Showsight - March 2018

© DONNIE MEYERS

C H C H E V A L I E R S D U R O L A N D ’ S P U M P K I N P I E

© DONNIE MEYERS

C H C H E V A L I E R S D U R O L A N D ’ S P U M P K I N P I E

Pumpkin

PUMPKIN SWEEPS WINTER CIRCUIT IN ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD RING THANK YOU JUDGES ROBIN STANSELL AND ANNE MARIE TAYLOR. Handler: Jason Starr | Owner/Breeder: D. Michael Bitz, M.D., Esq.

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MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER AJ ARAPOVIC BIG DOG SHOWS CREATE BIG BUZZ

There’s been a growing understanding of the importance of large entry dog shows. Big shows receive the kind of media coverage that turns viewers into spectators, many of whom become purebred dog owners after just one visit to a show like Westminster, the National Dog Show or the AKC National Championship. These high visibility events are crucial to the well-being of the fancy. They foster competition and create the kind of buzz the sport of dogs so desperately needs. However, not every big show has a big advertising budget. Some clubs create a buzz by joining forces. The clusters that are being held this month in Louisville, KY, and York, PA, create a lot of excite- ment within these communities. They draw enormous entries and attract spectators by the thousands, many of whom may be unaware of our sport. How do we bring spectators to our shows in hopes that some will become purebred dog owners and, hopefully, show people? Well, I spend at least 30 to 40 hours on the phone each week with fanciers and this question gets asked quite a bit. The bottom line is that our shows need entries to go up and we need more people to join the fancy. So, let’s get back to basics and consider ways to help every club become more successful. The following ac- tion items have been created for your consideration by the staff of our marketing department who have combined

100+ years of experience. Build Brand Recognition

Reach out to local radio stations, podcasts, newspapers and TV stations. Introduce them to the sport of dogs, your show site and, most importantly, wow them with the numbers. For example: 1.3 million dogs are shown each year at AKC events; each weekend there are approximately 10 dog shows held nationwide; Westminster is the sec- ond-oldest sporting event held in the United States. Showcase Your Venue Send pictures and videos to your local media outlets and post them on social media pages. If your budget per- mits, contact Facebook to push your posts to everyone in your area. Costs will range from $25 to $500, depending on how strongly you want to push your message. Make Face-to-Face connections Connecting with your audience on a personal level has a big impact on their engagement. Spend time talking about your dog show with neighbors and discuss how your event generates revenue within the community. Print flyers with a short, friendly message that encourages families and friends to attend. These should be distributed throughout your community and plastered on the windows of small businesses. These important face-to-face con- nections have become rare in the virtual world and are much appreciated. Strengthen Your Community In addition to developing a connection with your organization, the people who attend your events can build rela- tionships with each other and strengthen the community. There’s power in attending an event to discover other people who support the same cause, follow the same blog, or cheer for a local team. Meeting like-minded individ- uals in person will also encourage more active engagement online. Build Trust This is an often-overlooked benefit. However, hosting events — especially for newly-formed organizations — shows that you’re the real-deal. Not only do you exist, but you have the means to host a local event attracts ex- hibitors from throughout the country! It doesn't matter how big or small the event is. All that matters is that folks are able to connect with your show and your mission. Fundraising Local businesses can join in and organize an event to raise funds for charity. Giving back to the community is a great way to raise awareness about an important cause while gaining some recognition for your organization too. Establish Thought Leadership Holding a seminar or hosting a meet-and-greet for dog lovers in your area will provide value to your community and help to establish your club as an important resource. Have fun What could be better than seeing people in your community coming together to have a great time? People will be sure to enjoy themselves at your event. After all, everyone who shows up loves dogs., right? They’ll thank your club for its hospitality by taking hundreds of pictures to post on their social media accounts. On the behalf of the ShowSight team, I’d like to thank you all for your support of our efforts to spread the good

news about purebred dogs and dog shows. I hope that you like all the changes we’ve made to our magazine starting with this issue. If you haven’t noticed, the page size is larger and the paper is thicker. We’ve also made some changes to our editorial and ad layouts, and we’ve added a few special features. Please help us to continue improving our publication by sharing your ideas and comments with us. We’ll look forward to hearing from you soon at a (big) dog show near you.

AJ Arapovic Publisher

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 16 FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 40 LINES FROM LINDA by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 50 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 52 BECOMING by Jaquelyn Fogel 72 DEGENERATIVE MYELOPATHY by Ana Paolo Diniz 84 THREE TALES OF AN IRISH ICON by Dan Sayers 114 KENNEL CLUB OF BEVERLY HILLS 120 CACIB SHOW: BELGIUM by Karl Donvil 129 EVERYONE’S A SPECTATOR AT WESTMINSTER by Dan Sayers 144 SURVEY SAYS 157 WESTMINSTER 2018 158 WESTMINSTER by GAIL MILLER BISHER 165 BETTY ANN STENMARK An interview with Westminster’s BIS judge 166 WESTMINSTER’S 142nd; MY 39TH by Joseph Neil McGinnis III 182 TAKE THE LEAD FUNDRAISER Photos by Susan Sprung & Tom Weigand 192 AKC MEET THE BREEDS® AT WESTMINSTER Photos by David Woo, AKC 202 MTB BEST BOOTH CONTEST 213 THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WORKING DOGS 245 IRELAND’S MAGNIFICENT BREEDS by Allan Reznik 262 LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 265 ADVERTISING RATES 266 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION by Daniel Cartier 270 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Hanifa Arapovic Vice President

