Top Notch Toys January 2021

Yogi

GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

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GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen (CH Rhapsody’s Stairway To Heaven ROM* x Multi CH Am GCHG Always Pearl ROM*) Zen had a fabulous weekend in Orlando winning Best of Breed under judges Mrs. Barbara Alderman and Mr. James Mitchell (pictured), Best of Opposite under judge Mr. Johnny Shoemaker and Select Dog under judge Mr. Jon Cole at the 4 shows he was exhibited to complete his GCH title in just 7 shows. We are so excited about our new specials future.

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

ZINAIR ROSSITA, CM4 Tasha Congratulations TO THE BIEWER TERRIER FOR MOVING TO THE TOY GROUP. TRIPLE CROWN HAD MANY “FIRSTS” OF THE MAJOR WINS AND GROUP PLACEMENT IN THE TOY GROUP OF THE BIEWER TERRIERS!

2021 Best of Breed, First Bitch Biewer Terrier to win a Best of Breed Major Win 2018 BTCA designated National Specialty Best of Breed, Group 4 AKC FSS Best in Show Multi AKC FSS Best in Show and AKC Best in Miscellaneous Bred by Daniel Konti Kennels Owned by Michele Lyons and Daniel Yona

Donny RUS. CH IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA, CM7

Highest winning record of any AKC Biewer Terrier in AKC FSS 2020 AKC US Royal Canin National Championship Best of Breed and Best in Miscellaneous

2017 BTCA Designated Specialty Best of Breed and Best in Show

Multi FSS Best in Show and AKC Best in Miscellaneous Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons and Daniel Yona

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

RUS. CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS, CM4 Win

2021 Best of Breed and Group 4, First Biewer Terrier to win a Toy Group placement and Best of Breed Major Win 2020 Orlando Cluster Best in Breed 2019 AKC US Royal Canin National Championship Best of Breed and Best of Miscellaneous Bred by Olga Ptichenko Owned by Michele Lyons, Cindy Iken, Daniel Yona and Theresa Tafoya All Biewer Terriers shown exclusively unless Owner/Handled by Tonia Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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GCHB CH Rosemark Golden Arrow Se-Bash-Tian GCHG CH, Can Ch Rigair Unique Leo, ROM x Ch Rosemark's Virtue, ROM Bash!

Announcing Bash’s return to the ring full time. We are hopeful team Tonia Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara will work their magic with our boy and take him quickly to the top, as they did with his sister.

Co-owned by: Shanon Park , Previous owner/handler Rosanne Fett , Breeder

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Jovie!

CH Spark's Blaze Of Glory GCHB CH Rosemark Golden Arrow Se-Bash-Tian x GCH CH Rosemark So Cool She's Hot

Owned and bred by Shanon Park Handled byTonia Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara Bash's first, our first home bred champion Jovie finished her championship with a BOB win, a 5 point major over specials!

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Run Jun CH, Pol Jun CH, Euro JunWinner ‘18 AM BISS GCH CH SUNRISE DRAGONAZOR AHAI

Thank you judges, Dr. Wanda Spediacci, Mr. John Booth, Mrs. Mary Napper and Mrs. Carolyn Alexander for honoring our boy with these wins!

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Run Jun CH, Pol Jun CH, Euro JunWinner ‘18 AM BISS GCH CH SUNRISE DRAGONAZOR AHAI

Breeder Sunrise Dragon Elena Artemenko Moscow, Russia

Owner Sashellie Pekingese Kathy Hamilton

Co-Owners & Handlers Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

www.sashellielegadospekingese.com www.facebook.com/sashellielegadospekingese www.instagram.com/sashellielegadospekingese

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The darkness of 2020 while sitting out 3/4 of the year was brightened along the way with Westminster BOB, AMA Specialty Best in Show, Top AKC Breeder for the Toy Group and making future generations of hopeful stars. 2021 will allow us all to shine again...

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

BRED, CO-OWNED & HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN 2020 AKC BREEDER OF THE YEAR TOY GROUP HONOREE

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# ONE maltese (breed)*

©2020 American Kennel Club

- MULTIPLE BIS & MULTIPLE BISS WINNER -

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

- 2020 WESTMINSTER BOB WINNER -

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*AKC stats as of 10.31.20

DEBARAH BILLINGS BREEDER OWNER HANDLER WWW.WINDSONGBIEWERS.COM

AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

Biewer Terrier I N T O T H E T O Y G R O U P 2 0 2 1 WE L C OM I N G T H E

Yogi

C O N G R AT U L AT E S H I S G R A N D C H I L D R E N G A RT H A N D R UMO R !

WINDSONG’S WHEN THE THUNDER ROLLS CM2 5TH GENERATION BRED BY 2019 ROYAL CANIN BIEWER TERRIER PUPPY OF THE YEAR MULTIPLE BEST IN MISCELLANEOUS AND BOB NATIONAL SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW 2019 Garth

ROYAL CANIN BRED BY 2019

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DEBARAH BILLINGS BREEDER OWNER HANDLER WWW.WINDSONGBIEWERS.COM

AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

Rumor WINDSONG’S SOMETHIN’ TO TALK ABOUT YOGI ’S GRANDDAUGHTER

ROYAL CANIN BIEWER TERRIER PUPPY OF THE YEAR 2020

BEST IN MISCELLANEOUS ORLANDO CLUSTER 2020

BEST OPPOSITE NATIONAL SPECIALTY 2020

HANDLED BY SUSAN GILES

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

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45

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AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1.908.288.7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING BONNIE GUGGENHEIM bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1.512.686.3466

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16 Message from the Publisher AJ Arapovic 18 Toy Talk

38 42 45 60 61

The Havanese: What’s So Hard to Understand? Kathy Ambler

Bonnie Guggenheim

22 Toy Box

Simple Talk on the Yorkshire Terrier Kathleen B. Kolbert

Shelby Stevens & Kimberly Mackenzie

26 The Pomeranian: Structure Equals Healthy Function Debra Kailer 32 Whose Fault Is It? Terence Farley 36 Living with Havanese Joan J. Ambrose

