Showsight Presents The Brussels Griffon

JUDGING BRUSSELS GRIFFONS BY CAROLE ROSS Hilltop Brussels Griffons

W hen talking to people about what the judges are looking for in the Brussels Griffon ring the most common answer will be “it is a head breed”. They are commonly referred to as such because the head probably is the most endearing feature the Brussels Griffon has. The head rep- resents 35 points out of 100 on the point scale. To quote Jeffery Bazell (breeder judge), “A Brussels Griffon’s head is its crowning glory”. Jeff goes on to say, “But only when found in combination with a well-balanced, cobby body.” That statement could not be truer. It is so important for a judge to judge the “full package”. The head, body and move- ment make up the “full package”. The AKC standard calls for a head with an almost human like expression. The head is a very important feature. Eyes set well apart, very large, black, prominent and well opened. Eyelash- es are long and black. Eyes should be edged in black. We are seeing Griffons in the ring with very little or no “eyelin- er”. We are seeing a lot of small eyes in the breed and that is incorrect. Breed- ers should be breeding for proper eyes and judges should be looking for them. Ears should be small and set rather high on the head. Ears may be shown cropped or natural. If natural they should be semi erect. Some will say there are “rose ears”. Rose ears are not part of the Brussels Griffon Breed Stan- dard in the United States. The jawmust be undershot. The inci- sors of the lower jaw should protrude the upper incisors. Brussels Griffons should have black lips. I say they should look like they are pouting. Neither teeth nor tongue should show when the mouth is closed. Judges should carefully

228 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2017

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