Showsight Presents The Boston Terrier

TERRIER BOSTON

Let’s Talk Breed Education!

This Standard Comes With THE BOSTON TERRIER Everything BY CAROL GROSZ

T he hands that brought the world to Helen Keller were never far from her beloved “Phiz.” Cary Grant chose to own the only canine companion that was his equal in all things dapper and debonair. And for those of you who pause whenever you hear Louis B. Armstrong render his sig- nature ballad, “It’s a Wonderful World,” you might be amused to know that it was oft conjectured that Satchmo was crooning to “The General,” his Boston Terrier. Comforting. Debonair. Inspirational. All this and much more comes in a delightful package known as the Boston Terrier. Known as “a big dog in a small package,” just what is it about this lively little comedian that sends its owners flying to the dictionary for adjectives? For insight into their character and characteristics, we need look no further than the Breed Standard. Each recognized breed of dog has a standard that describes the perfect individual of its breed. Considering the breed’s original purpose, the Standard sets forth the physical attributes and person- ality traits necessary for the dog to successfully fulfill that purpose. Responsible breeders know their breed’s Standard inside and out, with each breeding carefully and meticulously planned. Breeders strive to produce an individual that not only reflects the Standard for conformation and movement, but also exudes the personality for which its breed is known. Each litter is evaluated for personality as well as structure to ensure that the puppy will thrive in its new environment. Does your dream dog win the ribbons and the points in the breed ring? Does he have the work ethic and drive to beat the clock in agility or score the highest points in the obedience ring? Maybe you’d like to share your Boston with other people, and you seek the individual who can quietly and comfortably make new friends who live in an extended care community. If your aim is to find a new best friend that enjoys a leisurely walk and a long nap on the couch, there’s a puppy ready to excel in that role too. Jodi and Dominic Koon have been breeding champion Bos- ton Terriers and world-class family companions for over 20 years. “Breeders seek to find the best homes possible for their puppies. We want to match the lifestyle, the home environment, and the fam- ily’s expectations with the puppy’s personality strengths. We have several repeat buyers of both companion and show puppies. We have also placed retired show champions. Companion homes are

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JANUARY 2021 | 189

THIS STANDARD COMES WITH EVERYTHING

“A consistently winning show dog requires more than an eye pleasing appearance to win in the conformation ring.”

looking for that special temperament of the Boston Terrier: loyal, alert, and friendly,” says Koon. “It’s very important to place the right dog in the right home.” The Koons are also willing to share the best of their breeding and show ring progeny with others. Cindi Bosley is one of these grateful owners whose dreams of owning and showing a superstar have come to fruition. When 10-year-old Cindi made her show ring debut in Pasadena, Cali- fornia, she did not come home with the blue. She brought home, however, the prize that would last a lifetime. Cindi came home with a heart on fire to compete. In 2019, she returned to that same venue and earned the coveted Best in Specialty with her sidekick and companion, MBISS GCHG QB and Hickory Hill’s Grand Tradition. Together, they are amassing an enviable record, each ribbon and title made more memorable as Cindi is an amateur handler. She gives all the credit to “Bronson,” her partner. “He finished his championship when he was just six months old, and each of those shows was a specialty,” shared Cindi. Just what is it that makes this specialty-winning dog so special? “He is structurally very correct. It’s his adherence to the Stan- dard that makes him difficult to defeat.” The 2011 AKC Standard calls for a calls for a “lively” dog that “conveys an impression of determination, strength and activity, with style of a high order” and with the prescribed color and markings. His overall message as he enters the ring shouts, “I’m something special and here I come!” His very demeanor reflects his intelligence, liveliness, and friendly nature. A consistentlywinning

show dog requires more than an eye pleasing appearance to win in the conformation ring. Those perfectly angled hindquarters and strong, short hocks help him enter the ring with the straight and effortless gait set forth in the Standard. With eye contact that reflects self-assured intel- ligence, he dares the judge to look any further. Athleticism, physical conditioning, and determination are factors as well. Dog show days are long days and the focus required to work with his handler is a necessity. Beginning with an early morning call to the breed ring, Bostons and their handlers must then settle in to compete for Best of Breed competition. Later in the afternoon is the Group ring and, hopefully, on to Best in Show where he will have to rely on the Boston’s determination to focus on his handler and “turn on” the shine. This requires a dog that is physically fit and engaged in close communication with his handler. A show dog must be physically fit to exe- cute his gait with animation, always holding his stacked position with intensity and flair. Mental alertness and the breed’s renowned intelligence help a dog like Bronson keep his mind on his mission. Unlike many dogs at the show, Bronson does not have to share his handler’s attention with anyone else. His day

190 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JANUARY 2021

THIS STANDARD COMES WITH EVERYTHING

breed’s activity level makes it a great can- didate for a wide variety of lifestyles. Their sensitivity to their owners’ needs is leg- endary. One adult male Boston, that was rescued at a year and a half, quickly took account of his new surroundings and got down to business. His new mistress had a pain disorder that often triggered full focal body tremors. Within six months of taking up residence, “Bugsy” was able to sense an oncoming incident. Whenever he came and sat in front of his owner, stamp- ing his front feet with determination, she and her husband knew what was coming. His quick diagnosis cut down on many visits to the emergency room. Sensitive and soulful. Comedic and compassionate. Alert and laidback. The individual Boston Terrier is certainly any- thing but “standard.” However, we look to the Standard when we are searching for a Boston that represents all the physical traits and characteristics we have come to know and love.