The Biewer Terrier Various Guests

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

Rates

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

Index to Advertisers

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Grand Champion # 1 # 1 HAVANESE * POINTS **

OWNED BY PAT TSCHOHL , SANDY MCCABE , DEB MCHUGH & WADE KOI ST INEN

Platinum Grand Champion HEARTLANDS R I PP IN T IME B I S , R B I S , & B I S S W I N S *AKC BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/20 **AKC GCH STATS AS OF 12/31/20

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER

WHAT A BLESSING

2 021 is finally here and I am quite sure it is going to be a great year! Of course, I amnot sure. I don’t knowwhat the future will bring—and none of us do, but I do know that a positive mindset will always create a happier life than a negative one. Although we did have a lot of amazing clubs postpone or cancel their 2020 shows, we will soon be blessed with many others that are fast-approaching in January and February. I myself have had conversations with many Show Chairs of the canceled or postponed shows, and they are all eager to return. Just like the rest of us, everyone is waiting to make any major decision until the beginning of February. However, I can tell you one thing: It is more than likely that the last three quarters of the year could be the best we have had in decades. I know that it is hard for many to see the light at end of the tunnel “today,” but we all know that it is there and we also know that when it shines on us it will be extremely bright. On occasion, we all hear about how our community doesn’t have a bright future. I beg to differ. Our dog show family has spoken, and the attitudes and actions of thousands have kicked such rumors and opin- ions, like a street sweeping truck, to the side of the road. New decade, here we come... I can’t continue this message without applauding every single person and organization that had anything to do with putting together all the amazing shows we enjoyed in 2020. Thank you, truly, from the bottom of my heart for doing such a phenomenal job of providing a safe and happy environment for the fancy to come together to compete and have a good time. Although I can’t speak for anyone but the Aramedia Group family, I’d like you all to know that you have helped thousands keep their jobs this year. I definitely can’t sign-off without thanking our amazing clients who decided to advertise and subscribe to TOP NOTCH TOYS during these unpredictable times. Many thanks also to the American Kennel Club and the Superintendents, ShowChairs, and Judges for enabling us all to participate in the sport. We wouldn’t have been able to produce a magazine without you. Last, but not least, many thanks to the Professional Handlers!! You have stepped-up so much for your clients, just as they did for you. Many of you left your homes for weeks and months at a time, driving thou- sands of miles week after week to keep us all whole. If we have learned anything from 2020, it is that we all depend on each other. We are, indeed, one large family that keeps on giving. We should all be extremely grateful for one another—I know the TOP NOTCHTOYS Family is! As my wife and I reflect on the past few years since becoming new owners of TOP NOTCH TOYS , we can’t help but feel very blessed that we have been given such a family. We’ve been given the opportunity to serve you and we are blessed to be surrounded by so many passionate people who just want to do well for our community. And I am blessed by having the privilege to consider so many of you our good friends. The trust you place in our magazine makes all the effort worthwhile. Your success—this year and every year—is our success. Hanifa and I are excited to welcome our third child into the world this coming year. We are pregnant and looking forward to welcoming our baby girl/boy sometime in early August. One more time, thank you to all our clients, readers, employees, and industry associates. I was taught that you can never give thanks enough to those who deserve it and, ladies and gentleman, you more than deserve it. May you all enjoy the many blessings in the coming season.

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

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Viva Bless Your Heart Grand Champion

MayBelle

#12 All Breed 2020 *

AOE & Best Bred By at AKC National Championship

*AKC All Breed Stats as of 12/31/21

Bred by and exclusively handled by Cecilia Bozzo

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PROMOTE YOUR WINNING IMAGE & CREATE AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN FOR 2021 by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor TOY TALK ETCETERA

T hought for the month! Without advertising, who would be aware of your accomplishments? An advertising plan or a cam- paign reaches a target audience, pro- motes a winning image of your Toy dog, and gives credibility to a breeding program. Think of your ads as your kennel or dogs’ “brand.” They present your dogs’ breed, type, style and, of course, wins! We are all aware of the kennel names that signify a great moving dog, a fabu- lous head, or a wonderful coat texture. In short, these qualities are the brand that’s been developed over the years and advertised on a consistent basis. An established brand makes any ac- complishment stand out. This “brand- ing” makes a kennel or a specific dog (or, at times, a prestigious win) stick in the minds of readers as they look to the future. Advertising creates an emotional response that affects your peers’

decisions as to which dog to breed to and which judges to exhibit to. Plus, advertising promotes your carefully crafted brand. Branding is not exclusively for the ad- vertising savvy. Top Notch Toys has a knowledgeable and creative design staff at your service, and I’m here to help you make decisions about your ad. We create beautiful and eye-catching ads that will enhance your brand. Our staff professionals are helpful with de- signing a campaign for that superior class dog as well as Group and Best in Showwinning specials. Letme help you create the brand that puts you in the top ranks and, through the creativity of our designers, makes you memorable. If you have a designer that you love working with, I’m happy to have them included as part of your ad process. Please contact me to start creating YOUR BRAND that will give you a great deal of exposure and promote an image of success in the show ring.

Branding offers a permanent refer- ence in print media and is a powerful way to build continued success. Face- book cannot do this and neither can digital magazines. Images in these formats cannot provide a permanent reference that can be taken from a library shelf for reference or review. Digital publications do have their place, of course, but the printed word in Top Notch Toys offers long-term im- pact and engagement with those who matter most in our wonderful world of dogs. A great photograph is worth a million words. Please call or text me with your exciting news and wins—because in- quiring minds want to know!

