Showsight Presents The Kerry Blue Terrier

TERRIER KERRY BLUE

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THE KERRY BLUE TERRIER

CONNIE CLARK I live in Rio Del Mar, California located in Northern Cali- fornia by the Monterey Bay. My husband and I enjoy cruising in the Pacific Northwest, Canadian Gulf Islands and points north in British Columbia. I’ve had 39 years in dogs, 39 years showing and was approved to judge in 2007. JULIE FELTEN I reside in Wauconda, Illinois, a northwest suburb of Chicago. I am employed as an insurance agent spe- cializing in home and auto products. Outside of dogs I enjoy spending time with my family and friends, music, traveling and shopping. I’ve had dogs since my early childhood and have been showing for about thirty years. I’ve been judging since 2000. ANNE KATONA

I started in Obedience with a Minia- ture Schnauzer in 1973. A couple of years later, I acquired my first show quality Mini and it took off from there. Along the way, I have also owned and bred champions in Cavaliers, Japanese Chin and Tibetan Spaniels. I started to judge in 1995; over 40 years in the dog fancy and over 20 judging. I can hardly believe it—time has flown by!

GIGI REILING In 2012, I retired from Hewlett-Packard after 28 years, where I was an Implementation Project Manager. I currently work at Ricoh USA as a Solution Design Consultant. When I am not working or at a dog activity, I enjoy live music and dancing. I have always had dogs, various Terriers and Pugs. I have been showing Kerry Blues for 40 years. I started in Juniors, but enjoyed the breed ring better. I’ve been a Kerry Blue judge since 2010, and was recently approved to judge Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers. 1. Describe the breed in three words. CC: Upstanding, balanced, soft and wavy blue gray coat. JF: Upstanding (proper length of leg), well knit (compact) and in good balance. AK: Blue, balance and upstanding. Blue being the coat color; it is the name of the breed. Balance refers to the com- plete package. Upstanding meaning on its toes and ready for anything, showing keenness and fearlessness! DK: Not low slung (the standard is quite specific in that regard). GR: Curious, intense and versatile. 2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? CC: Keen expression, powerfully built, free moving and soft, wavy coat. JF: The Kerry Blue must be moderate in every way: proper shoulder assembly (humerous is as long as the shoulder blade) with plenty of forechest, which brings the front legs back under the body allowing for a long free stride, a characteristic for the breed. I must also see small, dark, well-placed eyes with a keen Terrier expression. The coat must have soft, dense, rippling waves and of course, there should be plenty of dog behind the tail.

I live in wild horse country— Reno, Nevada. Outside of dogs, I love to read, snow show, bike, hike and spend as much time as possible with my daughter, Audra, my son-in-law, Scott and my 14-year-old granddaugh- ter, Ava. They live in San Francisco, California. Family is everything! I purchased my first Kerry Blue Terrier in 1973, and bred my first litter four

years later. The Kerry Blue will always be my heart breed. I started my judging career in 1985, with Kerry Blue Terriers. DAVID KIRKLAND I live in Sanford, North Carolina, which is located south of Raleigh. I am retired from Glaxo-SmithKline Pharmaceu- ticals and do some volunteer work locally. Steve and I enjoy our home, friends and participating in church activities.

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kerry blue terrier Q&A WITH CONNIE CLARK, JULIE FELTEN, ANN KATONA, DAVID KIRKLAND AND GIGI REILING

“TO BE A GOOD ONE, A KERRY MUST HAVE TERRIER CHARACTER:

KEEN, ON-HIS-TOES, EVER-READY, PROPER SET AND USE OF EARS, GOOD BITE, DARK EYE,

UP-TAILED ATTITUDE, PLENTIFUL, SOFT AND WAVY COAT OF VARYING SHADES OF GRAY BLUE, COMPACT BODY AND THE FREEDOM OF ACTION THAT IS DISTINCTLY KERRY.”

AK: I have several must-have traits. Outline: does it look like a Kerry Blue Terrier? Definite Terrier style: Alert, intelligent, keen, proud, feisty and confident! Balance: indicates soundness and ability. Well-knit signifies a pulled together dog while well-developed shows health and fitness. Height: clearly defined in standard. One sen- tence makes way for the superior specimen and justifies its existence (of course, here is where one questions who makes that “superior specimen” decision). Most breeders try not to take advantage of the maximums and attempt to stay within the moderate size range. However, the size pendulum swings every few years. DK: To be a good one, a Kerry must have Terrier character: keen, on-his-toes, ever-ready, proper set and use of ears, good bite, dark eye, up-tailed attitude, plentiful, soft and wavy coat of varying shades of gray blue, compact body and the freedom of action that is distinctly Kerry. GR: A large bear-like nose is my favorite trait, though coat texture and movement are what make the breed for me. 3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? CC: We are losing proper coat texture with grooming styles that tend to remove the waviness of the coat. JF: The tendency to breed and show dogs with incorrect fronts (i.e. short upper arm, lacking forechest) and exhibitors racing them around the ring thinking speed will cover up the obvious. AK: Body length and short legs are becoming exaggerated. The standard states, “Well-knit refers to the length of loin and ribcage making the back (topline)… Legs moderately long with plenty of bone and muscle.” However, most judges look at this combo and wonder, ‘Is the body too long or are the legs too short?’ In today’s show ring, one could see both! DK: I don’t know about exaggerated; however, there are a few things that have changed from the past. First, heads

