Showsight - July 2018

BULLDOG

OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

Lint.indd 1

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/18

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 5/31/18

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PUG

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TIBETAN TERRIER *SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/18

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER

THE DOG DAYS OF SUMMER As summertime temperatures heat up, it’s important to remember that dogs are vulnerable to injuries and illnesses related to hot weather. These include heat stroke, sunburn and foot pad burns. The most dangerous condition is heat stroke which can cause organ failure, seizures, brain damage, hemorrhages, blindness, convulsions and even death. Every single year, thousands of deaths occur due to the heat and it seems that a year does not go by that we don’t hear about a dog death within our community. I am writing about this because there is nothing more important than keeping our best friends healthy and safe. My goal with this short message is to remind you of something you already know with the hope that you will take a moment to post any type of warning on your social media accounts or print flyers to post at your local show. (Even the best among us can be careless at some point.)The information below might be common sense to many of you, but probably not to all. If it was, we wouldn’t have these cases happen over and over again. What can be done to prevent heat stroke? Be smart and proactive! 1. When the temperature is high, don’t let your dog linger on hot surfaces like asphalt and cement. Being so close to the ground can heat their bodies quickly and it’s also an invitation to burns on sensitive paw pads. Keep walks to a minimum. 2. Provide access to fresh water at all times. Make certain that access to shade and plenty of cool water are provided when dogs are outdoors. 3. Restrict exercise when temperatures soar. 4. Of course, never leave your dog in a parked car or trailer, not even if you park in the shade or plan to be gone for only a few minutes. The temperature inside a vehicle can reach oven-like temperatures in just minutes, often in excess of 140 degrees. That quick errand can turn into a disaster and it could be fatal for your dog. What are some symptoms of heat exhaustion? Heat exhaustion symptoms can include diarrhea, nausea and vomit- ing, rapid panting, and a reddening of the skin inside the ears. What do you do if you suspect your dog is suffering from heat stroke? Well, fast action might save its life. Remove the dog from the hot area immediately. Wet it thoroughly with cool-to-room temperature water and increase air movement around him or her with a fan. Do not use ice or very cold water. This can be counterproductive since cooling too quickly can trigger other life-threatening conditions. Allow free access to water, but don’t force your dog to drink since they could inhale it or choke.

Through some research, I was able to find a handy chart created by Tufts Animal Care and Condition (TACC) to help you decide when it is safe for your dogs to spend time outside in the heat or in a car or trailer. It was created as a screening tool for people in the animal health field using different criteria to finitely determine the presence of neglect or abuse. Tufts used weather data to create the warm weather safety chart (right). This chart should guide you safely through the dog days of summer. But please do not use it to determine if it is safe to leave your dog inside a vehicle during warm weather. The temperature inside your car or van will not be the same as the temperature in your backyard. NEVER leave your dog unattended inside a vehicle. Please refer to the chart — along with using some common sense (after all, you know your pet best!) — to avoid heat stroke and make it safely through the summer months. Re- member, a nice 85-degree day doesn’t feel quite as nice when it is accompanied by 90 percent humidity. Make it one safe and enjoyable summer.

HOW HOT IS TOO HOT?

°C °F

15° 60° 1 1 1

No evidence of risk: Have fun outside!

Risk is unlikely: Have fun outside, but be careful!

18° 65° 1 1 2

Unsafe potential, depending on breed. Keep an eye on your pet outdoors.

2 2 3

21° 70°

3 3 3

Dangerous weather developing. Use caution.

23° 75°

Potentially life-threatening heat. Avoid prolonged outdoor activity.