Michael Veras COO

Samantha Adkins Advertiser Relations

Daniel J. Cartier Web/Distribuution

Linda Ayers Turner Knorr Contributing Editor

BJ Andrews Contributing Editor

Arlene Czech Contributing Editor

Jacquelyn Fogel Contributing Editor

Allan Reznik Contributing Editor

Dan Sayers Contributing Editor

Telephone: 512 686 3466 info@aramediagrp.com subscriptions@aramediagrp.com

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The edi- tor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

Brian Cordova Advertising

Tammy Gincel Advertising

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SHOWSIGHT Joseph Neil McGinnis III FROM THE EXECTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

IN LIKE A LION... The old proverb about the month of March hasn’t ever meant much to me. It’s been accredited to several sources and its meaning isn’t quite clear. Some say it refers to astrological signs in force at the month’s start and end. Others say that if the weather’s blustery on the first, it’ll be springtime and flow- ery on the last. (And almost all say that the reverse holds, too.) Like I said, I never cared because I’m much too busy in March to heed such dumb predictions. There’s St. Patrick’s Day which, given my last name, has import; there’s St. Joseph’s Day which, given my first name certainly has a direct correlation to my daily demeanor anyways, and there’s my birthday, this year such a ponderous pair of digits that for the first time in my life I refuse to reveal their total. In any case, “out like a lamb” holds no interest to me. Everything I do, and we do here, is full-speed ahead, and onward and upward.

Always, also, in March we have numerous exciting shows. Claiming top headlines every year is the Kentuck- iana Circuit with its enormous entries and marathon schedule. We’ll have full coverage of it and other events in Apri,, but I predict another record-setting month. We’ve seen many changes in this top-draw cluster and it never shows signs of anything but positive growth. You’ll also see, as you gaze through ShowSight ’s March Issue, some subtle and not-so-subtlle changes we’ve adopted. Many are really quite trendsetting and all are for the continued improvement of what we feel is dogdom’s finest publication. This team is determined to provide the very best to our fellow dog fanciers on a monthly basis in the publication you hold in your hand or you view on your digital device. Our distribution’s wider than ever and our dedication to our goal has never been stronger. Drop us a line, give us a call, grab us at a show; we welcome your thoughts and your suggestions; we’re always open to input and it’s also a great excuse to spend time, one on one, with you. One thing that’s kind of fun this month is the custom portraits we’re now using for our great staff. This is an idea I concocted way back and never found a practical plan for its implementation. Enter AJ’s discovery, the tal- ented Inesa Balic-Klicic who brought the idea to fruition. We thank her for her amazing work, although I’m told the reason my own picture was the last to be completed is that she kept running out of ink when trying to draw my entire nose. You also see, in this issue, the first in a series of inter- national visits in which we explore foreign countries’ contributions to the sport as a whole and to our blood- stock in particular. This month we celebrate Ireland, the timing of which of course was planned, and our goal is to have the magazine hit the street on St. Patrick’s Day. Regardless, the entertainment and educational value of the feature will be valid year round. Next month we go south of the border to take a look at Latin America. But first and foremost we’re an American magazine and our main content will always be domestic. We’re not only saluting the sport here in the States, we’re fighting

for its health and for a really strong future for that which we know so well and love. We’ll never stray from this, our original goal. Now over twenty-five years since in- ception, ShowSight is still working full time to ensure that you will be able to breed and show your dogs with legal protection and the legacy handed down to us through the ages from fanciers past. Speaking of which, I wanted to share one of my fa- vorite poems with you, created by the uber-accom- plished Morgan Dennis (1892—1960) whose illustrations are extremely well known but whose written work might be less so. Following is a portion, germane to this month and a treat to read: THE IRISH SETTER SPEAKS I’m typically Irish and devil-may-care, I’m wonderfully gentle and company rare— And if you are skeptical, take a good look At the chapter on me in the Kennel Club Book. You’ll learn as a bird dog I cannot be beat, That once you’ve trained me you needn’t repeat Your teachings, that I am the kind who stays taught, Unlike certain canines whose I.Q. is naught. No gun dog is better in country that’s rough, I’m quick on my feet and not easy to bluff, I’m good in the open, I’m good in the briers— In short I’m the type a real hunter requires. So it it’s a bird dog you’re needin’, just buy me And you’ll be delighted the first time you try me. —Morgan Dennis Ah, what pleasure this world we’re in brings to us on a daily basis. From our friends, and our shows, to our dogs by our sides we are so so lucky. In fact, one might say dog people enjoy the Luck of the Irish. Top of the day to you. Today and every day, ShowSight Magazine wishes you All The Best.

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HITTING HIS STRIDE! Vega has grabbed the attention of judges and the fancy, gathering MBISS and multiple group wins and placements in the first weeks of 2018. We look forward to what the rest of this exciting year brings.

