Showsight Express - December 13, 2021

WIDELY DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY REASONABLE • RELIABLE • REALLY REALLY FAST!

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

#15 TOY DOG*

#1 BREEDER/ OWNER/ HANDLER MALTESE

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER

MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER WESTMINSTER BEST OF BREED WINNER 2020 AKC 2020

TOY BREEDER OF THE YEAR

LINEBRED FROM A LONG LINE OF TOP MALTESE AND PRODUCERS TIMEBOMB’S FUTURE GENERATION WILL BE SEEN IN THE RING SOON. . .

BRED OWNED AND HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

*AKC STATS AS OF 10/31/21

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R 30 YEARS: A MAGNIFICENT RIDE

What?! It’s already December and we are all ready for the holidays… or are we? Doesn’t it seem that 2021 has flown by, and isn’t it wonderful to feel some normalcy again after two years of craziness? Everyone is really look- ing forward to the holidays this year, and there is no question that we will be feeling more comfortable getting together with our families and friends as we count our blessings. We are all so fortunate to have a roof over our heads and a safe place to gather. For those of us at SHOWSIGHT , it’s hard to believe that we have been publishing the magazine for 30 years! For three decades, we have been at the helm of providing news, education, and advertising to the most dedi- cated and talented people in the sport of purebred dogs. Thanks to you, we’ve been able to utilize our platform to keep our community’s achieve- ments and developments in the public eye. It has been our pleasure to serve the community for 30 years, and hopefully, we’ve made a difference. Every month, we have dedicated free advertising pages, or made donations to non-profit organizations, to help increase awareness of events that raise much-needed funds for those in need. We even created Showsight Cares, which has donated over $300,000 in just the past 16 months. We are very much a family publication, and I am so proud of our accom- plishments and our desire to serve the dog show community and preser- vation purebred dog breeders. We are grateful to be in business, and we attribute our success to the continued support of our advertisers. Without our supporters, there would be no magazine. So, we want to send a huge thank you to everyone for making the last 30 years such a magnificent ride. We’re looking forward to seeing you all in Orlando and at Westminster, and to serving our community for years to come. On behalf of the SHOWSIGHT family, I’d like to wish you all a Happy Holiday Season and a very Happy and Healthy New Year. We’ll be seeing you in 2022... !

Yours Faithfully,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

BEST IN SHOW WINNER • RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTIPLE GROUP WINS • MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY WINNER 2021 WESTMINSTER BREED WINNER Irish WaterSpaniel * NUMBER ONE

Our appreciation to judge Mr. John P. Wade for Best In Show

Sporting Dog * A TOP

*

*All systems as of 10/31/21

**AKC all breed stats as of 10/31/21

SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

S loane BIS RBIS MBISS GCHB POOLE’S IDE SARGEANT SLOANE CD RN MX MXJ XF

Our appreciation to judge Ms. Marjorie Martorella for

recognizing Sloane in the group Presented by Joanne Thibault Owners: Stephanie O’Reilly and Gregory M. Siner Breeders: Poole’s Ide - Gregory M. Siner and Samuel A. Jenio

BULLMASTIFF

*AKC STATS AS OF 10/31/21

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Boom GCH Jazzin To The Beat At Big Boom

We are looking forward to seeing everyone and excited to see what 2022 will bring us.

Owned by Julie Caruthers, Diane Nelson & Jennifer Zingula Bred by Collette Jaynes, Lana Levai & Marcia A. Long Handled by Ginny Kincer

SPANIEL (CLUMBER)

After some time on the couch he hit the ring this November with his new bestie Ginny Kincer.

In just one month’s time Boom won 10 Best of Breeds, and was awarded a Group 3 in an extremely strong grou

happy holidays

from Team Boom

Boom finished quickly major pointing from the puppy class and going Best of Breed from the classes many times. He quickly earned his Grand Championship and became a Top Ten Clumber. He also won Select at 2020 Westminster KC under prestigious judge Mr. Michael Faulkner. With appreciation to the following judges for finding Boom and rewarding him for his proper structure, movement and breed type. Mr. Michael Faulkner, Mrs. Sulie Greendale-Paveza, Mrs. Danelle M. Brown, Mrs. Kathleen V. Carter,

Mr. Ken Murray, Mrs. Donna Ernst, Ms. Alessandra R. Folz, Mrs. Karin B. Ashe, Mr. Carl Gene Liepmannl, Mrs. Christine E. Calcinari & Mr. Nathaniel Horn

up.

Bred & Owned by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Co-owned with Michele True

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL

© Fritz Clark

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL

GCH CH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera

Owned by Michele True Co-owned with Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier candid photography by ©SueBee Photography

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/21 AIREDALE TERRIER

THANK YOU JUDGES

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Samburu M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W - M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W G C H P L Y O N N E S E B L U E P R I N T O F A L E G E N D # 1

R H O D E S I A N R I D G E B A C K *

# 4 H O U N D * HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM TEAM SAMBURU L O O K I N G F O R WA R D T O S E E I N G Y O U A T T H E A K C N A T I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P .

O W N E D B Y N I C O L E D A V I S C O - O W N E D & B R E D B Y D E B B I E H O L L Y & M A U R E E N T A U B E R E X C L U S I V E L Y H A N D L E D B Y F R A N K M U R P H Y

*AKC STATS AS OF 10/31/21

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB Judge Mr. James Covey

T H E T R I P L E CROWN O F DOG S HOWS S PORT I NG GROUP W I NNE R

Send i ng our DEEPEST GRATITUDE t o the s e SPORTING DOG AUTHORITIES f or the s e HISTORIC WINS!