are often shorter and blockier rather than clean with length. Second, presentation is different. They are shown with coats trimmed much tighter to the skin rather than with enough coat to be considered dense and plentiful (I see this tight trimming in Wheatens, also). Finally, size can sometimes be an issue deviating towards too large. GR: Exaggerated traits keep changing; however, narrow fronts and high kicking rears are not good. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? CC: Overall, the quality is consistent. As with many breeds, the quality depends on which part of the country you are in. In addition to the successful breeders here in the US, we’ve seen beautiful exhibits imported from the UK, Wales and Ireland that have also contributed to the breed’s success. “Mick” is a perfect example! JF: I think there are breed greats in many breeds that stand out in people’s minds. However, this is not an indicator of the depth of quality in general now or then. For the most part I feel breeders are doing a fine job keeping the Kerry Blue Terrier close to the blueprint. AK: I hate to answer this question, and please remember my remarks are my own opinions, but here goes. No, I do not think the breed is as good today as in 1980, or 1990 or 2000 to today. Yes, there have been a few really superior specimens. Unfortunately, none have produced as good as themselves, and certainly not better. That has been detrimental to the breed! All breeders have been striving to do the best possible with what they have to work around. Every once in a while, there will be a superior specimen and I keep my fingers crossed he will reproduce as good or better. However, there are several very good representatives of the breed (both dogs and bitches) in the show ring today! May the breeders be blessed by the Irish angels!

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kerry blue terrier Q&A WITH CONNIE CLARK, JULIE FELTEN, ANN KATONA, DAVID KIRKLAND AND GIGI REILING

“‘THE KERRY IS A POWERFUL DOG AND MUST BE CONTROLLED. TOO QUIET AND WELL TRAINED IS NOT TYPICAL; TOO SENSITIVE IS NOT TOUGH ENOUGH; TOO CONFORMING IS LACKING IN VITALITY AND ENERGY. THE KERRY STANDS ITS GROUND, ALERT AND READY BUT DOES NOT JUMP FIRST. ONCE JUMPED THOUGH, IT DEFENDS ITSELF TO THE END!’ THIS IS IMPORTANT TO KNOW— THE TRUE KERRY BLUE TERRIER DOES NOT JUMP FIRST.”

DK: Entries in this breed are not near as large as in the past. There have been some nice ones over the years, but the best Kerry I ever judged was the famous “Mick”. He is my template of perfection in this breed. GR: No, what I see today reminds me of dogs from the past and that shows consistency. 5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? CC: In the few instances I observed, there was misunderstanding the proper coat, movement and a low-slung Kerry. JF: I don’t think it’s really a misunderstanding about the breed, but more so we all have our own opinions and understanding about breed specific priorities. AK: New judges misunderstand mainly the Kerry Blue’s coat. Please be aware that curly is not correct! Cottony is not correct! Wiry or bristly is not correct! The coat should be soft, dense and wavy (Marcel waves) and molded to the body like a well-fitting garment! The coat should sparkle and shine in the sun. Do remember the Kerry coat should be so dense it should shed water. In addition, I am quoting from a breeder/mentor from the 1970s, but this still factors into judging this breed today. “The Kerry is a powerful dog and must be controlled. Too quiet and well trained is not typical; too sensitive is not tough enough; too conforming is lacking in vitality and energy. The Kerry stands its ground, alert and ready but does NOT jump first. Once jumped though, it defends itself to the end!” This is important to know—the true Kerry Blue Terrier does not jump first.

DK: Terrier entries are often quite low so I would imagine it must be very difficult for students without a solid Terrier background to truly understand breed type. I would not advocate that anyone apply to judge Terriers without experiencing them at either Great Western and/or Mont- gomery County. These two shows are most likely to have the numbers and the quality. GR: New judges must try to familiarize themselves with the phases of maturity, coat texture and color changes and muscle development. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? CC: I feel the breed is in good shape overall—hats off to the dedication of the breeders! JF: The Kerry is an aristocrat in the show ring. However, when the Resco® is removed, he makes a wonderful companion and is totally dedicated to his master, always looking forward to his next adventure. AK: I love judging, I love the dogs, the exhibitors and I com- pletely enjoy helping a newbie! I was mostly a breeder/ owner/handler and if I do not share what I have learned over the years, then shame on me. GR: They change and mature at different rates. I like to see them shown at all stages. In my experience, males are slower than females to mentally mature to a show attitude. It depends on how they are raised. Most are going to be pets longer than they are show dogs or brood bitches and that is a lifestyle they need to experience as they mature.