Photo by Colton O’Shea • Ad design by Avatar

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ch. lakeridge atalanta who’s your daddy

Owned by Lakeridge · Debbie Ferguson-Jones & Atalanta · Tony and Martin Sosnoff Presented by Olivia Hodgkinson & Conor McFadden S how S ight M agazine , M arch 2018 • 19

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On a winning streak first 12 SHOWS OUT 12 BEST OF BREEDS owned by Joanne Schottinger, Tina & John Bailey bred by Tina & John Bailey handled by Ron Mattson

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A Team to Watch in 2018! Rocco and Ron

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M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W | M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

D I K E R D A C H S L U C K Y ’ S B R I G H T S H I N I N G S T A R Bronze Grand Champion

W E S T M I N S T E R K E N N E L C L U B 2 0 1 8 B O S W I N N E R thank you M R . E D D E . B I V I N

owned by VALERIE DIKER | AKC BREEDER OF MERIT | DIKERDACHS KENNEL | NEW YORK, NY VISIT US AT WWW.DIKERDACHS.COM

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TopTen LONG H A I R E D DAC H S H U N D *

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 1/31/18

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/18

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© A L E X I S D I T LOW

G C H S P O U C H C O V E ’ S L I V I N ’ O N A P R AY E R 2 0 1 7 NCA SHOW B I TCH OF THE YEAR

TOP 20 & TOP SHOW BITCH FOR 2017 ! * NEWFOUNDLAND CLUB OF AMERICA # 3 OVERALL & # 1 FEMALE 2017 AKC GRAND CHAMPIONSHIP * # 10 OVERALL & # 2 FEMALE NEWFOUNDLAND ALL BREED FOR 2017 **

©CARLA VIGGIANO

* A KC G C H S TAT S A S O F 1 2 / 3 1 / 1 7 * * S H OWS I G H T A L L B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 1 2 / 3 1 / 1 7

OWN E D B Y M A R K & WE N DY K E Y S E R & C H R I S T I N E L A MU R AG L I A B R E D B Y C H R I S T I N E L A MU R AG L I A & P E G GY H E L M I N G E X C LU S I V E LY H A N D L E D B Y A L E X I S D I T LOW

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M A R L Y N K E N N E L S P R O U D L Y P R E S E N T S . . .

CHAMPION LUNN ' S XTRAORDINARE OF MARLYN

THE XMAN! T H E R E ’ S A N E W M A N I N T O W N :

O U R S I N C E R E A P P R E C I A T I O N T O

JUDGE MR. CHARLES TROTTER FOR RECOGNIZING ALSTON IN AN OUTSTANDING LINE UP OF SPORTING DOGS!

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Alston

Owned by MARILYN D. TITLE & CAROLYN MCKENZIE Bred by KRISTA A. MUSIL | Presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D (410) 822-2187

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Lines From Linda

Breaking News from Louisville BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

“S pring Fever” is on the way! If you haven’t caught it

yet, when you drive past the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center’s magnificent bloom- ing ornamental pear trees into the entrance of the Kentucki- ana Cluster Dog Shows it will surely hit you! A side effect of “Spring Fever” disease is “March Madness”. The combi- nation of both in addition to being surrounded by thousands of “AKC Addicts” will produce a state of euphoria. Medical experts advise that the disease only worsens with the accumulation of colored ribbons, especially those in com- binations of purple and gold and red, white and blue. Know- ing the great number of you who will be affected, I can only wish you the best! Long known for being among of the most exciting clusters of the year, the Mid Kentucky Kennel Club, Louisville Kennel Club and the Evansville Kennel Club joined by the Greater Louisville Training Club join forces to include many of our sport’s most popular events! With the backdrop of a city filled with legendary sites such as Churchill Downs, their success is guaranteed. AKC Executive Vice President Doug Ljungren’s team con- tinues to work to enhance our sport’s many events. The lat- est changes and items passed by our AKC Board of Directors have been announced by Bri Tesarz, AKC Event Operations Program Manager. Please take the time to read what’s next. TWO SHOWS IN ONE DAY— MANAGING SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS The Board has approved a change to this policy that makes approval of future events held in this format contingent on successful management of any offered special attractions. Clubs offering two shows in one day should be aware of how special attractions will impact their schedule. Unnecessary delays to the regular show or special attraction or the same regular and NOHS groups conflicting would be considered mismanagement of the event. The complete policy can be viewed here: http://www.akc.org/rules/policy-manual/ policy-manual-shows/. NOHS POINTS AT NATIONAL SPECIALTY Effective October 11, 2018 (the start of the new NOHS Qualifying Period), NOHS Best of Breed/Variety awarded at the National Specialty will earn 10 points. This is a change that gives this win more prestige than a win at any other spe- cialty event throughout the year. CHANGES TO EVENING SPECIALTY POLICY Changes to this policy allow clubs more flexibility in hav- ing a specialty after an all-breed/group club’s event. Effec- tive March 1, 2018, clubs hosting an evening specialty are limited to 50 entries per ring per judge provided the rings are run concurrently. The full policy can be viewed here: http://www.akc.org/rules/policy-manual/policy-manual- shows/. Should you have any questions, email eventnews@ akc.org .

Bri Tesarz, AKC Event Operations Manager Dog Show Rules & Programs, assisted by “Ember”, her Portuguese Water Dog, Rough Seas’ Midsummer Bonfire at Gablynn BN RN CGC TKA WWD..

“A SIDE EFFECT OF ‘SPRING FEVER’ DISEASE IS ‘MARCH MADNESS’. THE COMBINATION OF BOTH IN ADDITION TO BEING SURROUNDED BY THOUSANDS OF ‘AKC ADDICTS’ WILL PRODUCE A STATE OF EUPHORIA.”

