Showsight October 2017

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Skull The skull should be very large, and in circumference, in front of the ears, should measure at least the height of the dog at the shoulders. Viewed from the front, it should appear very high from the corner of the lower jaw to the apex of the skull, and also very broad and square. Viewed at the side, the head should appear very high, and very short from the point of the nose to occiput. The forehead should be

Temperament The disposition should be equable and kind, resolute and courageous (not vicious or aggressive), and demeanor should be paci fi c and digni fi ed. These attributes should be countenanced by the expression and behavior.

Influence of sex In comparison of specimens of di ff erent sex, due allowance should be made in favor of

the bitches, which do not bear the characteristics of the breed to the same degree of perfection and grandeur as do the dogs.

fl at (not rounded or domed), neither too prominent nor overhanging the face.

Bite The jaws should be massive, very broad, square and “undershot,” the lower jaw projecting considerably in front of the upper jaw and turning up. The teeth should be large and strong, with the canine teeth or tusks wide apart, and the six small teeth in front, between the canines, in an even, level row.

Topline There should be a slight fall in the back, close behind the shoulders (its lowest part), whence the spine should rise to the loins (the top of which should be higher than the top of the shoulders),

Feet The feet

should be moderate in size,

thence curving again more suddenly to the tail, forming an arch (a very distinctive feature of the

compact and fi rmly set. Toes compact, well split up, with high knuckles and very short stubby nails. The front feet

Size The size for mature

breed), termed “roach back” or,

may be straight or slightly out- turned.

dogs is about 50 pounds; for mature bitches about 40 pounds.

more correctly, “wheel-back.”

Gait The style and carriage are peculiar, his gait being a loose-jointed, shu ffl ing, sidewise motion, giving the characteristic “roll.”The action must, however, be unrestrained, free and vigorous.

Shoulders The shoulders should be muscular, very heavy, widespread and slanting outward, giving stability and great power.

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Reserve Best in Show win N ing | Multiple Group & specialty Win N ing | Grand Champion Bronze

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 8/31/17

Sincere ap P reciation to judge Mr. Houston Clark

Owned & Presented by

Bred by

Owned & Loved by

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*all systems as of 8/31/17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/17

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*All systems as of 8/31/17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/17

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GCH RUMMER RUN'S OLYMPIC SLAM DUNK

ALL BREED & SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW WINNER

BACK-TO-BACK BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWS, BOXER CLUB OF MILWAUKEE THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. KAREN HYNEK AND ROBERT VANDIVER.

BACK-TO-BACK GROUP 1ST WINS THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. PAULA HARTINGER AND MR. ROGER HARTINGER

OWNERS STEVE & ANN ANDERSON HANDLER RICK JUSTICE BREEDER/CO-OWNER JULIE WILMORE BREEDER CLAUDIA PARSONS

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*ShowSight Breed Point System 8/31/17

Thank You TO J U DG E M S . S H A R O N L YO N S F O R T H I S I N C R E D I B L E G R O U P H O N O R !

G E O R G I A B R O W N

owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY AND LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN bred by THE HURTYS presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D, (410) 822-2187

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S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N T A M A R I N T A I L B A C K M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

HOUSTON CLARK

KIMBERLY MEREDITH-CAVANNA

EUGENE BLAKE

T H A N K YO U J U D G E S

DOUGLAS JOHNSON

DENNIS MCCOY

EUGENE BLAKE

NANCY SIMMONS

JOHN WADE

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NO. 1 AFFENPINSCHER DOG*

THANK YOU JUDGE ROBERT STEIN

NO. 3 TOY DOG*

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/17

THANK YOU JUDGE JON COLE

OWNED BY DOYLE & CAROL GIROUARD

BRED BY JACKIE & TERRY STACY TAMARIN KENNELS

PRESENTED BY ALFONSO ESCOBEDO & ASHLIE WHITMORE

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*

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/17

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8/31/17 **DN STATS AS OF 8/31/17

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, (410) 822-2187 Tokio is owned by Marilyn Title & Carolyn McKenzie bred by Kao miichi

to Judge Dr. Robert D. Smith for recognizing Tokio with this beautiful group honor! Our Sincere Appreciation

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Monamour’s My Favorite grand champion

tokio

M S . J A N I N A L A U R I N & M R . K L A U S A N S E L M

all breed * *SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8.31.17

Always Breeder/Owner/ Handled by: LISA KNOCK Bred by: TRISORTS | LISA KNOCK & BARBARA VITARELLI

TRI SORTS SUMMER HARVEST HSAS, NA, NAJ

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GRAND CHAMP I ON R E N E GAD E S PAY ’ N I T F ORWARD A T DAWN H E I R H S A s