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THE KERRY BLUE TERRIER BY RICHARD BASLER

T he history of the Kerry Blue Terrier, like the history of Ireland itself, must be viewed through the mists of legend and myth. One popular story is that the Kerry, or Irish Blue Terri- er arose from black, soft-coated dogs that swam ashore from the remnants of the Spanish Armada driven onto the west coast of Ireland on their return to Spain. Another version tells of black dogs from Russian cargo ships, bound for England during the reign of Ivan the Terrible, driven off course and landing in Ireland. By either account, the story of the Kerry Blue Terrier seems to date from the mid-years of the reign of Elizabeth I in England. This was a time of great repression of the Irish People when private land

holdings were stripped from the native population and given as gifts and rewards to the great families of Eng- land and as punishment to the locals for holding on to their Catholic faith. Whatever its origin, the Kerry Blue became a popular dog in rural county Kerry, known for its small farms with herds of sheep and cows. The Kerry developed into an all-around farm dog in the days of tenant farmers—hunter of vermin, herder of livestock, and guard of the hearth and home. One of the nicknames for the Kerry is the “Gray Ghost,” a title bestowed for the Kerry’s ability as a provider of extra meat for the table from the rabbits it ran down and killed, hunting silently so the gamekeepers would not know that poachers were about.

Gentle, lovable and intelligent, the Kerry in more recent times has become an all-around working and utility terrier, used in Ireland and Eng- land for hunting small game and birds, and for retrieving from land and water. This overall working and sporting ter- rier is a faithful companion to the fam- ily, showing great personality, drive and energy. As one would expect from a dog of lowly and utilitarian origins, there are no Stud Books or pedigree histories. The earliest mention of what might have been Kerries was a report in 1808 by Bennelson, of packs of large gray, hunting terriers maintained by a few land owners in County Kerry. The first authenticated mention of a “silver- haired Irish Terrier” was made by Allan

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Lewis in a “journal newspaper” in 1887. These dogs were seen at a dog show in the southern part of County Kerry. This is also the earliest reported dog show in which Kerrys appeared. But it was not until after the formation of the Irish Republic that Kerrys began to appear in shows throughout Ireland, encouraged in part by their association with Gener- al Michael Collins, “The Big Fella,” who was an early Kerry owner and exhibitor and whose name and story is so intrinsi- cally entwined with the creation of the Republic. In 1921, Michael Collins spon- sored an Act of the Oireachtas in the Dail Eireann (Irish Parliament) to recog- nize the Irish Blue (or Kerry Blue) as the National Dog of Ireland. However, with the death of General Collins, the initia- tive died as well. “THESE DOGS WERE SEEN AT A DOG SHOW IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF COUNTY KERRY. THIS IS ALSO THE EARLIEST REPORTED

DOG SHOW IN WHICH KERRYS APPEARED.”

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1922 was the watershed year for the Kerry Blue. In that year, the breed was formally recognized by the Irish Ken- nel Club, the English Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club. This was also the year that the Dublin Kennel Club held the first Championship show for Kerries, drawing 257 entries. That year was also the first appearance of Kerrys at Crufts and at the Westmin- ster Kennel Club Show. The English standard is with a few minor excep- tions identical with the American stan- dard in that coats must be trimmed. English fanciers, always more fastidi- ous than their Irish neighbors, show the Kerry in a trimmed, more stylized coat, whereas the Irish still prefer a longer, less manipulated trim. “SOME OF THE FIRST KERRYS WERE IMPORTED INTO THE UNITED STATES BY SUCH

NOTABLES AS MRS. WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST AND GENE TUNNEY.”

Some of the first Kerrys were import- ed into the United States by such nota- bles as Mrs. William Randolph Hearst and Gene Tunney. In 1938, with the amalgamation of the Kerry Blue Terrier Club of America and the United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club, both founded in the late 1920s, the United States Ker- ry Blue Terrier Club became the official parent club for the Kerry breed. The Kerry is of medium height, up- standing and square, well muscled and with the strong bite of a hunter, but not accompanied by the visible jawmuscula- ture found in the Bully breeds. This size and structure makes the Kerry ideal for hunting small game and large rodents, such as badger, fox and rats. From the 1920’s one of the requirements to gain a championship in Ireland was for the Kerry to go to ground in a badger lair and bring the prey out. One might won- der if the Kerrys did to the Irish badgers was what Saint Patrick did to the snakes in Ireland, for in the 1960s the badger population had become sufficiently

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endangered that this requirement was dropped. The characteristic fall and beard is still retained as a relic that once protected the eyes and nose of the Kerry from the claws and teeth of the badger and the thorns of the brambles. Above ground, the open gait and strong musculature of its rear also makes the Kerry a formidable herder of cattle and sheep. The soft, nonshedding coat of the Kerry makes it an ideal house dog, and its size, combined with its love of family and home makes it a good dog for warning off potential intruders. In temperament, the Kerry will romp with the children, chase thrown balls for hours and then curl up beside you as you read the paper, ready for pets and scratches behind the ear. The ideal height for the Kerry is between 17 and 20 inches. While born black, the coat color matures into a blue- gray that allows for a wide spectrum of shade. A young Kerry needs some level of training and socialization, which its

intelligence readily accepts. However, left untrained and unsocialized that intelligence may result in unruliness. Kerrys, like most dogs of their size, require some level of exercise. While the Kerry is adaptable to apartment living as well as to a ranch, Kerrys need to have some room and time to exercise. Free access to a small yard may be enough, but where living space is restricted, owners must be willing to take their Ker- rys out for walks, runs or to parks where they can be free to romp. Kerrys also require grooming. The beautiful, soft lush coat required brush- ing at least weekly, but preferably more frequently. The nonshedding aspect of the coat requires that it be trimmed at least every month to six weeks. Kerrys are eligible to participate in numerous AKC events and receive titles for their efforts. Confirmation showing is popular, but growing in popularity are performance events, such as Obedi- ence, Agility, Rally and Herding, where