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Lines From Linda: Breaking News from Louisville BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FEE RETENTION

The Board approved a change to the percentage of the entry fee a club can retain from sweepstakes. Club will be allowed to retain up to 50% of the sweepstakes entry fee in order to cov- er their expenses associated with the sweepstakes classes. Also this month are our super charged AKC Board elections! There is a buzz in the air as the candidates offer very different options for the Delegates. No matter who your own personal favorites may be, we owe a great deal of debt to these ladies and gentlemen who are running for these important positions. Each of them shares a passion for our American Kennel Club and it’s future. Once they are elected, it remains our responsibility to communicate with them and do our part to help them suc- ceed in achieving their goals of grow- ing a passion for Purebred Dogs! Two amazing personalities of the Dog World celebrate in a big way this month. Happy Birthday to Judy Coo- per! And after recovering from his very big fall, our legendary Clint Harris (last seen driving around in his Jaguar) will be on hand to enjoy the Kentucka- nia shows! Now that’s breaking news from Louisville!

Happy Birthday to Judy Cooper! Judy and Linda at Churchill Downs

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BEST IN SHOW STOPPER.

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© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2018. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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C J ’ S SWEE T GEORG I A B ROWN G R A N D C H A M P I O N

Our sincere apprecaition to JUDGE MR. JOHN WADE FOR THIS GROUP PLACEMENT

GEORGIA

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owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN

bred by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY

presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D (410) 822-2187

Many thanks to JUDGE MR. DAVID R. MILLER FOR RECOGNIZING GEORGIA WITH THIS GROUP HONOR!

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SKYEHIGH’S MI SS HYPERION

H O O S I E R K E N N E L C L U B R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW

U N D E R J U D G E B A R B A R A D E M P S E Y A L D E R M A N , C E N T R A L I N D I A N A G R O U P 2 J O N C O L E | G R O U P 2 B A R B A R A D E M S P E Y - A L D E R M A N G R O U P 4 DA N A C L I N E

©Christina Freitag 2017

B R E D & OWN E D B Y C E L S O MO L LO & L I N DY B A R R OW, L I N DY@ S K Y E H I G H . C A

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SELENE

B E S T O F O P P O S I T E S E X W E S T M I N S T E R K E N N E L C L U B

T H A N K YO U J U D G E R O S E M A R Y S H O R E M A N F O R AWA R D I N G T H I S V E R Y T Y P E Y B I T C H B O S AT S U C H A P R E S T I G I O U S E V E N T

H A N D L E D B Y C O U R T N E Y K N I O L A

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EXC I T I NG START TO THE NEW YEAR !

G R A N D C H AM P I O N MONAMOUR’S my favorite

TOKIO IS OWNED BY MARILYN D. TITLE & CAROLYN MCKENZIE | BRED BY KAO MIICHI PRESENTED BY GREG STRONG | AKC REG’D | (410) 822-2187

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OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION TO JUDGE MRS. GLORIA GERINGER FOR AWARDING TOKIO THIS EXCITING GROUP 1 LEADING TO RESERVE BEST IN SHOW UNDER JUDGE MS. BARBARA PEPPER.

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On The Line

Probiotics For Your Dog? BY BJ ANDREWS

N o, I’m not kid- ding. If you want a healthy produc- er and show dog in tip-top glossy condition, you need to know the importance of live probiotics which carni- vores would naturally get from the intestines and stomach of their prey. Modern day dogs, lacking real probiotics, often eat dirt, feces, stools, grass or certain

You probably know this but just in case, take note. Probi- otics are killed by anti-biotics. They can also be wiped out by other drug therapies, colonics (enemas) or even a bad case of diarrhea. It is important to quickly replace them in the diet. Gail kresky cresci, Ph.D, a gastroenterology researcher at Cleveland Clinic Children’s Division, stresses the importance of prebiotics (called long-chain carbohydrates) as food for good gut bacteria. In other words, lots of prebiotics equal happy probiotics. Bananas are an excellent source of prebiotics that dogs seem to naturally like. (1) You may remember the top-win- ning Bulldog handled by Carroll James? He baited for banan- as… Hard on the handler but like any good dog-man, Carroll kept his charge happy in the ring. Dogs will also eat asparagus and garlic will do them no harm. Onions are out of favor for dogs but my dog-stew always contained onions. Raw carrots, berries and apples are a great source of prebiotics and I never met a naturally-reared dog that wouldn’t sample them. Bite-size apple pieces are one of my dog’s favorite treats. So are grapes but after the “poison grapes” scare, I do wash them because like most of today’s fruits and vegetables, grapes are over-sprayed with poison and unlike apples, potatoes, oranges, etc. we don’t peel away the protective “skin” on grapes. Can you get probiotics from supplements? Well of course you can but be sure they are the real thing. For you or your dog, it’s best to skip the flavored yogurt which usually con- tains high amounts of sugar, which causes inflammation. While there’s no set amount for a daily dose of probiot- ics for you or your dog, a happy target is at least 1 billion with a “b”. It has been suggested that since your dog has a comparatively shorter digestive tract, the good bacteria may not survive the trip from the stomach to the colon so if you’d rather give a pill than feed the real stuff, it is best to use a time-release capsule.Lastly, I should mention gas, unpleasant in people and a significant risk in large breeds. I’ve covered why big breeds are more prone to bloat—type “TheDogPress bloat gastric torsion” in your search engine. Oh, and for more on bananas, query “TheDogPlace bananas mood food.” Your dog’s gonna thank you!

