elvis HUNDERWOOD LOVE ME TENDER 1st Show 3 pt. major out of the 12-18 month class. A special thank you to Judge Mrs. Purkhiser, Greater Muskegon KC.

Elvis is bred by: Eric Bernard | Owned by: Neil Feerrar Both are shown & loved by: MJ Held 1442 Orchard Park Road | West Seneca, New York 14224 | 716-675-4497

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

Grand Champion Brylee’s Endless Love

Thank you Judge James Frederiksen

H A N D L E R : R O B E R T A L E XA N D E R B R E E D E R : M I C H E L L E A B E L S

OWN E R : S A N D R A G R OAT, V I VAC E H AVA N E S E , 2 6 9 - 3 6 6 - 0 5 0 9 S G R OAT@COMC A S T. N E T

CO - OWN E R : M I C H E L L E A B E L S

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Ginger y

C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S A C C O M P L I S H E D & E X Q U I S I T E

Celebrating S O M E O F O U R R E C E N T M A J O R w inner s!

CH GINGERY’S CHUPACABRA

GINGERY’S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY

GINGERY’S OUIJA

BREEDER: ARLENE BUTTERKLEE

HANDLER: VICTOR HELU

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L I G H T I N G H E A R T S O N F I R E ASHLEY &

GCH VALCOPY HOT N’ FLASHY NIKLBY

Bred & Owned by: Betty Cuzzolino, D. Plonkey & Michelle Starry Handled by: Ashley Cuzzolino

OCALA 3 BEST OF BREEDS & A GROUP 2 AWARD OF MERIT AT THE NATIONAL AMERICAN TOY FOX TERRIER CLUB CONSISTENT BEST OF BREEDS AT THE FLORIDA CIRCUIT

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M u l t i p l e G r o u p W i n n i n g & T o p 1 0 A l l B r e e d 2 0 1 6 *

Own e d & Han d l e d by L arry & P e nny D ewe y B r e d & Own e d by Chr i s t i n e Sm i t h & dan bay l e s s

C H A z t e x M a r c h - O n B u d d h a a n d t h e C h o c o l a t e B o x

THE First weekend in 2017 at Nolan River Kennel Club, Sidd and Larry won 2 Group Placements. Mrs. Melanie Williams is pictured above awarding Group 4 to Sidd. Sincere thanks to Mrs. Williams and to Mrs. Patricia Hastings for the Group 4 on Sunday.

W a t c h f o r S i d d & L a r r y i n T e x a s & L o u i s i a n a .

T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 49

*TNT ALL-BREED STATS AS OF 12.31.16

FALSE PREGNANCY OR PSEUDOPREGNANCY

IN DOGS by ERNEST WARD, DVM

WHAT IS MEANT BY FALSE PREGNANCY? F play of maternal (mothering) behavior combined with the physical signs of pregnancy following estrus (heat) in a female dog that is not actually preg- nant. A false pregnancy may occur in a dog, regardless of whether or not she was mated. The majority of intact female dogs will show some signs of false pregnancy after an estrus cycle. WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF FALSE PREGNANCY AND WHEN DO THEY OCCUR? alse pregnancy, phantom pregnancy, pseudo-preg- nancy or pseudocyesis are all terms that refer to a dis- Symptoms of false pregnancy usually begin four to nine weeks after the pre- vious heat period and mimic the symp- toms of true pregnancy. The more com- mon signs of pseudo-pregnancy include mammary gland enlargement with or without the production of milk, leth- argy, periodic vomiting and fluid reten- tion. The female often has a decreased appetite but seldom appears to lose

“SYMPTOMS OF FALSE PREGNANCY USUALLY BEGIN FOUR TO NINE WEEKS AFTER THE PREVIOUS HEAT PERIOD...”

will subside in approximately 14 to 21 days. If the dog appears physically ill or the behavioral changes are severe enough to cause concern, treatment is indicat- ed. Treatment is symptomatic and may include tranquilization to relieve anxi- ety, treatment with diuretics in order to reduce the milk production or relieve fluid retention; in rare cases, hormonal treatment may be required. If the female will not be used for breeding, ovariohysterectomy is rec- ommended to prevent future episodes. Ideally, this surgical sterilization should be performed after all symptoms have resolved. If she is surgically sterilized while she is experiencing signs of pseu- do-pregnancy, symptoms may continue for several weeks despite the fact she has been spayed.

weight, probably due to the amount of excess fluid she retains. These symptoms can occur at any age and do not necessarily follow every estrus. The severity of the clinical signs varies between individuals and may vary from one cycle to the next in the same dog. Behavioral changes of pseudo- pregnancy include nesting, mothering activity, restlessness, decreased inter- est in physical activity and occasionally even aggression. Some affected dogs will show signs of a false labor and then protectively guard toys or other small objects.

