Top Notch Toys - June 2022

GCH CH LEGACY CHENIN BLANC WITH EVERA

“Thai” was only shown at a few shows in January and February of 2020 when he finished his championship and at the end of the year at the AKC National Championship where he received an Award of Excellence. We are looking forward to seeing what 2022 will bring us!

From the standard - “Ideally, height at withers is 9 to 10-1/2 inches; but, not less than 8 inches nor more than 11 inches. Ideally, weight of mature dogs, 9 to 16 pounds.”

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INTERNATIONAL & AMERICAN CH HEARTY’S WONDER BOY

Award of Merit from the February 2020 Metropolitan NY Shih Tzu Fanciers specialty under judge Johnny Shoemaker. Owners: Leslie LeFave & L Sarah Lawrence Breeder: Papitchaya Sukonoi

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BELEV ITORNOT

#4 NOHS * NOHS RBIS, Multiple NOHS Group Winning

2021 Royal Canin Award of Excellence

Breeder / Co-Owner Michelle Barlak

Ms. “Brienne” GCH MAXIMAL’S OATHKEEPER BELEV ITORNOT

Perry x Katana

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WENDY SCHOBER belev@aol.com | 508.843.2606

WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING EVERYONE AT WESTMINSTER.

2019-2022 (4 CONSECUTIVE YRS) TOP 10 NOHS * TOP 10 BREED * #3 NOHS * Multiple Group Placing, NOHS BIS, Multiple NOHS Group Winning

2021 Westminster AOM

Royal Canin AKC National NOHS BOS

BOS District 2 Specialty Royal Canin

NOHS Lifetime Gold

Breeders Arvind & Joyce DeBraganca

© Teddy’s Pic 19

GCH CH PASSPORT SEA CAPTAIN CGC TKI

Gordie x Clover

*AKC stats as of 4/30/22

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FINNICKYSKYE CAVALIERS OWNED & SHOWN BY: JIM & SHARON UTYCH Catcher PLATINUM LEVEL NOHS CAVALIER RBIS CKCSC USA & GROUP PLACING MBISOH MRBISOH AKC GCHS CH LEGENDCREST FINNICKYSKYE DREAM CATCHER, JW AW CGC

SELECT DOG TUSCALOOSA KC – APRIL 7 UNDER JUDGE NANCY SMITH HAFNER

BIRMINGHAM KC – APRIL 8 UNDER JUDGE JON COLE

TUSCALOOSA KC – APRIL 9 UNDER JUDGE BARBARA DEMPSEY ALDERMAN

BIRMINGHAM KC – APRIL 10 UNDER JUDGE DEBORAH BARRETT

CLARKSVILLE KC – APRIL 23 UNDER JUDGE MOLLY MARTIN

CLARKSVILLE KC – APRIL 24 UNDER JUDGE ANDREA BRADFORD MD

©SKUNK WORX CUSTOMS PHOTOGRAPHY

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Edgar Both father and son are invited to westminster

CLOSING IN ON HIS GOLD GRAND CHAMPION TITLE - ALL OH MBIS CKCSC USA & GROUP PLACING RBISOH MBISS AKC GCHS CH BROOKHAVEN THE DREAM LIVES ON, AW CGCA

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED OUR TWO BOYS. WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING EVERYONE AT WESTMINSTER. SELECT DOG BIRMINGHAM KC – APRIL 10 UNDER JUDGE DEBORAH BARRETT BEST OF BREED CLARKSVILLE TN – APRIL 23 UNDER JUDGE MOLLY MARTIN OWNER HANDLED GROUP ONE CLARKSVILLE TN – APRIL 23 UNDER JUDGE JAY RICHARDSON BEST OF BREED CLARKSVILLE TN – APRIL 24 UNDER JUDGE ANDREA BRADFORD MD 5 POINT MAJOR SELECT MAURY KC – APRIL 30 UNDER JUDGE CAROLYN HERBEL

©SKUNK WORX CUSTOMS PHOTOGRAPHY

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR MEEGAN PIEROTTI-TIETJE Customer Relationship Manager meegan@showsightmagazine.com call/text 512.593.5517 AJ ARAPOVIC Publisher

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10 Yes, You (Probably) Can Import That Show Prospect Now Sheila Goffe 20 The Breeder/Owner-Handler Team Matina E. Johnson 22 Candids: Blue Ridge Classic Photos by Tom Weigand 26 Monkey Dogs in America Barry Leece & Cameron Riegel 30 Spotlight on the Chinese Crested Arlene Butterklee 40 Hey! Is That A Miniature Doberman? Kim Byrd 44 Smooth and Long Jennifer Grebinoski

50 Training the Performance Shih Tzu Beth Scorzelli 52 Silky Terrier Guide Norma Baugh 54 The Yorkshire Terrier’s Heritage Janet E. Bennett 56 Rates

aj@aramediagroup.com call/text 512.541.8128 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

57 Index to Advertisers 58 Coming Attractions

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

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ON THE COVER

GCH CH LEGACY CHENIN BLANC WITH EVERA

2021 #2

C K C S - U S A B I T C H *

2021 #3 CKCSC-USA O V E R A L L CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL *

BRED BY: DAWN STEVENS-LINDEMAIER OWNED BY: MICHELE TRUE AND DAWN STEVENS-LINDEMAIER

EVERA TRUE SPANIELS HIC VENIO

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*CKC STATS

YES, YOU (PROBABLY) CAN IMPORT THAT SHOW PROSPECT NOW

by Sheila Goffe

F or a year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has suspended, with only a few exceptions, the import of dogs from some 113 countries deemed “high risk for rabies.” For many fanciers this restriction meant an end of plans to special a dog in the US, or to import an exciting new prospect or an important new part of a breeding program. On June 10, 2022 that’s set to change thanks to new CDC rules that will make it easier to import a dog from the previously banned countries. WHAT’S CHANGING? While it is important for importers to also check additional USDA and local entry requirements, here is the latest from the CDC: New rules officially announced by the CDC on June 1 (and effective as of June 10) change the focus from a blanket suspension on imports to a risk-based approach that depends on where the dog’s rabies vaccination was administered and how many dogs are being imported. Under the new CDC rules, dogs that have not been in a high-risk coun- try may continue to enter the US through any port of entry and are not required to present a rabies vaccina- tion certificate. If the puppy is under six months of age, a verbal statement that the pup has not been in a high- risk country is required. For all dogs that have been in a high- risk country in the past six months, the dog must be at least six months old, have a valid rabies vaccination, and have an ISO microchip for iden - tification that matches the rabies cer - tificate. (A list of “high risk” for rabies countries is available at cdc.gov. )

Importers bringing 1-2 dogs into the US that have been in a high-risk coun- try have three options for entry: 1. Permit – Apply for a CDC permit prior to travel and arrange for the dogs to arrive at one of 18 approved airports with the import permit. 2. Titer – Make an advance reserva- tion for a port that has an approved animal care facility: Atlanta (ATL), New York (JFK), Miami (MIA), or Los Angeles (LAX); present a valid foreign rabies vac- cination certificate; present the results of a valid rabies serology titer; and have the dog examined by a USDA-accredited veterinar- ian and re-vaccinated. 3. No Titer – Make an advance res- ervation for a port that has an ap- proved animal care facility: Atlan- ta (ATL), New York (JFK), Miami (MIA), or Los Angeles (LAX); present a valid foreign rabies vacci- nation certificate; have the dog ex- amined by a USDA accredited vet- erinarian and re-vaccinated; and quarantine the dog(s) for 28 days. Individuals importing three or more dogs into the US from a high- risk country do not have the option to obtain a permit, but may enter with an advance reservation and se- lect either Option 2 (with a titer/no quarantine) or Option 3 (no titer/ mandatory quarantine). Under the new rule, commercial dog importers are not eligible for a CDC Dog Import Permit. However, com - mercial dog importers may now im- port dogs from high-risk countries provided that the dogs, upon arrival in the United States, are examined, re-vaccinated, and have proof of an

adequate titer from a CDC-approved laboratory. Alternatively, they may be held in quarantine at a CDC-ap- proved animal facility until they meet CDC entry requirements. Details on the new rules are available on the CDC website at https://www. cdc.gov/importation/bringing-an-an- imal-into-the-united-states/. BACKGROUND – SO WHAT’S THE ISSUE BEHIND THE RULES? Rabies is a serious threat to pet and public health. According to the CDC, is it one hundred percent preventable and ninety-nine percent fatal. The American Kennel Club has long been concerned about sick dogs be- ing imported into the United States— whether the issue be the rabies, brucellosis, viral infections, canine influenza, non-native parasites, zoo - notic diseases, or other pathogens that impact canine and public health. Historically, canine disease imported from outside the United States flew under the radar. There were also many fewer dogs being imported. In the last generation, however, breeders in the US have come under increasing restrictions and fallen victim to negative public pressure, even as the demand for pet dogs has increased. By 2019, even before the increase in ownership due to the pan- demic, it was conservatively estimat- ed that US demand for pet dogs is ap- proximately eight million dogs a year. US breeders simply couldn’t meet the demand for pets, particularly in light of anti-breeder laws. In the same year, CDC published es - timated US pet import figures of a whopping one million per year—many

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DEBARAH BILLINGS BREEDER OWNER HANDLER WWW.WINDSONGBIEWERS.COM

BRONZE AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

“HISTORY MAKING” MULTIPLE GROUP 1 Susan &Rumor

On the Road

THANK YOU JUDGES to Westminster # 1 BIEWER TERRIER BREED *

*AKC STAT AS OF 4/30/22

© JCDOGPHOTO.NET

GCHS CH WINDSONG’S SOMETHIN’ TO TALK ABOUT

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ONE OF AMERICA’S

Top ChineseCrested

THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. LISA GRASER

Breeder & Owner Kathleen Knoles PRESENTED BY HOLLEY ELDRED AND OCCASIONALLY OWNER HANDLED

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DYLAN BEST IN SHOW WINNING | MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING | MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to all judges for awarding Dylan’s quality. We are looking forward to all Summer Shows.

