Showsight - April 2018

G R A N D C H A M P I O N

R U M M E R R U N ' S OLYMPIC SLAM DUNK

OWN E R S S T E V E & A N N A N D E R S O N H A N D L E R R I C K J U S T I C E RUMMER RUN

PHOTOS BY ©ALEXANDRA GAV

AndersonIFC.indd 1

LAKELAND WINTERHAVEN KENNEL CLUB, FEBRUARY 2018

TWO GROUP ONES THANK YOU JUDGES MR. JOE PURKHISER AND MR. ROGER HARTINGER.

RESERVE BEST IN SHOW THANK YOU JUDGE PAULA HARTINGER.

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*DN STATS AS OF 2/28/18

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MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER

TOWARDS 2019 AND BEYOND As we look towards 2019 and beyond, we continue to transform ourselves and take on new challenges with the aim of creating a solid operating platform that can deliver consistent growth in the fancy. Although our operating environment is expected to change dramatically over the coming years, our overriding philosophy of placing our dog show family at the heart of everything we do will remain unchanged. Every day we are working hard to help make our existing dog family (you) happy. This is our first priority. Our second goal is to help the sport to grow by introducing it to people who can bring a positive energy and help our family grow. As a media company and publisher of a select group of dog show publications, including ShowSight, it is our duty to spread all the positive news about our sport and the people who dedicate their lives to dogs. We have and will continue to make investments to ensure that millions of dog lovers can learn more about purebred dogs and the things that breeders, owners and handlers sacrifice on a daily basis for the well-being of all dogs. Now that we are targeting dog lovers throughout all 50 states, our readership has risen dramatically. More people are becoming aware of the sport that we love! It’s been just a few months since we started using different media outlets to reach fanciers as well as those dog lovers who still aren’t a part of the fancy. We understand that we need to include more educational and motiva- tional material, so we’re having all-breed and breeder judges share important news and information with our readers. We’ve grown our editorial team too. This is why you’re seeing more contributing editors joining those who’ve been writing for us for many years. This month, we’ve added AKC Breeders of Merit Cathy and Mike Dugan, pure-bred dog breeders since 1987. Their Aviator Kennel has produced over 75 Dalmatian and more than 110 Portuguese Water Dog champions all over the world. Mike and Cathy bring everything that’s needed in our sport: Thoughtful articles that educate, make you smile and promote the fancy to millions of readers who may not yet be familiar with it. Starting this spring, one of the most exciting and important additions will be a feature that highlights our national specialties. On average, approximately 20 national specialties are held each month and every club will have an opportunity to be part of our magazine for that month — at no charge. Every breed recognized by the AKC will be offered a special section in our magazine to talk about their National. This will be a great opportunity to pro- mote individual breeds to judges, fellow exhibitors and to dog lovers who are looking to find that perfect addi- tion for their family. It is important that everyone is made aware when and where each National is taking place. We will rely on the parent clubs and show chairs to provide us with the correct information so that we may share tit with our readers. There is nothing more important to the future of purebred dogs than our national specialties where exhibitors travel hundreds or thousands of miles to connect with their friends, make new ones, compare breeding stock and simply celebrate their successes. For additional information and details, we strongly encour- age everyone to follow each breed’s publication and national parent club website. Some fanciers may ask why change is necessary? The answer is simple: We need to consider change for the health and welfare of the sport. People have been asking for this for a very long time. Remember, by leveraging our strengths and transforming ourselves from within, we can continue to take on new challenges that come our way. Some initiatives may not lead to concrete results in the short term, but we all must be personally committed to ensure that our contributions lead to success over the long term. To our clients and supporters, thank you for giving us this opportunity to serve you and everyone in the fancy. I feel proud and blessed for having your support. Always best, AJ ARAPOVIC • ARAMEDIA GROUP • CEO/PUBLISHER aj@aramediagrp.com MOBILE: 512-541-8128

TO SEE MORE OF SHOWSIGHT, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE At SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM FOLLOW AT www.instagram.com/showsight_dogshow https://www.facebook.com/ShowSight/ TO SEE OUR OTHER BRANDS AND SERVICES, PLEASE VISIT ARAMEDIAGRP.COM

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 14 FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 50 LINES FROM LINDA by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 60 BECOMING by Jaquelyn Fogel 66 LEAD BY EXAMPLE by Dan Sayers 84 SEVEN SECRETS TO SUCCESS by Mike & Cathy Dugan 90 LINDA’S LENS: COLLIE CLUB OF AMERICA by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 106 A FANCIER’S DREAM BECOMES A REALITY Malabo APD by Bel Drapier 132 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 138 PUP-LIC ART by Dan Sayers 144 SURVEY SAYS 120 CRUFTS! by Karl Donvil 170 BREED POPULARITY UPDATE 178 2018 LOW-ENTRY BREEDS 180 FROM ONE GARDEN TO ANOTHER... Garden City KS Cluster 180 AROUND THE RINGS IN PALM BEACH Palm Beach County Dog Fanciers Association 190 A MOMENT TO TREASURE Fanciers salute two respected peers 199 THE IMPORTANCE OF THE NATIONAL SPECIALTY