WHY DO THESE SYMPTOMS OCCUR?

Mild cases of false pregnancy do not require treatment since the symptoms

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Yorkshire Terrier Club of AmeriCA foundATion inC.

The YTCA Foundation, Inc. is a 501 (C)(3) charitable organization for the health and genetic concerns of the Yorkshire Terrier. Donations are welcomed. Yorkshire Terriers and other dog breeds. www.yoRkiEFoundation.oRG We support and promote research into hereditary and other diseases of

Education • HEaltH REsEaRcH • MEMoRials • FundRaisinG

YORKSHIRE TERRIER NATIONAL RESCUE, INC. http://www.yorkshireterrierrescue.com We do more than rescue Yorkies. We also have information and support groups for dog owners whose dogs are afflicted with Liver Shunt and Collapsing Trachea. Please visit: http://www.livershunt.com or http://www.collapsingtrachea.com Browse thru our Rescue Boutique where we have many upscale items, including beautiful hand knit Dog Sweaters by Charlie. www.yorkierescue.com We accept donations. We are a 501(c)(3) charitable organization.

T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 51

Owned by Scott Toney Bred by Scott Toney & Beverly Merritt

Submit your cute photos to our TOYBOX department. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog.

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PHA

Home of tHe Biewer terrier Where Knowledge Leads to Excellence www.btcainc.org • www.facebook/btca1 • www.biewerterrierregistry.com/

Biewer Terrier Dog Club.indd 1

5/30/16 10:20 AM

BONN I E GUGGENHE IM P H : 8 6 3 - 7 3 8 - 8 8 4 8 • F A X : 8 6 3 - 8 5 3 - 3 6 2 4 E M A I L : B O N N I E @ D M C G . C O M

Your Dog’s Portrait

Varsity Kennel boarding & grooming

allan M. Chambers owner 8447 Winter Gardens Blvd. Lakeside, Ca. 92040 619-561-3037

varsityamc@aol.com www.varsitykennel.net

Chambers BCard.indd 1

8/31/15 1:27 PM

From your photo... Pup Portrait Studio Watercolors by Judy Thompson JudyThompsonOHA@aol.com • 239.732.2037 www.PupPortraitStudio.com To an original work of art

Lisa Curry, Esq. 59 Gristmill Rd. Randolph, NJ 07869 201-400-7407

LCurry@lawfordogs.com www.lawfordogs.com

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PROTECT YOUR LOCAL & SPECIALTY CLUBS by BONNIE GUGGENHEIM

H as your kennel club ever been sued? Have you had an exhibitor fall in the ring? A judge slip enter- ing the building? A dog bite a child? A spectator who paid to attend your show is knocked over by an exhibitor with crates on a dolly? In any of the situations, liability could be the determining factor in what happens to your kennel club, unless you are properly insured by a Commercial General Liability policy with adequate limits to protect your club, the venue and your officers, directors and volun- teer working members. Next concern is your treasury. Big or small, you must have funds to put on your show which includes payment to judges, the superintendent, lunches or dinners for judges and members, raffle or auction expenses and all the many other costs involved with putting on a show. A Fidelity Bond policy would protect your kennel club, your directors and show chair, plus give your mem- bers confidence that the money earned by the club is protected from theft or embezzlement. Anyone serving as a treasurer should also be bonded and the club should insist on a Position Bond so they are able to elect a new treasurer and know the insurance is in place; no specific name is required. Your books should, of course, be audited with each change in the treasurer’s office. Depending on the amount of money and the financial circumstances of your club, the audit may or may not be a cer- tified audit but could be performed by an outside source offering this service. Limits on a Fidelity (or Crime coverage) policy are determined by the company underwriting the policy and the num- ber of Board and kennel club members. “YOU MUST HAVE FUNDS TO PUT ON YOUR SHOW.”