THE NATIONAL DOG SHOW Judge Mrs. Linda Hurlebaus

Owners: Carley Simpson, Suzanne Acevedo & Yvonne Hassler-Deterding • Breeders: Claire Malcolm & Mariah Dupuy Owned And Presented By: Valerie Nunes-Atkinson • Assisted By: Antonio Vidmar

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

1 GSP NO. ALL YSTEMS # 7 SPORTING DOG ** *ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/21 **AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/21

*

• MULT I PLE BEST IN SHOW • MULT I PLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW

©HAN ‘21

MORRIS & ESSEX Judge Mrs. Mary Ann Alston

Katie Gochev GRAPHICS

GCHG CLARITY REACH THE SKY VJK-MYST

LINES FROM LINDA

TIME FLIES WHEN WE’RE HAVING FUN HAS IT REALLY BEEN 30 YEARS?

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

W hen I was only four years old, my love for TV's Lassie prompted my parents, Roy and Hazel Ayers, to surprise me with a Collie. We began to play “pretend dog show” at home, in parks, and on a nearby ball- field. I worked with my dog on a leash every day, brushed her and fed her. My father immediately recognized that her quality was not pleasing to his eye. He subscribed to Dog World magazine and purchased our foundation dog, Ch. Poplar Stop the Music, from New York. My first times in the conformation ring began when I was only six years old. My parents made everything about the sport our family hobby. Choosing our kennel name was a contest between the three of us... Conrad Collie Ken- nels was chosen, as our street name sounded good with Collies. (They let me think it was my idea.) Musical names would be our theme. If you look in old magazines and books, there you will find me showing Ch. Conrad's Dancing in the Dark and many others. Mother had my show attire custom-made. My Poodle-type skirts featured felt cutouts of Conrad Collies.

I showed alongside my father, and as he became the Presi- dent of the Collie Club of Georgia, I was their first Junior Member. During the years when he was President of the Atlanta Kennel Club, I enjoyed teaching training and groom- ing classes, doing TV appearances and radio shows. He was President of the Southeastern Association of Kennel Clubs as well as serving as AKC Delegate for the Atlanta Kennel Club. During those years, my brother, Roy Ayers, Jr., was born and became the newest family participant in our sport. We were blessed to travel around the globe, watching and learning as our father embarked on the next step. When my father pursued his judging career, his philoso- phy was to either judge or show. He asked us to discontinue exhibiting in the conformation ring. All three of us became AKC Conformation judges—a rarity! As an All-Rounder, my dad inspired in our family a great love and respect for the American Kennel Club—our lifelong passion. These were the stories that Duane Doll and Joe McGinnis wanted me to contribute to Doll-McGinnis’ newest venture, an all-breed magazine named SHOWSIGHT . They would also be inviting BJ Andrews to join the team, and I had long- admired BJ and her lovely Akitas. SHOWSIGHT would be a positive magazine—and the dog world was really ready for one. What fun, I thought, and LINES FROM LINDA was born!

left: Always just a coincidence, no matter where we were, Joe McGinnis and I matched.

WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON

LINES FROM LINDA: TIME FLIES WHEN WE’RE HAVING FUN— HAS IT REALLY BEEN 30 YEARS?

Roy Ayers, Jr.., Linda Ayers Turner Knorr and Todd Turner

Frequent partners in folly, Joe McGinnis and I, without collaboration, always seemed to wear matching outfits! Meet the Breeds was one of our favorite projects.

“Over the past three decades, it has been my delight to share memories and pay homage to the many friends who have contributed to our family’s

incredible journey in the dog world.”

“Santa, I’ve been good this year.”

Day. The stockings are hung, the trees are lighted, a sleigh full of “fake” presents is in front of the house with Santa on the front porch behind. I’ve been decking the halls for a month while the carols were playing on Pandora. Yes, you can guess we have critical Christmas Spirit! GOOD LUCK IN ORLANDO AND NEW YORK, HAPPY 30th ANNIVER- SARY, SHOWSIGHT , HAPPY HANUK- KAH, AND MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL!

Publications. I had already fallen in love with AJ and Hanifa and their beautiful girls, so being a part of their newly named Aramedia Group has been a joy! It is important to name my encouragers who have made writing for SHOWSIGHT so much fun: Samantha Adkins, Daniel Cartier, Cortny White, and Kelli Stout. In Greenville, South Carolina, where I live, the family Manger Scene is promi- nently placed by a Bible turned to Luke 2, marked by a red velvet ribbon. Roy Ayers, Jr. and my son, Todd Turner, will travel from Washington, DC and Colum- bia, South Carolina, to celebrate the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ on Christmas

Over the past three decades, it has been my delight to share memories and pay homage to the many friends who have contributed to our family’s incredible jour- ney in the dog world. In more recent years, LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS and MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR have become new additions to the magazine. Time takes all but memories. With the passing years, I lost both of my parents, Roy and Hazel Ayers, and my dear friends, Duane Doll and Joe McGinnis. AJ Arapo- vic was like a son to Joe McGinnis and was the perfect person to carry on and grow the distinctive traditions of Doll-McGinnis

HO! HO! HO!