26° 80°

3 3 4

29° 85° 4 4 5

32° 90°

5 5 5

+1 if obese

35° 95°

5 5 5

+1 if brachycephalic breed

37° 100°

5 5 5

+1 if less than 6 months old or elderly

40° 105°

5 5 5

-1 if area is shaded from sun

43° 110°

5 5 5

-1 if water is available

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO I ARAMEDIA GROUP PUBLISHER I SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

source: adapted from The Tufts Animal Condition and Care (TACC)

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table of CONTENTS

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687

14 SHOWSIGHT 38 BECOMING Jacqueline Fogel

176 186 194 202 208 216 235 250 255 268 280 282

WOOFSTOCK CLUSTER CANDIDS Photos by Richard Paquette

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

44 BREEDER INTERVIEW Allan Reznik 64 THE SEVEN SECRETS TO SHOW SUCCESS Michael and Cathy Dugan 80 FOLDING CHAIR FORUM Dan Sayers

THE CAIRN TERRIER Various Guest Experts

SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

THE CANE CORSO Various Guest Experts

THE JAPANESE CHIN Various Guest Experts

84 BRYN MAWR 96 ON THE LINE

THE SCOTTISH TERRIER Various Guest Experts

KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards

THE VIZSLA Various Guest Experts

Barbara “BJ” Andrews

106 THE PORTABLE LIBRARY Dan Sayers 112 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 140 WORLD DOG SHOW Karl Donvil

THE MISCELLANEOUS GROUP Various Guest Experts

THE FOUNDATION STOCK SERVICE Various Guest Experts

ADVERTISING

NATIONAL SPECIALTY REVIEW Various Guest Experts

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com 201 747 8569

164 SURVEY SAYS 172 STATEN ISLAND

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

If you had to choose a different breed other than your own —what would you choose and why?

AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

ADVERTISING RATES

KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COURTESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

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BOXER

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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*ShowSight breed stats as of 5/31/18

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Half Down, Half to Go... Joseph Neil McGinnis III FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

W e lead such fast-paced lives that by the time the first offi- cial day of summer arrives it feels like we’re halfway through it. In fact, our July issue always marks the point where we think we’ve really got a bead on how the rest of the year will go. In the show rings, anyway; outside of that it’s anybody’s guess. The seasons run into one another quick- ly on our non-stop show circuits, and with the changing weather patterns these days one has to be prepared for anything. A few years back we went from bone-chilling cold to blistering hot in ten days—an that was all on the January Florida Circuit.

I’ve been asked what I think starts the summer shows, a date, a feeling, a tempera- ture, whatever. I used to say it was when the upper Midwest outdoor shows got grass; now I say it’s when the upper Midwest outdoor shows get traction . More about upper Midwest shows in a bit. One of the best things about my job is my final proof, the last step before we hit press, in which I first get to see the magazine start to finish intact. In the old days we had an actual printed document; these days and much more smartly, we do it in digital fashion but it’s still a thrill to see her finally come together cover to cover. I’m always especially delighted to see all the editorial in place. We here at ShowSight are especially proud of our team of opinion writers whose experience, expertise and style keep us applauding on a monthly basis. I thank you all. And that reminds me of the thanks I always feel on this, my very favorite holiday, July Fourth. Our freedom to do what we love is only one tiny benefit of being an American. I think about the words, so impactful and uplifting, that we repeated each school day as children and so often other times since; they keep me proud and strong through thick and thin: Photo July 2018 by Zell von Pohlman

I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND TO THE REPUBLIC FOR WHICH IT STANDS, ONE NATION UNDER GOD, WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.

Happy Fourth of July to all. Speaking of summer and upper midwest shows I have to tell you this in case you haven’t heard; it’s the wildest thing I’ve heard in all my years but I guaran- tee that it is totally, laughably, true. On a bright shiny morning of a hot—perhaps hotter than we thought—upper midwest circuit, early arrivals to the dock diving setup were in for a surprise. It was early, it was already warm, and no one was ready for what to their amazed eyes should appear. For there, in the glorious sunlight, floating atop the pristine blue water of the dock diving pool, was, incredibly... A lady’s brassiere. On that note I’ll let you get back to your barbeque. We here at Aramedia Group, The Breeders’ Almanac , and of course ShowSight wish everyone cool shows and very hot wins. Until August, always remember: ShowSight Maga- zine wishes you all the Best!