Kerrys are enthusiastic and successful in their participation. Kerrys are found in the ranks of Therapy dogs where their soft coat and love of people make them very suitable to that task. Kerrys also have retained their retrieving instincts and are frequently seen in Dock Dog Events where their enthusiasm, love of water and impish sense of humor often provide the watching crowd with great amusement. In general, the Kerry loves to please its owner, but does so on its own terms, as witnessed by Kerry that loved Obedience, but hated frosty grass. She would finish each routine by squat- ting beside her handler, her bottom a few inches above the wet, cold grass. With proper treatment, training, food and exercise, the Kerry Blue Ter- rier is very long-lived and healthy and will retain his activeness until the end. In fact, a Kerry Blue Terrier of six and eight years of age may well be taken for a young dog.

“THE CHARACTERISTIC FALL AND BEARD IS STILL RETAINED AS A RELIC THAT ONCE PROTECTED THE EYES AND NOSE OF THE KERRY FROM THE CLAWS AND TEETH OF THE BADGER AND THE THORNS OF THE BRAMBLES.” S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ANUARY 2019 • 341

COMMENTS ON JUDGING THE KERRY BLUE TERRIER

by SCOTT KELLOGG & BILLIE KNEALE

T he Kerry Blue Terrier is a long-legged Terrier that originated in southwest- ern Ireland, sometime in the late 1700s or early 1800s. It was developed as a multipurpose farm dog, and was used by mostly peasants to hunt vermin, guard livestock and serve as a companion dog. The General Appearance section of the US Kerry Blue Terrier standard highlights key

“THE FRONT ASSEMBLY OF A KERRY IS MORE LIKE A SPORTING/ WORKING DOG...”

elements of the breed: • upstanding, well-knit

• well-developed and muscular body of definite Terrier style and charac- ter throughout • good balance • a low-slung Kerry Blue is not typical • correct coat and color are important Proper balance and proportions, cor- rect movement for a long-legged Terrier and the breed’s hallmark coat are items to be particularly stressed. BODY STRUCTURE The standard does not specifi- cally describe body proportion; Ker- ries are slightly longer than square (height versus length). Square Terriers include Lakeland Terriers and Minia- ture Schnauzers—Kerries do not have this square proportion. But they are also not long-backed. They are not low- slung (short leg length in relation to back length). The neck is to be clean and moderately long—well set and carried proudly. A short-necked Kerry will look long-backed and often will have upright shoulder angulation.

MOVEMENT Kerry Blue movement is more akin to sporting/working dog movement than movement seen in Fox Terriers. They do not have a shortened fore- arm/humerus. Restricted reach and drive in the breed is faulty. Gait should have full freedom of action. Kerries do not goose-step in a pendulum motion when moving in the front—there is a bend of elbow and pastern which then extends out to full extension and reach. A problem seen in the breed is poor front movement often related to poor angulation—restricted reach in the front is the result. This is a difficult fault to breed out of—it often takes gen- erations. Hindquarters are strong and muscular and provide the power for good reach and drive during motion. Be cautious of over-angulation of the

The chest is deep/moderate breadth, ribs fairly well sprung/deep rather than round. Slab-sidedness is faulty. Shoul- ders should be long and sloping, well laid back. The front assembly of a Kerry is more like a sporting/working dog; it does not have the shortened forearm of the Fox Terrier—which is reflected in its movement. The back is short, strong and straight (level) (note: short back not referring to overall dog length). A slight tuck- up, short loin. The dog should not be waspy-waisted. Tail set on high, moderate length, carried gaily erect/ the straighter the tail the better. This does not mean long tails. This does not mean tails curving to the side like a Chinese Shar-Pei. There are dogs that are un-docked that have moderate tail length and proper carriage.

“A PROBLEM SEEN IN THE BREED IS POOR FRONT MOVEMENT OFTEN RELATED TO POOR ANGULATION— RESTRICTED REACH IN THE FRONT IS THE RESULT.”

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rear assembly. When viewed from the side during motion, the reach in front and the extension of the rear on the same side should be nearly equal, form- ing a “triangle” in appearance at the point of full extension. A good moving Kerry will reach in front to the level of the nose, or even past. Dogs with good reach and drive will have a ten- dency to drop their head down when moving; those carried high may be ewe-necked or straight shouldered. When viewed moving from the front or rear, the Kerry does not double-track; there is some tendency towards conver- gence in the cent (but not true single- tracking either). COAT AND COLOR Proper type in the Kerry requires proper coat texture and color. It is one of the breed’s defining hallmarks. The standards states the coat is to be soft, dense and wavy. A harsh, wiry, crispy, or bristle coat is to be severely penalized. There are too many Ker- ries being shown (and often reward- ed) that support a wiry, nappy, tight- curled, harsh or bristle coat. Coats that are “packed” by their groomers like a Poodle coat should be heavily penal- ized. The body coat should have the required wavy coat—visualize a “Mar- cel” or pinched wave.