RETRIEVER (GOLDEN)

BOBWinner of the 2021 GSPCANational Specialty Show

NATIONAL SPECIALTY MATURITY MULTIPLE BEST OF BREED WINNER

PRESENTED BEAUTIFULLY IN THE RING TO THIS HONOR BY HER CO-BREEDER TINA PARKER-CRAIG

THANK YOU TO JUDGE MRS. HEATHER BRENNAN AND TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED OUR BEAUTIFUL GIRL

owners EVAN TZANIS & DR. NIA TATSIS

breeders KAHLA ENNIS, SHARON DATTILIO, TINA M. CRAIG & BRENDA MAHONEY handler JOANNE THIBAULT

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

Ellie

Ch Shomberg’s A N Y T H I N G COU L D H A P P E N N AT I ON A L S P E C I A LT Y C H AM P I ON GCH CH MI KARMA N SANDY CREEK ONE MAN BAND (BOWIE) CD BN RE JH DM DS CGC X CH SHOMBERG’S TOO MARVELOUS FOR WORDS (KEELY) RM SH GSPCA VC CGC

Expertly presented by: Stephanie House

Diamond owns: Melissa Bates,

Erin Campbell, DVM and Cheryl Grubaugh Bred by: Erin Campbell, DVM and Kathy Thomas

Photos courtesy of: Melissa Bates

like a

WHIPPET

I NTRODUC I NG MULT I PLE GROUP PLAC I NG GCH KIMERA THIS SIDE OF PARADISE

Thank you Judge Dr. Carol White-Moser

We wish to extend our gratitude to all of the Judges for recognizing Diamond’s classic Whippet elegance and balanced effortless movement.

MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER MULTI PLE SPECIALTY WINNER MULTI PLE GROUP PLACEMENTS 3X BEST IN SPECIALTY WINNER 202 1 & 4X SPECIALTY WINNER IN 2020

I R I S H T E R R I E R *

THANKS TO ALL THESE JUDGES FOR RECOGNITION IN THE RING

TERR I ER CLUB SPEC I ALTY MRS . ROSLYN KRAMER (B I SS) SAND AND SEA KC SHAROL CANDACE WAY (G3) N I TA NEE KC MRS . JACQUEL INE L . STACY (G2) BALD EAGLE KC R . STEVEN L . KEATING (G2) HUNTERDON HI LLS KC MRS . CINDY VOGELS (G2) MRS . MARCIA FELD (G4) SUSQUE-NANGO KC MRS . CHARLOTTE P. PATTERSON (G4) T IOGA COUNTY KC MR . RODNEY E . HERNER (G4) NEWTON KC

I TCNY SPEC I ALTY WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE N I TA NEE KC JACQUEL INE STACY (G2) BALD EAGLE KC BRIAN BOGART DR . STEVE KEATING (G2) HUNTERDON HI LLS KC CINDY VOGELS (G2) HUNTERDON HI LLS KC

MARCIA FELD (G4) SUSQUE-NANGO KC CHARLOTTE PATTERSON (G4) T IOGA KC RODNEY HERNER (G4) NEWTON KC CAROL J EAN NELSON (G1 ) PAMELA PEAT SCHOOLEY ’ S MOUNTA I N KC WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE (G4) DR . GERALD PENTA CHESAPEAKE I R I SH TERR I ER CLUB SPEC I ALTY DR . ANDREW KRAMER (B I SS) CHESAPEAKE I R I SH

CAROL J EAN NELSON (G1 ) SCHOOLEY ’ S MOUNTA I N KC MR . WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE (G4) POCONO MOUNTA I N KC MR . JOE C. WALTON (G3) SAL I SBURY KC MRS . KAREN WI LSON (G2)

© STEVE SURFMAN

IRISH TERRIER

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 11/6/21

Gold Grand Champion B R E E Z Y ’ S C H A R M I N G C O N A R T I S T

G C H G M E R R Y M A C Z T R I K I N G X C H B R E E Z Y ’ S H O T T O P I C

T H A N K YO U M R S . R O S A L I N D K R A M E R F O R T H I S S P E C I A LT Y W I N

B R E D B Y : T E R R I VA N D E Z A N D E

H A N D L E D B Y : J A M E S D I C K S O N

OW N E D B Y : N I N A WA R R E N

REFLECTING on Milestones

A It is hard to believe that we are already 21 years into the 21st century. It does not seem all that long ago that Y2K was a huge issue, with people worried about computer crashes, world economies, and the possible destruction of all things controlled by technology. As one of the post-war baby boomers, I can honestly say that the world we live in has undergone so many changes that it does not resemble the America of my youth. Whether it be our lives, our families, our jobs, and even our sports and hobbies, the inevitability of change has been a constant. Do you ever look back at those moments in your life that most would consider mile- stone moments? These might include your first day of kindergarten or high school, your first date, first kiss and first serious relationship, your high school prom or a sports moment, your college graduation, marriage, and so many other significant moments in your life. Each one of us has a unique story. We are born into this world with no control over the circumstances in which we arrive. We are dependent upon our parents, our siblings, our extended families, the teachers, friends, mentors, and so many others as we grow and develop into the people we are today. For many, the circumstances in which we are raised have a profound effect on our adult lives. Some are born and raised in poverty, some in the average two-parent, middle class American home, while others are fortunate to be born and raised in the comfort of certain privileges that many will never have. Some will survive broken homes, physical and mental abuse, and a variety of religious and political upbringings. Many will come from loving, two-parent homes, some from single-parent or split families, and yet every- one will have moments or milestones, both good and bad, that mold them over the years. As I mentioned earlier, change is the one constant in life. In my youth, I don’t remem- ber very many of my friends coming from divorced families. In comparison, the average length of a marriage in the world today is a little over eight years, and only seven percent of marriages will last 50 years. Also, our life spans have increased over the years. During the 1970s, the average lifespan was 67 years, whereas today the average lifespan for men is 77 and it’s 81 for women. In the past, it was common to work and retire from the same company you’d worked for through most of your adult life. Today, the average employee tenure is 4.2 years and most people will change jobs over 12 times in their lifetime.