begins with an early morning groom- ing session and ends with evening walks geared to keep him both fit and relaxed; in a word, they are inseparable. It’s no sur- prise that he thrives on the road. Given the Boston’s predilection for being with their people, Bronson thrives on this arrange- ment. His owner can keep every detail of his home schedule the same when they are on the road. “They are just so smart. It’s my job to see that we stick to our rou- tine,” Cindi says. Meals at the same time of day, making sure he gets to bed on time and has plenty of rest; these are just a few of the things that help him feel right at home, no matter where they are. If he is happy and without worry, it shows up when he trots through the “in” gate, ready to take on all comers. Not all Bostons are destined for the show ring. There are many more that live their lives as integral members of their families. As happy settled into your lap as they are going for a hike and a swim, this

About the Author: Carol Grosz has been owned by Boston Terriers for over twenty-five years. She is currently training her younger dog, Joey (R), for his CGC. Carol is a published author and a freelance writer specializing in the preparation of promotional materials.

192 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JANUARY 2021

THE BOSTON TERRIER

COLLEEN BROSSARD

I’ve lived in California and Illinois, where I was a teacher. Aside from dogs, my other interest was helping my husband with his true love—antique shows. (His help with the dogs was spoiling them!) I was raised with Collies, but my hus- band and I always had one or two large dogs—German Shep- herds, Poodles or Dobermans. In the 60s, I lived in an apart- ment and wanted an active, smaller dog that I could spoil. The Boston fit the bill! John Loporto sold me my first show dog and Western Boston Club of Chicago taught me all that I know today. In 1995, after my husband passed away, I moved to Florida—which is truly God’s area! MARCIE DOBKIN I live in San Diego,

MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY

California and still work as Critical Care Transport RN to support my dog habit. Occasionally I make home crafted natural soap. I had an Airedale in col- lege, but quickly learned grooming wasn’t one of my talents. Then, I got started again in confor- mation in 1980 with Bull- dogs, which I showed until 2004. I was first approved to judge Bulldogs in 1996,

We reside in Independence, Kentucky and are lifelong residents of Kentucky. We are retired and have been married for 53 years. We have been breeding and showing since 1976. Michael has been judging since 1991 and Beverly has been judging since 2006. We were raised with Bostons as pets, but we got involved with showing when we purchased a male Boston in 1976 and the breeder entered us in a specialty show and we won our classes. From then on we were hooked. 1. Describe the breed in three words. CB: Square head from all angles, beautiful eyes plus the bal- ance of appearance of a square-looking body; therefore, the main three words would be 1) square, 2) balance and 3) round eyes.

now I judge the Non-Sporting, Toy and Working Groups. I grew up with Bostons. My elderly relatives all had them for as long as I could remember. My mother (who also grew up with Bostons) was actually quite disappointed that I bought a Bulldog and not a Boston (I thought BTs were “little old lady” dogs—I should have listened to her). I had become good friends with Ellie and Bob Candland while motor hom- ing at shows. In spending many weekends with them, I became enamored with Boston charm and bought a puppy from them. Cuddles was such a healthy joy, Bulldogs and Schipperkes were soon phased out and Bostons became my only breed.

MD: Stylish, square and charming. M&BS: Alert, kind and intelligent.

2. How much emphasis should be put on markings? CB: Even markings are a must, but more important mark- ings, in my opinion, is in the face area and of course the nice white chest. Lately, I have seen too much white past the shoulders and on the hocks. Then of course, you lose the balanced look! It is the same as very little white on

258 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018

boston terrier Q&A WITH COLLEEN BROSSARD, MARCIE DOBKIN AND MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY

4. What is the correct topline for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be placed on this? MD: The standard requires a level topline. These are not Frenchies or Bulldogs. This distinction from the Bulldog cousins makes the square aspects of the Boston silhou- ette distinct, which is so important to type. M&BS: The Boston Terrier topline is level and the back is just short enough to square the body. Both as breeders and judges, we put a lot of emphasis on a correct topline. On profile while moving the topline should remain level. 5. What effect does ear cropping have on head style vs. natural ears in Bostons? Should there be a pref- erence for either cropped or natural ears? CB: I love the cropped ears. Yet today more Bostons have smaller ears and I feel that there are really only a few veterinarians who trim the Bostons correctly. The small ears or bat ears are very hard to trim. Therefore, today many Bostons look fine either way. The Boston with larger or longer ears really clean up the Boston and give they look of dignity when trimmed. MD: I love cropped ears! The cropped ear adds a clas- sic, “finished” look of elegance to the headpiece. Small upright ears on the back corners of the skull are equally as lovely, but very difficult to find. Cropped ears are becoming much less common in the ring, but breeders don’t seem to put emphasis for the correct ears, thus big, incorrectly set ears are common and detract from proper intelligent and sweet expressions. I’m not sure why cropping has faded in practice, maybe difficulty in find- ing a skilled vet, cost, influence of the AR movement or owners afraid it will be painful to their beloved animals are factors. M&BS: As judges we feel that whether the ear is cropped or uncropped what is important is the correct placement of the ears on the skull and that the ears should be erect and in correct balance with the head. There should be no preference between cropped and natural ears. 6. Is the Boston a head breed? CB: Yes, in my opinion, it is a head breed; but yet again bal- anced with the rest. Without a proper head it would be too Terrier. That is where the shorter nose and the width are most important. I look for what we call the square look of the head from all angles! MD: The Boston IS a head breed! As companion dogs, this is the part we look at the most and seek in a dog whose only job is to make us happy. M&BS: Yes, the Boston Terrier is definitely a head breed as there are 35 points allotted to the head in the standard which is over a third of the total points. Although the Boston Terrier is a head breed, we shouldn’t accept poor structure for a good head. 7. Describe the proper/ideal expression for a Bos- ton. How important are eyes, wrinkles, and facial markings in influencing expression? CB: The eyes are what, in my opinion, give the ideal expres- sion. The eyes have to be large and round; which we lost