Most important in this determination is the amount of money in your treasury. Some companies will include your res- cue funds (most do not) and some will include your funds for your Canine Health Foundation accounts. Be certain to cover as much as the company will offer as the premiums for this type of insurance are very reasonable. If your assets were wiped out, could you put on a show? Back to the Commercial General Lia- bility policy. Today it seems everyone is subject to allegations of liability that are a result of your dog show, possibly your conformation classes and even Meet The Breed events hosted by your kennel club. For the CGL to cover any accident or injury, your club must be legally lia- ble and negligence must be proven. The cost of defense even when you are found not liable is high and should your club be liable for whatever reason, claims can be extremely high. The frightening part of this—and do check your club policy and your homeowner policy—is each director and officer can be held personally accountable. An attorney hired to sue the club will include the venue, your officers and directors and anyone additional involved. I’m person- ally aware a lawsuit that included the city the show was held in! Final insurance your all breed or spe- cialty club should consider is Directors and Officers Liability. As a general rule, this is the most costly of the types of insurance discussed, but personally, I would not serve as an officer or direc- tor of a club that did not carry it. This type of insurance provides coverage or protection from claims as a result of club activities to include misleading statements, breach of duty, neglect, error or acts of omission. The company underwriting will have specific ver- biage to clarify all coverage. Discuss all your needs with the agent or agen- cy you decide to purchase your insur- ance from. You can request a quote so your board or members can vote on the

amount of insurance your club needs to carry as well as discuss the various types of coverage. Coverage can be adjusted based on what underwriting can offer and the club budget. My reason for including this brief insurance lesson is simple. Unfortunate- ly, several years ago, I was Show Chair of a fairly large and active all breed club that was accused of negligence in pre- venting injury to an exhibitor. The ken- nel club was sued, the city, the large civ- ic center and all officers and directors of the board were personally sued. The person who claimed negligence stated that she stepped into the building and slipped on a wet floor falling and break- ing several bones. She said there were no cones indicating a wet floor and no warning signs were posted—probably some dog relieving himself there was her comment. In reality, and there were several witnesses, she stepped out of her motor home in the parking lot and stepped onto a dolly she planned to load wire crates on to pull dogs into the build- ing. Her foot became entangled she went down. She then got up, loaded and pulled the dolly with dogs on it (in wire crates) and entered the building. Upon entering, she stated she slipped on the wet floor and was ultimately taken to the hospital as a result of the fall inside the building. Exhibitors saw her fall in the parking lot and others saw her enter the building where she supposedly slipped and fell and stated she did not fall inside at all. Fortunately, this club had the appropriate insurance and no liability was assigned to the club or any of the members. She received no money and the claim was denied. It was a learning experience for all concerned and one I discuss with every club I’m involved with. The person discussed later passed away in an auto accident. Protect your club, your members and your money—learn about insur- ance, club and personal liability and make sure you’re covered!

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HISTORY OF THE POMERANIAN by CATHY DRIGGERS

W ith more coat than body, these Toy dogs have quite an interesting his- tory behind them. Pomeranians are a Spitz breed, mean- ing a type of dog that has several wolf- like characteristics. For instance, small ears help to reduce the risk of frostbite. There is an insulated undercoat that is denser than the guard hairs to trap the warmth and protect them from the heat. More specifically they’re part of the German Spitzen group, a subgroup of the Spitz type, which is comprised of five different sizes of dogs. The Poms are the group’s smallest members. The Pomeranian name came from the historical region of Pomerania that makes up the southern coast of the Bal- tic Sea, now present day Germany and Poland; not because it originated there, but because this was most likely where it was bred down to the smaller size in that region. In its larger form, they are said to have weighed as much as thirty pounds and to have served as an able herder of sheep. So many times I am asked about these “new” parti-colored or white Pomeranians. The colors and whites have become more popular in the past few years and are being shown in many of the areas that you would typically only find orange, reds or sables. There- fore, some spectators are only now understanding that Pomeranians come in other colors. Many people don’t realize that some of the first recorded pictures and paint- ings of the Pomeranian dog are of white and parti-colored Pomeranians. Many of the paintings and prints from the 18th century feature Pomeranians of various color and size. The Prince of Wales had a black and white parti Pomeranian, named “Fino”, that was painted in 1791. Prior to securing the breed name of Pomeranian, they were called by several other names: Fox Dog, Lulu, Pommer, Wolfsspitz German Spitz, Vol- pino and Spitz Dog. The Germans did