JENGA NUMBER ONE 6 ( m 2 0 1 6 & 2 0 1 7 * *ALL SYSTEMS 2016 & AS OF 8.31.17

GRYPHON

Champion

ALBERT

,nd  JOYCE ROWLAND & LAURIE YOUMANS 4rd  JOYCE ROWLAND, LAURIE YOUMANS & MARTY YOUMANS GRIFFITH

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FORWARD -a in ŵ

Champion

HOOKAH

BITTY Grand Champion

CASH

ELLA

ZAKYA Champion

JACK

Champion

SPITFIRE

MACY

PINCH

© 2017 PANDA PRODUCTIONS

TARNI

WIT

Champion

SMUDGE

SKYLAR

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M U LT I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G M U LT I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y S H OW W I N N I N G

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G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N DUNHILL WILL I AM

BEARDED COLLIE* *ShowS i ght breed st at s as of 8. 3 1 .1 7

J U D G E S F O R T H E S E S P E C I A L AWA R D S . ThankYou

OWNED BY Anna Mar i e Yura

BRED & CO-OWNED BY Ray Har r i ngton

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY James Bet t i s

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*

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/17

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*ShowSight breed stats as of 8/31/17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/17

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BRED & OWNED BY: LINDY BARROW / SKYEHIGH WESTIES | LINDY@SKYEHIGH.CA

HANDLED BY: COURTNEY KNIOLA

C A N A D I A N C H AM P I ON AM E R I C A N G R A N D C H AM P I ON S KY E H I G H ’ S S U B Z E R O

THANK YOU

to the many judges who have made this possible: Charles Olvis & Merl Taylor for recent BISs.

W I T H MU LT I P L E B I S , R B I S G R OU P A N D S P E C I A LT Y W I N S B I TC H

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GROUP INC. AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cellular 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

OCTOBER 2017 VOLUME XXV, NUMBER 3

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687

SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567 TAMPA FL 33679

TABLE OF CONTENTS MONTHLY COLUMNS 44 TABLE OF CONTENTS 45 COVER STORY 46 SHOWSIGHT -- FROM THE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 48 MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER AJ Arapovic 52 BECOMING Jacquelyn Fogel 56 SEE SPOT SKYPE Dan Sayers 72 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 76 LEARNING ALL THE MOVING PARTS by Allan Reznik 96 ROYAL CANIN PARTNERSHIP PROVIDES NEW VENUE 116 SURVEY SAYS: What's the main thing judges overlook judging your breed? 148 THE NATIONAL DOG SHOW Dan Sayers 156 SOMERSET HILLS CANDIDS 170 A BEAGLE FINDS A HOME by Judy Thompson 176 PENN RIDGE CANDIDS 186 THE BREEDERS’ BIBLE by the late Carol Garrison as told to Joe McGinnis III 190 GIVING BACK by Sharon Sakson 293 LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 294 AKC/ROYAL CANIN JUDGING PANEL NATIONAL SPECIALTY PREVIEW 191 THE IMPORTANCE OF THE NATIONAL BREED FEATURES BASSET HOUNDS 204 • BEAGLES 219 • BICHONS 224 • BOXERS 231 BRIARDS 240 • CARDIGAN WELSH CORGIS 251 • LAGOTTI ROMAGNOLO 260 PORTUGUESE WATER DOGS 271 295 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION by Daniel J. Cartier 301 ADVERTISING RATES

THE DOG SHOWMAGAZINE _______________________________ EXECUTIVE EDITOR Since Volume I, Number 1 Chief Media Consultant JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 EDITOR@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________ Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS

LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director, Social Media & Web Site DANIEL CARTIER DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM ADVERTISING BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com

201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

302 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 304 COMING ATTRACTIONS

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. 221 Indigo Lane, Georgetown, Texas 78628. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COURTESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8/31/17

**SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/17 **

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Linked Hands, Linked Hearts FROMTHE EDITOR EMERITUS

JOSEPHNEILM C GINNIS III

It’s too soon to tally results, but the amount of damage from the three horrid storms, Harvey, Irma and Maria, contin- ues to smash records and break hearts. As always, our fellow fanciers have banded together to aid one another almost as quickly as the hurricanes hit, and we’re getting constant reports of the efforts being expended and the open arms extended. If there’s anything good to be said about the situation, it’s that it is just one more example of the caring

nature of the people in this wonderful sport. Dog people have always been in the vanguard when it comes to helping each other and our dogs. Although the skies have cleared, the future’s cloudy. People are still in need and will be for quite some time. AKC was quick to jump in with Disaster Relief, as are many other dog- related organizations. TAKE THE LEAD is always on hand to help, and we’re so grateful to this source of comfort for the people who need it most We here at ShowSight welcome other information that can aid fanciers in this time of regrouping and rebuilding. Although in our hearts the show must go on, many didn’t, and Clubs, too, have been hit financially by this freakish force of nature And now our friends and family in Puerto Rico are suffering worst of all. We pray we find a way to help.. I included two photos below of my own dri- veway, only to give a tiny idea of the power of the winds. That 150-year-old Elephant Ear tree has withstood everything thrown at it for over a century; this was one gust too many for the towering beauty. Lesser flora, firmly rooted too,

Hurricane Help is standing by: Aid from within the fancy is available. TAKE THE LEAD has a disas- ter relief fund (up to $5,000 per incident). This can be a huge helping hand until FEMA or Insurance kicks in.If you are unable to get inter- net access you may call the TTL office at 1-800-814- 1123. Two AKC Pet Disaster Relief trailers were deployed to help evacuees from the storm, and AKC Reunite will continue to help shelters car- ing for pets displaced by the storm. To donate securely online, go to www.akcreunite.org/donate. Hurri-Canine Rescue founded in ‘92 in response to Hurricane Andrew has a hot- line: 863 816 8848 or hurricanine@dmcg.com. We will attempt to provide or net- work safe havens for fanciers and dogs displaced.