HANDLED BY SERGIO & MEAGAN OLIVERA

OWNED/BRED BY MONTE & SHEILA WYMORE

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GCHB CH COACHLIGHT AFF-TER BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND

SUPERSTITION KENNEL CLUB | BIS | UNDER JUDGE MS. ELIZABETH “LANI” MCKENNON

RIO GRANDE KENNEL CLUB | GROUP 3 | UNDER JUDGE MRS. PATRICIA (PAT) HASTINGS T op N otch T oys , J une 2022 • 15

of which were coming in with fraudu- lent paperwork. These factors, com- bined with poor oversight of existing import requirements, lack of enforce- ment, and increasing demand for dogs from overseas, created a perfect storm for the importation of sick dogs imported into the country. WHAT’S THE LONGER- TERM SOLUTION? The solution to this complex issue re- quires more than a blanket ban on im- ports of dogs from certain countries, or even a response to health threats caused by rabies only. Instead, AKC is advo- cating for comprehensive changes in two major areas: First is the passage of the federal Healthy Dog Importation Act (HR 4239/S.2597) supported by the Ameri- can Veterinary Medical Association, the National Animal Interest Alliance, and numerous other animal and public health experts. This would require vali- dated health certifications for all dogs imported into the United States, com- parable to what most other countries have required for years. The Healthy Dog Importation Act would go beyond a blanket ban related to rabies risk and instead focus on the validated health of animals, and mul- tiple potential health threats, while allowing the responsible import of healthy dogs from most countries. The second is recognizing the immense public health value of high-quality lo- cal pet breeders in our own communi- ties. Encouraging new and responsible domestic breeders who can be a local source of expertise and quality pets will remove the incentive for mass im- ports of random and unhealthy dogs.

Determining If A Dog Can Enter the U.S. As of June 10, CDC will allow the import of dogs from countries at high-risk for rabies under specific conditions. This chart outlines some new import rules. For full details visit www.cdc.gov .

YES

NO

Has the dog been in a high-risk country in the past 6 months?

Is the dog at least 6 months old?

Dog can enter at any port of entry with a 6-month travel history statement & healthy appearance.

YES

NO

Does the dog have an ISO-compatible microchip?

NO

YES

Dog is NOT allowed to enter the US.

Does the dog have a valid US-issued rabies vaccination certificate?

Dog may enter the US under certain conditions.

YES

NO

Does the dog have a valid foreign-issued rabies vaccination certificate?

NO

YES

See Rules for Bringing 3 or More Dogs with Foreign Rabies Vaccine from High-risk Country at CDC.gov.

Are you importing 3 or more dogs?

YES

NO

Does the dog have an adequate rabies serology titer from an approved laboratory, drawn at least 45 days and no more than 1 year before arrival?

YES NO

The dog may enter with a CDC Dog Import Permit through one of 18 approved airports or without a permit through an airport with an approved animal care facility. See Rules for Bringing 1 or 2 Dogs with Foreign Rabies Vaccine from High-risk Country.

The dog must have a reservation to quarantine at an approved animal care facility in the United States upon arrival and enter through the airport where the facility is located. See Rules for Bringing 1 or 2 Dogs with Foreign Rabies Vaccine from High-risk Country.

For informational purposes only. For more information, contact the CDC directly or visit www.cdc.gov. This information was sourced on June 01, 2022 from https://www.cdc.gov/importation/bringing-an-animal-into-the-united-states/dogs.html.

The increasing demand for dogs, es- pecially rescue pets, from overseas is due to the shortage of available fam- ily pets indirectly caused when state and local laws undermine responsible domestic breeders. It’s time to recognize the value of re- sponsible breeders as a community

resource. Let’s encourage our law- makers and communities to welcome back responsible breeders as a bul- wark against the importation of public health dangers—while also ensuring the freedom to import dogs that do receive appropriate preventatives and health checks.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR As Vice President, Government Relations for the American Kennel Club, Sheila Goffe leads the AKC’s efforts in the public policy arena, including working to protect the rights of all dog owners and promote responsible dog ownership. She oversees AKC legislative policy strategy and AKC outreach at the federal, state, and local levels. She also serves as AKC staff lead for the AKC Detection Dog Task Force, Service Dog Pass, and other key programs. Sheila joined AKC in 2006. Prior to working for the American Kennel Club, she was a Se- nior Legislative Analyst/Editor and Deputy Director of Editorial Product Development for Congressional Quarterly in Washington, DC. Previous experience included federal legisla- tive staffing and advocacy, work as an editor and analyst for The Economist Intelligence Unit, and serving as an adjunct in Political Science/Comparative Politics at the State Uni- versity of New York/Stony Brook. She also owns, breeds, and shows Siberian Huskies.

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AKC Platinum Grand Champion & AKC NOHS Platinum Ranking MBISS, MOHBISS, MOHBIS, MOHRBIS, GCHP Angelheart N Adorabull’s Moose On The Loose

Moose

Mid Florida Havanese Club Speciality Orlando, FL December 2021 Judge Sandra Bingham-Porter Best of Breed, NOHS Best of Breed

Delaware Valley Havanese Club Independent Speciality Edison, NJ March Madness Cluster Judge Janet Allen Best of Breed, NOHS Best of Breed

Monticello Kennel Club Judge Kenneth Kaufman Best of Breed, Group 1

AKC #1 LIFE TIME OWNER HANDLED HAVANESE * MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALITY WINS

TOP TEN BREED AND ALL BREED * WESTMINSTER INVITEE 2020, 2021, 2022

bred by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER

co-owned by BILL & PAULA FRAZIER & JANE CHAVEZ

Delaware Valley Toy Dog Fanciers Judge Dawn Hitchcock Toy Dog Speciality Best of Breed, Toy Group 3

co-owned & exclusively presented by KAREN MARIE DUPRAT-FELDMAN

*AKC stats as of 4/30/22

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Enchante (which is the breeder’s home state of New Mexico). Boston does it under Breeder Judge Pamela Peat. Dreams do come true. Boston wins over a top ranked special! FROM THE LAND OF ENCHANTMENT!