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagrp.com 512.971.3280

HAVE A HAPPY AND WINNING NEW YEAR

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M U LT I O H G R O U P W I N N I N G • M U LT I G R O U P P L AC I N G • O H B I S GCHS TYAVA’ S SUGARFOOTS STRIKE FORCE

for this Owner Handled win. Appreciation to the judges who have awarded this very correct Yorkie.

BREEDER: AVA TYREE, TYAVA’S YORKIES

OWNER/HANDLER: VICKI EDWARDS, SUGARFOOT YORKIES

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Kathleen B. Kolbert Turyanne Yorkshire Terriers

CH Ozmillion Playboy CHWindsor Gayelyn Gilded Lily CH Gayelyn Gilded Lily Adam Gidget Lily Father Mother Daughter

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Gilly

CH Rembrandt’s Gilly of Turyanne

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog. 22 • T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2021

*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/20

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*AKC stats as of 12/31/20

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THE POMERANIAN STRUCTURE EQUALS HEALTHY FUNCTION

By Debra Kailer

T he purpose of this article is to bring to light how structure has a cause and effect on the overall healthy function of the Pomera- nian. How does structure impact the long-term soundness in this small breed? It is important that, as mem- bers of the American Pomeranian Club, we must improve the patella health for the future of the breed. It is apparent to me that we have let ir- responsible judging lead to irrespon- sible breeding, and that judges are un- aware that the decisions they make in the show ring promote the lameness problems in our breed. I have asked judges if they were aware of the un- soundness issues of the Pomeranian and the answer has been resounding that they “were not.” Unlike the other Toy breeds, the Po- meranian has the worst structural is- sues leading to the degradation of the patella, which leads to painful lame- ness and costly surgeries. This degra- dation of the patella is caused by how

the weight of the dog is carried over its structure. The breed standard for the Pomeranian has clearly stated that the Pomeranian should have a pro- nounced prosterum. The prosterum should be positioned halfway, center line of the body of the dog. Equally important, to reduce the degradation of the patella, is the laid back shoulder because it carries the majority of the weight of the dog over the dog’s shoul- ders, reducing stress to the rear legs. Correcting the shoulder structure in this breed will give our Pomeranians a better chance of living a full life and avoiding patella problems. Entering the world of dog showing was new to my husband and I. We just assumed that a champion Pomera- nian would be a complete individual with type, and that correct structure would be the baseline; a given. Much to my surprise, you cannot trust that a champion Pomeranian is truly a structurally sound breeding dog. The OFA at that time had the Pomeranian

listed at 50/100 of the breeds with pa- tella problems. Sowe asked the breed- ers, “Why do Pomeranians have so many issues with their patellas?” The response was, “Pomeranians are just like that. All they need to do is walk over to the water bowl.” It was 15 years ago when we decid- ed we would like to try our hand at showing. We had two Pomeranians as pets, with no patella problems. As our pets aged, we looked for a Po- meranian puppy with show potential. It was my thought that we should get a starter Pomeranian before we in- vested a lot of money in a show dog. We knew we were going to need men- tors, and we were lucky to have close to our home several good mentors for whom, in their own breeds, struc- ture was paramount in their breed- ing programs. We were lucky that our mentors were dog people—not only Pomeranian people—because we were indoctrinated to the im- portance of structure in show and

“WE JUST ASSUMED THAT A CHAMPION POMERANIAN WOULD BE A COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL WITH TYPE, AND THAT CORRECT STRUCTURE WOULD BE THE BASELINE; A GIVEN. Much to my surprise, you cannot trust that a champion Pomeranian is truly a structurally sound breeding dog.”

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VAIDEN Shih Tzu Vaidenshi tzu.tripod.com

MultiBIS AmGrCh BrazCh Columbia CH PanAmCh BR Pepper’s Kiss This Doll x Ch Vaiden’s Just Like Daddy are delighted to announce that their three boys are now Champions! This makes both parents ROM eligible. Quite an accomplishment during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic which resulted in limited shows with significant competition! We are extremely proud of this achievement!

CH VAIDEN’S RED JADE Bred by Deborah Vaiden Owned by Hideki Iguchi & Deborah Vaiden Handled by Becky Mullins Thank you Judges Joao Machado, David Miller for two 5 point majors and Tammy Jackson for Award of Excellence at Royal Canin National

CH VAIDEN’S KISS N’ RUN Bred & Owned by Deborah Vaiden Handled by Becky Mullins

CH VAIDEN’S GAGA LOVER COOPER AT SHORELAND Bred by Deborah Vaiden Owned by Ed Schott & Deborah Vaiden

Special thanks to Becky Mullins for her hard work and perseverance in making this possible. Also many thanks to Charly Andrade and Wendy Paquette for sharing Donnie with us!

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NARROW UPSIDE DOWN “V” RESTRICTED MOVEMENT STEEP SHOULDER STEEP ANGULATION

WIDE UPSIDE DOWN “V” FULL RANGE OF MOTION LAID BACK SHOULDER

“TRAD” TREMENDOUS REACH AND DRIVE IMPROPER GAIT OFTEN FOOLS JUDGES

UNBALANCED UPSIDE DOWN “V” WEAK REAR DRIVE

90°

90°

REAR KICK

FRONT LIFT

UNBALANCED REACH DRIVE

BALANCED

BALANCED

breeding stock. They also pointed out to us that we needed something better than what we saw in the Po- meranian show ring; that structure and movement would set our dogs apart. As non-professionals, we needed a competitive advantage that would be rewarded under certain judges. Having the “same” type of Pomeranian would require us to hire a handler, winning with judges that would do for them. These mentors evaluated our show Pomeranians for us. Having these evaluations was extremely insightful as to how the judges were judging. The reason I say “irresponsible judging” is because we could see in the show ring judges awarding top awards to Pom- eranians that, on the down and back, would do the “one, two, three, hop” and, on the side gait, cross-canter, with some shaking out their patella. The movement was unbalanced, re- stricted, side winding and, from the rear, some of these Pomeranians rolled from side to side as the dog was swinging its rear legs from the hip rather than moving off its hocks. Frankly, it hurts my eyes to watch these dogs struggle around the ring as they trot towards you, “winging” one front leg or crossing over in the front. Over the past 15 years, every dog show where my husband and I showed, we have had spectators, Pomeranian pet owners, approach us with their pa- tella horror stories; costly and pain- ful for both the owners and their dogs.