Photo: Lee Herr

was no match for the onslaught. Imagine what this did to the homes and lives more directly impacted. Although extremely fortunate, we were without power for a week and the cleanup hasn’t even begun at my home in central Florida. Many fared far, far worse. Our hearts go out to them. All of us here at AraMedia Group send heartfelt wishes of comfort to those afflicted. Again, let us know if you or someone you know needs help. We will do everything in our power to assist. .

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THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. MADELINE PATTERSON

THANK YOU JUDGE MR. PETER J. GREEN

We appreciate the judges who have recently recognized Zelda’s excellence: Mrs. Anne Savory Bolus Group 2 Cheyenne Kennel Club 9/2/17 Mr. David J. Kirkland Group 3 Cheyenne Kennel Club 9/3/17 Mr. Johnny R. Shoemaker Group 2 Arizona Dog Fanciers 9/22/17 Mr. John P. Wade Group 4 Prescott Arizona Kennel Club 9/24/17

ZELDA IS OWNED BY DIANE ADAMCIK, MARGARET HODGE & PAM LAPERRUQUE ZELDA IS CONDITIONED AND SHOWN BY PAM LAPERRUQUE

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Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC A NEW LOOK AND ONLINE SHOP

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE has made great strides over the past six months to successfully improve the quali- ty of our renowned magazine. With help from our partners and the dedication of our contributing editors, we’ve increased our global reach and expanded our publication’s readership. This growth has allowed us to attract new writers and publish high-quality articles written by breed authorities and thoughtful newcomers. Many of the articles we’ve published are well researched and thought provoking, building on our maga- zine’s collective efforts while furthering our reputation for bringing exceptional content to our readers. SHOWSIGHT’s respectability and reach would not be possible without contributions from dedicated fanciers who have something to say. To that end, we are calling for the submission of articles that offer either an educational or an entertainment experience. Informational and motivational articles are strongly encour- aged. Submissions may appear on our website and social media pages, and some could find a place within our magazine’s glossy pages. Topics could range from historic profiles and research articles to opinion pieces on the latest news coming from the AKC. (I know there are many heartwarming stories with a posi- tive tone that need to be shared!) By broadening our coverage of the sport’s past, present and future, we’re confident that we will encourage a more positive approach to the dog sport. And if we fall short of this lofty goal, at least we’ve provided space where anyone can share his or her love of purebred dogs. Articles may be submitted electronically through email submission ads@aramediagrp.com. The subject line should read: Article by (Name of Author) for Sport of Dogs. We look forward to hearing from you! Beginning with this issue, ARAMEDIA GROUP INC. and SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE are pleased to introduce our new website, SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM. The completely reimagined site includes many new and interactive features that allow easy access to current news and information, ringside videos, show results and ratings system as well as directories for superintendents, breeders, handlers, juniors, photographers, designers and much more. The site even includes a dog show calendar, time machine, contests and, of course, advertising that’s distributed virtually to our international readership. Every single AKC registered breed will now have its own digital publication on our site at no charge and each will link to educational information prepared by breed authorities and parent clubs. We’ve finally created a more uniform look that you can access across all of platforms. But we’re not done yet! In response to inquiries from within and outside the dog show community, we have opened a digital marketplace for dog-related products and ser- vices. This one-stop shop will enable dog owners to purchase needs and favorite wants under one cyber roof. We’ve made the investment to provide this virtual shopping experience and hope that you’ll appreci- ate the convenience and variety that’s on offer. To have your product(s) marketed and sold in our shop, please contact AJ Arapovic, CEO at aj@aramediagrp.com or 512-541-8128. Those of us at ARAMEDIA GROUP and SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE are working hard to give you — our clients and readers across the globe — what you’ve been wanting for a long time. That is, a single source, purebred place to visit early in the morning, late afternoon or in the evening before calling it a good night. We hope that you enjoy our new look and online shop, and we thank you for your continued support of our efforts to represent the dog sport in the best possible light. Wishing you and yours all the best.

AJ ARAPOVIC, CEO AND PUBLISHER

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IF SOMEONE TOLD YOU THAT

OF THE TOP 100 * SHOW DOGS EAT THE SAME BRAND OF FOOD Would you ask what it is?

HELPS KEEP SKIN & COAT IN EXCELLENT CONDITION

HELPS MAINTAIN IDEAL BODY CONDITION

SUPPORTS IMMUNE SYSTEM DURING TRAVEL & COMPETITION

HELPS OPTIMIZE OXYGEN METABOLISM FOR INCREASED STAMINA

proplansport.com SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT PET SPECIALTY RETAILERS *AKC Top Dogs SM All Breed Competition through December 31, 2016. The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors.

Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. Printed in USA.

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TO BE CONSISTENTLY RECOGNIZED.

TO REGIONAL JUDGE MR. ALAIN PECOULT AND TO NATIONAL SPECIALTY JUDGE MR. DOUGLAS WINDSOR FOR RECOGNIZING DEAUVILLE WITH THESE AOMs ! 50 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017

FAIRYTALE BRIARDS PROUDLY PRESENTS Grand Champion DEAUVILLE DU TCHIBO D’EBENE

Deauville OWNED BY: ODILE SMITH | WWW.FAIRYTALEBRIARDS.COM BRED BY: ZSOFI PECSÉRI | PRESENTED BY: GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D | (410) 822-2187

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Becoming BY JACQUELYN FOGEL Breeders Have a Story To Tell

I am no longer too shy or embarrassed to talk about being a dog breeder. Much as I’d like to blame my former quiescence on the AR people and their disdain for breeders, the problem was internal to me. As a former white collar professional, I was a little embarrassed to say proudly that I was a dog breeder. It sounded, so, well, mundane. I didn’t think it sounded inter-

genetics of your bloodline. They don’t want to know any details about whelping a litter, or the critical life- stages you monitor as the puppies grow. Few people train their dogs, so they don’t even ask you for tips or advice on training. Some want to tell you why their Goldendoodle is the best dog they’ve ever owned, even though they know you breed pure-bred dogs. I used to try to inject something about most dogs being wonder- ful, but usually got shut down with the F1, F2 hybrid nonsense the producers of their dogs fill their heads with. One thing is certain – few people want to know about the life of a breeder. Even most veterinarians look at you sideways when they find out you’re a breeder. You can almost see their thoughts as the words come out of your mouth, “Oh, you’re one of THOSE.” Yes, I am the same person who has spoken often about developing an elevator speech for why purebred matters. I can talk for hours about the problems in retail rescue, and why monitoring dog-related legislation is important for every pet owner. I often discuss problem behaviors and dietary issues with people, but it’s usually related to their dogs, not mine. I can talk about what’s happening in the AKC, and I am often asked about whether or not I go to Westminster, though that conver- sation usually devolves quickly into what I like about New York City, and there’s a lot to talk about on that subject.. What I rarely lead with is. “I am an AKC breeder of Basset Hounds and Bedlington Terriers, and I own a boarding kennel.” Usually the kennel part comes first and that immediately opens the doors to the other per- son’s Fido stories. Lately I have reversed my traditional response to the question of what I do. I have decided to lead with my life-long passion instead of the occupation I chose to support that passion. This week I had a meeting with an advisory board for a local career college. Several of the board members were new, so introductions were required. I tried out my new opener when they asked for my name and occupation. The room went completely silent. Nobody there knew how to react to a breeder being on their board. I was fine as a groomer and boarding kennel owner, but breeder was not what they expected. The committee members were polite as we did the work we were there for, but none of them tried to engage me in conversation. When the meeting ended and most of the members started leaving, I positioned myself near the new young veterinarian who was overseeing the pro- grams. I explained that I was not spending time in the cat rooms because of my allergies, and I was disappoint- ed that there were no dogs on site, so the people learn- ing to become vet techs had no opportunity to work

esting or special. It was just something I did that made me happy – like sailing a boats or playing poker make others happy. I knew how much I didn’t enjoy heating about those hobbies, so I naturally assumed nobody wanted to hear about my passion, either. The animal rights movement added another layer of doubt onto my willingness to talk about breeding, but the reluctance had started long before that movement took hold in this country. I don’t know why other people’s passions seemed so much more interesting than my own, but they did. Perhaps the problem lies in the fact that most people own or have owned a dog, and perceive themselves as canine experts. Someone with a passion for sailing can be assured that few people in their audience will share this passion, or even own a sailboat. Everything they talk about is new to the listeners. Same thing with peo- ple’s occupations. Even an accountant can seem inter- esting to people who do not deal with numbers and finance every day. And anyone with a CPA is at least widely respected. While most of us can balance a check- book, few of us know anything about managing the finances of a corporation. The stories these people tell are interesting because their listeners readily admit they don’t know much about the topic, and will often ask interesting, if not mundane, questions. Then there are dogs. I have learned over the years that everyone who has ever owned a dog considers themselves to be an expert on all things canine. Even worse, if they find out you own a dog, they all think you want to hear about every cute thing their dog Fido has ever done. They immediately pull out their phones to show you dozens of Fido photos, and excitedly tell you every detail of their pet’s life. It was always easy to not talk about my own life in dogs because everybody else always had their own Fido stories to share. I just had to listen, smile and nod as they droned on. Nobody ever asks you how you manage your 18 dogs, or wonders about how you plan a breeding program or manage the

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MULTI PLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER, MULTI PLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER & MULTI PLE GROUP WINNER