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BOSTON MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING GCHB ENCHANTE’S BOSTON CREAM PI

OWNER SallyAnn Tietsworth

BREEDERS Cameron Riegel Barry Leece Wendy Galbreath

HANDLED BY Lexi Schlott

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THE BREEDER/OWNER-HANDLER TEAM

Creating a Winning Duet

by Matina E. Johnson

L ong before I was a breeder/owner- handler, I was a professional singer. Singing solo is rewarding, but never the rush of excitement that comes from singing a duet. That is because when you sing alone, especially when you have been doing it a long time, you come to trust yourself, your training, and your discipline. When singing with someone else, though, especially with a new duet partner, there is a wildcard element that is, frankly, exhilarating. I find it to be the same in the sport of handling dogs. In the breeder/owner- handler arena, I’ve been privileged to have many duet partners over the years, the majority of which I bred myself, holding sacred the preservationist values of my dear mentor and longtime breeder-judge, Carl C Yochum. From training a puppy to retiring a veteran, there is an ebb and flow to the relationship between the dog and handler that is nurtured and developed, where each learns from the other, and it can be incredibly rewarding. It takes time, hard work, patience, and practice. No two dogs are the same. Sometimes, the best and most fun partners in the end are the most spirited and challenging to train. I recently watched the Kentucky Derby and could not help but be impressed by the winning jockey's strategic maneuver- ing, timing and truly knowing his part- ner well enough to pull off quite a thrill - ing victory. There have been days when I arrived at a show with a 40-plus hour work week barely in the rear view mirror, regular maintenance of my dogs on my to do list, and a mountain of worries on

my mind—just to compartmental- ize it all for those two minutes in the ring while my Special’s “fire to compete” inspired me like a mental energy drink. On the reverse, some days the handler may have a great day when the dog is not completely “on.” Yet, when both the dog and handler hit their stride in perfect synchronicity to showcase the best of the dog’s qualities and worthiness in the moment, there is magic to be made.

Carl used to tell me that you will al- ways succeed when you least expect it, and it has always been that way. I think that is because when you fo- cus on your partner, it’s really easy to silence the background noise and focus on nothing else. In the end, the dog/handler duo has the opportuni- ty to showcase the best the dog has to offer in type, form, function, and all of the other notes that play into the symphony of—hopefully—being selected as the dog on the day.

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CH BROOKVIEW’S HOMETOWN YUBILEE TOP 10 YORKSHIRE TERRIER NOHS* Yubi

STRUCTURE, MOVEMENT & TYPE!

THIS CORRECT SILK COAT HAS NEVER BEEN WRAPPED!

*AKC NOHS STATS AS OF 5/13/22

JUST NEEDS 1 DEFEAT TO FINISH HER GRAND CHAMPIONSHIP!

FOLLOWING IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF HER BELOVED GRANDDAM, THE TOP WINNING GOLD GCH YT BITCH IN GCH POINTS OF ALL TIME ALWAYS EXCLUSIVELY BREEDER-OWNER HANDLED BY Matina E. Johnson

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BLUE RIDGE CLASSIC

Fletcher, North Carolina . May 26-May 30, 2022 photos by Tom Weigand

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BLUE RIDGE CLASSIC

Fletcher, North Carolina . May 26-May 30, 2022 photos by Tom Weigand

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MOMENTS TO REMEMBER

A DONATION TO THE AKC CANINE HEALTH FOUNDATION CELEBRATES YOUR LOVED ONE—HUMAN OR CANINE. Make a donation at akcchf.org/tribute to honor a person or dog. AKC Canine Health Foundation will send a card announcing your gift to the person you designate. Your donation helps support canine health research and provide educational resources to dog lovers everywhere.

akcchf.org/tribute

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MONKEY DOGS IN AMERICA

by Barry Leece & Cameron Riegel Enchante’ Affens & Bouvier des Flanders

(A version of this article appeared in the September 2017 edition of SHOWSIGHT.)

O riginally from Germany, Affen - pinschers are a sturdy, comical Toy Breed historically believed to have been used in the home and farmsteads as a ratter. Woodcuts and paintings depicting small Terrier-like dogs that are probable precursors of the Affenpinscher place this little dog in Europe in the late 1400s-1700s, although official records and formal breeding programs for this breed did not exist until the late 1800s. In the United States, the Affenpinscher was first listed in the American Kennel Club (AKC) Stud Book in 1936. From Jerome Cushman’s authorita- tive book on the Affenpinscher, he notes that, “...in German the word affenmartig means ‘monkey-like’ and the word pinscher means ‘Ter - rier.’” In France, they are often re- ferred to as “Diablotin Moustachu,” or “mustached little devil,” possibly referring to not only their looks but also to their oftentimes goofy and mischievous behavior. ABOUT THE AKC STANDARD The American Standard for the Af- fenpinscher was adopted from an ab - breviated translation of the German

become vehemently excited when threatened or attacked and is fear- less toward any aggressor.” Having lived with Affens for many years, for a small dog, Affenpinschers have more than their share of attitude. A favorite description of the monkey dog refers to its “over-inflated sense of their own self-importance.” It may be a Toy, but they don’t know it! ENCHANTE’ KENNELS Affenpinschers in New Mexico, “The Land of Enchantment!” What place could be more fitting for such an en - chanting little breed? After retiring from a twetny-five year career with Johnson & Johnson, and Cameron’s successful real estate management business, we left California and de - cided to return to New Mexico as our base of operations for a burgeon- ing travel and dog-showing lifestyle. As AKC Breeders of Merit, we have bred and shown Bouvier des Flanders for nearly thirty years, but wanted to expand our canine horizons into something different. Affens fit the bill perfectly because of their comic tem- perament, easy-going nature, small size, portability, and minimal shed- ding. They are accommodating to