front feet; it seems to take away from the movement on most Bostons. MD: Markings are the icing on the cake. Any form of “tux- edo” markings within the standard, to define the dog as a Boston, are fine with me. Sadly, many typey, “plain Janes” are ignored for lack of flash when otherwise, they have all the qualities of a lovely Boston, but are just more subtle. Too much white I think is more of a distraction than not enough of the desired markings described in the standard, but that’s just my personal preference for my own dogs. M&BS: Naturally the Boston Terrier must have the required markings (white muzzle band, white blaze between the eyes and white forechest). This is a most important characteristic of the breed. Lack of these markings is a disqualification. While desired markings are preferred, a dog should not be penalized for not possessing a full collar. 3. What is the correct movement for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be put on move- ment that is correct for our breed vs. “generic” movement? What value do you put on reach and drive in the breed? CB: The Boston movement is ruined when going too fast! We want to see a nice reach with rhythm and level top lines when moving, which will not happen if made to move like a Terrier or Sporting breed! They are not to move like a Bulldog. MD: Of course, sound movement is ideal, but these aren’t field/working dogs dependent on structure for survival, BTs are companions. Bostons have no specialized move- ment like a Bulldog, Whippet or Neapolitan Mastiff. I much prefer a symphony of squareness with a beautiful expression over an incorrect, but more sound, specimen. M&BS: The Boston Terrier is a straight gaited dog with its forelegs and hindlegs moving straight ahead in line with perfect rhythm while maintaining a level topline. The front reach should equal the same distance as rear drive. The Boston should move effortlessly with good reach from sloping and well laid back shoulders at an angle that permits a good stride that is in balance with the rear quarters. Viewed from the rear, the hocks should remain parallel following on a line with the forelegs neither too widely or too closely spaced. Hocks and all four feet should turn neither in nor out. The Boston Terrier should function as a parallel tracking dog. There is some conver- gence toward the centerline, but the paws fall on either side of the centerline, rather than single tracking on the centerline. This would be due in part to the build of the Boston Terrier with its forelegs set “moderately wide apart”. Just as convergence must not be mistaken for moving too closely in the rear, a dog that parallel tracks should not be confused with one that moves with its legs parallel to each other, meaning that no convergence is present. If the Boston Terrier assembly is correct and all parts are in balance, you should have correct reach and drive. Without the correct reach and drive the Boston cannot achieve its proper gait.

260 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018

“THE EXPRESSION SHOULD BE INTELLIGENT, SOFT AND SWEET WITH A TWINKLE OF MISCHIEF.” boston terrier Q&A WITH COLLEEN BROSSARD, MARCIE DOBKIN AND MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY

for a while, but more and more through the hard work of breeders of today—they are coming back. MD: The expression should be intelligent, soft and sweet with a twinkle of mischief. Round dark eyes, (without bulging and white showing or lateral gaze) are what gives the Boston his distinct way to melt our hearts! A square, full muzzle adds to the softness and balance. Ideal mark- ings are just that, but correct expression can also be achieved with minimal required markings. M&BS: Expression is a most important characteristic of the breed. The Boston expression is alert and kindly, indicat- ing a high degree of intelligence. This expression comes not only from the Boston’s large, round, dark eyes and proper ear set, but also from an inner attitude that let’s you know how special a dog he thinks that he is. The skull is square, flat on top, and free from wrinkles with a well-defined stop, but slight wrinkling can occur in front of the ears when the Boston is excited or animating, or from lifting of the ears as well. This wrinkling in front of the ears should not be penalized. 8. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? CB: In the past ten years, we have seen so many improve- ments in the Boston breed; that is why they are catching the eyes of many Judges today. MD: Although no traits seem exaggerated in today’s ring, I am disturbed, right now, seeing Bostons that are too small and “toyish” with the coordinating round heads, buggy eyes and fine bone. The Boston is a family compan- ion, not a tiny lap dog and must be sturdy enough to be handled by small children without fear of injury. I’ve also been seeing unsound feet. In keeping the preferred small round foot, breeders have been exhibiting dogs where the lateral toe is too short to reach the ground. This needs to be addressed as a health issue. M&BS: There are presently no traits in the Boston Terrier that we fear are becoming exaggerated. There is no complete perfect Boston Terrier, but we do have our standard to keep us on track that was updated in 2011 to disqualify colors other than those listed in the standard. 9. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? CB: New Judges have a hard time understanding standard when judging them in the ring. Which I feel is because of the three weights. Many people have heard me say over and over that we should have a ideal weight. When you look at the Specials they usually are close in size. The smaller ones are not usually seen in the Groups same as the very large. It is all about the balanced look. Not weight. They are not always easy to show. The handlers have to make them think it is fun or they could care less. Also Judges have to be gentle with them on the table or