Hanifa Arapovic Vice President

Michael Veras COO

Samantha Adkins Advertiser Relations

Daniel J. Cartier Web/Distribuution

Linda Ayers Turner Knorr Contributing Editor

BJ Andrews Contributing Editor

204 UPCOMING SEMINARS 180 AROUND THE RINGS IN LOUISVILLE The Kentuckiana Cluster by Booth Photography 236 PANEL DISCUSSION: THE TOY GROUP 256 UPCOMING SHOWS IN LATIN AMERICA 260 THE PERUVIAN HAIRLESS DOG 266 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION by Daniel Cartier 265 ADVERTISING RATES 272 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Mike Dugan Contributing Editor

Cathy Dugan Contributing Editor

Arlene Czech Contributing Editor

Allan Reznik Contributing Editor

Dan Sayers Contributing Editor

Jacquelyn Fogel Contributing Editor

Telephone: 512 686 3466 info@aramediagrp.com subscriptions@aramediagrp.com

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The edi- tor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

Brian Cordova Advertising

Tammy Gincel Advertising

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MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER | GRAND CHAMPION Wonderland's Darby V Wolf Creek

#1 BITCH BREED*

#2 BITCH ALL BREED**

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/18

** SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/18

Breeders ED FERRELL & JOHN CONELY Owners JULIE TITTL & JULIA FOSTER-HESS (810) 625-5551 Handler JULIA FOSTER-HESS

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THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED OUR BEAUTIFUL GIRL.

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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SHOWSIGHT FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III

IT SEEMS LIKE ONLY YESTERDAY THAT I TURNED 65. Oh wait—it WAS only yesterday that I turned 65 . Well, I don’t know how you spent—or plan to spend—that landmark day, but I spent it, and the four before, at shows with the people I enjoy and the dogs I love. In fact, In the past six weeks I found myself happily immersed in the world that we celebrate here on a monthly basis. Or more exactly, daily. Our pride & joy, the issue that you hold in your hands each month, is available online around the clock so we’re always talking to, and grateful to hear from, fanciers around the world. And on a daily basis our team is working to put together the next edition and doing our best to top the last. ShowSight Magazine has a very tough Standard against which to be judged, one that we crafted ourselves out of our deep devotion to the sport and the dogs it protects. And of course producing a top quality product is always our goal; as breeders we tried, as exhibitors we aimed for the top, and as proud members of the dog press that is what we shoot for every single month. Or every single day—although we pro- duce this magazine in record time, don’t ever think it’s easy. This is a labor of love with a lot of labor involved.

But so is our entire sport, and that’s why our content each month is geared to drive us onward and upward in our quest to promote purebred dogs. Take for example this month: We have Linda Ayers Turner Knorr keeping an eye on developments at AKC, Daniel Cartier sharing photos of happy readers at dog shows around the coun- try, Dan Sayers giving a glimpse of canine influcence in civic art and architecture, Jackie Fogel reminding us that the Standard is (or should be) our Bible; BJ Andrews telling of the impact a canine can make on a household, Mike & Cathy Dugan sharing the secrets to success in the ring (and beyond), our international correspondent Karl Donvil takes us to Crufts, and I take us to four very different venues and very different events. We also have an illustrious panel of judges teaching us about the Toy Group, and many other offerings we know you’ll enjoy. Again this month ShowSight provides news and views you won’t find anywhere else. A hot topic this month, and not just among judges, is the new judging approval system which kicked into ef- fect 1/1. Although many changes were adopted, many remained the same, one being the educational opportu- nities available to prospective judges. They are in the form of Institutes, Seminars and Workshops. All are ex- tremely valuable to the people who will give out ribbons, the canines we hope to receive them, and the breeding programs they’ll affect. I had the pleasure of attending a Toy breeds series in Raleigh on the Tarheel Circuit and found it to range from illluminating to entertaining. I did not feel that one sec- ond of my time was wasted, which is a tribute to the pre- senters and to the promoters. I have to send a huge congratulations and thanks to the North Carolina Trian- gle Area Judges Education Group, and especially Celeste Gonzalez for a truly well-run and successful undertaking. As editor/publisher of dog magazines for 35 years, I’ve gotten to watch this facet of the fancy all through its in- fancy and development into the powerhouse tool we use today. But one of the things I’ve heard quite often, not just this time but for many years, is that on occasion parent

clubs are less than cooperative with sponsoring groups. Providing materials and manpower by which to instruct the people to whom we’re entrusting our dogs’ reputa- tions and our breeds’ future seems to me a primary re- sponsibility of a Club. My hat is off to those whose hard work and dedication I was lucky enough to witness. We’re going to be addressing this subject more in the months to come. In the month that just passed I enjoyed a whirlwind of doggie activity and at each eventI experienced some- thing uplifting and gratifying.. My first stop after the Gar- den was a Garden of another type: Garden City Kansas KC. Hosted in the middle of the Plains, GCKKC is testi- mony to the dedication of its members; the club is small and the city for which its named is but twenty-seven thousand people—and the closest major city is Wichita, over two-hundred miles away—yet each year their three- day cluster is a success. Numbers aren’t huge although I was surprised to see thirty-one Boxers and twenty-eight Rhodesian Ridgebacks, but judges agreed that the entry reflected quality if not quantity. Educational opportuni- ties for exhibitors and spectators were availble as well, including a discussion of Canine Terminology moderated by a panel of the event’s judges. Show Chair Odebt Massey, also a noted artist in addition to being a success- ful long-term breeder is justly proud of her club and her team which includes her husband Bill, a noted musician and excellent steward. The show was relaxing and enoy- able and gave ample opportunity to really study the dogs. There was also a kindliness and light-hearted air that permeated the entire weekend. I’d go back. In fact, I plan to. You should, too. I mentioned that everyone I met during this trip was not only upbeat and friendly, but there was one en- counter that sticks out in my memory. Tossing my lug- gage into a car at 4:45am I was still, I admit, half asleep. As the car neared the end of the hotel’s drive, in the rearview mirror a figure appeared, running and waving his arms. Well, one of his arms, anyways. In the other was my carry-on with my Ipad, laptop, and two cell phones which I’d inadvertently left near the lobby >p38