Standard in November, 1936. The Affenpinscher Standard is specific for size, eye color, structure, and a number of phenotypical traits, but is broader and open to interpreta- tion in describing other aspects of the breed. For example, ears may be cropped or not, upright (prick ear) or bent, but must always be symmetri - cal. The American Standard allows for a broader coat color spectrum, spanning silver, reds, beige, and black. This color variation is in marked con- trast to European Standards where black is preferred and no other color is encouraged or allowed to be exhib - ited. From the Breed Standard: “The total overall appearance of the Af- fenpinscher is more important than any individual characteristic. He is described as having a neat but shaggy appearance.” However, in the AKC Breed Standard, the description of a “monkey-like” expression is included no less than four times, emphasizing the relative importance of the distinc- tive facial traits. The breed’s temperament is de- scribed as, “game, alert and inquisi- tive with great loyalty and affection toward its master and friends. The breed is generally quiet, but can

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multiple group winning TEDDI GCHB CH SILHOUETTE’S STAY IN YOUR LANE

OWNED HANDLED BY DANIELLE HEYL

3 group 1 wins in a row! APC Gold Club Award & Hall of Fame Member ** Multiple RBISOH (Reserve Best in Show Owner Handled) Multiple Group 1 OH placements #4 Pomeranian Owner Handled * in the country

©PERSPECTIVES IN TIME PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS

*AKC NOHS STATS AS OF 4/30/22 **PENDING APC APPROVAL

what they offer in terms of developing a sound breeding program. Everyone has misses in judgment, but a good mentor can help to keep those to a minimum. At some point, breeders will likely want to develop a relation - ship with another breeder who may have a puppy, bitch or sire to incor- porate into their breeding program. Remember, they are guarding their reputation as well, so respect that and go into the relationship educated and aware of potential pitfalls. As in most purebred breeds, ama- teur handlers can feel disadvantaged and discouraged from venturing into showing their own dogs. One of the reasons we love breeding and showing Affens is the camaraderie that devel - ops between other owners, handlers, pet owners, and breeders. Fortunate - ly, there are many longtime breeders and handlers who are more than will - ing and generous with helpful hints to improve grooming and handling. We have always maintained that, outside the ring, we absolutely enjoy our re - lationships with other Affen fanciers and are quick to share a glass of wine or a story. But, in the ring, the gloves come off and we compete the best way we know how. Is it all serious competition? Hardly! This is a comical breed, so we learn to laugh at ourselves and our little dogs—and those we encounter along the way. Who hasn’t missed a ring call or been caught snoozing when supposed to be in the ring? Oh, and did we mention how notoriously un - predictable Toy Dogs can be? It only takes a time or two of not realizing that your dog has decided it’s time for a break and you just have to acknowl - edge the applause until they’re done. After all, they’re only human!

the show ring, improving the breed, or paying careful attention to maintain- ing a relatively healthy breed. Spe- cifically, reputable breeders of Affens have an almost maniacal attention to avoiding eye and joint problems. Many years ago, a friend of ours fell in love with “Tequila” and wanted an Affen of her own. She wasn’t willing to wait, so found several breeders selling “Quality Affenpinschers” online for a fraction of the cost of a monkey dog from health-tested, AKC champion dam and sire. She purchased a female that grew to be nearly four inches over the height standard and almost unrecognizable in facial expression, coat, and temperament relative to the Standard and Affenpinschers seen on the show circuit. To a great extent, there is truth and danger in the adage about getting what you pay for! Because of the Affen’s small size, it isn’t uncommon for litters to be as few as one puppy, but more typically in the 3-5 range. Survivability can sometimes be an issue with any lit - ter, but as litters get larger, so does the probability of mortality. We’ve had our share of heartache, so hav- ing a strong genetic foundation can’t be overstated. Knowing this, breed - ers are always scouring the country and the world for genetic compatibili - ties to strengthen the breed. This is a sturdy little breed, but genetic weak - ness can be an insidious threat if not managed proactively. For the new breeder, it can truly be daunting to enter the world of Affens. Start with love of the breed and add in healthy doses of education, diligence, willingness to listen, and hard work; it pays off. Reputation is hard fought and hard won. There aren’t any short - cuts, but it helps to latch on to a will - ing mentor and listen religiously to