there goes the expression and the expression by shut- ting their eyes or turning their head away to show who is boss. MD: New Judges seem to equate the Boston with the Bull- dog and Frenchie—probably from too many seminars that compare the three brachycephalic Non-Sporting breeds together; thus too forgiving or actually choosing the roached topline and search for the flattest face pos- sible without allowances for the slightly longer muzzle as permitted in our standard. M&BS: Some new Judges may not be aware that a represen- tative specimen should not be penalized for not possess- ing “desired markings”. 10. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. CB: They are a companion dog, so unless it is fun they are unhappy. Lastly, I like the brindle in the coats as it seems to give the soft feeling with fine smooth finish look mixed with the black fine hair. But there is nothing prettier than a true brindle yet they have a hard time in the ring with Judges as of the White of the Boston stands out more with the dark seals and blacks. MD: I think I’ve said enough in the previous answers, but would like to define the ideal Boston by the following: The Boston Terrier is a dog of squares—square muzzle on a square skull with a square body in a tuxedo. A dapper gentleman, ready for an evening of adventure while on the town in New York City! M&BS: We are glad to see Boston Terriers holding their own in the Non-Sporting group. It has been awhile since the Boston Terrier has received the credit that they deserve. It is good to see so many quality Boston Terriers being shown and being recognized and we hope to see this trend continue. 11. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? MD: Too many funny experiences to think of one in par- ticular, but a giggler (now, not then) during the Bulldog National Obedience trial, my Bulldog ran away during the off lead heel exercise, forcing me to chase her through the gallery, the vendors, the lobby and the bar of this huge convention center, while yelling, “ETHYL COME!” and trying to catch her. She didn’t qualify! (Except for the comedy award.) M&BS: One of our funniest experiences happened when we traveled to Australia to judge the Boston Terrier specialty. In Sydney after renting a car at the airport we found that with all of the roundabouts that no matter which way we turned or what road we took we took, we would eventu- ally end up right back in the airport. It reminded me of Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day”. After that funny experi- ence we did our traveling by train.

262 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018

THOUGHTS ON THE BREED: BOSTON TERRIER

COLLEEN BROSSARD

MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY

I’ve lived in California and Illinois, where I was a teacher. Aside from dogs, my other interest was helping my husband with his true love--antique shows. (His help with the dogs was spoiling them!) I was raised with Collies, but my hus- band and I always had one or two large dogs—German Shep- herds, Poodles or Dobermans. In the 60s, I lived in an apart- ment and wanted an active, smaller dog that I could spoil. The Boston fit the bill! John Loporto sold me my first show dog and Western Boston Club of Chicago taught me all that I know today. In 1995, after my husband passed away, I moved to Florida—which is truly God’s area!

We reside in Independence, Kentucky and are lifelong residents of Kentucky. We are retired and have been married for 53 years. We have been breeding and showing since 1976. Michael has been judging since 1991 and Beverly has been judging since 2006. We were raised with Bostons as pets, but we got involved with showing when we purchased a male Boston in 1976 and the breeder entered us in a specialty show and we won our classes. From then on we were hooked. 1. Describe the breed in three words. CB: Square head from all angles, beautiful eyes plus the bal- ance of appearance of a square-looking body; therefore, the main three words would be 1) square, 2) balance and 3) round eyes.

MARCIE DOBKIN

I live in San Diego, California and still work as Critical Care Transport RN to support my dog habit. Occasionally I make home crafted natural soap. I had an Airedale in college, but quickly learned grooming wasn’t one of my talents. Then, I got started again in conformation in 1980 with Bulldogs, which I showed until 2004. I was first approved to judge Bulldogs in 1996, now I judge the Non-

MD: Stylish, square and charming. M&BS: Alert, kind and intelligent.

2. How much emphasis should be put on markings?

CB: Even markings are a must, but more important mark- ings, in my opinion, is in the face area and of course the nice white chest. Lately, I have seen too much white past the shoulders and on the hocks. Then of course, you lose the balanced look! It is the same as very little white on front feet; it seems to take away from the movement on most Bostons. “SQUARE HEAD

Sporting, Toy and Working Groups. I grew up with Bostons. My elderly relatives all had them for as long as I could remem- ber. My mother (who also grew up with Bostons) was actually quite disappointed that I bought a Bulldog and not a Boston (I thought BTs were “little old lady” dogs—I should have lis- tened to her). I had become good friends with Ellie and Bob Candland while motor homing at shows. In spending many weekends with them, I became enamored with Boston charm and bought a puppy from them. Cuddles was such a healthy joy, Bulldogs and Schipperkes were soon phased out and Bos- tons became my only breed.

FROM ALL ANGLES...”