JOE MCGINNIS, EDITOR EMERITUS

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SEALYHAM TERRIER

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 5/31/18

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SHIH TZU

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MINIATURE POODLE, STANDARD POODLE

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tea A L L B R E E D B E S T I N S H O W, M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W, S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W & M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G T I M E F O R

S A R A T O G A K . C . M R S . M A G O R Z A T A S U P R O N W I C Z

G L E N F A L L S K . C . I N C . M R . J O H N C O L E

D E L - O T S E N A N G O K . C . I N C . M R S . T H O R A B R O W N

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA

raincliffepc@aol.com Assisted by Casey Bair

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STANDARD POODLE

G C H S T O N E R U N A F T E R N O O N T E A

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MU L T I P L E B E S T I N S H OW & R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G

CJ’s Sweet GEORGIA BROWN S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N

T H A N K YO U J U DG E M R S . G AY L E B O N T E C O U Best in Show M I D - H U D S O N K E N N E L A S S OC I AT I O N N EW PA L T Z , N Y S U N D AY , J U N E 2 4 , 2 0 1 8

OWN E D B Y J E A N N E & C H A R L E S H U R T Y L Y N N E & MA R K F L O R I A N

P R E S E N T E D B Y G R E G S T R O N G , A K C R E G ’ D 4 1 0 . 8 2 2 . 2 1 8 7

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PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDÉEN

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BRIARD

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B R E E D *

A L L B R E E D * *

© T E D D Y ’ S P I C 2 0 1 8

2 0 1 8 B E S T O F B R E E D V A R I E T Y T H A N K Y O U J U D G E D R . T R O Y C L I F F O R D D A R G I N F O R T H I S V E R Y S P E C I A L W I N !

C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S @ YA H O O . C O M

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S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H E D E L W E I S S A L I T T L E F R E A K Y D E A K Y

O W N E D B Y T R A C E Y M A I G N E , H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S | B R E D & H A N D L E D B Y K A T H Y K N O L E S

* S H O W S I G H T B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 1 8 * * S H O W S I G H T A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 1 8

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/18

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*

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 5/31/18

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KUVASZ

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ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD

number A N A T O L I A N S H E P H E R D * ONE

* S H OW S I G H T B R E E D & A L L B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 1 8

Pumpkin PUMPKIN PIE G C H C H E V A L I E R S D U R O L A N D ’ S

H A N D L E D B Y J A S O N S TA R R

B R E D & OWN E D B Y D . M I C H A E L B I T Z , M . D . , E S Q .

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*

**

*all systems as of 5/31/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 5/31/18

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DACHSHUND (LONGHAIRED)

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*

**

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/18 **CANUCK STATS

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GLEN OF IMAAL

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS 2017

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Becoming The 2018 AKC Educational Summit—What Next! BY JACQUELINE FOGEL

T his June, the AKC hosted a one-day educational Summit for all member clubs. They encour- aged every club to send at least one rep- resentative and they scheduled it for the day before a regularly scheduled delegate meeting in New Jer- sey, so many clubs had their delegates attend. Other clubs sent vol- unteers to attend. The