active lifestyles, wonderful at Agility, or content to be couch potatoes. We absolutely love our Bouvs, but come bedtime it is much easier to fit six Af - fens on the bed! As in so many things in life, getting our first Affen fifteen years ago was a combination of planning and sheer luck. Monkey dogs are relatively uncommon, and getting one usu- ally means going on a waiting list of a somewhat limited field of breed - ers. So, we were thrilled when our long-time handler friends, Jorge and Susie Olivera, contacted us to ask if we would be interested in adopting a stunning little Champion, Tamarin Tequila. She certainly wasn’t perfect, but she was perfect for us. Comical, fearless, adorable, and eager to insert herself into our pack of Bouvs; she be- came our introduction to the breed that has slowly taken over our lives. Compared to most of the AKC breeds, there are only 500 or so Affenpin - schers in the United States. This rar- ity presents its own set of challenges for judges, breeders, and pet fanci- ers because it can be difficult to get hands-on experience getting to know their unique set of traits, correct phe- notype, temperament, and attitude. As previously mentioned, there are profound differences among the Stan - dards, between the United States and international Standards, regarding dentition and color. So, what a judge may see at Crufts may not correlate to what is seen in the United States. A strong judges’ education program helps to develop competent, objective evaluations of our breed. In our opinion, one of the developing threats to the quality of purebred Af- fenpinschers stems from their scarci- ty and the unscrupulous cashing in by commercial breeders not interested in

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T op N otch T oys , J une 2022 • 29

SPOTLIGHT ON THE CHINESE CRESTED By Arlene Butterklee

C hinese Cresteds are a unique and old dog breed with two varieties (Hairless and Powderpuff) that dates back to the 1400’s as shown by their depiction in various paintings and drawings during that era. No one knows exactly where the first Chinese Crested dog (or the first hairless dog, for that matter) came from. Some speculate Africa, others Asia, and still others Mexico; but what is known for sure is that the hairless Crested resulted from a genetic mutation or mistake. Other genetic mutations oc- cur within populations of animals, but the hairless Chinese Crested resulted from a mutation in a long-coated breed. The Chinese Crested’s hairless trait was propagated, and eventu - ally the Chinese Crested became the dog it is today. Recent DNA evidence shows that the Chinese Crested foun- dation may have originated primar- ily from Terriers with an infusion of soft-coated dogs. By 1979 and 1980, there were a few established breeders of Chinese Cresteds: Hazel Willard (Phaedri- an), Jenny Tall (RiverCrest), Wally Swett/Ken Oberg (Mordor), Dick Dickerson (Dickerson), and Ginette Perez (GiPez). During the 1980s, an early group of fanciers under Dick Dickerson’s guidance founded a club specifically dedicated to the Chi - nese Crested breed: the American Chinese Crested Club. The goal of the club was to promote the Chinese Crested breed, educate society about

1991, the Chinese Crested achieved full purebred status and was eligible to compete in the Toy Group. With respect to breeding to the Stan - dard, the original Chinese Crested Breed Standard had a few key points that made Chinese Cresteds a special and unique breed. First and foremost, “the Hairless variety” meant that the Chinese Crested was a real hair- less dog, with hair only on the head, feet, and tail. No trimming of hair - less dogs was accepted, not even on the face. They were completely natu- ral, with soft, baby skin that felt like porcelain. They were not allowed to be hairy Hairless groomed to appear hairless. The “Powderpuff variety” was the opposite, fluffy as can be.

them, and obtain full purebred sta - tus with the American Kennel Club. In February 1986, the AKC accepted the Breed Standard that the club had submitted, and the Chinese Crested entered the Miscellaneous Class. The AKC required the breed club to mod - ify certain aspects of the Standard in order for the breed to become fully recognized. One example was that Powderpuffs had to have erect ears, as did the Hairless. There were also dif- ferent styles of Chinese Crested; the refined and delicate type, resembling a little fawn (known as the deer type), and a lower-to-the-ground, stockier body type, (known as the cobby type), which were combined into one body style that we know today. On April 1,

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“IT WAS BELIEVED THAT THE HAIRLESS CRESTEDS WERE KEPT AS THE TREASURED PETS OF CHINESE EMPERORS AND THAT THEY HAD HEALING POWERS.”

It was believed that the Hairless Cresteds were kept as the treasured pets of Chinese emperors and that they had healing powers. If you had an ache or pain, simply place a Hair - less on the pain and the “higher body temperature” of the Crested would eliminate the pain. Contrary to this belief, Cresteds have a normal dog body temperature. It is only because they have no insulation that their body heat radiates out of them, giving them a portable heating pad effect. It was also believed that the dogs were used as ratters on ships because their prehensile paws allowed them to hold and grip their prey, and their “terrier- like” behavior helped them to shake the rat to death. But whatever purpos- es they were used for in the past, today they are wonderful little terrier-like dogs with big personalities. They are highly intelligent and, if one puts in a

but Powderpuffs had been allowed to have dropped ears. The Powderpuff had to have complete dentition while the Hairless were often missing teeth. Now, after 42 years in the breed, some significant changes have been observed. Dogs that are clearly not hairless are being passed off as such. A DNA test for the Forkhead Box I3 gene (FOXI3) supposedly tests for hairlessness; but in many cases, the dogs have thinner coats and poor den- tition without any areas of hairless- ness. Too often, these dogs are shaved to the skin and represented as the Hairless variety. This activity con- tinues to be an area of controversy. It takes little imagination to realize this practice leads to poorly-coated Pow- derpuffs with poor dentition being passed off as Hairless (or in extreme cases, normal Powderpuffs shaved to look hairless).