“PROPER TYPE IN THE KERRY REQUIRES PROPER COAT TEXTURE AND COLOR. IT IS ONE OF THE BREED’S DEFINING HALLMARKS.”

An excellent coat will have row after row of rippled waves. The coat is a single coat—no undercoat. There is no such thing as an “open” coat. The beard is blown dry straight, or left natural with a slight wave. The upper part of the legs have a wavy coat; the lower legs are blown dry straight and sculpted. Lighter colored dogs (silver, silver-blue, silver grey) often have a ten- dency to have looser waves, while dark- er-colored Kerries (darker grey-blue, slate blue) tend to carry a denser coat with tighter waves (but not small/tiny waves). Light silver Kerries used to have a tendency to have a cotton-textured coat, but not so much anymore. Darker Kerries should not have a packed—Poo- dle type coat.

The coat is hand scissored—not clippered. The only areas clippered are the neck, ears, sides of the head, between the foot pads, the abdomen and below the anus/scrotum/vulva. Talented groomers can hide a number of faults with clever scissoring—you must go over the dogs with your hands. The color range is broad: from silver, to silver-blue and silver-gray, to blue- gray and into slate blues. Slate blues are not black. In natural light, slate blues will show a bluish hue and colored hairs can be found dispersed through- out their body coat. A Kerry is born black and develops its color as it matures. Some bloodlines are slow in developing color, but will eventually get color at an older age. Up to 18 months of age in the young dog, black is permis- sible. A black dog 18 months of age or older is to be disqualified. A white mark on a black dog over 18 months of age does not constitute clearing or mature color and the dog is to be disqualified. Some lines support a black mask on the head, with or without dark points on the lower legs. Black on the muzzle, head, ears, tail and feet is permissible at any age. In judging light-colored dogs, black marks may be present that have occurred due to previous injury to the skin—the hair at the healing area may come in darker or black—the dog should not be penalized. Puppies and juveniles that display an almost human-like hair textures will develop into the proper coat as an adult. The hair tends to lie a little flatter on the body and leg areas. Puppy and juvenile coats are transitional, or clearing, until they reach an age of about 18-24 months (some bloodlines are even slower). The transitional stage may display a tan or brownish color tinge—this clears out as

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should be excused from the ring in accordance with AKC rules and proce- dures. When sparring Kerries, be sure to have plenty of space between dogs. Spar two at a time—bring the dogs from opposite sides towards each other, but keep four or more feet between dogs when sparring. Kerries are fast and will try to nab a beard (or more) if allowed to do so. It is recommended to spar males with males, bitches with bitches. Males may not want to spar with a bitch. Be weary of novice handlers that may not know how to spar Terriers. Do not let handlers get the dogs too close to each other. The Kerry Blue Illustrated Standard states the following: at a dog show, a judge should put to the side any exhibi- tor who allows a Kerry to lunge and snarl. This is not typical of good Kerry temperament—Kerry Blues should be sparred. “If they eye each other intently, throwing themselves forward on their front toes, arching their necks, raising their ears to proper Kerry position, stand taut and ready for anything, each waiting for the other to make the first move and when, neither does, if they wag their tails, turn slowly and return happily to their places, then they are truly Kerry Blue Terriers.” This is a quote by Dr. E. S. Montgomery, author of the original KBT book. In summary, remember that balance, correct movement, proper coat and color and correct temperament as very important factors in your judging. The Kerry Blue Terrier is a wonderful breed and a lot of fun to judge—an out- standing specimen can take your breath away. Your educated decisions will be well received by exhibitors. ABOUT THE AUTHORS Scott Kellogg DVM and Billie Kneale (son/mother) are third/second gen- eration dog show exhibitors and have shown Kerry Blue Terriers since 1978 under the Camshron prefix. They have finished many champions, including three national specialty winners, BIS/ Group/Specialty winners, the top-pro- ducing Kerry Blue Terrier dam of all- time and a #1 ranked bitch. Both are Terrier group judges and have judged Kerries at the Montgomery County National Specialty, Traveling Nation- al Specialties, Chapter Club special- ties, Westminster and internationally (including its native country).

“THE MOST COMMON PROBLEM INVOLVING SIZE IN THE BREED ARE OVERSIZED DOGS; RARELY DO YOU SEE AN UNDERSIZE DOG.”