I recently got a phone call from a lady looking to buy a pet Pomeranian puppy. In talking with her, she told me that she had purchased her last three Pomeranians from AKC Breeders of Merit. All three of her Pomeranians required patella surgeries at about the age of five years old. She went on to say that people ask herwhy shewould con- tinue to have Pomeranians, and she said it’s because they were the cutest, sweetest little dogs ever.Well, our cut- est, sweetest little dogs deserve better than to continue to breed this painful condition. Truthfully, we should di- rect these pet owners to write to the AKC so that AKC is made aware of what the public is experiencing, that it is a big problem in the Pomeranian breed, and that it is rooted in AKC’s judging [of the breed]. So, how can we get our breed to a rea- sonable number of affected dogs? The majority of the Toy breeds are 7/100 or less for affected dogs. One way is to look to other breeds and how they have made corrections to their breed. At a dog show, I was talking with a breeder from another breed who told me in her breed they had a problem with bad temperament. They were producing dogs that were biting kids and their owners, and their breed was getting a reputation as a nasty breed of dog. Their breed club went to the judges and said they needed to turn this problem around in their breed. They were able to enlist the judges to the fact that—no matter how

beautiful, no matter who is handling the dog, nomatter who owns the dog— if a dog grumbles on the table, the dog is not to be put up. Change is possible and it starts in the show ring with responsible judging and responsible judges’ education. It has to come from the breed club. The judge that swipes over and pats the Pomeranian on the table is not looking at shoulder struc- ture in their evaluation of that dog. Shoulder and structure is “black and white” and is not subjective. So, where do we start? I think one of the first steps we can take is to inform our judges that—no matter how beau- tiful, no matter who is handling the dog, no matter who owns the dog—if a Pomeranian does not have a cor- rect shoulder, that dog should not be awarded in the Toy Group ring and no Best of Breed win (if there is a candidate with better structure). In so doing, Pomeranian breeders will come to understand that you need to breed a dog with correct structure if you are going to special a Pomeranian for top honors. When the profession- al handlers say to the Pomeranian breeders that the judges are just not going award a dog in the Toy Group that doesn’t have a correct shoulder, then we will see improvement in our breeding programs. Always breed for good patellas, but remember that you can reduce the ef- fect of wear and tear on the patellas by breeding a dog with sound shoulders. Pomeranians with good patellas as

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SO PROUD OF OUR WONDER FROM DOWN UNDER GRAHAME NEAVE – THANK YOU

BIS MBIS2 AUSTRALIAN SUPREME CH, MBISS AM GCHG, BISS CAN GCH, POL JR CH, LIT JR CH THAT’S SUN RAY AT PILOSUS AUSTRALIA 2019, TOP RANKED USA & CANADA 2017 & 2018 NUMBER ONE HAVANESE

JUDGE MR. JOHN COMERFORD – AUSTRALIA

BIS2 AUSTRALIAN CH, AKC GCH, CAN CH THAT’S MENDOTA’S JACK OF HEARTS

DOING EXCELLENT IN THE SHOW RING. FINISHING HIS AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP WITHIN JUST 3 MONTHS OF HIS ARRIVAL WITH MULTIPLE GROUP WINS! EXPECTING MORE GREAT THINGS FROM THIS SPECTACULAR TEAM!!!

JUDGE MISS SHARON PHILLIPS – AUSTRALIA

MBIS MBIS2 AUSTRALIAN SUPREME CH, BIS MBISS AKC GCH CAN GCH HASKI JUST GO WITH IT NUMBER ONE HAVANESE AUSTRALIA 2017 & 2018, TOP RANKED IN USA & CANADA 2019

JUDGE IS MR. PHRED WONG – THAILAND

SO PLEASED WITH THE PUPPIES ALL THREE OF THESE BOYS HAVE SIRED. THEY ARE DOING SPECTACULAR WORLDWIDE. SEE THE INSIDE BACK COVER SPREAD AND BACK COVER FOR FERIA, A JACKSON BABY! ALL THREE BOYS ARE AVAILABLE AT STUD TO APPROVED BITCHES.

THAATZ HAVANESE IN AUSTRALIA GRAHAME NEAVE THAATZHAVANESE@GMAIL.COM

THAT’S HAVANESE IN THE USA DAVID & DARLENE SCHEIRIS THATSHAVANESE@AOL.COM, 816-213-8100

T op N otch T oys , J anuary 2021 • 29

“IT TAKES GENERATIONS OF BREEDING FOR SHOUL- DER SOUNDNESS AND, IF YOU ARE STARTING OUT AS A BREEDER, FINDING SUPERIOR STRUCTURE IN A FEMALE POMERANIAN IS PRICELESS AT THIS POINT IN TIME. KEEPING THAT STRUCTURE IN FUTURE GENERATIONS REQUIRES GOING BACK TO THE STRONG-STRUCTURED INDIVIDUAL, GENERATION AFTER GENERATION. If we make structure our focus, we will have structure in this breed and we do not have to sacrifice type and coat to have it.”