not accept the breed to be named Pom- eranians. All five sizes were generi- cally called the German Spitz. They didn’t actually start using the definition Pomeranian until 1974! In Italy they were used to watch over their owner’s items. The Pomeranians would alert their owner of someone coming or attempting to steal their valuables. In 1873 the Kennel Club (England) was formed and the so-called Spitz dog was among the first breeds recog- nized. The first Poms shown weighed nearly 18 pounds. In 1888 a Pomeranian named “Mar- co” was sent from Florence, Italy to become the beloved companion of Queen Victoria of England. Marco weighed 12 pounds. The Queen also imported a 7½ pound white female named “Gena”. The Queen’s love of the breed was clear to everyone who saw her with her dogs. Because the Queen was a popular monarch, the breed’s popularity grew as well. In fact, the Queen is credited for encouraging the trend toward the smaller Poms. At one time, Queen Victoria had 35 Pomera- nians in her kennel, and on her death- bed, asked for her Pomeranian “Turi” to be at her side. Pomeranians were shown in the United States in the Miscellaneous

Queen Victoria and Turi

Fino

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Miss Cheli with her Toy Pomeranians: Dot, Dainty and Topsy.

Class as far back as 1892, but regular classification was not provided until 1900 at New York. In 1900, the Pomera- nian was recognized by the American Kennel Club and the American Pomera- nian Club (APC) was formed. In 1909, APC was accepted as a Member Club of the AKC and APC became designated as the parent club for the breed. APC held its first specialty show in 1910 with an entry of 138 Pomeranians. Early American winners were heavi- er in bone, larger in ear and usually weighed under six pounds. They had type and good coat texture, although they lacked the profuseness of coat in evidence today. As companion dogs, Poms make excellent friends and have rubbed

shoulders with some of history’s great- est creative minds. Mozart dedicated one of his finished arias to his pet Pomeranian, “Pimperl”. Frédéric Cho- pin, inspired by his friend’s pet Pomera- nian chasing his tail, wrote the song “Waltz of the Little Dogs”. When Michel- angelo was painting the Sistine Chapel,

his Pom was sitting below on a satin pil- low watching the action. While this Nordic breed has sled dogs, watch dogs and herding dogs behind them, they have been bred for many years for simple companion- ship. You will find that many Pomera- nians today still carry many of the same traits as the breeds behind them. This little compact Toy dog does not realize that it is such a small dog. Pomeranians are truly large dogs in a small dog body. They have a vivacious spirit with a fox- like expression. They are playful throughout the majority of their lives, but are also happy to simply hang out on the couch or in your lap. Their territorial nature will alert you to any unusual distur- bance or intruders to your house- hold. Pomeranians are very loyal to their people. They have a strong desire to please, but can remain stub- born should they see fit. They have been successful in obedience, rally, agility and many other events. Their social nature among themselves makes it easy and interesting to own more than just one.

Gena

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JUDGING THE POMERANIAN by FRED C. BASSETT

W hen I present seminars on the Pomeranian, I start by telling students that the Pom is pretty easy to understand in structure. It is a “four-square” short-backed dog with structure typical of these traits. Look for sound legs with balanced angles front and rear. The Pom is square in body proportions measured from with- ers to ground, and point of shoulder to point of buttocks. There are three things that make the Pom unique, so I will emphasize those as our breed-specific characteristics: 1. The Head 2. The Coat and Its Presentation 3. The Tail and Its Plume In order to understand the above traits, first, let’s discuss the Pom’s origin and give the breed context. The Pomeranian is part of the North- ern/Nordic/Spitz family of breeds, and shares the traits of this family of dogs including: • Wedge-shaped head • Prick ears • Tail over the back, with heavy coat • Double coat with weather resistant texture • Short compact body

“THE POMERANIAN’S HEAD IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT. WHEN IT IS CORRECT, THERE IS NO WAY THAT THE DOG CAN BE MISTAKEN FOR ANY OTHER BREED.”

for any other breed. The Pom takes the Spitz traits of wedge shape and prick ears, and through selective breeding has evolved to have the broadest wedge shape of the family with the short- est muzzle to skull proportions. Our newly revised standard now includes a clarification for ideal head length pro- portions: muzzle to skull. See Figure 1 for clarification. The ears are also very important to give the Pom a distinctive look and expression. We call for the prick ears to be small and set high. You will see many ears that are too large, but I don’t think I have ever seen any that were too small. We also have many that