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ANUARY 2017 • 147

WITH COLLEEN BROSSARD, MARCIE DOBKIN AND MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY boston terrier Q&A

MD: Markings are the icing on the cake. Any form of “tux- edo” markings within the Standard, to define the dog as a Boston, are fine with me. Sadly, many typey, “plain Janes” are ignored for lack of flash when otherwise, they have all the qualities of a lovely Boston, but are just more subtle. Too much white I think is more of a distraction than not enough of the desired markings described in the standard, but that’s just my personal preference for my own dogs. M&BS: Naturally the Boston Terrier must have the required markings (white muzzle band, white blaze between the eyes and white forechest). This is a most important characteristic of the breed. Lack of these markings is a disqualification. While desired markings are preferred, a dog should not be penalized for not possessing a full collar. 3. What is the correct movement for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be put on move- ment that is correct for our breed vs. “generic” movement? What value do you put on reach and drive in the breed? CB: The Boston movement is ruined when going too fast! We want to see a nice reach with rhythm and level top lines when moving, which will not happen if made to move like a Terrier or Sporting breed! They are not to move like a Bulldog. MD: Of course, sound movement is ideal, but these aren’t field/working dogs dependent on structure for survival, BTs are companions. Bostons have no special- ized movement like a Bulldog, Whippet or Neapolitan Mastiff. I much prefer a symphony of squareness with a beautiful expression over an incorrect, but more sound, specimen. M&BS: The Boston Terrier is a straight gaited dog with its forelegs and hindlegs moving straight ahead in line with perfect rhythm while maintaining a level topline. The front reach should equal the same distance as rear drive. The Boston should move effortlessly with good reach from sloping and well laid back shoulders at an angle that permits a good stride that is in balance with the rear quarters. Viewed from the rear, the hocks should remain parallel following on a line with the forelegs neither too widely or too closely spaced. Hocks and all four feet should turn neither in nor out. The Boston Terrier should function as a parallel tracking dog. There is some convergence toward the centerline, but the paws fall on either side of the centerline, rather than single tracking on the centerline. This would be due in part to the build of the Boston Terrier with its forelegs set “moderately wide apart”. Just as convergence

must not be mistaken for moving too closely in the rear, a dog that parallel tracks should not be confused with one that moves with its legs parallel to each other, meaning that no convergence is present. If the Boston Terrier assembly is correct and all parts are in balance, you should have correct reach and drive. Without the correct reach and drive the Boston cannot achieve its proper gait. 4. What is the correct topline for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be placed on this? MD: The Standard requires a level topline. These are not Frenchies or Bulldogs. This distinction from the Bulldog cousins makes the square aspects of the Boston silhou- ette distinct, which is so important to type. M&BS: The Boston Terrier topline is level and the back is just short enough to square the body. Both as breeders

148 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ANUARY 2017

WITH COLLEEN BROSSARD, MARCIE DOBKIN AND MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY boston terrier Q&A

and judges, we put a lot of emphasis on a correct topline. On profile while moving the topline should remain level.

M&BS: Yes, the Boston Terrier is definitely a head breed as there are 35 points allotted to the head in the standard which is over a third of the total points. Although the Boston Terrier is a head breed, we shouldn’t accept poor structure for a good head. 7. Describe the proper/ideal expression for a Bos- ton. How important are eyes, wrinkles, and facial markings in influencing expression? CB: The eyes are what, in my opinion, give the ideal expres- sion. The eyes have to be large and round; which we lost for a while, but more and more through the hard work of breeders of today--they are coming back. MD: The expression should be intelligent, soft and sweet with a twinkle of mischief. Round, dark eyes, (without bulging and white showing or lateral gaze ) are what gives the Boston his distinct way to melt our hearts! A square, full muzzle adds to the softness and balance. Ideal markings are just that, but correct expression can also be achieved with minimal required markings. M&BS: Expression is a most important characteristic of the breed. The Boston expression is alert and kindly, indicat- ing a high degree of intelligence. This expression comes not only from the Boston’s large, round, dark eyes and proper ear set, but also from an inner attitude that let’s you know how special a dog he thinks that he is. The skull is square, flat on top, and free from wrinkles with a well-defined stop, but slight wrinkling can occur in front of the ears when the Boston is excited or animating, or from lifting of the ears as well. This wrinkling in front of the ears should not be penalized. 8. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? CB: In the past ten years, we have seen so many improve- ments in the Boston breed; that is why they are catching the eyes of many Judges today. MD: Although no traits seem exaggerated in today’s ring, I am disturbed, right now, seeing Bostons that are too small and “toyish” with the coordinating round heads,

5. What effect does ear cropping have on head style vs. natural ears in Bostons? Should there be a pref- erence for either cropped or natural ears? CB: I love the cropped ears. Yet today more Bostons have smaller ears and I feel that there are really only a few vet- erinarians who trim the Bostons correctly. The small ears or bat ears are very hard to trim. Therefore, today many Bostons look fine either way. The Boston with larger or longer ears really clean up the Boston and give they look of dignity when trimmed. MD: I love cropped ears! The cropped ear adds a clas- sic, “finished” look of elegance to the headpiece. Small upright ears on the back corners of the skull are equally as lovely, but very difficult to find. Cropped ears are becoming much less common in the ring, but breeders don’t seem to put emphasis for the correct ears, thus big, incorrectly set ears are common and detract from proper intelligent and sweet expressions. I’m not sure why cropping has faded in practice, maybe difficulty in finding a skilled vet, cost, influence of the AR move- ment or owners afraid it will be painful to their beloved animals are factors. M&BS: As judges we feel that whether the ear is cropped or uncropped what is important is the correct placement of the ears on the skull and that the ears should be erect and in correct balance with the head. There should be no preference between cropped and natural ears. 6. Is the Boston a head breed? CB: Yes, in my opinion, it is a head breed; but yet again bal- anced with the rest. Without a proper head it would be too Terrier. That is where the shorter nose and the width are most important. I look for what we call the square look of the head from all angles! MD: The Boston is a head breed! As companion dogs, this is the part we look at the most and seek in a dog whose only job is to make us happy.