SIZE The most common problem involv- ing size in the breed are oversized dogs; rarely do you see an undersize dog. Ker- ries the size of Airedales are atypical for the breed—the standard addresses this specifically, even though there is not a size disqualification. Dogs over 20 inch- es or under 17 ½ inches and bitches over 19 ½ inches and under 17 inches are to be severely penalized—please read the standard for size descriptions. Legs should be moderately long with plenty of bone and muscle. BE SURE TO HAVE PLENTY OF SPACE BETWEEN DOGS.” TEMPERAMENT/SPARRING Kerry Blues are spirited, energetic dogs—they often show such tempera- ment in the show ring. They should not be vicious or show biting or attack- ing behavior. Dogs that bite people in the ring should be dealt with in accordance with AKC rules and pro- cedures. Vicious, uncontrollable dogs “WHEN SPARRING KERRIES,

they mature. They may also have color splotching, uneven coloring or unusual color-turning patterns as juveniles. There is no such thing as a parti-color in the breed. Kerries may have a small white spot on their chests. HEADS The head is long, but not exagger- ated and in good proportion to the rest of the body. Well-balanced, with no apparent difference between the length of skull and fore-face. A lack of back skull is a fault. Cheeks should be clean and level, free from bumpiness. The zygomatic arch should be flat, not pro- truding. The ears are V-shaped, small but in proportion to the size of the head. A small, flying ear and a high breaking set, as in the Fox Terrier, is for- eign to the Kerry head and expression. Ears are carried close to the cheeks with the top of the folded ear slightly above the level of the skull. Ears that are not reaching the cheeks, but end above the eyes are incorrect. A dead, hound-like ear is very undesirable. Kerry ears are partially man-made; puppy ears are glued to create the correct ear set. Some forgiveness may be needed if ears are not perfect. Avoid snipey muzzles. Correct bites are either scissors or level. Large, round, or light eyes are faulty. The silver, sil- ver-grey, silver-blue, lighter gray dogs will usually have eye coloring lighter than the darker-hued Kerries. When viewed from the front, the Kerry head should be rectangular (or brick) in shape, sitting on an arched neck .Heavy heads, short heads, cheekiness, bumpy domed top skull, short back skull, hound ears, flying ears, high- breaking ears, light eyes, too wide/ breadth of skull, down face, snipey muzzle, lack of beard and eyebrows are all faults when looking for the “perfect” head.

228 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , F EBRUARY 2017

KERRY BLUE TERRIER Question & Answer

CONNIE CLARK I live in Rio Del Mar, California located in Northern Cali- fornia by the Monterey Bay. My husband and I enjoy cruising in the Pacific Northwest, Canadian Gulf Islands and points north in British Columbia. I’ve had 39 years in dogs, 39 years showing and was approved to judge in 2007. JULIE FELTEN

work at Ricoh USA as a Solution Design Consultant. When I am not working or at a dog activity, I enjoy live music and dancing. I have always had dogs, various Terriers and Pugs. I have been showing Kerry Blues for 40 years. I started in Juniors, but enjoyed the breed ring better. I’ve been a Kerry Blue judge since 2010, and was recently approved to judge Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers. 1. Describe the breed in three words. CC: Upstanding, balanced, soft and wavy blue gray coat. JF: Upstanding (proper length of leg), well knit (compact) and in good balance. AK: Blue, balance and upstanding. Blue being the coat color; it is the name of the breed. Balance refers to the com- plete package. Upstanding meaning on its toes and ready for anything, showing keenness and fearlessness! DK: Not low slung (the standard is quite specific in that regard). GR: Curious, intense and versatile. 2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? CC: Keen expression, powerfully built, free moving and soft, wavy coat. JF: The Kerry Blue must be moderate in every way: proper shoulder assembly (humerous is as long as the shoulder blade) with plenty of forechest, which brings the front legs back under the body allowing for a long free stride, a characteristic for the breed. I must also see small, dark, well-placed eyes with a keen Terrier expression. The coat must have soft, dense, rippling waves and of course, there should be plenty of dog behind the tail. AK: I have several must-have traits. Outline: does it look like a Kerry Blue Terrier? Definite Terrier style: Alert, intelligent, keen, proud, feisty and confident! Balance: indicates soundness and ability. Well-knit signifies a pulled together dog while well-developed shows health and fitness. Height: clearly defined in standard. One sen- tence makes way for the superior specimen and justifies its existence (of course, here is where one questions who makes that “superior specimen” decision). Most breeders try not to take advantage of the maximums and attempt to stay within the moderate size range. However, the size pendulum swings every few years. DK: To be a good one, a Kerry must have Terrier character: keen, on-his-toes, ever-ready, proper set and use of ears, good bite, dark eye, up-tailed attitude, plentiful, soft and wavy coat of varying shades of gray blue, compact body and the freedom of action that is distinctly Kerry. GR: A large bear-like nose is my favorite trait, though coat texture and movement are what make the breed for me.

I reside in Wauconda, Illinois, a northwest suburb of Chicago. I am employed as an insur- ance agent specializing in home and auto prod- ucts. Outside of dogs I enjoy spending time with

my family and friends, music, traveling and shopping. I’ve had dogs since my early childhood and have been showing for about thirty years. I’ve been judging since 2000. ANNE KATONA

I live in wild horse country—Reno, Nevada. Outside of dogs, I love to read, snow show, bike, hike and spend as much time as possible with my daughter, Audra, my son-in-law, Scott and

my 14-year-old granddaughter, Ava. They live in San Fran- cisco, California. Family is everything! I purchased my first Kerry Blue Terrier in 1973, and bred my first litter four years later. The Kerry Blue will always be my heart breed. I started my judging career in 1985, with Kerry Blue Terriers. DAVID KIRKLAND home, friends and participating in church activities. I started in Obedience with a Miniature Schnauzer in 1973. A couple of years later, I acquired my first show quality Mini and it took off from there. Along the way, I have also owned and bred champions in Cavaliers, Japanese Chin and Tibetan Spaniels. I started to judge in 1995; over 40 years in the dog fancy and over 20 judging. I can hardly believe it—time has flown by! GIGI REILING I live in Sanford, North Carolina, which is located south of Raleigh. I am retired from Glaxo-SmithKline Pharmaceuticals and do some volunteer work locally. Steve and I enjoy our In 2012, I retired from Hewlett-Packard after 28 years, where I was an Implementation Project Manager. I currently

3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated?