• Sound legs with adequate angles to provide an endurance trot gait This family of dogs shares each of these traits to some degree. The Spitz family of dogs includes the Pomeranian as well as the Keeshonden, Schipperke, American Eskimo, Samoyed, Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, the Asian Spitz breeds (Chow Chow, Shiba Inu and Akita), as well as many other Asian and FCI breeds not yet recognized by the AKC. THE HEAD The Pomeranian’s head is extremely important. When it is correct, there is no way that the dog can be mistaken

Fig. 1: Left: the ²/ ³ skull and ¹/ ³ muzzle; Right: “Wedge” shape

T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017 • 59

“THE PRESENTATION OF THE COAT ALSO GIVES THE BREED-SPECIFIC LOOK THAT WE DESIRE. THERE SHOULD BE ENOUGH LENGTH TO GIVE THE DOG A ‘ROUND ALL OVER’ SHAPE.”

are set too wide and flare at a slight angle out rather than being set nice and high on the skull, as desired. The eyes are the final head trait that makes or breaks a really beautiful expression. We want an almond-shaped eye, medium-sized and dark in color. Our new standard includes disqualifca- tions for a few eye faults that detract severely from the desired expression, see below for additional details. The combination of these distinctive head traits is what gives the Pom his beautiful “fox-like” expression. Please put sufficient emphasis on the head to ensure you are rewarding a typical The Pomeranian with correct coat has the longest and fullest coat of the Spitz family. Like the rest of the family we want a double coat with a short dense undercoat of rather soft texture, and a long harsh texture outer coat or guard coat. The texture should be harsh enough to provide weather resistantance. example of the breed. THE COAT & ITS PRESENTATION

The presentation of the coat also gives the breed-specific look that we desire. There should be enough length to give the dog a “round all over” shape. With correct natural length and a care- ful and moderate trim, the dog will look round from the side, the front or back, and also from the top. Trimming has gone through many trends over the past few decades, but these days the majori- ty of the dogs you see in the ring will be trimmed rather well. If you have a dog that is overly trimmed it will lose the round look from various angles, and too much of the outer coat will be trimmed off to the point that it is difficult, if not The Pom tail is set very high, and combined with the correct flat croup gives a carriage right on top of the back and as tight to the back as possible. When it is properly set, it will also give you a bit of shelf behind. Combined with the unique long hair forming a plume, this tail and set provides another very significant breed-specific trait. Our standard emphasizes this important impossible, to evaluate texture. THE TAIL & ITS PLUME

characteristic in three different places, so please look for it and reward it when you can. Low tail set is listed as a major fault in our standard. THE 2011 STANDARD & DISQUALIFICATIONS Our new standard went in to effect August 31, 2011. It was primarily undertaken to be clear on the Merle color pattern, which was not specifi- cally addressed previously. The par- ent club’s final decision was to accept the Merle color pattern, but provide DQs for eye characteristics that some- times appear along with this color pattern and detract from breed type and expression. Here is the exact language from the new standard, “Disqualification: Eye(s) light blue, blue-marbled, blue-flecked.” (See Figure 2.) Please note that a cor- rect blue merle dog will probably have a very dark blue eye. This is correct, and provides the expression we desire. JUDGING THE POM I hope this has proved helpful to you in terms of judging the Pom and placing proper emphasis on breed- specific traits. Please remember, the Pom, and all other toy breeds, needs a gentle touch during your table exam. Do not be too heavy-handed. On the same token, please feel free to feel under that heavy coat to see what the actual struc- ture is like. I see far too many judges who give only a cursory exam, which will not provide the full picture. Also, expect to evaluate expression on the ground rather than on the table. Most dogs are not trained to show you full expression on the table, so please wait until the dog has done his out-and-back movement and the handler should alert the dog to show you expression. But, if they don’t, just ask.

Fig. 2: New Disqualifications: eye (eyes) of light blue, blue-marbled and blue-flecked.