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Siba G C H S T O N E R U N A F T E R N O O N T E A

Reserve Best in Show, Specialty Best in Show and Multiple Group Winning. TIME FOR TEA…

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA raincliffepc@aol.com

RBIS judge Ms. Sharon Lyons

Group 1st judge Ms. Marie Ann Falconer

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*ShowSight Breed & All Breed Stats as of 2/28/18

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thank you judge

M R . R A L P H A M B R O S I A F O R T H I S WO N D E R F U L G R O U P W I N !

CJ’s Sweet GEORGIA BROWN G R A N D C H A M P I O N

MU L T I P L E B E S T I N S H OW A N D R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G

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OWN E D B Y J E A N N E & C H A R L E S H U R T Y L Y N N E & M A R K F L O R I A N

P R E S E N T E D B Y G R E G S T R O N G A K C R E G ’ D | 4 1 0 . 8 2 2 . 2 1 8 7

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A Team to Watch in 2018! Rocco and Ron On a winning streak f irst 24 SHOWS OUT 24 BEST OF BREEDS

Thank you judge eva berg for the group placement owned by Joanne Schottinger bred & owned by Tina & John Bailey handled by Ron Mattson

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©Ken O’Brien & sharon carvalho

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/18

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T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R S . L O R A I N E B O U T W E L L

BRED & CO-OWNED BY: DEENA MATHOG L I SA BET T I S RYAN WOLFE

OWNED BY: EL LEN M. CHARLES

PRESENTED BY: L I SA BET T I S RYAN WOLFE

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M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

BICHON FRISE *

NON-SPORT ING **

*ShowSight breed stats as of 2/28/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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SHOWSIGHT FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

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entrance. My gush of thanks was heartfelt but sadly in my rush I didn’t catch his name. I’m not even sure he was with the dog show but I like to think he was. I mean, who else would be up at that hour, on a Sun- day, with a dog show barely five blocks away. From Garden City I was off West Palm Beach, where the two-day Palm Beach County Dog Fanciers Association shows always have a great group of peo- ple in and around the rings. And I mean great. I want to share with you this following, heartwarming, an- ecdote which says so much: At some point at these shows I cut my hand but did not notice until I’d bled on the front of my own jacket. When I discovered it, it seemed way too late to do anything so I just went about my day. A well- known and highly respected handler noticed, then grabbed me and said “Don’t go far, I’ll be right back.” She then proceeded to her motorhome, got a bottle of peroxide, and removed the stain. What an incred- ibly kind thing to do. Thank you, Vanessa Sanchez, for another example of the caring nature of people in this sport. That was only one of the many nice things that happened at those shows, with their fes- tive Pink & Green color theme and innovative Mem- ber- and Exhibitor-appreciation awards and gestures.

I also had the pleasure of spending several hours with Lynette & Stanley Saltzman, during which we swapped fun stories from many years of dogdom. The following morning, as I fired up email to send a note, I had one waiting for me. It said “Just wanted to tell you that I haven’t enjoyed myself at a dog show, in a long time, as much as I did today. Thanks!”

AKC Rep Diana Wilson & GCKKC Show Chair Odebt Massey; PBCDFA’s guiding lights Connie Miller, Jeffrey Pepper, Stan & Lynette Saltz- man, and Lorna Menaker; Kentuckiana Cluster’s Melinda Lyon & David John- son; Take The Lead officers Mari-Beth O’Neill & Pam Beale (photo by Randy Garen) and Carolyn Koch. Photos by the author.

And I thank you . There are many reasons to support these wonderful shows. If you routinely go, you know first-hand why; if you don’t, you’re missing out. After Palm Beach it was off to Louisville for the blockbuster Kentuckiana Cluster which for years has reigned as one of the nation’s largest. Many Special- ties—including several Nationals— accompany the five-day marathon and the entries are huge by any measure. The competition was, indeed, staggering; there were more magnificent dogs on hand than you could shake a squeakie at. Cluster Chair David John- son and co-chairs Melinda Lyon & Cindy Lane-Smith went all out again this year to provide a calendar of events that rivals all others. And again this year the Itty Bitty Plush Dog class for “handlers” five and under was a crowd pleaser; to see these future fanciers being included is a thrill and we at ShowSight applaud all clubs that provide this expo- sure to our kids. Among the many wonderful things that took place in Louisville was the chance to see my friend Thomas Curley, absent from the scene for a while. Canadian residents Thomas and his wife Dianne Bell have been successful handlers and valued members of our sport for many years. Thomas recently had a bout of >p40

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SHOWSIGHT FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