The Powderpuff was the completely covered counterpart, having the same structure but with untrimmed hair. The hair was soft and silky, but never kinky or curly. Minimal grooming for cleanliness was desired. Second, the Chinese Crested was a rectangu- lar, long-backed breed that was a Toy size. Over 14 inches was considered too large. Third, they had to have hare feet and elongated toes so that they could curl their paws and hold objects as if they had hands. Fourth, the head had to be a pleasing wedge. Shortness in muzzle and broad backskulls were not favored, even if they were consid - ered to be cute. The temperament of the breed was described as “terrier- like but never noisy or aggressive.” The old Standard allowed for dif - ferences between the Hairless and Powderpuff varieties. For example, ears had to be erect in the Hairless,

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two-year old “Sprite” earned her first Tracking title, and a year later, she earned her Tracking Dog Excellent title with trainer Wendy Wallace. Sprite’s full name with titles is Gin - gery’s Phenomenon CGN PCD CD CDX CGC AgN AgNJ CDN2 FDN FDNT RN RA RE TD TDX and, with titles bigger than her, she really was a phenomenon. The sport of Agility has taken over the dog world and is a very competitive ac- tivity. A Powderpuff was competing in Agility before it became a full-fledged AKC sport, but when it did, the Crest - eds started running and jumping and weaving in and out of poles. There are many MACH Cresteds, but the first one was a Hairless named Ch. Luvan Trouble Is My Business CD, owned by Barbara Majka and bred by the late Jean Scott. the dog world and is a very competitive activity.” “The sport of Agility has taken over

Powderpuff Crested (Little Joseph v Gingery, aka “Joey”), and made him the first Crested to be used in service work as a Hearing Dog. Joey paved the way for other Cresteds to help and assist the disabled. Today, “Androm - eda” (Seizure Dog) and “Beamer” (Hearing Dog) are performing ser - vices. Fidos for Freedom, a Hearing Dog organization based out of Mary- land, has also used Chinese Crest - eds. Quick, fast, alert, and smart, the Chinese Crested can answer the call of a crying baby or warn their hearing-impaired owners of fires or other dangers. Other Chinese Cresteds have found their niche in Flyball, Tracking, and Agility competitions. “KayDee,” who is owned by Lauralie Mcguire, com - petes in the North American Flyball Association trials. In March 1998,

small amount of time to explain what is expected of them, Chinese Crest - eds can achieve a great deal. Chinese Cresteds can do many things, but they are especially won - derful as therapy dogs. They are small but not breakable, very cuddly, and do not shed. These attributes enable them to sit on the laps of the elderly and to entertain small children. Be- ing active and intelligent, the Crested can be taught many tricks and Obe- dience commands. Their size makes them portable. The late Sister Pau - line Quinn, a Dominican Sister, rec - ognized the Crested’s love for people and focused their eager attitudes to make them Service Dogs. Sister Pauline established the first prison program where dogs are trained by the prisoners to help the handi- capped. In 1991, she obtained her first

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• First Champion in AKC: Ch. Phaedrian’s Razzmattazz With Spice (Powderpuff) • First Sire of Distinction: Ch. Gingery’s Maple Syrup (Powderpuff) • First Dam of Distinction: Sol-Orr’s Ten-A-C Walker (Hairless) • First Best in Show Winner (Hairless): Darshire Sun Nee Dal Of Luvan • First Best in Show Winner (Powderpuff): Ch. Gingery’s Maple Syrup • First National Specialty Winner AKC: Ch. Razzmatazzmanian Stripper • First Westminster Best of Breed Winner: Ch. Gingery’s Maple Syrup It is clear from the breed’s accomplishments in both Performance and in the Breed ring that the Chinese Crested is not just the average Toy Dog. They serve as excellent companions and love lap-living, but ask a Crested to do something and it will rise to the occa- sion. Living with them is always an experience, since they are comical and cute, playful and mischievous, and very inquisitive. Cresteds enjoy the company of people and should never be shy or nervous. Of course, their size (and their sometimes-fragile appearance) can lead to them becoming spoiled housepets. Some actually control their people by manipulation in order to get their own way, but if you treat them like the big personalities they are, Cresteds will be your best and faithful friend for many, many years.

Obedience competition, like the other Performance Events, re - quires a special bond between dog and owner. Chinese Crested Powderpuff OTCH Prezemeks Mr Mojo Risin UDX, aka “Jack,” was bred by Margaret Supronowicz and owned by Marsha Smith. Jack is the breed’s first Obedience Trial Champion. Lat - er, Marsha competed with another OTCH dog, “Laars” (Gin - gery’s Dramatic Mojo), who became only the second OTCH in breed history and was ranked No. 1 in the Toy Group the year he was campaigned. The most interesting and controversial activity for Cresteds is Weight Pulling. This is normally a sport that is done by the Working or larger Terriers, such as Pitbulls, but it has been em - braced by Cresteds as well. In Weight Pulling, the dog is hooked up to a cart with a harness. The dog cannot be touched, led, or fed by their owners, but the owners can talk to their dogs. Bot - tom line, the dogs have to want to do it or nothing will happen. The first Crested to win a UKC Total Dog award with Weight Pull is Ch. Gingery’s Terrapin, owned by Dana Ferry. He pulled over 55-times his body weight and also auditioned on America’s Got Talent as “Toby the Strong.” Most of the time, Cresteds are seen in larger numbers in the Conformation ring. The Chinese Crested Hall of Fame is a document established to keep detailed records of the Chinese Crested’s accomplishments within the AKC. Special thanks to Jennifer Johnson who is the current Keeper of the Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame contains a chronological listing of the breed’s Best in Show winners, National Specialty winners, champions, and breeding awards. It has expanded to include Obedience and Agility statistics as well. Some notable firsts include:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Arlene Butterklee has been a Chinese Crested enthusiast for over 40 years and has earned inter- national respect as one of the premier breeders of Chinese Cresteds. Arlene brings with her an ex- tensive wealth of knowledge and experience in the breed. In the 31 years since AKC recognition, Arlene has either bred or finished 340 AKC champions, including both Powderpuffs and Hairless. Her Gingery Chinese Crested breeding program has produced (in both varieties) Sires and Dams of Distinction, Best in Specialty Show winners, Best in Show winners (AKC, UKC, and International), and the Westminster Kennel Club BOB winner for the first five years that the breed was eligible. Arlene actively promotes both the Hairless and Powderpuff varieties of the Chinese Crested breed