young dogs can and will have patella problems as they get older, if they have a bad shoulder. The ewe-necked Pomeranian with the extreme profile is pushing its weight to the rear legs. Dogs with steep angulation, and the sickle-hocked champion, are not im- proving our breed. Frankly, the dog without structure, no matter how beautiful the dog is and no matter how well the dog shows, is defective in structure. Type and beauty is ev- erywhere in this breed, but a beauti- ful dog with sound structure is hard to come by. Everyone has beautiful Pomeranians and winning Pomera- nians. It takes generations of breed- ing for shoulder soundness and, if you are starting out as a breeder, finding superior structure in a female Po- meranian is priceless at this point in time. Keeping that structure in fu- ture generations requires going back to the strong-structured individual, generation after generation. If we make structure our focus, we will have structure in this breed and we do

not have to sacrifice type and coat to have it. One thing we can look for in the show ring is how the dog moves. I look for the Pomeranian that makes the wide upside down “V”s. The wide “V” -moving dog that is as close to making a 90 degree angle [as possible] has the laid back shoulder and has the drive off the rear; matching angula- tion. The narrow upside down “V” -moving dog is restricted in motion, resulting in a steep shoulder and a steep turn of stifle. The Pomeranian whose stride makes a wide “V” in the front (reach) and a narrow “V” in the rear (drive) is out of balance, and is showing its weakness of structure in its hindquarters. Defective struc- ture is actually a health issue in the Pomeranian breed. Over the years of showing, we have had the pleasure to show to some very talented and knowledgeable judges who diligently judge structure and take pride in their ability to know it when they see it. At one show, a judge

took the time to talk to us about the special my husband was showing and the class dog I was showing. I think his comments describe what many judges, especially if they were breed- ers themselves, are thinking. He said about the special, “This is the dog, this is the dog.” Then he pointed tomy class dog and said, “And that dog is a nice dog too. Have you seen what is out there?” His comment, “Have you seen what is out there?” resounded with me because here we have a state- ment coming from a person who judg- es a lot and in a lot of different areas of the country. To see a judge light up like fireworks when he found a cor- rectly structured Pomeranian (and is equally excited to acknowledge that dog) should be the norm, not the exception. I think it is sad that many judges have said to me that they have to “point to something” in the Pomer- anian ring. I think it is equally sad to see poorly structured Pomeranians with top honors when it affects the well-being of the breed.

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*AKC breed & all breed stats as of 12/31/20

WHOSE FAULT IS IT? THE BLAME GAME BREEDER HANDLER JUDGE

by Terence Farley, Judges Education Chair, The Havanese Club of America

D og People” come in three main categories; breeders, exhibi- tors and judges. All three seem to have opinions about the ail- ments of the Havanese. Each blames the other for the problems that the breed is experiencing in the ring. It is the breeder’s fault for breeding this style; it is the exhibitor’s fault (ex- hibitor being professional hander, breeder/handler or owner-handler) for showing this style or for groom- ing the dog in this fashion; or it is the judge’s fault for rewarding these par- ticular styles. I am using the term “style” verses “type” because I was told, a long time ago, there is only one type that is the Havanese, but styles may vary. So, whose fault is this controversy?Do we blame the breeder? This is the per- sonwho bred the dog for the ring in the first place. Obviously, the breeder has in her/his mind’s eye the ideal picture of what a Havanese should look like, move like and, in general, be like. This person must have a love for the breed to have devoted the time and energy to have studied pedigrees, completed the necessary health testing, bred, socialized, and trained this puppy. Breeding is not an easy process if it is done right, and I am assuming that a person who is devoting the time, en- ergy, and money to have a dog shown is attempting to be an ethical breeder

and to have the correct breed type in mind. But is this enough? Will this particular style win? The bottom line is that if the other dogs in the ring are of a different style and winning, the breeder will eventually alter the style they produce in order to exit the ring with ribbons, rosettes, and points. Now we start to hear some blaming; blame the other exhibitors (handlers) or the judge. Should we blame the professional handler? According to Wikipedia, “ A professional handler, sometimes called a professional dog handler is a person that trains, conditions, and shows dogs in conformation shows for a fee. Han- dlers are hired by dog owners or breed- ers to finish their dogs championship, or if finished, to be shown in the Best of Breed class as a ‘special’. ” This person is a paid professional. His/her job is to complete a dog’s conformation title or, better yet, receive breed placements and national rankings. A handler has a winning reputation to maintain as well as keeping his/her clients con- tented and satisfied. A handler’s duty (professional or owner) is to present the dog to its fullest potential. It must be well trained, well fed, bathed/dried and groomed to the specifications of the standard, and be ready to dazzle the judge in the ring. If Winners Dog, Winners Bitch or Best of Breed are a different style than the one that the

handler is showing, then the handler might change the grooming or style of the dogs they are showing. Once again, we start to hear blaming; blame the breeder or the judge. Or should we blame the judge? Ac- cording to Wikipedia, “ A dog show judge, sometimes dog judge, is a per- son that is qualified to evaluate dogs at a conformation show. ” Becoming a judge is not an easy task. A judge must have bred and exhibited dogs for several years, gained experience with show ring procedures (including stewarding) and completed training (including, but not limited to, judges’ education seminars, ringside mentor- ing, attending national specialties, and being mentored as well as having to go through an interview process that includes written/oral evalua- tions as well as ringside observations by AKC field reps). Prospective judg- es are highly trained to evaluate the dogs that will be presented to them. Outside the ring, we often scratch our heads and ask how or why the judge put up one dog versus another. From outside the ring, the onlooker cannot see the dog’s bite, determine by feeling if the dog has the proper rise, shoulder layback, correct front, and so on. Other times, a ringside ob- server will feel that the dog receiving an award did not show the proper ele- ments of breed type. Judges might say

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“Is anyone at fault—or are we all at fault? In my opinion, we are all at fault.... THEREFORE, BREEDERS, EXHIBITORS, AND JUDGES ALL HAVE AN EQUAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE PRESERVATION IN OUR BREED.”