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illness which cost him his left leg. In typical Thomas fashion, he’s already back in the ring and showing his great spirit and sense of humor in this photo and the decoration on his new appendage. We wish him (and them) continued best of everything and thank them for years of dedication and respected work. And then, finally, it was the shows in Raleigh, home to AKC and the legendary Tarheel Circuit. Raleigh was also home to a bang-up fundraiser for TAKE THE LEAD, for which Esteban & Jennifer Farias lent consid- erable culinary talent much to everyone’s delight. Many others were involved in the planning and execution of this nice affair but I’m sure that Pam Beale, Mari-Beth O’Neill and Carolyn Koch were instrumental in making it a success. Raleigh was also the site for the Seminars and Work- shops I mentioned earlier. And I also mentioned that the last day of “school” was also my sixty-fifth birthday. Well, word got around and three friends serenaded me in the cafeteria by singing “Happy Birthday.” (They were joined by people at adjoining tables.) Thank you Karin B. Erichsen Ashe Dr. Kenneth H, Levison, and Judy Brownt. To have these three esteemed judges do that for me was touching to say the least. But wait: Later in the day, Celeste Gonzalez, supremely qualified and capable Chair of the Seminars and Workshops held by the NC Triangle Area Judges Education Group, co- sponsored by the participating Tarheel Cluster dog clubs, during a break, announced to the crowd about my little event and the ENTIRE GATHERING sang to me. I was, indeed, humbled and quite moved. No photo of that , unfortunately, but it's forever ingrained in my memory. Next stop: who knows? Each weekend there is something wonderful happening in the sport of dogs. The series of literary snapshots I was lucky enough to include evoke but a fragment of the good vibes shared by fanciers at every show. (I was able to include a few actual snapshots, too, and although they contain my face far more than I’d like—they were taken as per- sonal keepsakes and not intended for publication—— a picture’s worth a thousand and I’m running out of room.) But not included in this report were the hun- dreds of hugs, and smiles, and pattings of dogs’ heads, and sharings of best wishes that I and my fellow fanciers also shared. And that was just one person’s ex- perience; multiple that by thousands and the rest of the world gets a pretty good picture of the dog fancy. You probably already knew it but it never hurts to be re- minded. I’m sure this goodwill will also be available tomor- row at a show near you. I hope to see you soon at one or all of these events, and of course next month here in the pages of ShowSight . Till then, I repeat the senti-

Thomas Curley with the author in Louisville (the green suit was in honor of my late dear friend and mentor Edna Voyles to whom the Derbytown Peke Club Specialty was dedicated); Celeste Gonzalez, Karin Ashe, Ken Levison and Judy Brown in Raleigh. ment I’ve been using now for over twenty-five years: ShowSight Magazine wishes you All The Best!

Chairing large shows. Due to his own- ership of a publishing company which produced six monthly dog magazines, McGinnis suspended breeding and ex- hibiting activities so as not to have any conflict of interest. Sale of the maga- zines in April of 2017 has made it possi- ble for him to pursue a judging career. He's heavily committed to dog-world-

related charitable organizations and views the health and future of purebred dogs and the sport as a responsibility he takes very seriously. Outside of dogs, McGinnis has extensive experience in real estate, design, breeding and ex- hibiting purebred cattle, live entertain- ment, and is a Tony Award winning Broadway producer.

Joe McGinnis has been an active dog fancier since the 70s. During his breeding/exhibiting career he finished over 60 champions, handled dogs to numerous All Breed and Specialty Bests in Show, and was named a Register of Merit breeder. McGinnis also served in almost every dog club capacity from teaching Conformation Classes to

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G R A N D C H AM P I O N MONAMOUR’S my favorite

our sincere appreciation TO JUDGE MRS. KATHI BROWN FOR TH I S WONDERFUL GROUP WI N !

TOK I O I S OWNED BY Ma r i l yn D. T i t l e & Ca ro l yn McKen z i e BRED BY Kao M i i c h i PRESENTED BY G r eg S t rong AKC r eg ’d ( 4 1 0 ) 82 2 - 2 1 87

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GCHB Dikerdachs Lucky’s Bright Shining Star Luck y MU LT I P L E B E ST I N S P E C I A LT Y S HOW · MU LT I P L E G ROU P W I NN I NG

owned by:

VALERIE DIKER · AKC BREEDER OF MERIT DIKERDACHS KENNEL · NEW YORK, NY www.dikerdachs.com

S H E N A NDOA H VA L L E Y K E NN E L C L U B , I N C .

Thank you Judge Dr. Carol White-Moser

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A NUMBER

ONE

Mini Longhaired Dachshund * *ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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GCH SMASH JP COPENHAGEN *ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18 AMER I CA’ S number one TOY POODLE AL L BREED*

thank you JUDGE GROUP 1 MRS . ELA INE LESS I G AND BEST IN SHOW JUDGE MRS . DEBB I E CAMPBEL L FREEMAN .

OWN E D B Y J E R R Y & C AT H Y G A U C H E

P E R F E C T LY P R E S E N T E D B Y M R . K A Z H O S A K A

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INCREDI BLE MOVEMENT UNPARAL LELED TYPE

ATT I TUDE GALORE LOVES TO SHOW, LOVES L I FE

SHE ’ L L STEAL YOUR HEART

©Holloway

M U L T I P L E S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R & B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

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Lines From Linda In Good Hands BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

F ollowing hard fought campaigns by some highly qualified candidates, the dog world celebrates the election of recently elected members of our AKC Board of Directors. Meet the members of the team.