Blue-Marbled Eye

Blue-Flecked Eye

Light Blue Eyes

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LIVING WITH THE POMERANIAN

by VICTORIA OELERICH

C anines are canines. They are descendants theoretically from the wolf, but veered off as a species because of their desire to be a companion to man. The varying breeds possess many simi- lar qualities despite the obvious differ- ences between them. They are none- theless all part of the same species, canine familiaris. But what is so fasci- nating about pure bred dogs are the dif- ferences that have been purposefully bred into them in order to make them

uniquely distinct. Each breed is unique, not only in how they look and in their abilities to do the jobs they were creat- ed to do, but also in the different nuanc- es of behavior particular to their breed. Pomeranians are “a cocky, com- manding breed, buoyant in deportment and inquisitive by nature”, according to the newly revised Pomeranian breed standard. Those adjectives have been in the standard and handed down through breed standards for decades. The traits that make a Pom act like a

Pom are not at all accidental, but the result of microscopic threads of DNA that are transferred through genera- tions. It is because of dedicated breed- ers who continue to create this breed to not only look like Poms, but to act like Poms as well. This breed was originally a much larger-sized dog from the Baltic region. They were bred for multiple purpos- es--protectors on boats, herding and even as small sled dogs. Even though their size has been diminished 25%,

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their character has remained pure. They continue to have a strong pack mentality, use their voices to warn, stand loyal to their owners, protect what they feel is theirs to protect and have stamina and enthusiasm for what they are involved in well beyond what you would expect for their diminutive size. Pomeranians contain a “joie de vivre” and transfer that attitude to all who are around them. They are natural born

comedians, are very busy dogs and as a group, can amuse themselves for hours. Toys are at the center of the games they play, but not always a neces- sary ingredient. They can make a game out of just about anything or out of nothing at all. Chase games are a huge source of entertainment in the Pom community. One will appear to be “it” and then the roles will switch. They can go on like that until exhaustion sets in, and then it will be nap time for all.

As an owner of any dog comes responsibility. As an owner of a Pomera- nian, there are the same responsibili- ties and more. Their small size requires that their safety is always taken into consideration. As with any tiny dog, their joints, limbs, necks, spines and skulls are all very fragile. The most innocuous thing can prove deadly: a set of stairs, being left unattended on a couch, children roughhousing, large dogs, an erroneously thrown baseball

62 • T op N otch T oys , F ebruary 2017

or a ceramic floor can all be a recipe for a tragedy. Precautionary thinking ahead is mandatory. Because of the double nature and harsh texture of the Pomeranian coat, grooming is less difficult than many of the other types of pure bred dogs.

Their type of coat is made for being out in the elements. It is an insulator and a protector against extreme tem- peratures, moisture, injury and dirt. The double coat works to keep the skin surface dry, clean, safe from insect bites, scratches and helps keep body

temperatures normal. Unless it is a soak- ing rain, most moisture is also held away from the dog’s body by the dense under- coat. The correct texture does not easily mat and regular brushing will remove most dirt. Frequent nail trimming is essential for this breed. Being light on their feet as well as light in weight doesn’t lend itself to the natural filing down of their nails, so it is necessary to check the nails often for excess growth. Teeth are another important concern for all dogs, but especially small dogs such as these. They have small mouths, small teeth and small jaw bones. Food particles trap easily in the tiny crevices. They collect and harden into plaque which is a bacterial breeding ground, that can lead to gum disease, tooth loss and then potentially to heart and kidney disease later on. Scrupulous cleaning, hard-chewing type foods and treats are imperative to maintaining a healthy Pomeranian. Though Poms are no longer pulling sleds, guarding flocks or protecting boats in the canals, it is the responsibil- ity of the conscientious breeders to pre- serve what is the essence of the Pomer- anian, what makes a Pom uniquely a Pom. Currently they are mainly bred as companion animals but the core of who they are as a dog has been handed down through the centuries. They do work well in obedience, agility and in therapy dog capacities. Their “busy and inquisitive” nature likes to feel impor- tant and purposeful. They take them- selves and their jobs as seriously today as their ancestors did hundreds of years ago, even if those jobs only consist of play time, nap time or lap time.

“CURRENTLY THEY ARE MAINLY BRED AS COMPANION ANIMALS BUT THE CORE OF WHO THEY ARE AS A DOG HAS BEEN HANDED DOWN THROUGH THE CENTURIES.”