Important Note: The six critical elements of breed type listed above are in judging order, not in order of importance. All should be given equal weight in judging, regardless of whether they are visible on the go around or only on the table. “Dog People” come in three main categories; breeders, exhibitors, and judges. All three seem to have opin- ions about the ailments of the breed. Instead of playing the “Blame Game,” I believe—frommy point of view as an experienced breeder and handler— that we each have a responsibility to ensure that we take an active role in correcting and preserving the breed we love. Breeders; breed the best Ha- vanese possible following the guide- lines set in the breed standard. Ex- hibitors; present the best example of the breed keeping true to the proper grooming and handling procedures when presenting in the ring. Judges; award the best examples of the stan- dard in the ring, at times making dif- ficult decisions. Breeders, exhibitors, and judges working together in tandem as part- ners is the solution to what ails our breed.

that the dog they awarded the points to was the best they had to work with. Back to the blame game; breeders and exhibitors are not showing the best examples of the breed. So, what canwe do as breeders, exhib- itors or judges? Is anyone at fault—or are we all at fault? In my opinion, we are all at fault. I like to compare this situation to an equilateral triangle; in geometry an equilateral triangle is a triangle in which all three sides are equal. Therefore, breeders, ex- hibitors, and judges all have an equal responsibility in the preservation in our breed. Breeders need to stay true to the breed. Breeding the best possible Havanese according to “the breed standard.” There will always be room (within reason) for interpretation of the standard. Exhibitors need to show the best example of the Havanese accord- ing to “the breed standard.” Show the dog to its fullest extent, make it shine in the ring, and limit groom- ing to meet the set guidelines of the Havanese standard. Judges need to award dogs that are the best examples of the breed type as they understand it, encourage new breeders and exhibitors when pos- sible, and withhold ribbons, if and when necessary.

Havanese Judges’ Education has an excellent guide: Havanese Breed Type at a Glance. This guide outlines the six critical elements of the Ha- vanese Breed Type (i.e., What makes a Havanese unique amongst Toys?): 1. Topline: Straight, but not level, ris- ing slightly from thewithers to rump… the result of moderate angulation fore and aft combined with a typically short upper arm. 2. Outline: Slightly longer than tall, with head carried high and tail arched over back. 3. Gait: Springy, with moderate reach and drive, showing free reach and good extension. Not stilted, May show flash of pad coming and going. The topline holds under movement, neither flattening nor roaching. 4. Coat : Soft, silky, wavy and abun- dant. May be corded. 5. Expression: Broad backskull and large, dark almond eyes; correct ear set follows line of skull; full rectan- gular muzzle is slightly shorter than backskull. The expression is soft and intelligent, mischievous rather than cute. 6. Temperament: Intelligent, play- ful, sweet and non-quarrelsome.

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BRYNSTAR YORKSHIRE TERRIER PROUDLYWELCOMES New York Stribrne Prani TOAMERICA!

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LIVING WITH HAVANESE By Joan J. Ambrose

T he first word most people would use to describe living with a Ha- vanese is: Fun. My dogs have also opened new worlds for me. When we got our first Havanese in 1999, we had no idea how much this little dynamo would change our lives. We were introduced to dog shows, breeding, Delta Therapy dogs, Obedi- ence, Agility, and hilarious antics. Her name is “Hanna,” CH K.B.’s Star of Havana. She is 13 - 1/2 now and is still beautiful. Another thing people say about Ha- vanese is that they are like potato chips; you can’t have just one. Hanna introduced us to the dog fancy and to dog shows. However, we were lonely when she was away at shows. So, our family was joined by our darling “Tig- ger,” CH Los Perritos Star of Varade- ro. He is the happiest and gentlest soul. Like Will Rogers, he never met a man he didn’t like. Although a Cham- pion at a young age, he found his niche as a Therapy Dog. He is 12 now and has retired. I have tremendous respect for the work so many of these little dogs do as Therapy Dogs. Patients love their soft, silky hair and happy demeanor. They have the most uncanny aware- ness of the various situations, and seem to know just what to do. Living with Havanese brought us to our next great experience; breeding. We listened carefully to our breeder and studied every aspect. The re- sult was our GCH Shallowbrook Starlet O’Hanna. She grew up a bit and went into the ring like the super- star she has always believed herself to be! She was a Specialty and Best in Show winner. At ten, she still loves to be in a show. Havanese are called Velcro dogs. They follow you everywhere, not to demand attention, just to be near you. They don’t like to be left behind.

They can open zippers, jump most barriers, and figure out how to work a swinging door. I even had one that could climb a fence. They adapt eas- ily to travelling in carriers, and on a plane they are good under the seat. Each has special qualities. One of mine does back flips to express joy. One “talks,” and has a very extensive range. Some hide favorite toys, some hide favorite treats. So, look behind the cushions on the sofa! Another thing people notice about living with Havanese is that they sleep in all sorts of positions. Mine often sleep upside down on their backs. They curl up in unusual places too, and like having a pillow under their heads. I think they watch us! They wear costumes without com- plaint. One owner said, “What is it about these dogs? They put on a cos- tume and go to a party like it is the most natural thing in the world!” They love to dance and to jump. You need to be careful when they are young as they can injure themselves. It is awonder that any of themhave in- tact patellas; they lead their lives like a flying squirrel! What are the problems? Well, house- breaking must be done consistently. After six months [they are] good as they are mature enough to “wait.” If puppies are allowed to roam around when they are small, and have acci- dents, it is more difficult to really fix it later. They do get bored. When teaching tricks or obedience, they will “get it” pretty fast, especially if it is fun. So, don’t do too many repetitions or yawning will commence. Paper is a favorite toy. If you have a low roll of paper towels, drop a Kleen- ex or have toilet paper within reach, youmay find that they havemade con- fetti. Fast too! Havanese are usually healthy. Good

Some Havanese have a strong attachment to babies and small children.

breeders try to keep it that way with frequent and extensive health testing. The Havanese Club of America is do- ing aHealthSurvey now, so in the near future we will know of any issues. All in all, this is a happy, fun-loving, affectionate, and gentle breed. They are beautiful and they make us laugh with their antics. They have opened wonderful new worlds for me. What could be better? ABOUT THE AUTHOR JoanAmbrose was born and raised With their enthusiastic athletic ability, Ha- vanese are nowmaking their mark in Agility.

in NYC. She a t t e n d e d the Brearley School and

Columbia University. Joan now re- sides inKey Biscayne, Florida. She was the President of the Havanese Club of America from 2010 through 2014 and is a Board Member of the Progressive Dog Club (NYC).