Ronald H. Menaker

NEWLY ELECTED AKC BOARD OF DIRECTORS These individuals join current sitting Board members. ANN WALLIN CLASS OF 2022 ATLANTA KENNEL CLUB Representing the Atlanta Kennel Club, Ann was re-elected after being selected by the Board to fill the seat and complete the term of the late Steve Gladstone. HAROLD “RED” TATRO CLASS OF 2022 FORT WORTH KENNEL CLUB

Ann Wallin

Harold “Red” Tatro

CHRISTOPHER L. SWEETWOOD CLASS OF 2022 TRAP FALLS KENNEL CLUB

RONALD H. MENAKER CLASS OF 2019 MEMPHIS KENNEL CLUB

Christopher L. Sweetwood

As the Delegate for the Memphis Kennel Club, Ron was re-elected as Chairman of the Board of the American Kennel Club. THOMAS DAVIES CLASS OF 2019 SPRINGFIELD KENNEL CLUB Davies was voted to continue to serve as the Board’s Vice Chairman.

Thomas Davies

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Lines from Linda: In Good Hands

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

Thomas S. Powers

Harvey M. Wooding

Dr. Carmen L. Battaglia

Patricia M. Cruz

CURRENT MEMBERS AKC BOARD OF DIRECTORS

DR. CARMEN L. BATTAGLIA CLASS OF 2019 GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG CLUB OF AMERICA PATRICIA M. CRUZ CLASS OF 2020 HEART OF THE PLAINS KENNEL CLUB WILLIAM J. FEENEY CLASS OF 2020 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE KENNEL CLUB KAROLYNNE M. M c ATEER CLASS OF 2020 IRISH SETTER CLUB OF AMERICA RITA J. BIDDLE CLASS OF 2021 INGRAM COUNTY KENNEL CLUB DOMINIC P. CAROTA CLASS OF 2021 PHARAOH HOUND CLUB OF AMERICA THOMAS S. POWERS CLASS OF 2021 KENNEL CLUB OF BEVERLY HILLS HARVEY M. WOODING CLASS OF 2021 WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB

William J. Feeney

Karolynne M. M c Ateer

Rita J. Biddle

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*all systems 2017 & as of 2/28/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18

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Lines from Linda: In Good Hands

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

DENNIS B. SPRUNG PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER GINA DINARDO EXECUTIVE SECRETARY JOSEPH V.

AKC EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

AKC Executive Officers are respon- sible for the daily business operations. They are charged with carrying out the rules, regulations, policies and deci- sions. As directed by the AKC Board and/or the Delegate Body. Dennis B. Sprung serves as President and Chief Executive Officer, Gina M. DiNardo is the Executive Secretary and Joseph V. Baffuto, Jr. holds the position of Chief Financial Officer.

BAFFUTO, JR. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Dennis B. Sprung

Gina DiNardo

Joseph V. Baffuto, Jr.

left: Superman Clint Harris visiting with Houston and Toddie Clark at the Louisville Kennel Club Show

Whether your personal favorites were elected or not, the success of our American Kennel Club depends on everyone working together. You personally can have a large role in that success! There is power in positive thinking! A negative attitude has abso- lutely no value. Do your part to support your club and it’s activities. Volunteer! Encourage newcomers to enjoy the wide variety of sports available though our great organization! If you have ideas, suggestions or issues of any kind, our elected offi- cials welcome hearing from you. Com- plaining on social media accomplishes nothing. Go directly to these leaders who actually have the knowledge and resources and want to assist you. We’re in good hands! FLASH! Looking great as ever, the shining star of the Louisville dog shows was Clint Harris who shows no signs of slowing down following his terrible accident last year. Yay, Clint!

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WILLY D U N H I L L W I L L I A M Gold Grand Champion

G R O U P 1 - J U D G E M S . D E N I S E D E A N

o w n e d b y A N N A M A R I E Y U R A

b r e d & c o - o w n e d b y R AY H A R R I N G TO N

e x c l u s i v e l y p r e s e n t e d b y J A M E S B E T T I S

G R O U P 1 - J U D G E L I N D A R I E D E L

WIL Gold Gran D U N H I L L Multiple R E S E R V E & B E S T G R O U P 1 - J U D G E M R . R I C K G SW E N D E R

B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R I N S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

G R O U P 1 - J U D G E D R . PAY R O

LLY nd Champion W I L L I A M

S how S ight M agazine , A pril 2018 • 59

Becoming BY JACQUELYN FOGEL It all Begins and Ends With The Standard

I am working with several foreign puppy buyers right now. As I explain my breeds to these buyers, I always refer to the AKC stan- dards, and the FCI standards written for my breeds. Then I go into details about where my dogs consistently meet the standards, and where my breeding program is a little weak on some parts of the standard. In bedlingtons, I have to go into great detail about the dif- ferent words used to describe movement in the two standards because the FCI standard refers to a gait that is “rather mincing… and slight roll at full stride,” while the AKC standard describes a “unique lightness… springy in the slower paces.”