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

Wildisle , Reg J I L L R I C H A R D S B R E G Y

B R E E D I N G T O T H E S TA N D A R D &

P R O T E C T I N G T H E B R E E D S I N C E 1 9 6 6

W I L D I S L E , R E G .

P R O D U C I N G G E N E R AT I O N S O F

T Y P E & S O U N D N E S S

IRISH WOLFHOUND

M U LT I B I S A N D B I S S , C H Warlock wildisle warlock

breeder & owner WARLOCK WINNING HIS 4TH NATIONAL SPECIALTY UNDER JOAN MORDEN AT 6 YEARS OF AGE IN 1979

IRISH WOLFHOUND

OF THE IWCA AND MULTIPLE WINNER OF IWANE AND IWCC SPECIALTIES the only four time winner

WARLOCK WINNING HIS FIRST NATIONAL SPECIALTY IN 1974 FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR CLASS AT 13 MONTHS

WARLOCK FINISHED GOING BIS FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR CLASS AT HIS 5TH SHOW

J ILL R . BREGY, WILDISLE , REG .

REFLECTING ON MILESTONES

PA RTIC IPA TION IN THE SPORT Just like everything in life, our sport is also undergoing constant change. Part of the charm of our great sport of purebred dogs is the truly unique diversity that each of us who are participants brings to the table. What other hobby, profession, or com- petition can you think of that has such a diverse group of participants? We have all ages, all races, all religions, diverse sexual orientations, every political view, people with average incomes, and those with great resources. We have a variety of breeders, owners, and exhibitors, from newcom- ers to professionals and everything in between. Our participants come from all walks of life with a variety of backgrounds, and we have a sport that exists throughout the world, made up of people dedicated to man’s best friend. Through my nearly five decades in this sport, I can honestly say that my involve- ment has introduced me to people, places, experiences, and relationships that I would have never thought possible in my youth. The sport also brought Carol into my life, and we are about to celebrate 38 hap- py years of marriage. Even after all these years, we both share in our love of the dogs; breeding, showing, and judging together. Rumor has it that the average length of involvement in our sport is between three and five years. So, I guess just surviving all of these years is a milestone in itself. Reflecting on my journey, I have had many milestones. Like many in our sport, I started with a “pet quality” puppy bought from a newspaper advertisement. Little did I know that my little Old English Sheep- dog puppy would change my life. Her name was “Ginger,” and like most newbies, I did not have a clue about rais- ing, grooming, and training a puppy. For- tunately, I met a man while walking her one day. His name was John Tacejko and he was a member of the Western Reserve Kennel Club and the Old English Sheep- dog Club of America, as well as a founding member of the Western Reserve Old Eng- lish Sheepdog Club; all clubs that I would eventually join and learn a great deal from. John invited me to a club “fun day” where I met other OES owners who were won- derful about helping me and teaching me how to groom, etc. Eventually, I went to my first sanc- tioned “B” match and I still have the first ribbon I ever won from that match. I went to many matches that were very available in those days, and I learned how to show and groom and practice my handling skills

for the show ring. Unfortunately, it did not take me long to realize that Ginger was not a show dog—but I had already been bit- ten by the bug. So, I began to search for a “show prospect.” While I pursued a real “show dog,” Irma Dixon of the Cleveland All-Breed Training Club encouraged me to train Ginger for an obedience title. Back in those days, very few OES competed in obedience. So, I took on Irma’s challenge to get Ginger trained so that she could compete at the OESCA National Specialty in Obedience the following year. I earned the first two legs toward her CD that win- ter, and then waited until the National Specialty where I was fortunate to qualify with a third-place to complete her CD. As I pursued my show dog, I went through the heartbreak of two puppies that had dysplasia before I was able to obtain my first champion from Ken and Paula Leach. His name was Cheerio Olde Eng- lish Jester. “Jester” finished at the Greater Portland OES specialty, and together we enjoyed a good competitive career in the old Working Group. When I think back, there were many milestones moments; first ribbon, first sanctioned match Best of Breed and Group placement, first leg in Obedience, first Obedience title, first Conformation points, first Champion, first Group place- ment, and so on. Since those early days, each of my dogs, litters, and different breeds has provided a

these people and from so many others. We learned from the people and judges at the shows. We would have dinner with the judges and they would share their experi- ence and knowledge, and no one ever ques- tioned the integrity of the judges because of it. We had many great learning experi- ences, but we also had our share of issues, tensions, jealousies, and occasional rifts. However, in those days, there was a lot more respect given to the judges as well as to our fellow exhibitors. Everyone knew that it took hard work and dedication, and if you were willing to pay your dues, even- tually, success would come. I can remember the Late Tommy Oel- schlager with his Siberian Huskies, and me with my OES, talking about how cool it would be to earn a Group 3 or 4 at the shows when Lina Basquette with her Great Danes and Tommy Glassford with a Sam- oyed of the Hritzo’s dominated the Groups in our area back in those days. Over the years, the sport has changed a great deal. During the 1970s, little black and white newspapers were started. These were way different than what we have today, but they were “current” publications and probably the first that were devoted exclusively to “show dogs.” Popular Dogs and the AKC Gazette were out there, but the early newspapers were the first to show- case dogs currently being shown. In the years since that first black and white edition was published, there have been numerous others that have come and gone on the show scene. UP-TO-D A TE & EVER -C H A NG ING It was 30 years ago this month that SHOWSIGHT came on the scene, and it has continued to grow into possibly the best publication in our sport. Through the years, SHOWSIGHT has been the one magazine that tries to bring its readers up- to-date information in our ever-changing world of purebred dogs. AJ Arapovic and his staff work hard to bring information to the masses about individual breeds through informative articles on subjects ranging from anatomy, structure, and gait to those about each specific breed, including topics such as how to judge the breed, interviews with successful breed- ers, in-depth information on how breeds have changed, the current show scene, selections dedicated to the various Groups and Owner-Handlers, spotlighting Junior Showmanship, and providing recaps and photos of shows and just about everything related to our sport, both past and present.