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CH WYSTERIA & GRANDVI EW’S

CH HARBOR’S PURPLE RE IGN X CH GRANDVI EW’S STOLEN KI SS BY THE RIVER

A Special Thank You to the judges that recognized Vogue from the start with very limited Showing in 2020.

ENUMCLAW CLUSTER, OLYMPIC KENNEL CLUB & WALLA WALLA KENNEL CLUB

Mrs. Terry Dennison - BOW 4pt. Major Ms. Stacey Davis - NOHS Toy Group 3 Mr. WoodWornall - NOHS Toy Group 3

Mr. Eugene Bake - BOW 3pt. Major & Best Owner Handler Mrs. Jacqueline Stacy - BOW 3pt. Major & Best Owner Handler Mrs. Valerie Brown - WB 3pt. Major

WHIDBEY ISLAND KENNEL CLUB

Mrs. Valerie Brown - BOW 5pt. Major

Ms. Lee Whittier - BOB 5pt Major

Loved, Owned and Bred by LISA VIVOLO & DEBBI FOUST

Handled by LISA VIVOLO

WWW.GRANDVIEWHAVANESE.COM

WWW.WYSTERIAHAVANESE.COM

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THE HAVANESE WHAT’S SO HARD TO UNDERSTAND?

By Kathy Ambler, Ambler Havanese

T he very first paragraph in the Ha- vanese Standard says it all. It de- scribes our wonderful breed in a nutshell. So, why is it so difficult to understand when you actually are in the process of evaluating a dog for show potential at home, or evaluating a class of dogs in the show ring? GENERAL APPEARANCE: “The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. The native dog of Cuba, he is beloved as a friendly, intelligent and playful companion. He is slightly longer than tall, with a long, untrimmed, double coat. The Havanese has a short upper arm with moderate shoulder layback and a straight topline that rises slightly from the withers to the croup. The plumed tail is carried arched forward up over the back. The unique springy gait is a result of the breed’s structure and playful, spir- ited personality. These characteristics of temperament, coat, structure and gait are essential to type.” The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. Well—your version of small and mine may be two different ideas. But the standard goes on to say, the Havanese must not be under 8.5 inches or over 11.5 inches at the withers. As a judge, you can wicket if you are un- sure. As a breeder, you should know be- fore you take your dog into the ring if it is within the standard. So if your idea of small does not include an 11.5 inch tall dog, then you are not understanding the AKC standard. The Havanese breeders who approved this standard are telling you, point blank, small is anything be- tween 8.5 and 11.5 inches, and we go on to say that our preferred height is 9 to 10.5 inches. Easy enough, right? Not re- ally, because the standard goes on to de- scribe the length of body in relation to

height and the amount of bone we want our dogs to have; all to help you under- stand what is meant by “small.” The standard uses the word “slightly”—the Havanese should be slightly longer than tall, with a rectangular outline. The standard even goes on to describe the rectangle. The length should come from the rib cage, not the loin. The loin is short! When I evaluate puppies, I want my length to be 2/3 from sternum to last rib and 1/3 from last rib to buttock. If you think a dog looks too long, put your finger on the last rib. Stand back. Does it divide the dog directly in half? Then chances are, your eye is right, the dog is longer than we are describing as slightly longer in the standard. (Could also be that the dog looks long because it is actually low on leg, creating an optical illusion). So, now you understand what the standard means by slightly longer than tall and a rectangle. So, what else makes up a small, sturdy Havanese? Bone. The standard calls for moderate bone. The Havanese should never appear coarse or fragile. The Ha- vanese that is 8.5 inches is going to be smaller than the Havanese that is 11.5 inches, but both should have sturdy, moderate bone. That 8.5 inchHavanese should not be fine-boned and the 11.5 inch Havanese should not be heavy- boned. Remember, this breed is meant to be a family companion for all ages. I would never want to have to tell a fam- ily with small children that my puppies are too fragile for their family! My ideal is approximately 1.25 to 1.5 pounds per inch tall. So, as an example, an 8.5 inch Havanese should be about 10 pounds to as much as 12. An 11.5 inch Havanese could be 14 to 17 pounds and still be considered small and sturdy. You, as

breeders, can breed to your prefer- ence for size; and judges, if all else is equal, you can also have a preference for size. You cannot, however, award a dog that is under- or over-sized, frag- ile or coarse. Always keep in mind that the HCA preference is 9-10.5 inches. You cannot award a poor quality, small Havanese over a good quality, larger Havanese just because you prefer small and feel the breed should be small to be in the Toy Group. And yes, I have seen it happen. So, let’s move on next to “Immense Charm.” What does this mean and how do you judge it in the show ring? How does the exhibitor show his/her dog’s immense charm? That is easy! It is described under temperament in the standard: “The Havanese is friend- ly, playful, alert and intelligent with a sweet, non-quarrelsome disposition. Ag- gression and shyness should be faulted.” So, why are we seeing aggressive Ha- vanese in the ring? Why are they being awarded ribbons? The standard says it should be faulted. Now, luckily, we see fewer aggressive Havanese than shy Havanese. The standard also says that shyness should be faulted! Yet, I see Havanese with their tails between their legs, crouching away from judges on the table—simply scared to death— being awarded winning ribbons. I am not telling you to not show it. However, these dogs need to learn that shows are fun and, with some youngsters, this may take awhile. But, personally, I do not care howwonderful your dog is at home. If it is aggressive or shy in the ring, it should never take home a winning rib- bon. And no owner, handler or breeder should ever expect one. Just consider it an expensive handling class.

