Showsight Presents The Russell Terrier

“The Russell silhouette is SLIGHTLY RECTANGULAR IN APPEARANCE when measured from the point of shoulder to point of buttock, but ‘SLIGHTLY’ SHOULD NOT TRANSLATE INTO LONG BODIED.”

Parson, making it easier to carry on the hunt in a terrier bag. However, the Rus- sell Terrier should never be so distinctly different in appearance from the Parson as to be short-legged or coarse in bone, head or substance. Th e chest is the hallmark and, without a doubt, the most defining characteris- tic of the Russell breed. No matter how perfectly conformed the Russell may be, without a small, oval, flexible chest, he will not be able to work e ffi ciently under- ground. Th ese traits can only be deter- mined by proper spanning. If the chest is excessive in size, inflexible and incorrectly shaped, e ffi ciency of work is limited. Th e chest must never fall below the elbow. A deep chest distorts the required propor- tions and is indicative of undesirable dwarf characteristics.

Many fanciers over the years separated the Parson Russell Terrier and the Russell Terrier referring to them as being long- legged or short-legged, respectfully. How- ever, reference to Russells as “short-legged” is misleading. Th e Russell is not a short-legged breed; the standard requires an exact height proportion of 50/50 (withers to the bot- tom of the brisket should represent 50% of the distance from the withers to the ground). Th e Russell silhouette is slight- ly rectangular in appearance when mea- sured from the point of shoulder to point of buttock, but “slightly” should not translate into long bodied. Th e Russell must remain flexible and balanced, with flat, smooth muscle transitions. Overall, the Russell may not show any evidence of dwarf characteristics.

“MANY FANCIERS OVER THE YEARS SEPARATED THE PARSON RUSSELL TERRIER AND THE RUSSELL TERRIER referring to them as

being long-legged or short-legged, respectfully.”

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