P L AT I N U M G RA N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T

CH SI LVERHALL SANTANA X CH STI LL-PI NES HOL I DAY CHEER

NUMBER ONE COCKER SPANI EL BREED *

OWNED BY KAREN OSPER, JESSICA LEGATH & RUI DASILVA

BRED BY KAREN OSPER

PRESENTED BY JESSICA LEGATH

SPONSORED BY PAM SULLIVAN & PAULA RAMBO

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*ShowSi ght breed stats as of 8/31/17

Becoming: Breeders Have a Story To Tell

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

with multiple dogs. He is a very pleasant young man, and our conversation quickly morphed into a discussion of vaccination protocols and canine nutrition. Before he could start to lecture me on his beliefs, I started telling him about my 45 years of practical breeder’s informa- tion. He started to contradict a couple of things I said, but I quickly told him that my 45 years of real-life expe- rience had taught me otherwise. He was shocked to learn that I had a current Merck Manual and a Plumb’s Veterinary Medication Handbook – and even more astonished to learn about a widely used protocol that prescribed daily fenbendazole for pregnant and nursing dams. I suggested he refer to his Plumb’s Manual and he would find it there. He said he was astonished at my medical knowledge, and I suggested that he get out and meet more breeders and animal farmers in real life. Our conversation then shifted. He began treating me like a co-professional instead of a novice, and he started to ask me some very different types of questions. My favorite was when he asked if I knew anything about German Shepherds. I responded that I was no expert in herding dogs, I breed hounds and terriers, but I would try. He said his German Shepherd was sort of high- strung…… at which point I stopped him and asked if he knew what the pure-bred dog he kept in an apartment was developed to do. “Well, they herd, of course! “ he responded feeling quite smug. And I countered with, “You know, of course, that not all dogs in the herding group were bred to move animals around, right?” I got a blank look from the vet and I continued. I explained that German Shepherds were bred to be perimeter guards and not only did they have to travel great dis- tances, they had to have highly tuned instincts to distin- guish in a moment who was prey and who was preda- tor. They were bred to be herd guards, not herd movers. Now just imagine why all of the German Shepherds you see have such beautiful long strides, and always behave as though they’re looking for something. What you are calling high-strung has been bred into these dogs to make sure they can do their work. Then I asked him what he was doing to make sure his dog had plenty of exercise and intellectual stimulation appropriate for his breed. The young vet looked me directly in the eye and said, “I feel really stupid. They don’t spend any time on behavioral issues in vet school, and I really don’t know anything about why certain dogs behave differently from others. Thank you.” I then went on to briefly describe the Early Neurological Stimulation program that Carmen Battaglia writes about, and explained that Carmen is a German Shepherd breeder, and he may want to address some of his questions to a real expert on the breed. I also talked about the reproductive work done by Marty Greer, and pointed out that she is a Corgi breeder. Then I told him that AKC breeders of pure bred dogs were becoming extinct, and he should start now to figure out where the

next batch of breed-related statistics was going to come from since nobody collects good data on mutts. I fin- ished by suggesting that he get to know the younger Amish breeders in Indiana who are trying to make a dif- ference in the world of pure-bred dogs because when the AKC breeders are gone, they may have the only pur- pose-bred dogs left in this country. By then the young vet’s head was swimming, and I had taught myself to be proud of my work as a breeder of AKC dogs. I followed up by sending the vet links to Carmen’s ENS articles and a link to a “Dog Talk” inter- view done with Craig Curry who is an advocate for the Indiana Amish breeders. I hope he reads and listens, though I have not heard back from him. Breeders must learn to own and take pride in what they do, and be confident enough to talk to people about being breeders. Too many people think breeders are bad. Don’t fall for the, “I only buy rescues,” – and respond with a variation of, “If that dog wasn’t pulled from a burning building or a flooded rooftop, then it wasn’t rescued. It was intentionally bred by somebody who didn’t care one bit about it’s health, behavior or purpose, and was sold to make money. So-called res- cues perpetuate the growth in poorly bred dogs by sup- plying endless buyers for those intentionally, and poor- ly, bred dogs.” We have to take back our story, and we need to start telling it out loud, to as many people as we can. We can- not afford to be shy or embarrassed. We need to be proud of the hard work we do as responsible breeders of well-bred, purpose bred dogs. The people in this country still love their dogs. Many of them are begin- ning to realize that there are significant down sides to purchasing recycled dogs of unknown origin. So I want to suggest that the next time somebody asks you what you do, look them straight in the eye and lead first with,” I am an AKC breeder of purebred (fill in this blank with your breed).” Then begin your own story about how you chose that breed, and why they are such great dogs. You don’t have to just listen to all the other Fido stories because you have your own story, and it’s way more interesting. ■ Jackie Fogel got her first purebred basset in 1969, but her real education in the world of AKC dogs and shows started in 1979 when she moved to Wisconsin and whelped her first home-bred champion. In 1995 Jackie got a bedlington terrier from David Ramsey of the famous Willow Wind line. She has bred and shown numer- ous #1 bedlingtons, and continues to actively breed both bas- sets and bedlingtons. In 2007 Jackie began judging, and is approved to judge 6 breeds. She owns and manages Cedar Creek Pet Resort, and is active in the Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, Keep Your Pets, Inc., (a non-profit she founded), and the local Rotary club. Jackie writes for ShowSight Magazine, the basset column in the Gazette, and a pet column in a local magazine.