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C H W Y N S O N L I T T L E B L A C K D R E S S

Tiffany

BILL AND DIANA CHAPMAN WYNSONDOG@HOTMAIL.COM

GREAT TIME IN ORLANDO! ITALIAN GREYHOUND CLUB OF AMERICA WINNER’S BITCH AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 2ND AWARD OF MERIT Thank you Judges Timothy Robbins and Jacqueline Stacy

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The first paragraph of the standard goes on to talk about the coat; a long, un- trimmed, double coat. There seems to be a huge division of thought on what is correct when discussing the coat. First of all, age will determine the length of coat. A coat of shorter length on a younger dog should not be faulted. Even some adults, those that have a slower growing coat, may have shorter length. But, it should always be a double coat on an adult Havanese and it should never be trimmed! The standard describes the perfect coat. It is silky to the touch, soft, and light in texture. The outer coat carries slightly more weight. It stands off the body, flows with movement and is abundant and wavy. Dogs can be shown corded as well. Puppy coats can be softer than on adults, and they also may not have much undercoat develop- ment. If the coat is flat, frizzy or curly, it should be faulted. If it is coarse or wiry, it is a DQ. The standard is pretty explicit on how the coat should be, and it goes on to say that head furnishings can be in simple braids—simple, plain bands holding the braids in place. The big issue is what can be done to the coat to comply with the sentence that states: “Havanese should be shown as naturally as is consistent with good grooming.” I think it is simply stated in the standard and should be adhered to. Minimal trimming of the anal and genital area is allowed, but should not be seen on presentation. Hair on the feet and be- tween the pads should be trimmed. No other trimming or sculpting of the coat is permitted; it is to be severely penal- ized as to preclude placement. For some reason, time after time, I see obviously scissored coats being rewarded. And, yes, many are also flat ironed. Why? The standard calls for a wavy coat! Flat ironing also changes the texture of the coat. It is no longer that soft, wavy, lightweight coat. When a standard says it should be severely penalized and pre- clude placement, why are theywinning? Is the rest of the entry, untrimmed and being shown naturally (but brushed), so bad that the judges cannot “see” the trimming of the coat and the excessive shaving around the bum? The HCA has

stated in their standard that they do not want this level of grooming rewarded. Another area of confusion in the stan- dard is the parting [of the coat]. Most adult Havanese coats will fall down from the middle of their backs to the sides. If they do not, they have an incor- rect coat. The coat should not stand off their backs like a Bichon. Remember, it is to be a long coat. Long coats will fall to either side. What the standard says, very clearly, is that the coat should not be deliberately parted. Meaning, not a Yorkie or Maltese part that is perfect and done with a knitting needle! And never should the dog’s coat be parted and held in place with hairspray! Yes, I have watched it being done right out- side the ring. But, judges, please under- stand that a correct coat is going to part. Time and again I have had handlers and owners tell me that they were scolded in the ring for their dog’s coat parting. And just where would those judges like the coats to fall? Even brushed straight back, the dog shakes and the coat falls to either side—naturally. The first paragraph also describes the topline in the Havanese. For a while, when I first started showing Havanese, I saw dogs winning with excessive rises. Putting my hands on them, I realized it was either that they had crooked front legs, poor shoulder assembly or no rear angulation. (Or they were a bad combi- nation of all three.) But they had a rise, and so the judges were rewarding this. It seems that the breeders have gotten better about choosing “keeper” puppies with better front legs and somewhat better shoulders, and all should be look- ing for that short upper arm. But now, toplines seem to have gone completely in the opposite direction. We now have level toplines. Finding a slight rise is getting harder and harder. I hear it all the time from judges. They are seeing it across the country. We are losing the short upper arm, the topline, and the springy gait. I see videos on Facebook and,maybe, one infivehas a slight riseon the move. The well-behaved puppy with a level topline wins because the judges can’t get past that cute face and happy temperament. Please remember, this is

a hallmark of the breed and is what makes the Havanese outline different from other breeds. While I am glad that we have less and less chondrodysplastic dogs being shown and bred, I would hate to lose this hallmark of the breed. The plumed tail also adds to that beautiful, correct outline.While Iwouldnot throw out a tight or a loose tail, I would hope that breeders would choose mates care- fully, to try to breed away from these traits. We want to keep that arched tail, another hallmark of our breed. The springy gait is also mentioned in the first paragraph. This is so impor- tant as to distinguish aHavanese froma Shih Tzu or a Lhasa. The structure and attitude both contribute to the gait. The Havanese should never be run around the ring. They are not a Sporting dog and should not have the reach and drive of one. They also should not have “lift” in the front like a Min Pin. And, yes, I have seen both being rewarded. They are to be shown on a loose lead. Howev- er, this does not mean the lead should be dragging on the ground behind the dog. The handler still has to have control over the dog. What is meant here is that the HCA does not want to see the Ha- vanese being strung-up as is so popular with other Toy dogs. Stringing them up, letting them run, and letting them sniff the ground, all throw-off the topline on the move. It is important to see the topline rise on the move, not just while stacked. So, no tight leads; but also, not so loose that the dog is then controlling how they move around the ring instead of the handler controlling the dog. Yes, this is a training issue too. Please keep in mind that these little dogs are happy and inquisitive, and letting them have too much leeway on that loose lead can lead to a disaster. I hope that I have helped you under- stand the hallmarks of the breed. Keep in mind that these are simply my opin- ions, and how I personally have inter- preted the breed standard. If you want to know how I evaluate puppies and adult dogs, and how I determine overall balance and quality, I would be happy to discuss my thoughts with you. My email address is havayork@yahoo.com.

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