“THE BOSTON EXPRESSION IS ALERT AND KINDLY, INDICATING A HIGH DEGREE OF INTELLIGENCE.”

150 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ANUARY 2017

that compare the three brachycephalic Non-Sporting breeds together; thus too forgiving or actually choosing the roached topline and search for the flattest face possible without allowances for the slightly longer muzzle as permitted in our Standard. M&BS: Some new judges may not be aware that a represen- tative specimen should not be penalized for not possess- ing “desired markings”. 10. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. CB: They are a companion dog, so unless it is fun they are unhappy. Lastly, I like the brindle in the coats as it seems to give the soft feeling with fine smooth finish look mixed with the black fine hair. But there is nothing prettier than a True Brindle yet they have a hard time in the ring with Judges as of the White of the Boston stands out more with the Dark Seals and Blacks. MD: I think I’ve said enough in the previous answers, but would like to define the ideal Boston by the fol- lowing: The Boston Terrier is a dog of squares—square muzzle on a square skull with a square body in a tuxedo. A dapper gentleman, ready for an evening of adventure while on the town in New York City! M&BS: We are glad to see Boston Terriers holding their own in the Non-Sporting group. It has been awhile since the Boston Terrier has received the credit that they deserve. It is good to see so many quality Boston Terriers being shown and being recognized and we hope to see this trend continue. 11. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? MD: Too many funny experiences to think of one in particular, but a giggler (now, not then) during the Bulldog National Obedience trial, my Bulldog ran away during the off lead heel exercise, forcing me to chase her through the gallery, the vendors, the lobby and the bar of this huge convention center, while yelling, “ETHYL COME!” and trying to catch her. She didn’t qualify! (Except for the comedy award.) M&BS: One of our funniest experiences happened when we traveled to Australia to judge the Boston Terrier specialty. In Sydney after renting a car at the airport we found that with all of the roundabouts that no matter which way we turned or what road we took we took, we would eventually end up right back in the airport. It reminded me of Bill Murray in Groundhog Day . After that funny experience we did our traveling by train.

buggy eyes and fine bone. The Boston is a family compan- ion, not a tiny lap dog and must be sturdy enough to be handled by small children without fear of injury. I’ve also been seeing unsound feet. In keeping the preferred small round foot, breeders have been exhibiting dogs where the lateral toe is too short to reach the ground. This needs to be addressed as a health issue. M&BS: There are presently no traits in the Boston Terrier that we fear are becoming exaggerated. There is no com- plete perfect Boston Terrier, but we do have our standard to keep us on track that was updated in 2011 to disquali- fy colors other than those listed in the standard. 9. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? CB: New Judges have a hard time understanding standard when judging them in the ring. Which I feel is because of the three weights. Many people have heard me say over and over that we should have a ideal weight. When you look at the Specials they usually are close in size. The smaller ones are not usually seen in the Groups same as the very large. It is all about the Balance Look. Not weight. They are not always easy to Show. The handlers have to make them think it is fun or they could careless. Also Judges have to gentle with them on the table or there goes the expression and the expression by shutting their eyes or turning their head away to show who is boss. MD: New judges seem to equate the Boston with the Bulldog and Frenchie--probably from too many seminars “THE BOSTON TERRIER IS A DOG OF SQUARES— SQUARE MUZZLE ON A SQUARE SKULL WITH A SQUARE BODY IN A TUXEDO. A DAPPER GENTLEMAN, READY FOR AN EVENING OF ADVENTURE WHILE ON THE TOWN IN NEW YORK CITY!”

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ANUARY 2017 • 151

ThoughTs on The Breed:

BOSTON TERRIER

COLLEEN BROSSARD

MARCIE D OBKIN I live in San Diego, CA

and still work as Critical Care Transport RN to sup- port my dog habit. Occa- sionally I make home crafted natural soap. I had an Airedale in college, but quickly learned grooming wasn’t one of my talents. Then, I got started again in conformation in 1980 with Bulldogs, which I showed until 2004. I was first approved to judge Bulldogs in 1996, now I

I’ve lived in California and Illinois, where I was a teacher. Aside from dogs, my other interest was helping my husband with his true love—antique shows. (His help with the dogs was spoiling them!) I was raised with Collies, but my hus- band and I always had one or two large dogs—German Shep- herds, Poodles or Dobermans. In the 60s, I lived in an apart- ment and wanted an active, smaller dog that I could spoil. The Boston fit the bill! John Loporto sold me my first show dog and Western Boston Club of Chicago taught me all that I know today. In 1995, after my husband passed away, I moved to Florida—which is truly God’s area!

4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& . "3$) t

boston terrier q&a

judge the Non-Sporting, Toy and Working Groups. I grew up with Bostons. My elderly relatives all had them for as long as I could remember. My mother (who also grew up with Bos- tons) was actually quite disappointed that I bought a Bulldog and not a Boston (I thought BTs were “little old lady” dogs— I should have listened to her). I had become good friends with Ellie and Bob Candland while motor homing at shows. In spending many weekends with them, I became enam- ored with Boston charm and bought a puppy from them. Cuddles was such a healthy joy, Bulldogs and Schip- perkes were soon phased out and Bostons became my only breed. MICHAEL & BEVERLY STALEY

“EVEN MARKINGS ARE A MUST, BuT More iMporTanT Markings, in My opinion, is in The faCe area and of Course The niCe whiTe ChesT.”