plants. If your dog has developed yucky dietary cravings, check your current dog food ingredients and consider chang- ing his diet. What’s the difference between probiotics and prebiotics? I knew you’d ask. Probiotics are “good” bacteria that eat up bad bacteria and keep the gut healthy. Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohy- drates that serve as food for probiotics. Premium pet food brands usually list probiotics. If in doubt, check their website to be sure the probiotics are live. Either way, it is perfectly safe for you to provide natural pre- biotics. One practical, highly nutritious way is with yogurt and buttermilk which contain both probiotics and prebiotics. Most dogs will readily lap these up (real) yogurt and butter- milk because they “know” what’s good for them. The fermenting process produces the same gut-healthy bacteria. Now you know why people eat fermented foods like sauerkraut, kefir and kimchi. Your dog will reject those sour-tasting foods but he will eat “cultured” yogurt and buttermilk. So why are probiotics important? Once again, when you or your dog consume probiotics the intestines turn it into good bacteria that eats up the bad bacteria. Really! The beneficial bacteria helps with digestion but they also manufacture nutri- ents. In both people and pets (1) good bacteria help protect against food-borne pathogens and get this, they can help reg- ulate body weight. Right. In you and your dog. “BANANAS ARE AN EXCELLENT SOURCE OF PREBIOTICS THAT DOGS SEEM TO NATURALLY LIKE.”

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 2/15/18

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Becoming BY JACQUELYN FOGEL Discovering Westminster 2018

This was another terrific year at Westminster! I love this show and everything that goes on around it. It certainly doesn’t hurt that the show takes place in my very favorite big city, New York. This year I discovered, or re-discov- ered some really great things about this week of events that I’d like to share.

tell. It was hard coming up with placements – a lot like judging a class of 150 great dogs – hard but gratifying. All deserved recognition. It was most wonderful to see the thousands of spectators who were jammed into the two buildings eager to meet our pure bred dogs and their breeders. New Yorkers love their dogs – and pure bred breeders put on a marvelous show for their audience. I discovered that spending an extra day in New York after the Big Show can be really relaxing and fun! I trav- eled out with my husband and another couple who all love the theater, so we decided to spend Valentine’s Day in the City instead of in airports and shuttle buses. We spent the day eating a late breakfast and going to see ‘Dear Evan Hansen,’ a super musical that was available relatively inexpensively because it was a Wednesday matinee. Then we walked around mid-town, had a leisurely dinner with our Valentines, got to be early, and made it to the airport early for an uneventful trip home one day later than usual. We have been going to Westminster almost every year since 2000, and we keep extending our stay. Now we come in on Thursday to make sure we get to at least a Friday show and a Sunday matinee. And this year we extended our stay an extra day. We’re up to a full week now, and even that time goes way too fast. I don’t think seeing four shows is too much, though I must admit I’ve become a Broadway snob, and don’t enjoy local productions near as much as the deep talent found in New York. This year the limited engage- ment of John Leguizamo’s ‘Latin History for Morons’ was especially fun. I was fortunate to be sitting with dear friend Celeste Gonzales who filled me in on a lot of the Spanish translations that Mr Leguizamo left out of his bril- liant one-man show. Thanks to her, I now know some really cool Spanish words that probably don’t show up in dictionaries. I have re-discovered that the people I admire most in this sport are the people who know how to lose and win graciously. They are excited for their placements, even if there is some disappointment that it wasn’t higher. They say nice things about many of their their competitors – at least the ones they are willing to talk about – and they don’t slam anybody ringside. If there are people they don’t admire, you don’t know it by talking to them ring- side. I watched standard poodles, and the competition was remarkably intense, but when the judging was over, they all acted like adults who were happy to be there. Nobody wants to lose with a dog that you just spent 5+ hours putting up, but all of the poodle people I spoke to were pleasant and composed. They all had a long-term philosophical view of the day’s events, and they came away loving their dogs whether or not they won the top honor. The competition was nail-biting drama up until the very end, and I loved every minute of it. >

I have re-discovered that I can observe class judging with friends and other judges, and disagree on placements. These discus- sions can be enlightening and fun as long as the peo- ple involved don’t get angry, and we rarely do. It’s easiest in breeds we

don’t have a joint vested interest in, but it’s possible in all breeds, even the ones we really, really, really care about. No, we are not even close to coming to blows. We were, however, at times animated and intense while talking about the things we were seeing, and the respect among us was palpable. I have been a student of hounds for more than 45 years, and there is still a lot I don’t know. I learned so much from some long-time sight hound judges I sat with, and my respect for them just soared. Talking with long-term successful dog people is like being in a state of Nirvana for me, and Westminster is the place to do it because it brings dogs and fanciers from all over the country together. I continue to discover that watching the Group judg- ing at the Garden is better than watching it on a TV, even if the TV screen is really big. I found myself watching both the actual dogs on the floor, and the jumbotron at the Garden. If there was ever a doubt about what we were seeing, we found it best to watch the actual dog. The jumbotron offered a different perspective, and it was nice when the judging was not on the same end of the arena as our seats, but it is not a replacement for observ- ing the actual dogs. The TV angle doesn’t give you the whole picture that you see when you watch the actual dog and handler. I am eternally grateful that we were invited to sit with Joe McGinnis in his Showsight box. But even in the nosebleed seats I still like to see the show live. It’s like seeing baseball on TV versus at the stadium. I like seeing the whole thing as it’s happening. I discovered that I loved judging the Meet-The Breeds booths! I cannot begin to convey the awe I felt as we went around the two buildings looking at all of the booths staffed entirely with volunteers in all of the AKC breeds. There were hundreds of beautiful, educational booths, and many hundreds of volunteers willing to talk to anybody about their purposeful, well-bred dogs. Some had volunteers that went into the audience and pulled you in to meet “Fluffy”, and some that had so many breed-related facts it made my head swim. Some had huge, wonderful photos of their breed in action, and some had the cutest costumes you can imagine. All rep- resented the breeds well, and it was delightful to see the public get pulled into the stories these volunteers had to