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LOOK! IT’S A POMERANIAN! ISN’T IT CUTE? by BARBARA MCCLATCHEY

T o paraphrase an old saying, “So many dogs, so little time.” Choosing the breed and dog you want to live with for the rest of its life can be confusing. They’re all so cute (especially when they are puppies!) that I seem to want them all. But since that is not possible, here are some of the reasons you might or might not want my favorite breed, the Pomeranian. SIZE At 3-7 lbs. (but some are a bit big- ger), Poms are easy to pick up and car- ry around. They can fit nicely in your lap; in fact, two or three of them can fit at the same time. And most of them enjoy lap time. But they should also be given basic obedience training to keep them from becoming obnoxious. If you always carry a Pom, he begins to think that he is four or five feet tall, and may try to attack a much bigger dog. If he learns to walk nicely on a leash, he may notice that other dogs are bigger than he is. On the negative side, being small makes Poms a bit fragile, which means they are not for small children who don’t understand that if you pick up a Pom and then drop it, the Pom may break. This small size also means that your house fence must be totally secure. Pomeranians can get through the tiniest space imaginable, and then their boundless curiosity will take them through the neighborhood and across busy streets, where bad things can hap- pen. Do microchip your dog and always keep a well-fitting buckle or clip collar on him with an ID tag that has your phone number and address, just in case. ENERGY LEVEL Poms can be very energetic little dogs. They run, play and bounce around and if you have more than one Pom and an assortment of toys, watching them play can be like living in a zoo. They love going for walks (on leash, please), but long walks or running can tire

those small legs too much. Their ener- gy is not overwhelming and once they get past the puppy stage, they are willing to just chill until the next excite- ment comes along. Be aware that the excitement could be a noise outside to bark at, since barking is a definite Pomer- anian activity. Q: What do you get when you cross a Pomeranian with a giraffe? A: You get a dog that barks at airplanes! CARE Part of what makes Poms so cute is all that hair. But all that hair must be groomed regularly. A Pom should be brushed and combed down to the skin once a week to avoid mats. If a regular grooming schedule is followed, there will be little shedding around the house. If you take a dog to the groomer infrequently, the groomer will be the one who has to remove those painful mats and you will not be there to see that it is hurting the dog. Pomeranian teeth are also in need of frequent brush- ing and a yearly dental with your vet is a must. ACTIVITIES One of the easiest activities to do with your Pomeranian is Pet Therapy, visiting people in nursing homes and hospitals. This work comes naturally to Poms, who generally love everyone and are happy to go from one person to another being told how beautiful they are (which they already know, of course!). You can even get an AKC Ther- apy Dog title to add to your dog’s regis- tered name (see the AKC’s website for more information). Other activities that Poms love and can readily be trained for include Obedience, Rally, Agil- ity, and even Earthdog, Nosework and Flyball. The fact that they love to run and play and to investigate the world around them makes them naturals for these events, most of which have AKC titles to add to your dog’s name, which is fun. You may have a B.A. (Bachelor of Arts), but your dog can come right back

with his C.D.X. (Companion Dog Excel- lent) and other titles. Training your dog for these activities will create a bond between the two of you that you will never forget. HEALTH Any breed (and any mixed breed dog as well) has a tendency toward some health issues. One of the most common problems for a Pomeranian is luxating patellas, or floating knee- caps. If you get your dog from a good breeder, one who is trying to eliminate problems in the breed, you will have less likelihood of having to deal with this issue, which can require specialist surgery. Poms need regular veterinary checkups and immunizations, as well as heartworm prevention. A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A POMERANIAN I open my eyes, stand up and stretch. Look around. Yes, the house is still here. I know this is my doing, since I have been ready through the night to hear an intruder and chase him away. Now, where’s my Mom? Still sleeping? “Hey, Mom, time to get up! I need to go out!” I go into the yard and see an intrud- er. “Squirrel! Go away!” He goes away. I’m good at that chase business. Oh, yes, potty time. “Mom! Let me back in, I’m hungry.” Ah, that was good. Get some lap time while Mom drinks her coffee. Oops, she’s getting up, guess I’ll take a nap. She’s getting out the leash! We’re going for a walk! Spin. Twirl. Bark. Good walk. Now it’s training time. Yes, I can sit—cookie! I can heel—cookie! I love training. Nap time again. Oh, now she’s getting out my special leash for visiting those people in wheel chairs. I love those people; they pet me and laugh and tell me about the dogs they used to have. I wish I lived with all of those people at once. And so it goes when you have a Pomeranian; it’s life at its best.

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