milestone moment along the way. L EA RNING FROM M ENTORS

In the early 1970s, there was no Inter- net, cell phones, or trophies for just par- ticipating. Everything you got was earned. The only way to learn and succeed was to do your research through various books and publications or by observing and learning from mentors in the breed who were willing to help. Joining those clubs previously men- tioned was also a huge source of knowl- edgeable people who were generous in sharing and encouraging anyone who wanted to learn. I have many fond memories of talking OES (as well as other breeds in general) with people I met through the clubs and at the shows. In OES, Cass Moulton-Arble, Ken Kopin, Hugh and Linda Jordon, Ken and Paula Leach, Anna Jacobsen and oth- ers, as well as such notables as Max Riddle, Lina Basquette, Frank Oberstar, Sam Piz- zino, David Parker, Tommy Glassford, Bob and Ellen Fetter, and Bob Stein… just to mention a few. I learned a lot from

REFLECTING ON MILESTONES

“FOR 30 YEARS, SHOWSIGHT HAS BEEN THERE FOR ALL OF THE HIGHS AND THE LOWS IN THE SPORT, WHILE COVERING THE CONTINUED EVOLUTION OF OUR SPORT AS IT TAKES PLACE.”

For 30 years, SHOWSIGHT has been there for all of the highs and the lows in the sport, while covering the continued evolution of our sport as it takes place. Do you realize that 30 years ago we did not have the Grand Champion Program or the National Owner-Handled Series? Even if you personally don’t like them, there is no doubt that they have been good for the sport. By adding the various levels to the Grand Champion title, many exhibitors who might have simply quit showing now continue to exhibit in pursuit of higher lev- els of achievement. In some cases, exhibi- tors live in an area that has restrictions on the number of dogs they may have on their premises. So, some may have faded away or may have had to wait for their older dogs to pass on before getting another. Although I come from a time when no one thought twice about the owner vs. the professional handler, the NOHS seems to be growing, and for some exhibitors, it is a deciding factor on whether or not to attend some of the shows. Many of these individuals take the program seriously and work hard to achieve a top owner-handler ranking in their respective breeds. Thirty years ago, we only had Confor- mation, Obedience, and Field Trials. Here we are today with AKC titles available in Agility, Lure Coursing, Scent Work, Herding, Dock Diving, Therapy, Farm Dog, CGC, Trick Dogs, and a variety of other competitions. Looking at today’s dog in the catalog or on a pedigree you will see an “alphabet soup” of letters both before and after the dog’s name, signifying all of the titles they have earned. Thinking back to the mid-1990s when I started the St. Jude Showcase of Dogs in Memphis, Tennessee, part of our mission was to show the public everything they could do with their dogs. I would like to think the success of that event was instru- mental in the AKC adopting many of those same competitions into their organiza- tion. When you look at the AKC National Championship Presented by Royal Canin, the entire concept is a replica of the 16 highly successful years the St. Jude event had, along with contributing hundreds of thousands of dollars to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Through that event, therapy programs were developed at the hospital, and today, therapy dogs are a big part of our society. Look at the growth of “Take the Lead” over the past 30 years and the difference that organization has made in the lives of

our officials has deteriorated. Disgruntled exhibitors are often complaining about many of our judges. As a result, the AKC is trying to legislate integrity with rules and guidelines for judges that, in my opin- ion, are not necessary but are being done to give credibility to the complaints from unhappy exhibitors who find it easier to find fault with judges and handlers rather than taking a good, long look at what they are exhibiting. Back when I started in the sport, you did not complain about the judges; you just got better dogs and did not show to those whom you thought lacked integrity. As mentioned, change is constant— and will be forever. With each change, there will be those who approve while others will be dragged along kicking and screaming. Hopefully, each change will provide new opportunities for future mile- stone moments to cherish and remember. What does the future of our sport look like? I don’t think any of us knows. Since COVID, we have seen more issues with club and show facilities, a decrease in the reliability of show superintendents, vir- tual competitions for titles, and numerous other issues. For our sport to succeed, we need to find ways to satisfy the needs of clubs, exhibitors, breeders, and judges. These needs must be satisfied in a practical, eco- nomical, and safe way for both humans and canines. It may be time for the Ameri- can Kennel Club to look into a change within the Bylaws, to update the over 100-year-old model into one that fits the 21st century and beyond. SHOWSIGHT has been here for 30 years, and hopefully, AJ and everyone at SHOWSIGHT will be here in 2031 to reach another milestone. Congratulations to SHOWSIGHT and the staff for continuing to meet and exceed the needs of our ever-changing sport. In closing, I hope that each person in our sport can reach the goals and milestones they look forward to with their version of Man’s Best Friend.