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 1/31/18

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Becoming: DiscoveringWestminster 2018

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

Over the years she always wished us well as we left for New York. She watched us on TV – both the streaming breed video and the Group broadcasting. She was one of the first to congratulate or console. This year Becca made her dream of attending the show in person come true. She brought her fiancé along, and they did a whirlwind tour of some of New York’s best spots – including the World Trade Center Memorial, Central Park, and the Westminster Dog Show. She had heard my stories over the years, and finally got to experience this week for her- self. I am pleased to report that she was thrilled beyond all expectation, and her FaceBook posts verify and chron- icle her adventures. I had no idea how deeply she was affected by my annual trek, but I am so glad we always came back with a positive attitude and great stories to share. Though I know Becca and her two labs will prob- ably never be entered in the show, it is so gratifying to see that our experiences inspired her so much. I hope she continues to come back, and maybe bring even more friends with her. Finally, I am discovering that it’s time to get serious about passing the mantel to the next generation of great breeders. As I see more young breeders and handlers entering the ring at Westminster, I realize how important this is. I still have a few years of breeding left in me, but I must pass along both my knowledge and passion if my breeding program is to survive. I am discovering what a monumental responsibility this is. People new to a breed often have passion, but they typically lack the ability to evaluate dogs objectively, or the patience to do the pedi- gree and health research that must be done to build and establish a great bloodline. I don’t want the breeders I mentor to become kennel blind, and I want them to understand the difference between good, really good, and great dogs. That takes time and developing an eye for great dogs not just in one breed, but in many. I want to teach them how to breed, and how to select puppies, and how and when to trust their developing instincts. I am blessed to have a couple of young breeders who want to start the journey in bedlingtons, but I am afraid I will have to trust other good breeders to pass the mantel in bassets. I am also discovering how rejuvenating this process can be. Now I just need to find the energy to keep up. They all have Westminsters of their own to work toward and discover. n Jackie Fogel got her first purebred basset in 1969, but her real education in the world of AKC dogs and shows start- ed in 1979 when she moved to Wisconsin and whelped her first home-bred champion. In 1995 Jackie got a bedlington terrier from David Ramsey of the famous Willow Wind line. She has bred and shown numerous #1 bedlingtons, and continues to actively breed both bassets and bedlingtons. In 2007 Jackie began judging, and is approved to judge 6 breeds. She owns and manages Cedar Creek Pet Resort, and is active in the Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, Keep Your Pets, Inc., (a non-profit she founded), and the local Rotary club. Jackie writes for ShowSight Magazine, the basset column in the Gazette, and a pet column in a local magazine.

I discovered that no matter how often you wash your hands, it’s still possible to catch a bad cold. I have also learned that I am unwilling to give up on hugs in a vain attempt to limit exposure to germs and viruses. Many of the people I spent time with in New York came down with the Westminster crud this year. It was a nasty respi- ratory disease, and it is taking a long time from which to recover. It could well have been the plane travel that caused so many people to get sick. Air travel is certainly full of perils these days. But whatever caused it, it is not enough to deter me from going again. I don’t want to miss any of the excitement of this time in New York I rediscovered that sharing a great dinner with dog show friends is one of my greatest rewards for being a part of this culture. Nothing can replace the laughter at inside jokes and the super camaraderie we have when we share a meal at a fabulous New York restaurant. Even when we spend the day doing different things, that evening meal together is heavenly. The worries of the day disappear, and only the friendships remain as important. We have also discovered the joys of finding New York restaurants that are delicious and won’t break the bank. I am happy to share our favorites with anybody who is looking for a recommendation! Unfortunately I have also rediscovered that the depths of jealousy know no bounds, and social media only makes things worse. This year I was fortunate to win BOB with a bedlington. Both my dog’s handler and I made a stupid mistake and did not turn in our media card, each thinking the other had done so. That means the TV announcer Gail Bischer, had a blank paper in front of her when the dog went on the table. Thankfully, Westminster is staffed with super professionals who did a little background checking and found out that my dog had also won BOB at Montgomery County in 2017. That was the only fact she had to fill 30 seconds of airtime. Since the bedlington is a terrier, Gail talked about the wonderful Montgomery County Terrier show where many terriers host Nationals. However, because bedlingtons did not host our 2017 National there, two members of the Bedlington Terrier Club of America board of directors took the opportunity to publicly call my handler and I liars and reputation embellishers. Texts on my phone were coming in fast and furiously Tuesday night as their FaceBook postings started going viral, correcting our “lies” with win pictures of the real 2017 National winner, and rancorous remarks about both of us. Even when I tried to tell them it was a simple mistake, they would have none of it and dredged up even more falsified “facts” to back up their assertion that this was all planned in advance. I nearly let it destroy my extra day in New York – but decided I was not going to let this incident ruin our Valentine’s Day for the people with whom was I travelling. There would be time later to correct the false assertions and innuendos. I discovered that sometimes the dreams you instill in others take a few years to come to fruition, and they are always worth the effort. Several years ago a young lady worked for me as a receptionist/bather and all-around great kennel employee. Becca started when she was in high school and stayed with me until she graduated with her Associate Degree as a medical technician. She loved the dogs so much that she even taught herself how to groom a bedlington in a really nice pet trim. Now that Becca is working full-time for a premier Milwaukee hos- pital, she has the resources to do a lot of things that were beyond her financial reach while she was still in school.