Talking about a breed standard with somebody who wants to breed a purebred dog should not be boring or irrelevant. In fact, I believe it should be the opener in every conversation we have with people who are buying a dog for a breeding program, or for showing. That’s why I was astounded when a young Chinese buyer I am work- ing with told me that everyone she had approached about buying a puppy wanted to tell her about all of their awards and honors, but not one person before me had mentioned the Bedlington terrier standard. What!? How is that possible? How can any conversation about the merits of a purebred dog start without mentioning the standard? Why are awards and wins more important than conforma- tion to a standard? Am I living in an altered reality? We call them “conformation” shows because we expect each entry to “conform” to its breed standard. They aren’t cute doggie or grooming competitions, they are conformation competitions. They begin and end with each breed’s stan- dard. Period. Lately there has been a lot of talk among exhibitors and breeders about a judge who dismissed several entries because the dogs’ tails were not docked. I read the AKC Silky Terrier standard – it says, “tail is docked.” It doesn’t say it should be docked. It doesn’t say it may be docked. It gives no indication that an undocked tail might be acceptable. It says the tail IS docked. In case any of this is new to anyone, each registry has its own standards for their recognized breeds. You may show an undocked Silky Terrier in UKC or FCI shows without penalty. And you may breed a dog with an undocked tail any time you choose. But if you are planning to show in an AKC show, then you should be very familiar with the AKC standard and expect to be penalized for a tail that isn’t docked. You may not like the severity of the penalty a judge chooses. Should the dogs be excused, or should the undocked tails be one of many examples of how that par- ticular specimen deviates from the standard describing a perfect dog? That is up to each individual judge and can- not be argued by the exhibitor. My personal opinion is that if your Silky does not have a docked tail, then don’t show it in an AKC show without expecting a penalty. All judges prioritize differently what they want to see in each breed, and all will reward or penalize based upon their understanding of the standard, and how important each deviation is. Judges should never be held to some imaginary standard that claims if one breed’s tail is impor-

In my American interpreta- tion of these phrases, they are describing two very dif- ferent gaits. Americans would never use “rolling

and mincing” to describe the gait of a structurally sound dog with good shoulder layback and well let-down stifles – at any pace. Dogs like the Old English Sheepdog may amble or pace at slower paces, but they don’t mince or roll. Mincing denotes short-stepping, and rolling is what usually happens when shoulders are steep, and the topline dips behind the withers. Both of these words are pejorative in American discussions of gait, and not what a breeder would aspire to produce. However, in my dis- cussions with European Bedlington breeders, they refuse to admit that their standard calls for short-stepping or rolling. They focus on the lightness of movement at slow- er paces, and proper shoulder construction. When I sug- gest that our two standards describe essentially different breeds, they insist that I am just misinterpreting their standard, which was revised in 2011. They correctly note that the two standards both describe flat, sloping shoul- der blades and well-angulated stifles. We agree the prop- er Bedlington head should be emphasized at least as much, if not more than gait. We agree about the body shape and V-front, but the movement description remains open to debate. As the previous paragraph illustrates, I can go into great depth describing the smallest details in the stan- dards for my breeds. I can literally bore people to tears with my detailed description of correct shoulders, and I am never considered the life of the party in most casual, fun gatherings. The stuff that excites and animates me is considered irrelevant by at least 98% of the general pop- ulation. I don’t care about cute Fluffy stories, and I really don’t want to discuss the wonders of a Goldendoodle. I am a self-admitted canine, purebred, standard-quoting snob. If you want to talk about correct movement for a breed, what constitutes a wry or undershot bite, why an Irish terrier coat turns light if it is scissored, or where the rise on a topline should be, I am your person. I love the details embedded in each breed standard, and I love hear- ing from long-time breeders about the quirks in their par- ticular breed. I love a judge who can go into great detail about what is wrong with a brindled Saluki. I am a stan- dard wonk.

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S how S ight M agazine , A pril 2018 • 61

Becoming: It all Begins and Ends With The Standard

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

their dogs as well. She is beginning to train her eye to spot correct structure underneath beautiful grooming. She has also modified her grooming to reveal the good parts of her dogs, rather than hide multiple faults. I have learned over the years that well-built dogs are much eas- ier to groom than poorly constructed dogs, and this has become another tool in my evaluation arsenal. If I find myself struggling to get a good pattern on a dog, I care- fully examine what is causing that struggle, and usually eliminate those dogs from my breeding program. I will still show them, but the dogs with difficult problems to fix will not be used to carry forward genetics in my breed- ing program. Breeders who start their conversations with the breed standard will never go wrong. Standards cannot cover every possibility within the structure of a dog, but they must be the guiding document for every breeder. Each breed has its nuances and important details. Many breeds have characteristics unique to that breed – like a V-front in a bedlington; or a trait that is so important it must never be overlooked – like a prominent sternum in a bas- set hound. These are the traits that contribute to breed type. These are the traits we’d all like the judges to find, or not, and reward and penalize accordingly. Breeders are the ultimate keepers of breed standards. If they don’t understand them, don’t discuss them, don’t teach them, and don’t breed to them, our breeds will lose type and morph into something the original founders never intended. I have read some discussions on a Russian breeder’s Facebook page that blames poor judg- ing for the proliferation of poorly built and incorrectly coated dogs. Poor judging does exist, but it does not cause breeders to continue to breed marginal dogs. If judges were shown nothing but quality dogs, even a poor judge can look like a genius. Breeders who succumb to the fad of the day are a much bigger problem. Breeders must take responsibility for the dogs they breed. It is every breeder’s responsibility to mentor and educate peo- ple about the breed standard. If we are breeding to please a fickle marketplace, then we need to stop breed- ing. If we are breeding to please poor judges, then we need to stop breeding. If we don’t really understand the standard and think that win ribbons are the only measure of a successful breeding program, then we need to find someone to work with who can really teach the standard rather than merely promote wins. I am a serious Packer fan, but Vince Lombardi’s famous quote, “Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing,” just doesn’t cut it when it comes to dog breeding. In our world the standard is king. In our world, “The breed standard isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.” n Jackie Fogel got her first purebred basset in 1969, but her real education in the world of AKC dogs and shows started in 1979 when she moved to Wisconsin and whelped her first home- bred champion. In 1995 Jackie got a bedlington terrier from David Ramsey of the famous Willow Wind line. She has bred and shown numerous #1 bedlingtons, and continues to actively breed both bassets and bedlingtons. In 2007 Jackie began judging, and is approved to judge 6 breeds. She owns and manages Cedar Creek Pet Resort, and is active in the Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, Keep Your Pets, Inc., (a non-profit she founded), and the local Rotary club. Jackie writes for ShowSight Magazine, the basset column in the Gazette, and a pet column in a local magazine.