many in our sport who have dealt with difficult times. During the past 30 years, the landscape of the breeds themselves has changed. In my breed, the Vizsla, we have grown in popularity and competition from being one of the lower entry breeds into one in which (in some areas) our point scale is higher than that of Dobermans and Box- ers. At the same time, there has been a huge decline in what I call the “hard work required” breeds; those with coats that demand work and dedication. Thirty years ago, Irish Setters, Afghan Hounds, Old English Sheepdogs, Bearded Collies, and others would garner entries of over 35-50 regularly. Now, at many shows, they rarely even reach double-digit entries. Even the Terrier Group, once full of high quality and sizeable entries, has seen a huge decline in entries. This is probably because of the demanding effort needed to condi- tion and maintain the coats for competition. C H A NG E IS C ONSTA NT The number of breeds continues to increase. The Herding Group itself has grown from the initial 16 breeds to 31 breeds today. Every Group has seen some type of growth over the past three decades, and the AKC continues to add more new breeds to the registry. Over the past 30 years, we have lost many ICONS of the sport, yet there have always been highly competent individuals to step up and fill those roles. Unfortunately, over the past 30 years, we have seen a huge decline in the “true” dog men and women involved in our sport. Nowhere has this become more evident than within the ranks of today’s judges. The number of individuals approved not only as Breed Judges, but also as Multiple Group Judges, has grown by leaps and bounds. This meteoric rise in the ranks has also, unfortunately, brought about a dilution of talent in the quality of today’s judging. The American Kennel Club has made many changes over the years, but in some circles, the perception of our shows and

Thank you to the judges who have acknowledged Scarlett’s quality

Breeder Elizabeth Sullivan | Handled by Elisabeth Szymanski | Special thanks to Marie Cotton RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Scarlett

G R A N D C H A M P I O N CH GLENEARRAIGH’S Scarlett Of Spring Valley

#1

LEONBERGER 2021

ALL SYSTEMS *

BEST IN SHOW WINNING MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING MULTIPLE GROUP WINS AND PLACEMENTS

THANK YOU TO JUDGE ROBIN L. STANSELL FOR THIS RECOGNITION

OWNED BY MARY MONAHAN & LUANNE MOEDE

BRED BY LUANNE MOEDE

PRESENTED BY CHELSAY PAUL GRUBB

LEONBERGER

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/21

Ethan BIS MBISS GCHG BLUDRIFT’S ESCAPADES WITH ETHAN CGC THANK YOU TO JUDGE DAVID BOLUS FOR THIS RECOGNITION

A 30-YEAR JOURNEY FROM OWNER HANDLER TO JUDGE TO MENTOR LEARNING TO LEARN, TEACH AND MENTOR

BY LEE WHITTIER

E very step along my 30-year journey as a dog show owner handler, judge, and mentor has evolved from a core pas- sion to learn, to teach, and to mentor. Each experience, through both learning and being mentored, developed into a role of teaching and mentoring. It was the experience of being mentored that made me hungry to learn more. I wanted to study, to learn more and more about the breeds, and... more breeds. In turn, this “learning to learn” approach provid- ed the pathway to judging, and later, to both teaching and mentoring. As I met and interacted with people in the com- munity, I was convinced that there was not only a need for learning, but there was also a desire, specifically among the owner handlers, to raise the bar. The running dialogue in my head was, “These exhibitors need to learn and want to learn. I know how to teach.” I knew that owner handlers needed help, and so I created Dog Show Mentor. WHERE IT ALL BEGAN – THE BACKSTORY My entry into the world of dogs started in my mother’s whelping box with Collies, and later, Goldens. We raised all kinds of animals on our property, but it was the dogs that inter- ested me the most. My mother was a hobby breeder, but she showed occasionally, including at Morris and Essex. As a young adult, a friend of mine had an Akita. I was enchanted by the essence of this proud breed, and the story about Hachiko and his loyalty to his owner. When I saw that same loyalty in my friend’s dog, I set my sights on the Akita to be my first show dog as an adult.

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LEARNING TO LEARN, TEACH, AND MENTOR

A year later, I chose “O-Kami” from a large litter. Of course, no novice Working breed owner should be allowed to choose their own puppy! It was a big mistake that eventually became a blessing—like so many things in life. Despite our rough start, that dog taught me a lot about dogs with special needs and about “reading” dogs. To this day, this helps me with pup- pies in the whelping box and in the ring as a judge. I still carry that tough, loyal, wild dog in my heart. Fortunately, I found someone to help me with O-Kami, and she later became one of my trusted mentors. Mrs. Jan Marshall was a member of the Woodstock Dog Club and a Rottweiler breeder/owner/handler. Not only was she able to help me with my dog, she shared her passion for the Rott- weiler. It became mine as well. Mrs. Mar- shall invited me into the Woodstock Dog Club, which was a safe haven to meet other dog people who took me under their wings and started teaching me to learn about many breeds and the world of dog shows. In retrospect, it must have been so obvious that I was completely out of my league. I was not a natural, but I was a sponge! I was determined to have a well- trained show dog. That passion grew as I was mentored by seasoned breed experts. Our hard work paid off. Once my Akita was trained, he won a 5-point major. I was hooked! Other exhibitors started noticing me and my determination to “get it right!” A Siberian breeder was happy to have a show travel companion, so off I went with her. Not only did I get tips, I had the added bonus of developing a working knowledge of the Siberian. Sadly, my Akita died shortly after he turned two. The dog show community heard about the untimely, traumatic death of my beloved dog and rallied around me. In hindsight, this was a significant event in my entry into the dog world. Although at first, when he died, I had entertained the idea of leaving the dog show world, after experiencing the coming together and sup- port from the community, I realized that I had stumbled upon a rather special family of dog show people and a unique opportu- nity for personal growth. During those early years, I benefited from having mentoring opportunities at shows where people generously helped me to develop a new understanding of dog presentation and how to develop a strate- gic approach. Those early mentoring expe- riences helped inform the creation of the Dog Show Mentor program.

DURING THOSE EARLY YEARS, I BENEFITED FROM HAVING MENTORING OPPORTUNITIES AT SHOWS WHERE PEOPLE GENEROUSLY HELPED ME TO DEVELOP A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF DOG PRESENTATION AND HOW TO DEVELOP A STRATEGIC APPROACH. THOSE EARLY MENTORING EXPERIENCES HELPED INFORM THE CREATION OF THE DOG SHOW MENTOR PROGRAM.