MD: Stylish, square and charming. M&BS: Alert, kind and intelligent.

2. How much emphasis should be put on markings? CB: Even markings are a must, but more important mark- ings, in my opinion, is in the face area and of course the nice white chest. Lately, I have seen too much white past the shoulders and on the hocks. Then of course, you lose the balanced look! It is the same as very little white on front feet; it seems to take away from the movement on most Bostons. MD: Markings are the icing on the cake. Any form of “tux- edo” markings within the Standard, to define the dog as a Boston, are fine with me. Sadly, many typey, “plain Janes” are ignored for lack of flash when otherwise, they have all the qualities of a lovely Boston, but are just more subtle. Too much white I think is more of a distraction than not enough of the desired markings described in the standard, but that’s just my personal preference for my own dogs. M&BS: Naturally the Boston Terrier must have the required markings (white muzzle band, white blaze between the eyes and white forechest). This is a most important characteristic of the breed. Lack of these markings is a disqualification. While desired markings are preferred, a dog should not be penalized for not possessing a full collar.

We reside in Independence, Kentucky and are lifelong residents of Kentucky. We are retired and have been married for 53 years. We have been breeding and showing since 1976. Michael has been judging since 1991 and Beverly has been judging since 2006. We were raised with Bostons as pets, but we got involved with showing when we purchased a male Boston in 1976 and the breeder entered us in a specialty show and we won our classes. From then on we were hooked. 1. Describe the breed in three words. CB: Square head from all angles, beautiful eyes plus the bal- ance of appearance of a square-looking body; therefore, the main three words would be 1) square, 2) balance and 3) round eyes.

4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& . "3$) t

“I LOVE CROPPED EARS! The Cropped ear adds a ClassiC, ‘finished’ look of eleganCe To The headpieCe. sMall uprighT ears on The BaCk Corners of The skull are equally as lovely, BuT very diffiCulT To find.”

3. What is the correct movement for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be put on move- ment that is correct for our breed vs. “generic” movement? What value do you put on reach and drive in the breed? CB: The Boston movement is ruined when going too fast! We want to see a nice reach with rhythm and level top lines when moving, which will not happen if made to move like a Terrier or Sporting breed! They are not to move like a Bulldog. MD: Of course, sound movement is ideal, but these aren’t field/working dogs dependent on structure for survival, BTs are companions. Bostons have no specialized move- ment like a Bulldog, Whippet or Neapolitan Mastiff. I much prefer a symphony of squareness with a beautiful expression over an incorrect, but more sound, specimen. M&BS: The Boston Terrier is a straight gaited dog with its forelegs and hindlegs moving straight ahead in line with perfect rhythm while maintaining a level topline. The front reach should equal the same distance as rear drive. The Boston should move effortlessly with good reach from sloping and well laid back shoulders at an angle that permits a good stride that is in balance with the rear quarters. Viewed from the rear, the hocks should remain parallel following on a line with the forelegs neither too widely or too closely spaced. Hocks and all four feet should turn neither in nor out. The Boston Terrier should function as a parallel tracking dog. There is some conver- gence toward the centerline, but the paws fall on either side of the centerline, rather than single tracking on the centerline. This would be due in part to the build of the Boston Terrier with its forelegs set “moderately wide apart”. Just as convergence must not be mistaken for moving too closely in the rear, a dog that parallel tracks should not be confused with one that moves with its legs

parallel to each other, meaning that no convergence is present. If the Boston Terrier assembly is correct and all parts are in balance, you should have correct reach and drive. Without the correct reach and drive the Boston cannot achieve its proper gate. 4. What is the correct topline for a Boston Terrier and how much emphasis should be placed on this? MD: The Standard requires a level topline. These are not Frenchies or Bulldogs. This distinction from the Bulldog cousins makes the square aspects of the Boston silhou- ette distinct, which is so important to type. M&BS: The Boston Terrier topline is level and the back is just short enough to square the body. Both as breeders and judges, we put a lot of emphasis on a correct topline. On profile while moving the topline should remain level. 5. What effect does ear cropping have on head style vs. natural ears in Bostons? Should there be a pref- erence for either cropped or natural ears? CB: I love the cropped ears. Yet today more Bostons have smaller ears and I feel that there are really only a few veterinarians who trim the Bostons correctly. The small ears or bat ears are very hard to trim. Therefore, today many Bostons look fine either way. The Boston with larger or longer ears really clean up the Boston and give they look of dignity when trimmed. MD: I love cropped ears! The cropped ear adds a clas- sic, “finished” look of elegance to the headpiece. Small upright ears on the back corners of the skull are equally as lovely, but very difficult to find. Cropped ears are becoming much less common in the ring, but breeders don’t seem to put emphasis for the correct ears, thus big, incorrectly set ears are common and detract from proper intelligent and sweet expressions. I’m not sure why

t4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& . "3$) 