tant, every breed’s tail is important. Judges prioritize dif- ferently for each breed they examine. While color and distribution of markings has no importance in a basset hound, a Boston Terrier must have correct color and dis- tribution of markings, or it is not a Boston. The same judge may think that a Scottish Terrier head is more important than reach or drive, and that side movement on a Brittany should be more important than head shape or eye color. Each standard will dictate what is important to the breed, and each judge will have their personal inter- pretation of priorities described within the standard. I do have a serious problem with judges who do not disqualify dogs with disqualifying faults, but all other reactions to deviations from standards are within the judge’s purview. Being angry with a judge that finds your dog’s faults is just silly. Every exhibitor I know says they understand that no dog is perfect, but I think many secretly believe their dog really is perfect, and it’s just the judge who doesn’t under- stand. This is novice exhibitor thinking. It must be avoid- ed at all cost. More likely than not, the breeder/exhibitor has not been properly mentored in their breed standard. More likely than not they are not understanding what the words in the standard actually mean because they have not had their hands on enough breeds, studied structure or movement enough, or just don’t care. More likely than not, the initial reaction of these exhibitors to someone finding fault in their dogs is to accuse the other person of not understanding their breed. These exhibitor/breeders all fall back on the number of wins their dogs have achieved, but they rarely go into detail about the quality of the competition at the shows in which they win, or the experiences of the judges doing the evaluation. Some judges who have not been well-mentored also have faulty beliefs, and sometimes they actually look for the wrong things in a breed. The careful observer can usually figure out what the judge is looking for, and then determine if that judge is worthy of more entries or not. I witnessed one judge with a large Bedlington entry very carefully find and reward every single dog with a ewe neck. Since I breed very few dogs with that particular fault my dogs were always at the end of his line. It is pointless for me to show my dogs to that judge again, so I won’t. I sincere- ly hope that judge gets some good breed mentoring so he doesn’t continue to reward a fault, but unless that hap- pens, I will not waste my money on his opinion. That is a decision I can make. The same thing should happen with the Silky Terrier exhibitors. Now that they know how important the tail is to that judge, they may choose to show to her, or not. But they have no authority to say that she should be accept- ing a clear and visible fault within the AKC standard. They may continue to argue within their breed club about the importance of a docked tail, but until the AKC stan- dard is rewritten, an undocked tail must be penalized to some extent. That brings me back full-circle to the young Chinese buyer who wants to learn the Bedlington terrier standard so she can breed better dogs. She communicates regularly with me, and we discuss diagrams and photographs of dogs. I allowed her to go over every dog of my breeding that was entered in the Florida shows, and we discussed faults and desired traits for each one. I encouraged her to ask all other breeders if she could physically examine

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S how S ight M agazine , A pril 2018 • 63

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(Show) Lead by Example Have Loose Leads Been Replaced by a ‘Tightness’ Trend? ARTICLE AND PHOTO BY DAN SAYERS A n invitation to judge at your breed’s National Spe- cialty is an honor bestowed on just a few lucky fanciers. Accepting that invitation, however, is not for the faint of heart. After all, stepping into

In 2002, I was invited to judge Sweepstakes at the Irish Water Spaniel Club of America’s National, held in Jamestown, Virginia. The invitation came as a surprise, but I accepted without reservation since this is the breed that has held my attention since I first saw its likeness in a book about dogs. I’d been a member of the parent club for nearly 20 years at the time and worked on the Board in a variety of positions. I’d even bred a litter that produced five champions, with a couple of dogs that earned titles on both ends. I felt certain that I could do a good job evaluating the merits of the dogs brought to me by my peers. So, I studied the standard intensely to make sure I could distinguish its requirements from my personal prefer- ences. I couldn’t wait for the day to arrive when I could get

the center of the ring under the watchful gaze of fellow club members can make or break a person. Your placements will likely raise your stock in the minds of a few, but a wayward point of the finger can also result in “D” grade on your judge’s report card. In the end, your winners will go into the record book and the memory of so many beautiful examples of the breed you love will last a lifetime. The secret to enjoying the assignment is to remain focused on the dogs, and not the han- dlers—or the handling.

A tight show lead is perfectly acceptable for some, but not all, breeds.

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H2ope C H R I S T I N A F R E I TAG 2 0 1 8

G R A N D C H A M P I O N SILHOUETTE ’ S HOPE SOLO

CO R R E C T S I Z E , S T R U C T U R E A N D MOV E M E N T— W I T H O U T C O L O R E N H A N C E M E N T S O R S C I S S O R I N G .

Pictured here with Michael Canalizo.

Canfield cluster and Specialty weekend to finish by going WB, BOS, Bred By Group 3. WB, BOW first day, third day Select bitch (as a 9 month old puppy) with different handlers each day. ONLY Elkhound to place in any of the groups during the cluster.