pursuant to the AKC Breed Standard. She was the first to introduce Chinese Cresteds to the Performance Sports, having com- peted in both Obedience and Agility before the breed was recognized by AKC. Her dogs include MACH and OTCH titled dogs and are among Specialty Winners with performance and breeding accolades. As a longtime active and lifetime member of the American Chinese Crested Club, Arlene has served on several committees. In the 1980s, she was the Rescue Chair and later served on the Hall of Fame Committee that created guidelines for recording the accomplishments of Chinese Cresteds. Arlene is an American Chinese Crested Club approved breed mentor and has been a member of the Judges Education Committee since its creation. Arlene works as a Radiation Therapist for the Northwell Health System where she treats cancer patients. Arlene received her A.S. degree with honors in Radiation Therapy from Nassau Community College where she was the valedictorian. She also has a B.S. and a M.S. degree from Stony Brook University, where she is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board for Stony Brook’s College of Business. Arlene was also the commencement speaker for the May 2016 College of Business graduation ceremony. Arlene’s goal is to educate judges, spectators, and exhibitors alike on the features that make a Chinese Crested special—and not just a generic dog. Arlene can be contacted at 631-804-5186 or at Gingeryab@aol.com.

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*

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*All Breed Stats as of 4/30/22

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HEY! IS THAT A MINIATURE DOBERMAN? By Kim Byrd (A version of this article appeared in the October 2013 edition of SHOWSIGHT.)

F or those of us who live and play with Miniature Pinschers, our first inclination is to holler a great big emphatic “No!”—but we don’t. We gently smile and say, “No, this is a Miniature Pinscher. He is a totally different breed from the Doberman.” Now, let me explain why. History tells us the Miniature Pin - scher breed originated in the far away country of Germany. The breed first appears in a 17th century painting showing a picture of a cat-sized dog resembling the Miniature Pinscher of today. The Miniature Pinscher is, in fact, an older breed than the Dober - man Pinscher, which doesn’t come into play until the late 1800s. The breed was developed in Germany and agreement among dog historians tells us the Miniature Pinscher breed comes from genetic crosses of the Ger - man Pinscher, the Dachshund, and the Italian Greyhound. From these ances - tors, the Min Pin (as we lovingly call him) gets his feistiness, fearlessness, and his playful speed and grace. By the 19th century, the Reh Pinscher, as he was called in Germany, was devel - oped. The feisty and quick little dogs

moves, be it leaf or critter in his yard. The Min Pin is a great dog for small homes and apartments, although he requires exercise to keep his energy level down—or long walks in the park work just as well. They are protective and will loudly announce company, either good or bad. Until the company has been thor - oughly inspected, sniffed, bumped with a quick hop, sniffed again, and barked at again, only then are visi - tors allowed to stay. The greatest gift you can give your dog is the gift of socialization. Take him everywhere as a puppy. Let him hear cars, horns, trucks, banging pans, and loud nois - es... and let him smell his environ - ment. Have every stranger you meet, touch him and pet him. Be sure to hold him off the ground so that he is not in - timidated. He has to know the world won’t hurt him and that he really is the toughest kid on the block. You’ll be doing very little grooming to keep him tidy; a good brushing to re - move loose hair and a bath on occasion. Be aware he does not like to be cold, and some will bury themselves under the blanket even in the warmest weather.

were used as vermin hunters (rats, mice, moles and such creatures). Their size, 10 to 12-1/2 inches, and speed enabled them to get close to the home threats and keep the pests from eating food and destroying man’s home. The Miniature Pinscher is a square- proportioned, well-balanced little dog with a level topline. He has a hackney-like gait, with head and tail held high. The Miniature Pinscher Club of America and the American Kennel Club have accepted the colors Red, Stag Red, Black and Rust, Black and Tan, and Chocolate and Rust, in a short, straight, and lustrous coat. Miniature Pinschers are versatile and can adapt to just about any situ- ation you put them in. They are small enough to be a portable companion that is able to be a part of your life, no matter what you do. For short, we call him the Min Pin, but in reality, he is the King of Toys. He is fearless, feisty, quick to run after the ball or rabbit. He can be trained to sit quietly in a travel crate, walk politely on the leash, and cuddle with children and friends. Then with a smart bark and a jump, he is off to investigate anything that

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