wiTh Colleen Brossa

rd, MarCie doBkin an

d MiChael & Beverly

sTaley

cropping has faded in practice, maybe difficulty in find- ing a skilled vet, cost, influence of the AR movement or owners afraid it will be painful to their beloved animals are factors. M&BS: As judges we feel that whether the ear is cropped or uncropped what is important is the correct placement of the ears on the skull and that the ears should be erect and in correct balance with the head. There should be no preference between cropped and natural ears. 6. Is the Boston a head breed? CB: Yes, in my opinion, it is a head breed; but yet again bal- anced with the rest. Without a proper head it would be too Terrier. That is where the shorter nose and the width are most important. I look for what we call the square look of the head from all angles! MD: The Boston IS a head breed! As companion dogs, this is the part we look at the most and seek in a dog whose only job is to make us happy. M&BS: Yes, the Boston Terrier is definitely a head breed as there are 35 points allotted to the head in the standard which is over a third of the total points. Although the Boston Terrier is a head breed, we shouldn’t accept poor structure for a good head. 7. Describe the proper/ideal expression for a Bos- ton. How important are eyes, wrinkles, and facial markings in influencing expression? CB: The eyes are what, in my opinion, give the ideal expres- sion. The eyes have to be large and round; which we lost for a while, but more and more through the hard work of breeders of today—they are coming back. MD: The expression should be intelligent, soft and sweet with a twinkle of mischief. Round DARK eyes, (without

bulging and white showing or lateral gaze ) are what gives the Boston his distinct way to melt our hearts! A square, full muzzle adds to the softness and balance. Ideal markings are just that, but correct expression can also be achieved with minimal required markings. M&BS: Expression is a most important characteristic of the breed. The Boston expression is alert and kindly, indicat- ing a high degree of intelligence. This expression comes not only from the Boston’s large, round, dark eyes and proper ear set, but also from an inner attitude that let’s you know how special a dog he thinks that he is. The skull is square, flat on top, and free from wrinkles with a well-defined stop, but slight wrinkling can occur in front of the ears when the Boston is excited or animating, or from lifting of the ears as well. This wrinkling in front of the ears should not be penalized. 8. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? CB: In the past ten years, we have seen so many improve- ments in the Boston breed; that is why they are catching the eyes of many Judges today. MD: Although no traits seem exaggerated in today’s ring, I am disturbed, right now, seeing Bostons that are too small and “toyish” with the coordinating round heads, buggy eyes and fine bone. The Boston is a family compan- ion, not a tiny lap dog and must be sturdy enough to be handled by small children without fear of injury. I’ve also been seeing unsound feet. In keeping the preferred small round foot, breeders have been exhibiting dogs where the lateral toe is too short to reach the ground. This needs to be addressed as a health issue. M&BS: There are presently no traits in the Boston Terrier that we fear are becoming exaggerated. There is no

“EXPRESSION IS A MOST IMPORTANT CHARACTERISTIC OF THE BREED. The BosTon expression is alerT and kindly, indiCaTing a high degree of inTelligenCe.”

4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& . "3$) t

wiTh Coll en Bros

sard, MarCie doBk

in and MiChael & B

everly sTaley

“iT is good To see so Many qualiTy BosTon Terriers Being shown and Being reCognized AND WE HOPE TO SEE THIS TREND CONTINUE.”

complete perfect Boston Terrier, but we do have our standard to keep us on track that was updated in 2011 to disqualify colors other than those listed in the standard. 9. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? CB: New Judges have a hard time understanding standard when judging them in the ring. Which I feel is because of the three weights. Many people have heard me say over and over that we should have a ideal weight. When you look at the Specials they usually are close in size. The smaller ones are not usually seen in the Groups same as the very large. It is all about the Balance Look. Not weight. They are not always easy to Show. The handlers have to make them think it is fun or they could careless. Also Judges have to gentle with them on the table or there goes the expression and the expression by shut- ting their eyes or turning their head away to show who is boss. MD: New judges seem to equate the Boston with the Bull- dog and Frenchie—probably from too many seminars that compare the three brachycephalic Non-Sporting breeds together; thus too forgiving or actually choosing the roached topline and search for the flattest face pos- sible without allowances for the slightly longer muzzle as permitted in our Standard. M&BS: Some new judges may not be aware that a represen- tative specimen should not be penalized for not possess- ing “desired markings”. 10. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. CB: They are a companion dog, so unless it is fun they are unhappy. Lastly, I like the brindle in the coats as it seems to give the soft feeling with fine smooth finish

look mixed with the black fine hair. But there is nothing prettier than a True Brindle yet they have a hard time in the ring with Judges as of the White of the Boston stands out more with the Dark Seals and Blacks. MD: I think I’ve said enough in the previous answers, but would like to define the ideal Boston by the following: The Boston Terrier is a dog of squares—square muzzle on a square skull with a square body in a tuxedo. A dapper gentleman, ready for an evening of adventure while on the town in New York City! M&BS: We are glad to see Boston Terriers holding their own in the Non-Sporting group. It has been awhile since the Boston Terrier has received the credit that they deserve. It is good to see so many quality Boston Terriers being shown and being recognized and we hope to see this trend continue. 11. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? MD: Too many funny experiences to think of one in par- ticular, but a giggler (now, not then) during the Bulldog National Obedience trial, my Bulldog ran away during the off lead heel exercise, forcing me to chase her through the gallery, the vendors, the lobby and the bar of this huge convention center, while yelling, “ETHYL COME!” and trying to catch her. She didn’t qualify! (Except for the comedy award.) M&BS: One of our funniest experiences happened when we traveled to Australia to judge the Boston Terrier specialty. In Sydney after renting a car at the airport we found that with all of the roundabouts that no matter which way we turned or what road we took we took, we would eventu- ally end up right back in the airport. It reminded me of Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day”. After that funny experi- ence we did our traveling by train.

t4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& . "3$) 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29

showsightmagazine.com

Powered by