All Breed Judges and Breeder Judg- es are finding and rewarding Hope, no matter who is on the end of her lead. NESCEM Specialty weekend BOS all three days with three different handlers and Best in Sweeps. Pictured here with Judge Mr. William Potter II and Keith handling her.

2 days Best of Breed, 4 days Best of Breed Bred By Champion, Group 3 and Group 4 in the very tough Bred By Groups. L O U I S V I L L E C L U S T E R :

M R . J O N C O L E FO R T H E G R OU P 2 AT T H E I N DY W I N T E R C L A S S I C .

b r e e d e r /ow n e r / h a n d l e r s K E I T H & E R I N O L S E N S I L HOU E T T E E L K HOU N D S HO L LY, M I

(Show) Lead by Example: Have Loose Leads Been ... BY DAN SAYERS continued

“A TIGHT LEAD MAY BE PERFECTLY CORRECT FOR SOME TOY, TERRIER AND NON–SPORTING BREEDS, BUT IT’S AN ALTOGETHER BAD IDEA FOR SHOWING MOST SPORTING, HOUND OR WORKING DOGS.”

my hands on those promising puppies and enjoy a moment with each of the Veteran virtuosos that I’d watched grow to maturity. Needless to say, the experience didn’t disappoint. Twenty- three puppies were entered on the day and each gave me the opportunity to appreciate the subtle differences that exist in the breed’s unique silhouette, head characteristics, coat texture and way-of-going. All of the exhibits were nicely groomed—though none excessively so—and each moved on a lead with just enough slack to allow for proper head and tail carriage. Assessing gait was especially satisfying. Though some youngsters did not particularly enjoy the hands–on exam, they all demonstrated that dashing Irish spiritwhen they went around the ring. Only one young dog had difficulty maintaining a trot, but even he managed to collect himself long enough to demonstrate his breed’s characteris- tic free and easy locomotion. The Veterans provided a special thrill as they entered the ring. After having gone over so many underdeveloped puppies, the mature animals provided an opportunity to really put my understanding of the breed standard to the test. Four dogs and nine bitches were entered, including a few that had achieved many notable victories in both breed and all-breed competition. Since the Irish Water Spaniel matures slowly, most of the Veterans were in prime condi- tion. Even a 12–year–old bitch was in remarkable shape considering her age. As might be expected of seasoned show dogs, the Veterans moved effortlessly both down– and–back and around the ring. Their freedom of movement was allowed thanks to the looseness of their show leads. My Best Veteran in Sweeps brought me so much pleasure that I had her handler take her around the ring again and again. When I later saw the lady limping through the hotel park- ing lot, I realized I hadn’t considered the exhibitors’ wel- fare. I’d been so entranced by the movement of the dogs that I’d failed to think of the handlers’ ability to keep up with them! The experience of judging at a National Specialty did much to inform me about the important role judges play in the preservation of purebred dogs. The opportunity to judge comes with a tremendous responsibility to uphold the stan- dard’s intention—to preserve the breed. So, when I was invited back to judge Sweepstakes at the 2016 National held in Chino, California, I looked forward to having another opportunity to increase my understanding of the judging process. I also anticipated how this entry might compare with the dogs I’d had in my ring 14 years earlier. Would I discover that overall quality had improved or regressed? Would I find that minor faults were corrected or had they become even more widespread? Had presentation stayed true to tradition or had it become uncharacteristic for

the breed? Would the nine puppies and six Veterans entered at my second National assignment even offer a broad enough comparison? Well, some of the differences I observed between the 2002 and 2016 entries involved subtleties of breed-specific characteristics. This would be expected since the time span represented the breeding of several generations. However, the greatest distinction I observed had more to do with the manner in which the dogs were shown. Whereas the earli- er entry had largely been presented in a somewhat relaxed manner and shown on relatively loose leads, many of the dogs that made up the latter entry seemed to be overtly controlled during both the exam and while gaiting. To be fair, puppies of this breed can hardly be expected to stand still for long, much less show like superstars. (In fact, a little control can go a long way toward making the most of an excited—or anxious—moment.) But instead of allowing the dogs to stand and move on their own, many exhibitors had resorted to using extremely short and tight leads that restricted movement and did nothing to present a correct outline. Although this manner of presentation can provide some equilibrium, it does little to improve a judge’s ability to assess breed–specific structure and mobility in the majority of exhibits. In my case, I found myself instructing exhibitors to step away from their dogs so that I could see how the animals stood on their own four feet. This request did much to inform my opinion, but it also served to relax the younger dogs. Pup- pies that were unnerved by the hands–on examination were permitted a moment to display their true character without undue pressure. Likewise, a tight lead did little to help with my assessment of the dogs’ movement. Only when in the hands of an experienced exhibitor did the dogs move well on a short lead. More often than not, they moved poorly and displayed faults that all but disappeared when the dogs were allowed to move freely on a loose lead and at a moderate pace. Some exhibitors seemed reluctant to give up control. Even when told repeatedly to “slow down” and “loosen the lead” many could not. This interaction, though frustrating, informed me that a judge’s instruction is given for the benefit of the dog and handler team. It is only because a judge wants to see your dog at its very best that he or she tells you what to do. A tight lead may be perfectly correct for some Toy, Terrier and Non–Sporting breeds, but it’s an altogether bad idea for showing most Sporting, Hound or Work- ing dogs. Herding dogs too are quite capable of mov- ing on their own. It’s what they do. To show these breeds on a tight lead may provide a certain degree of con- trol, but it sure can make it hard for a judge to evaluate the dog.

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