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kerry blue terrier Q&A with connie clArk, julie felten, Anne kAtonA, dAvid kirklAnd & gigi reiling

CC: We are losing proper coat texture with grooming styles that tend to remove the waviness of the coat. JF: The tendency to breed and show dogs with incorrect fronts (i.e. short upper arm, lacking forechest) and exhibitors racing them around the ring thinking speed will cover up the obvious. AK: Body length and short legs are becoming exaggerated. The standard states, “Well-knit refers to the length of loin and ribcage making the back (topline)… Legs moderately long with plenty of bone and muscle.” However, most judges look at this combo and wonder, ‘Is the body too long or are the legs too short?’ In today’s show ring, one could see both! DK: I don’t know about exaggerated; however, there are a few things that have changed from the past. First, heads are often shorter and blockier rather than clean with length. Second, presentation is different. They are shown with coats trimmed much tighter to the skin rather than with enough coat to be considered dense and plentiful (I see this tight trimming in Wheatens, also). Finally, size can sometimes be an issue deviating towards too large. GR: Exaggerated traits keep changing; however, narrow fronts and high kicking rears are not good. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? CC: Overall, the quality is consistent. As with many breeds, the quality depends on which part of the country you are in. In addition to the successful breeders here in the US, we’ve seen beautiful exhibits imported from the UK, Wales and Ireland that have also contributed to the breed’s success. “Mick” is a perfect example! JF: I think there are breed greats in many breeds that stand out in people’s minds. However, this is not an indicator of the depth of quality in general now or then. For the most part I feel breeders are doing a fine job keeping the Kerry Blue Terrier close to the blueprint. AK: I hate to answer this question, and please remember my remarks are my own opinions, but here goes. No, I do not think the breed is as good today as in 1980, or 1990 or 2000 to today. Yes, there have been a few really superior specimens. Unfortunately, none have produced as good as themselves, and certainly not better. That has been detrimental to the breed! All breeders have been striving to do the best possible with what they have to work around. Every once in a while, there will be a superior specimen and I keep my fingers crossed he will reproduce as good or better. However, there are several very good representatives of the breed (both dogs and bitches) in the show ring today! May the breeders be blessed by the Irish angels! DK: Entries in this breed are not near as large as in the past. There have been some nice ones over the years, but the best Kerry I ever judged was the famous “Mick”. He is my template of perfection in this breed.

GR: No, what I see today reminds me of dogs from the past and that shows consistency.

5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? CC: In the few instances I observed, there was misunderstanding the proper coat, movement and a low-slung Kerry. JF: I don’t think it’s really a misunderstanding about the breed, but more so we all have our own opinions and understanding about breed specific priorities. AK: New judges misunderstand mainly the Kerry Blue’s coat. Please be aware that curly is not correct! Cottony is not correct! Wiry or bristly is not correct! The coat should be soft, dense and wavy (Marcel waves) and molded to the body like a well-fitting garment! The coat should sparkle and shine in the sun. Do remember the Kerry coat should be so dense it should shed water. In addition, I am quoting from a breeder/mentor from the 1970s, but this still factors into judging this breed today. “The Kerry is a powerful dog and must be controlled. Too quiet and well trained is not typical; too sensitive is not tough enough; too conforming is lacking in vitality and energy. The Kerry stands its ground, alert and ready but does NOT jump first. Once jumped though, it defends itself to the end!” This is important to know—the true Kerry Blue Terrier does not jump first. DK: Terrier entries are often quite low so I would imagine it must be very difficult for students without a solid Terrier background to truly understand breed type. I would not advocate that anyone apply to judge Terriers without experiencing them at either Great Western and/or Mont- gomery County. These two shows are most likely to have the numbers and the quality. GR: New judges must try to familiarize themselves with the phases of maturity, coat texture and color changes and muscle development. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? CC: I feel the breed is in good shape overall—hats off to the dedication of the breeders! JF: The Kerry is an aristocrat in the show ring. However, when the Resco ® is removed, he makes a wonderful companion and is totally dedicated to his master, always looking forward to his next adventure. AK: I love judging, I love the dogs, the exhibitors and I com- pletely enjoy helping a newbie! I was mostly a breeder/ owner/handler and if I do not share what I have learned over the years, then shame on me. GR: They change and mature at different rates. I like to see them shown at all stages. In my experience, males are slower than females to mentally mature to a show attitude. It depends on how they are raised. Most are going to be pets longer than they are show dogs or brood bitches and that is a lifestyle they need to experience as they mature.