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*all systems as of 8/31/17

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017 • 55

See Spot Skype TEXT AND PHOTOS BY DAN SAYERS Dog Names Are a Reflection of the Times

Fanciers of a certain age may remember learning to read with help from a Parti-Color Cocker Spaniel named “Spot.” In “Fun with Dick and Jane,” a series of children’s books created by

William S. Gray and Zerna Sharp, a tail- wagging purebred helped teach millions of American children the basics of grammar through phrases such as “See

Spot Run.” The Spaniel’s carefree days, spent in the company of a pair of human siblings, documents a generation whose children no longer needed to work on farms or in factories. Mid-century American kids were allowed a childhood, complete with an education and a faithful friend named Spot or Bandit or Duchess. Before the 1940’s, kids and dogs were expected to earn their keep, and both were given names with a certain degree of seriousness. By contrast, today’s kids are dependent on technology to learn and they’re often given the very same names that “pet parents” bestow on their own “kids.” If names are a reflection of the times, then today’s Colin and Chloe might well pick up an e-reader at school to read, “See Spot Skype.”

Pet Names with a Pedigree The very first name recorded in Volume I of the American Kennel Club (AKC) Stud Book is that of English Setter “Adonis.” Owned by Mr. George Delano of New Bedford, Massachusetts, the black, tan and

English dog was thought to have grand style and, befit- ting his quality, was renamed “Sensation” in the U.S. Another early English Setter import, a blue belton dog by the name “Druid,” came to this country in 1877. Mr. Arnold Burgess of Hillsdale, Michigan — consid-

ered the “Father of the Stud Book” — brought the three- year-old to America. Though not especially successful on the bench or in the field, Druid was neverthe- less a prolific sire. His sons “Gilderoy” and “White Cloud” and daughters “Lavalette” and “Countess Druid” were well-known among the shooting fraternity of the day. Their dramatic names were typical for dogs expected to compete

white birddog is listed as having been sired by “Leicester” out of “Doll,” a bitch imported in whelp. Each of these names is typical of the monikers given to dogs during the period when canine competitions were in their infancy. A Greek god, a place name and a child’s toy were acceptable sobriquets for dogs considered worthy of the title champion. So too were words that evoked a positive — even sensational — per- formance. In 1876, the

The model for Westminster Kennel Club’s distinctive logo was given a ‘sensational” name. Photo courtesy the Westminster Kennel Club.

members of the Westminster Kennel Club arranged for the importation of a lemon-and-white Pointer named “Don.” (Although a nickname for Donald, Don is also an honorific title in both Spanish and Italian used tra- ditionally to address members of the nobility.) The

and win. However, common girl’s names were not at all uncommon at the time. (Some of Druid’s best- known daughters were named Lizzie, Lee and Peg.) In Burges’ first volume of the Stud Book, the names of 55 English Setters are inscribed. Also included are 50

56 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 8.31.17

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017 • 63

See Spot Skype BY DAN SAYERS continued

Gordon Setters, 71 Irish Setters, 64 native (generally English) Setters, 44 cross- bred Setters, 34 Pointers and nine Spaniels (Clumbers, Cockers and Irish Water.) The first rat- tailed Spaniel registered in the U.S. was named “Bob,” a name that anticipated the trend to bestow American dogs with boy’s nicknames. As interest in the breed- ing and exhibition of pure- bred dogs grew and addi- tional breeds were added in the Stud Book, registered names evolved to include kennel names and titles earned. Early Westminster winners include Ch. Strathtay Prince Albert (Bulldog, 1913), Ch. Haymarket Faultless (White Bull Terrier, 1918), and Ch. Barberry Bootlegger (Sealyham Terrier, 1924). Ch. Slumber (Old English Sheepdog, 1914) is the show’s only winner with a single word moniker. Kennel suffixes were wide- spread too, especially

fervor generally reserved for entertainers and politicians. To support growing interest in the “cocking” Spaniel, the American Spaniel Club (ASC) was formed in 1881, a move that pre- dates the founding of the AKC by three years. “The very first Cocker regis- tered was a liver and white named ‘Captain,’” according to the ASC website. The first Black and Tan registered was named “Jockey,” with the first Black Cocker registered as “Brush II.” These were simple names for simpler times. Two decades after the Midkiff bitch went Best in Show at the Garden, a Black Cocker came along that ushered in a gen- uine hysteria for the breed. In 1940 and ’41, every major newspaper and magazine in circula- tion covered Ch. My Own Brucie’s back-to- back Westminster wins.