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS 2017 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS 2017

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BEST IN SHOW

gold grand champion BO-BETT ’S FAVORITE PICK

BRED & CO-OWNED BY Carol Harris

OWNED BY Deborah Bahm

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY Ashlie Whitmore

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Photo by Melia

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 1/31/18

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Deauville Fairytale Briards present

Thank you Judge Dr. CarolWhite-Moser for awarding Deauville

GCH. Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene

owned & loved by Odile Smith

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, (410) 822-2187

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Multiple B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y & B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

o w n e d b y A N N A M A R I E Y U R A b r e d & c o - o w n e d b y R AY H A R R I N G TO N e x c l u s i v e l y p r e s e n t e d b y J A M E S B E T T I S

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WILLY Gold Grand Champion D U N H I L L W I L L I A M ©Holloway 2017 S how S ight M agazine , M arch 2018 • 65

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*S how S ight all breed StatS aS of 1/31/18

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S H E C A N D O I T. . .

# 4 BEAGLE ALL BREED * . . . A N D S H E I S DO I N G I T

T H A N K YO U FAMO U S HO U N D J U D G E G E N E B L A K E .

RO S I E E A R N E D H E R B RO N Z E G R A N D C H AM P I O N S H I P AT W E S TM I N S T E R T H I S Y E A R . T H A N K YO U HO U N D J U D G E PAM E L A B RU C E .

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B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N L A N BU R ’ S S I MP LY R I V E T I N G Owned by: ELIZABETH SOHNLE Bred by: JON WOODRING Handled by: JERI EL DISSI

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 1/31/18

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OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS BONNIE WAGAMAN DEBORAH CAYWOOD BRED BY

BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS & NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/18 **DN STATS AS OF 1/31/18

THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO MADE THIS POSSIBLE. WORKING DOG ** # 3

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BOXER ALL BREED * # 1

ALL BREEDS * # 11

G C H G C I N N I B O N ’ S B E D R O C K B OM B S H E L L

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DEGENERATIVE MYELOPATHY by ANA PAOLA DINIZ

D egenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a slowly progres- sive spinal cord disorder that resembles Amyo- trophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) in people. The inevitable result for dogs with DM is paraplegia. DM affects primarily older dogs, with symptoms typically beginning at eight years of age or older. Back in the day (when I was just a pup) we referred to this disease as German Shepherd Myelopathy because we thought it was unique to this breed. We now know that DM occurs in many purebred and mixed breed dogs. The breeds most commonly affected include the German Shepherd, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Boxer, Borzoi, Rhodesian Ridge- back, American Eskimo Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, Golden Retriever, Great Pyrenees, Kerry Blue Terrier, Poodle, Pug, Shetland Sheepdog, Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, Wire Fox Terrier and Chesapeake Bay Retriever. DM symptoms progress slowly over the course of months to even years. From beginning to end, DM affected dogs typically remain alert and animat- ed. The symptoms typically progress as follows: INITIAL • Loss of coordination (ataxia) in the hind legs • Dragging the hind feet causing wearing down of the toenails. • Hind end weakness (difficulty climbing stairs, jumping up into the car, going for walks) INTERMEDIATE • Knuckling of hind feet (weight bear- ing on the tops of the feet rather than their undersides) • Difficulty supporting weight with hind legs • Inability to walk without support • Urinary and/or fecal incontinence ADVANCED • Paraplegia (paralysis of hind legs). • Weakness in front legs. Although this degenerative process is not painful, affected dogs can devel- op discomfort because of overuse of other body parts attempting to compen- sate for the hind end weakness.

DM causes degenerative changes within spinal cord axons, structures that transmit information back and forth between the brain and the rest of the body. These degenerative changes begin in the thoracolumbar region of the spinal cord, the portion that lines up with the end of the rib cage. This explains why the hind limbs are more severely affected. Given enough time, the disease progresses toward the head end of the body, causing loss of front leg function as well. DM is an inherited disease. In 2008 a group of researchers reported through Texas A&M University that a genetic mutation on the SOD1 gene is a major risk factor for the development of DM. Their study involved Boxers, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, German Shepherds, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers and Rhode- sian Ridgebacks. The researchers discovered that DM has a recessive mode of inheritance. In order for a dog to be affected, the mutation must be inherited from both dam and sire. What remains unknown is why some dogs who have this “dou- ble mutation” never develop symptoms of DM. Testing is available to determine an individual dog’s SOD1 mutation status.