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!"#$%#&&'$()*#$!#&&+#& !"#$%&'#()'*+,'*- ! hen I was a young teenager in the late 1970s, my cousin and her husband had an Old English

Sheepdog which they trained and showed to an AKC Companion Dog (CD) title, earning many awards at matches and trials along the way. I decided that one day I too would have a dog that I could successfully compete in obedience with, and the search for a suitable breed was on. In my junior high school library, I found a book on dog breeds that included a picture of an athleti- cally built but very beautiful and unique- looking large terrier breed: the Kerry Blue Terrier. It was the accompanying text that clinched it for me, though; the author described the breed as a “canine Jack of all trades and a master at most.” In 1990, I finally got my first Kerry, thus beginning my 20+ year love a ff air with the breed, and my successful involvement in AKC obedi- ence and many other dog sports. Especially when I was competing in obedience with my first Kerry back in the 90s, judges and fellow competitors frequently commented on how surprised they were not only to see a Kerry Blue Ter- rier competing, but that he was actually good! I also encountered skepticism from breeders when I told them that I wanted a Kerry for obedience competition; the breeder I ended up getting my first two Kerries from even initially urged me to consider another breed. But, as I now advise people who are considering add- ing a Kerry or another breed to their fam- ily, the best indication of what to expect is to simply look at what the breed was historically used for. Kerry Blue Terriers were originally developed as all-purpose, working farm dogs: they were expected to guard, herd livestock, and even retrieve upland game in addition to the more traditional terrier jobs of vermin eradica- tion, etc. In fact, the Kerry along with the 268 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J UNE 2014

closely related Soft Coated Wheaten Terri- ers are the only breeds in the Terrier Group that are allowed to compete in AKC herd- ing tests and trials! So Kerries should be, and are, much like the herding and sport- ing breeds, very trainable and willing to please. On the terrier side, there is a ten- dency for high prey drive, dominance chal- lenges, some dog-on-dog aggression, and a bit of an independent streak! Forewarned is forearmed; early and ongoing train- ing and socialization will produce both a family dog that is a joy to live with, and a performance dog that is willing and able to successfully compete in just about any activity you want to try with it. In 2004, the breed’s AKC parent club, United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club, cre- ated a Versatility Award in order to honor those Kerries that exemplify the breed’s original purpose by earning titles in mul- tiple categories: conformation, obedience, rally, tracking, “earthdog” (actually either the AWTA’s Hunting Certificate or Barn Hunt, since Kerries are too large to compete in Earthdog trials), herding, and agility. A few years ago, an additional miscella- neous or “wild card” category was added to include activities that didn’t fit neatly into the other recognized categories such as AKC coursing ability and canine nose- work. Although the Versatility Awards program does not normally recognize ther- apy or service dog certifications, the AKC’s

Th erapy Dog title (THD), which requires documentation of service hours logged in addition to certification, is accepted for this category. Th e program currently rec- ognizes a succession of seven di ff erent lev- els of achievement, from Bronze (for titles in two eligible categories) all the way up to Diamond (seven categories). To date, more than three dozen Kerries have been rec- ognized for earning titles in two or more of these categories, with more Club mem- bers applying for their dogs’ Versatility Awards each year. Recipients so far include Champions and Grand Champions, obe- dience Utility Dog Excellent (UDX) and Rally Excellent Advanced (RAE) titlists, AKC Master Agility Champions, cours- ing ability titlists, a Tracking Dog (TD), and multiple herding titles. Th is year, sev- eral Kerries with the new Barn Hunt titles are expected to be added to the list. My current Kerry Blue Terrier, CH MACH2 Kerigolf ’s Loaded For Bear UD RN MXC MJC MXF TQX CAA RATO HCT, is one of the Versatility Award pro- gram’s standouts. With eligible titles in con- formation, agility, obedience, rally, coursing ability (wild card), Barn Hunt, and herding, 6 year old “Remi” will become the breed’s first Diamond level Versatility Award recipi- ent at the USKBTC’s annual membership meeting in October 2014. And like many of the Club’s other VA recipients, he did not simply earn the minimum title required

for each category, but went well above and beyond in several! Remi finished his cham- pionship with back to back majors at a spe- cialty weekend; ranked as the #5 or #6 agil- ity Kerry for the last four years, has OTCH points and high in trial/high combined awards in obedience; and is one of the first Kerries to earn an open Barn Hunt title. Th is past year, Remi made breed history by qualifying for all three AKC championship events being held in Harrisburg, PA the 2014 AKC National Agility Champion- ships, National Obedience Invitational (along with two of his littermates), and Ral- ly National Championships! I am still plan- ning to start therapy dog work and earn an AKC Tracking Dog title (TD) with him. If we are successful at the latter, the USKBTC might need to add another recognition level to the Versatility Awards! But the titles and honors are secondary to the fact that Remi is a loving, well-trained and (usually) well- behaved family member that I love doing things with, and who is welcome almost anywhere I go. At a recent agility trial, a friend of mine overheard another exhibitor comment, “Now THAT’S exactly the kind of dog that should be bred!” Made my day! “Topper,” CH MACH4 Calix Cosmo V. Topper BN RA MXC MJC MXF TQX T2B2 RATN, owned by Patti Camp- bell of Virginia, is another Kerry that exemplifies the breed’s reputation for ver- satility. In addition to being one of the

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