Mid-century American kids frequently grew up with a Cocker Spaniel named Spot, Bandit or Duchess. Photo courtesy The New Cocker Spaniel, Howell Book House.

among imports. The list of Westminster’s imported winners includes three Wire Fox Terriers owned by Halleston Kennels: Ch. Signal Circuit of Halleston (1926); Ch. Flornell Spicy Bit of Halleston (1934); and Ch. Flornell Spicy Piece of Halleston (1937). Although Terriers would come to dominate America’s most pres- tigious dog show, Sporting breeds frequently rose to the top at Madison Square Garden. Occasionally, the selection came about through debate. In 1921, a Parti- Colored Cocker Spaniel named Ch. Midkiff Seductive was selected Best in Show after two judges could not agree on a winner and a third adjudicator was called

Millions of American families soon wanted a dog just like him and many got their wish as breeders — both reputable and unscrupulous — supplied puppies to a nation that was falling in love with purebred dogs. Throughout the 1940s and ‘50s, the Cocker Spaniel was the most popular breed registered in America and its meteoric rise did not go unnoticed by Hollywood. In 1955, Walt Disney Studios released the animated film, Lady and the Tramp, a romantic tale about a pam- pered Cocker and her stray mongrel suitor. The film’s reception provided the studio with its highest grossing release since Snow White and gave purebred dogs an unprecedented boost. In the film, the protagonists’ pals include Scottish Terrier “Jock,” Bloodhound “Trusty,” Pekingese “Peg” and a Bulldog named, appropriately enough, “Bull.” (Even a pair of Siamese cats named “Si” and “Am” make an appearance on behalf of pedigreed felines.) The year before Disney’s dog-centric blockbuster was released, another Cocker Spaniel dominated the competition at Westminster. ASCOB Cocker Ch. Carmor’s Rise and Shine’s registered name suggests a kind of American optimism that values getting up early to walk the family dog. Throughout the second half of

in to make the final decision. Cocker Spaniel Sobriquets

Cockers Spaniels were on everyone’s radar ever since the arrival of Ch. Obo II in 1882. As reported in an article published in the October 1884 issue of the American Kennel Register, the solid black dog was a stand-out right from the start. “About a year ago, it was rumored among the Spaniel men that there was a clinking young dog up in New Hampshire, owned by a person named Willey, who had lately taken to the fancy,” the magazine reported. The fancy quickly embraced the smallest of the Sporting breeds with a

64 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017

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See Spot Skype BY DAN SAYERS continued

babies. From a “dog mom’s” point of view, little “Lexi” is entitled to the same rights and privileges as any child. However, an argument could be made that it is not as children that a growing number of people prefer to view their dogs. Instead, many four-legged “fur babies” are treated like grandchildren. Whereas parents are responsible to teach their children basic manners, good hygiene, and the ability to discern what is right from wrong, grandparents are free to spoil their grandbabies ad nauseam. Grandchildren get to stay up late and are always told how wonderful they are. Grandchildren are perfect and can do no wrong, just like your co- worker’s “rescue.” Although treating a dog like

the 20th century, the popu- larity of Cockers (and Collies and Cairns) steadily grew. And just as registra- tions increased, so too did the amount of time Americans spent watching television. Consequently, more and more dogs were given names of TV person- alities, both real and ani- mated. One of the biggest winning Cockers Spaniels of the 1990’s was Ch. La Shay’s Bart Simpson, a Black Cocker named for a spirited preteen cartoon character with a penchant for causing trouble. With more than 100 Best in Show awards to his credit, Bart Simpson’s canine counter- part caused more of a sen- sation. He handily won the Sporting Group at Westminster in 1995. Sixteen years later, the win

Some of today’s “lifestyle” magazines feature articles pro- moting baby talk for adult dogs. Photo by Dan Sayers.

was repeated by another Black Cocker, Ch. Casablanca’s Thrilling Seduction. “Beckham’s” name- sake, however, was no cartoon. He was a real-life foot- baller with a celebrity salary. As the 21st century dawned, the cult of personality had taken hold and its influence began to be expressed in the names given to dogs and children alike. Fur Babies and Fashion Models A visit to the magazine stand of any book seller today provides ample proof that the role of the dog in soci- ety has changed. Periodicals intended for sale to a dog- loving public are no longer presented as the voice of authority. Instead, many of today’s “lifestyle” maga- zines carry cover lines modeled after the fashion rags. Where once a photo of a recognizable purebred could be found, a beguiling mixed breed with a forlorn expression now begs to be “rescued.” Articles that used to offer dependable advice on animal care have been replaced with features touting the benefits of “baby talk.” To a growing number of media con- sumers, a dog is no longer just a family member with a clever name. To many of our friends and neighbors a dog is the family, and only the most extraordinary call name will do. Many of the names given to dogs today reflect a seis- mic shift in the role that canine companions play in our society. Both empty nesters and millennials are choosing the same names for dogs that parents are choosing for newborns. “Mason,” “Logan” and “Aiden” have become as common for puppies as they are for