I emphasize the connections that I developed both in those formative years and in the 30 years since. In the Wood- stock Dog Club, I held every position except Treasurer, taking on leadership positions such as President and Show Chair for fourteen years. With much study, men- toring, and working experience, I devel- oped relationships with successful breeders of Siberians, Norwegian Elkhounds, Silky Terriers, Smooth Fox Terriers, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and Labradors, to name a few. I wanted to study more, to learn more and more about the breeds, and... more breeds. In turn, this “learning to learn” approach provided the pathway to judg- ing. I always knew my path was to become a judge; it was later that I realized I would mentor others. 1992 – COMPETITION & COMMUNITY The Rottweiler was the breed for me. I was enchanted with their minds as well as their bodies. I loved the characteristi- cally powerful cadence of their gait; true to Rottweiler type. To be competitive in

a breed that took 23 bitches for a major, I had to study and learn from anyone and everyone. There was little room for error. I wanted to win, but I wasn’t sure how at first. I sat ringside and studied the Dober- man handlers. They helped me to under- stand not only presentation, but also being able to have a strong competitive spirit, and at the same time, be friends at the end. This is the epitome of competition and commu- nity. As an owner handler, I enjoyed some nice wins myself, and I also worked with professional handlers. Living in Vermont, traveling to shows added hours onto any show weekend. I found that working with professionals was convenient, and I got to learn even more about the sport and about presentation than I did by only sit- ting ringside. For me, it was always more, more, more. The rest of the ‘90s was a blur of attending one hundred shows a year, always—never less, hundreds of thousands of road miles, lots of champions, and many new friends. I loved showing up unexpect- edly, knowing that I was prepared and that my strategy would likely pay off.

LEARNING TO LEARN, TEACH, AND MENTOR

Thus, I created Dog Show Mentor (DSM), a program that is topic-based so that exhibitors of all levels can come together and explore topics of interest. The newer ones learn, not only from me, but also from each other. In turn, the more experienced members learn “Beginners Mind” and are able to look at situations and knowledge from a totally different perspective. This system serves all levels of owner handlers, and brings the impor- tance of our dog show community to the forefront. Our Owner Handler Commu- nity teaches each member to share their knowledge and mentor others at dog shows. Through the interviews, master- classes, and private coaching sessions, there is a body of knowledge gained from the broad perspective of many brilliant minds. The years of studying and being mentored by others continues, as I learn new breeds to help the Dog Show Men- tor members in the program. This format continues today. As 2022 approaches, I am very excited to be launching a new, independent pro- gram called, Dog Show Mastery. It is a yearlong intensive for experienced dog show owner handlers who want to go far- ther, faster, and play their bigger game—

National Owner-Handled Series (NOHS). The owner handlers, who make up the preponderance of entries, select those shows where it is offered. They have, in effect, changed the system by voting with their entries. My vision involves a shift for the AKC National Owner-Handled Series to step into its rightful place. In its current state, the NOHS is sometimes perceived as being a subset of dog shows. This is not correct. I see owner handlers raising the bar every day. I see the owner handlers using their positive voice. At every show, in every ring, a quality dog with an owner handler prevails. Think about that. Every show, every ring, an owner-handled dog prevails. This is truly raising the bar on the quality of dogs and on the quality of presentation. A CALL TO ACTION Rise up, owner handlers! Make the dif- ference you want to see in the sport that you so dearly love! My own early mentor- ing experiences helped inform my role in the dog show world as an owner handler and a judge, and ultimately, for the cre- ation of the Dog Show Mentor program. I am grateful for the early support that I received during a bleak time, when my dog died. I am grateful for the individuals who saw my struggles and gently offered their words of wisdom and mentorship. I recognize that growth involves the cycle of learning and teaching; being mentored and then mentoring. I am proud to be in a position where I can mentor owner han- dlers as they make their mark in the dog show world. I am also incredibly thank- ful for the individuals, the community, and the dog show world for providing me with a place to learn, a place to teach, and a place to meet incredible people while doing so.

2002 – TRANSITION TO JUDGING In 1999, I submitted my first applica- tion to judge a single breed; the Rottwei- ler. The AKC judge’s approval system at the time was “one for one,” so after seven years, I was approved to judge 17 breeds. It took 10 years on that system to get a Group. I’ve always taken my breed studies seriously, so I meticulously prepared for each application and interview. (I continue to apply for more breeds as time allows.) Education is the key to being a more effec- tive judge and mentor. Paying attention to the details, rather than “winging it,” is essential to both endeavors. I take pride in my training and husbandry, and I lean into my level of preparation, as I believe that that is the kind of preparation every judge (and mentor) should possess. The American Kennel Club evidently agreed because, during this timeframe, I had the privilege of being hired as an Exec- utive Field Representative—the ultimate study of all breeds. The Pacific Northwest welcomed me as a transplant, realizing that I had moved 3,000 miles to be with them. The move from Vermont was a culture shock, but it wasn’t long before I grew to love the area and the people. I am grateful for the opportunity to move and to work with clever breeders of excellent dogs. I’m honored to be part of the community. A FORMATIVE YEAR – 2016 THE YEAR MY WHOLE WORLD CHANGED In 2016, my whole world changed. I was inspired to start a mentoring program for owner handlers. No more would they muse about what the judge was think- ing. No more speculation about why they didn’t win. I had benefited from being mentored and I understood the potential for learning, teaching, and growth that is implicit in a mentorship. I was ready to be the mentor.