This test is available through the Ortho- pedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). All that is required is a blood sample or cheek swab. This DNA test identifies dogs that are normal (have two normal copies of the gene), those who are carriers (have one normal copy of the gene and one mutated copy), and those who are at risk for development of DM (have two mutated copies of the gene). It is impor- tant to remember that DNA testing does not diagnose DM. This is because not all dogs with two mutated copies of the gene go on to develop DM. Responsible breeders utilize DNA testing for DM to help assess whether or not a particular dog is suitable for breeding purposes. If contemplating purchasing a pup of an at-risk breed, it is important to request DM test results for the dam and sire of the litter of inter- est. It is also reasonable to have the pup- py tested prior to purchase, although, if the parents have been tested and have “normal” results, this is unnecessary. DM is a “rule out diagnosis”. What this means is that a presumptive diag- nosis can only be made by ruling out other causes of spinal cord disease (e.g., herniated intervertebral disk, tumor, infection, trauma). The only way to

“DM SYMPTOMS PROGRESS SLOWLY OVER THE COURSE OF MONTHS TO EVEN YEARS. FROM BEGINNING TO END, DM AFFECTED

DOGS TYPICALLY REMAIN ALERT AND ANIMATED.”

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RUMMER RUN’S OLYMPIC SLAM DUNK

GRAND CHAMPION

RUMMER RUN OWNERS STEVE & ANN ANDERSON HANDLER RICK JUSTICE PHOTO BY ©ALEXANDRA GAV

LAKELAND WINTERHAVEN KENNEL CLUB, FEBRUARY 2018

TWO GROUP ONES THANK YOU JUDGES MR. JOE PURKHISER AND MR. ROGER HARTINGER.

RESERVE BEST IN SHOW THANK YOU JUDGE PAULA HARTINGER.

GRAND CHAMPION

©ALEXANDRA GAV

%

% n/n 50.84% n/DM 38.33% DM/DM 10.83%

“WHEN SEARCHING THE INTERNET, ONE MIGHT FIND MANY APPROACHES THAT HAVE BEEN TRIED OR ARE RECOMMENDED. UNFORTUNATELY, THERE IS NO SCIENTIFIC

EVIDENCE THAT SUPPORTS THEIR EFFICACY.”

n/n

n/DM

DM/DM

definitively diagnose DM is via a spinal cord biopsy collected through an autop- sy (post-mortem) examination. The diagnostics performed to rule out other causes of spinal cord disease often include: • A thorough physical/neurological examination • Blood and urine testing • Advanced imaging (CT or MRI scan) • Spinal fluid collection and analysis The cause of spinal cord disease is best diagnosed by a veterinarian who specializes in neurology, internal medi- cine or surgery. Currently there is no known treat- ment capable of significantly alter- ing the course of DM. When search- ing the Internet, one might find many approaches that have been tried or are recommended. Unfortunately, there is no scientific evidence that supports their efficacy. Unfortunately, the prognosis for dogs with DM is poor. The quality of life for affected dogs can be enhanced through diligent nursing care, pre- vention of pressure sores, rehabilita- tion therapies such as swimming and stretching exercises, massage, acu- puncture, monitoring for urinary tract infections (immobilized dogs are more prone) and the use of specialized equip- ment such as booties, slings, harnesses and wheelchairs to assist with mobility. DM becomes so debilitating that most people eventually opt for eutha- nasia. Exactly when to euthanize is a

Malabo APD is a Brazilian kennel founded about ten years ago and it is taking a serious approach to manag- ing the diseases that affect our Rho- desian Ridgebacks. At Malabo APD Kennel we always target our health issues head on, and when something is identified we do our best to fix the issue. Because of this, we decided to check our 120 dogs. Our results are illustrated by the graphic above. As part of our approach, we are neu- tering our DM/DM dogs, which makes up 10.83% of our animals. This exam is not mandatory in the United States and we don’t have it avail- able in South America. However, we believe that we can encourage other facilities to take this same step towards eliminating this disease. We can’t allow breeding of n/DM x n/DM animals. This selection gives us 25% of probability of having DM/DM dogs. Breeding n/n X n/DM give us 50% of animals with n/DM genes and 50% n/n. The ideal situation is n/n X n/n, this way we can work this genetic issue out of our breeding program. Testing our animals is the only way to ensure that are working solely with healthy dogs and not spreading the problem. Having beautiful dogs is very impressive, but beauty at the cost of health is unacceptable. At Malabo APD, our main goal is to keep our animals healthy.

highly individualized decision based on how adaptive, both physically and psychologically, the involved dog and human(s) are. Some dogs thrive in a well-fitted doggie cart/wheelchair. Others are highly resistant to such an apparatus. For the human caretaker, in addition to the emotional toll that DM takes, there is a great deal of lift- ing, carrying and cleaning involved. Everyone responds differently to this challenging situation. Letting go of a beloved four-legged family member is never easy, but it can be particularly heartbreaking when DM is the cause. Affected dogs typically have good appetites, are pain-free and their minds remain just as sharp as ever. Letting go of a dog who acts or feels sick is usually a bit easier, simply because the process seems to make more sense. It so happens that, like dogs with DM, some people with ALS carry the SOD1 gene mutation*1. Having a canine model for studying ALS has important ramifications. Not only might more be learned about the degenerative process that afflicts people with ALS, the canine model may ultimately prove to be valu- able in terms of learning more about therapeutic interventions. RESOURCES: 1. “Genetics of ALS.” - The ALS Asso- ciation. ALS Association, n.d. Web. 07 Jan. 2015. <http://www.alsa.org/ research/about-als-research/genetics- of-als.html>.

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