a child (or grandchild) is nothing new — it’s the very reason for Toy breeds, after all — it has become the raison d’être for many people in search of the perfect pooch, no matter the breed or its mix. However, not every dog wants (or needs) to be spoiled rotten or given an unusual name. In fact, most dogs would rather put in a hard day’s work than be pampered from morning ‘til night and called “Arkyn.” Spoil a Spaniel all you want, it will still prefer to wallow in mud puddles and flush visiting songbirds from the bird bath. No amount of mollycoddling will change its hard-wiring, although it will still happily answer to any name it’s given. Queenie, Myckenzie and Kerfluffle are perfectly acceptable dog names — and so is Spot. ■ Dan Sayers covers the dog sport with a particular interest in the people who’ve served to promote and preserve pure- bred dogs. His articles feature breeders and exhibitors of the past as well as those who work tirelessly on behalf of the fancy today. A self-taught artist, Dan’s artwork is repre- sented in collections worldwide and his illustrations appear in the award-winning Encyclopedia of K-9 Terminology by Ed and Pat Gilbert. Since 1981, Dan has exhibited primarily Sporting breeds and Hounds. He’s bred both Irish Water Spaniels and Rhodesian Ridgebacks and has judged a variety of match shows and sweepstakes, including the Irish Water Spaniel Club of America National Specialty twice.

66 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , O CTOBER 2017

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On The Line BY BJ ANDREWS WHY DO WE RESCUE DOGS BUT ABANDON BREEDERS?

Why do so many dog fanciers not fancy the people who love dogs? There’s no glory or $$$ in saving breeders. Is that why we rescue the dogs and condemn the humans just when they need us the most? We feel good about answering the call, load-

ing “In her mind, she loved those dogs, and she thought she was doing right by them.” She went on to imply that the owner wasn’t thinking clearly in that she was “living and sleeping in a house covered by feces and urine…” Why didn’t she call family members or Great Dane breed- ers for help? We will probably never know why the owner didn’t reach out but TheDogPress.com will follow up on that aspect because it is not rare for dog owners to become physically or mentally ill just as any other segment of soci- ety. What doesn’t escape this reporter’s notice is that the news stations were immediately pleading for donations and the internet lit up with alerts such as this at NH1.com “Rescue of 84 Great Danes at NH puppy mill leaves humane society looking for donations.” Hopefully the thousands of dollars that poured in to HSUS will be applied to the proper feeding and care of those Great Dane dogs currently being held at an “undisclosed location.” One source who asked

ing up the van and driving 10 hours to rescue an abused dog. Did you know that many of the dogs we automatical- ly dub “puppy mill rescues” were once top winning cham- pions? Their owners were show breeders who’ve fallen on hard times, health, or emotional problems. You’ve heard about the more than 80 “Wolfeboro Great Danes” rescued in June of 2017. It was an especially juicy

story because the Danes were owned by very wealthy woman who lived in a man- sion on a spectacular estate. Was there some degree of envy hidden in the internet blasts and condemnation of that Dane fancier? My ears went up when the N.H. State Director for the Humane Society of the United States was quoted as saying

not to be identified ques- tioned the motive for the raid. She knows the owner, whose name we have withheld unless and until she is proven guilty of animal abuse. She said “the dogs were healthy and happy” pointing out that

“some of the pony-sized dogs could look her in the eye and some tipped the scales at more than 300 pounds.” Okay, it’s really not funny. She is the HSUS State Director… who obviously knows nothing about dogs. But she knows how to raise money and donations piled in, not to the local resources, but the HSUS. Makes you wonder who initiated the raid… Either the story was as vastly overblown as the size of the dogs and the “horrible cruelty” or the Wolfeboro, NH Police Department grossly under-charged the owner with only two misdemeanor counts of animal neglect. Think about that. Not abuse. Not cruelty. She neglected to keep them off the beds and possibly she didn’t put them out to potty often enough. But photos don’t lie. A photo was used to describe the “neglect” suffered by the giant dogs that were given free access to the mansion’s 9 bedrooms. All photos showed beautiful, spoiled Danes if anything, a little overweight. Oversized kennel runs with need non-slip surfaces were provided by their owners - until something happened. Marilyn Kelly worked at the estate and is quoted as stat-

the Great Danes may have been “spoiled and overindulged but were greatly loved.” She suggested that the owner needs “counseling not punishment.” And that is the point. Why would owners who love and spoil their dogs knowingly neglect them? And do the dogs feel neglected or mistreated? In this, as in many cases of “animal abuse” there is little if any interest in an animal owner who needs help. ■ Barbara J. Andrews published The Akita Handbooks and instituted the Register Of Merit system for top producing sires and dams in 1974. Bill and “BJ” set multiple breed records in Rottweilers, Akitas, and Miniature Bull Terriers. She now owns 7 Toy Fox Terriers. BJ served as columnist for The Dog newspaper, Dog World, Kennel Review Magazine, The AKC Gazette, and Canine Chronicle until 1993 when she became exclusive columnist for ShowSight Magazine. BJ has authored eight breed books published in eight languages, including World Of The Akita (Breed Book Of The Year Nominee), The Chihuahua , and The Miniature Bull Terrier .

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