really bring on their “A” game. A LOOK TO THE FUTURE

Did you know that +/-80 percent of the dogs shown at AKC shows are handled by their owners? Imagine if more owner handlers stepped into leadership roles, developed a fuller—deeper—understand- ing of what the competitive world of dog shows consists of, and used their influ- ence for the good of the sport? What if those who blame and complain, instead, decided to contribute to make AKC what they envision? For example, in today’s market, most shows can’t compete unless they offer a

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Ms. Lee Whittier has been involved in the sport of purebred dogs for over three decades. Her involvement began as owner, exhibitor, and subsequently, a breeder of Rottweilers. She has also owned and exhibited numerous breeds in three Groups, currently Tibetan Terriers. Lee began judging in 2000, and then took a hiatus for several years to work for The American Kennel Club as an Executive Field Representative. She returned to judging in 2011, and currently judges the Working, Terrier, Toy, and Non-Sporting Groups, eleven Hounds breeds, six Sporting breeds, Bouvier des Flandres, and Best In Show. She has judged throughout the US as well as internationally. Lee is a standing member of Dog Fanciers of Oregon, the American Rottweiler Club, and the Tibetan Terrier Club of America. She is Show Chair for Vancouver Kennel Club and the Terrier Association of Oregon’s January show with Rose City Classic. In addition to judging, Lee Whittier has developed the Dog Show Mentor program, exclusively for owner handlers. This is an online program where owner handlers of all stages and levels learn to develop an individual, strategic approach to showing dogs. She also travels to speak to owner handlers all over the world.

C

JBK Border Collies

i

Jodie Keener BREEDER OWNER HANDLER

PRESENTED BY DAVID HARPER CO-OWNER D. BALETKA Duke

BORDER COLLIE

JBK Border Collies

Amadeus

CO-OWNED & PRESENTED BY SAMANTHA CARLSON

Madaline

PRESENTED BY BRIAN LIVINGSTON

THE OWNER HANDLER

KALYN ERICKSON

3. Do you attend show handling classes? Have you attended any handling seminars? Nope! Just my mom, my brother, David Erickson (14), and my cousin, Skylar Kolosik(14). My mom would have us show our dogs and then tell us what we did wrong and pick the best— and I was! No, not yet on any seminars. 4. Have you found virtual learning tools to be helpful? Classes? Videos? Websites? Social Media? I am not allowed. (I am only 10!) 5. Do you compete in the National Owner-Handled Series? Are rankings important to you? Yes & Yes, because I want to be Number One. I have the Num- ber One Owner-Handled Smooth Fox Terrier in the country for this past year. I am currently the Number Two Smooth Fox Terrier in Junior Handling. 6. In which class(es) are you most likely to enter your dog(s)? Why? Breed, Juniors, Owner-Handled & FastCat. (Because that is all I can enter him in right now!) 7. Is it a challenge to compete with your breed(s) as an Owner Handler? Yes, it is very competitive in our breed. (It is even harder in the Groups.) 8. Are you intimidated by the professional handlers? By the judges? Yes, a little bit because they are good! Most of the judges are really nice to me. 9. Who have been your mentor(s) as an Owner Handler? My brother, David, my mom, Erica Dunlavey, and my Me-ma, Michelle Erickson. 10. How important is the Owner Handler to the future of the dog sport? I don’t know how to answer this question. I just know that it is important to the owner and breeders, and I like showing in this class. 11. What are your goals as an Owner Handler? Is there a victory that has eluded you? To be Number One! (When I don’t beat my mom & Me-ma!) 12. Is there a funny story that you can share about your experi- ences as an Owner Handler? When I am in the ring with my mom, I steal her bait… and then I beat her!! From Michelle Erickson: We had to explain some of the words to Kalyn. (She just turned ten years old.) The judges love watching her in the ring and she makes them smile. Kalyn makes us all smile, and she doesn’t know how good she really is—and how hard this can be— because she is a natural.

Kalyn Erickson just turned 10 years old in November. She has had dogs all her life. They have been her playmates and her best friends! She started showing at around seven years old, helping with mom and grandma’s Sealyham Terriers. She would take the winners of the class back in and lead them around the ring. When she turned nine, Kalyn was able to go in Juniors, so she needed a dog—and wanted a dog that could beat her mom! So, Kalyn’s mother got on Facebook and started looking for a good Juniors and BOB dog that wasn’t one of her own breed. She spotted “Ben” (Smooth Fox Terrier) and reached out to the owner, Christine Martin, about Ben. Kalyn and her mom, Eri- ca Dunlavey, now co-own Ben together with Christine Martin and Jamie Taylor. This past February, they went to Chicago to pick up Ben, and snuggled all the way home. Ben and Kalyn connected (she loved him right away!) and Kalyn started show- ing him right away. In April, they got their first Owner-Han- dled placement and, on May 29th, Ben and Kalyn got Best in Show, Owner-Handled. On July 11, Kalyn got a Group 1 in the regular Terrier Group. Kalyn’s grandma, Michelle Erick- son, was in the Group ring with her… and almost lost her dog. Kalyn got her first Best Junior on August 19th. Kalyn likes showing dogs and will show any dog, for anyone… if they ask her! She cannot wait for the Orlando Show, with mom & grandma! 1. When were you first introduced to the sport of purebred dogs? To your breed? About three years ago in Fort Dodge, Iowa, I showed Sealyham Terriers in the Breed class! I got “Ben” in February! 2. How many years in dogs? How many as an Owner Handler? My whole life has been with dogs. I started Owner-Handled this past March, with my first win on April 4th. Mom had to learn how to groom Ben. She got help from Rosario Betan- court (!) and Rosario gave me some help on how to handle Ben in the ring.

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