significant departments: club communications, public edu- cation, club development and government relations is woe- fully small. In some cases, they have only two to three people working throughout the country to assist the hundreds of clubs and thousands of breeders. We all understand tight bud- gets. And we all understand that if the sport of purebred dogs is going to continue, we need to find better ways to do things and communicate with the public. I think these departments will need to grow to become significant to our sport. Sport. I used that word twice in the last paragraph and it brought me back to a really great comment made during the Summit by Howard Soloman from the Bedlington Terrier Club of America. Howard raised an issue after a presentation on Breed Preservation. He wants us to consider whether or not our conformation shows should be considered a sport at all. All-breed shows are really not a sport in the sense that teams or individuals compete and winners are determined by an objective accumulation of points or scores, in a pre- determined manner. What we do is actually much more like the livestock events at county and state fairs or the adjudica- tion of works of art at an art show. Howard’s comment sug- gested that if we returned to calling what we do an evaluation of livestock, then perhaps it might bring more credibility to the breeders who are professionally producing those ani- mals who compete for ribbons based upon the quality of their dogs. Right now the public thinks we host hundreds of beauty pageants and winners are just the lucky partici- pants the judges find attractive enough to send to Westmin- ster. I can understand why. We are not clear about the way judges examine and evaluate the dogs they see in relation to their breed standard. This is particularly true in the Group judging, which is the venue most often seen by the largest number of TV spectators. We all accept that the profession- als at county and state fairs understand the breeds they are judging and we accept their wisdom in the placements of the animals. That same level of understanding is absent from peo- ple watching dog judging. They think we are just picking the next “Dog of the Universe,” in our pageants. We are having a lot of trouble supporting the concept of conformation dog shows as sport. The closest events I think resemble what we do are the Olympic free-style gymnastic

cost was nominal—$75.00—and participants were given a gift bag from Royal Canin, lunch and summary materials. The Summit was well-attended with about 400 people rep- resenting clubs from every segment of the AKC’s venue of supported activities. Mostly the attending participants were invited to listen to presentations from AKC staff and volun- teers who were prepared to talk about issues facing all-breed clubs and breeders specifically. Mostly the audience listened to presentations, but after each presentation the audience was invited to ask questions of the presenters. Thankfully, the moderators limited the time available for questions and the day progressed quite smoothly. My future hope is that they include time for break-out discussion sessions along with presentations. I came away from the meeting with a general sense that the AKC has finally begun to realize the challenges facing breeders who work in isolation from other breeders and all-breed clubs who struggle to find members, volunteers and tools to help them keep their shows going. It is a good start and certainly welcome. However, as I look at the aging populations that attend these meetings, I am worried that it may be too little too late and the AKC may not be devoting enough attention to these issues instead of things like Urban Doggie DayCare Centers. The size of the staff in each of the

“RIGHT NOW THE PUBLIC THINKS WE HOST HUNDREDS OF BEAUTY PAGEANTS AND WINNERS ARE JUST THE LUCKY PARTICIPANTS THE JUDGES FIND ATTRACTIVE ENOUGH TO SEND TO WESTMINSTER.”

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*

**

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 5/31/18 **ShowSight breed stats as of 5/31/18

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FLAT-COATED RETRIEVER

Becoming: The 2018 AKC Educational Summit—What Next!

BY JACQUELINE FOGEL continued

“THE BIG, GLITZY SHOWS DON’T TELL THE STORY, THE SMALL SHOWS DO.”

or ice dancing competitions which include a lot of subjective scoring from a panel of judges representing several countries. At least there are panels of biased judges in these competitions and the highest and lowest scores are discarded, so one person’s opinion does not carry as much weight. In dog shows, winners are selected by only one person, with no controls on personal biases. I do not mean this as a criticism of dog show judges. I personally believe most do an exceptional job of applying their knowledge of breed standards to their evaluations of breeds. It is more a critique of a system that opens up our competitions to harsh criticism from spectators, who refuse to view what we are doing as sport. The team who shoots the most baskets, has the most hits, or the person who scores the most points wins the game. In their minds sports are objective and dog shows are entirely subjective. If we are not a sport, but an evalua- tion of breeding stock, or an adjudica- tion of an art form, then what is our next step in promoting our competitions? I would like to return to the original con- cept of dog shows that sold our venue as an evaluation of breeding stock. While I believe there is certainly an element of art in the show part of what we do, I firmly believe the emphasis should be on the conformation evalua- tion. Let the competitive dog grooming world worry about the artistic sculpt- ing of hair. I want to see us evaluate the conformation, structure and movement of our dogs. I want a championship to mean that these dogs have been judged and found to be worthy of continuing on in a breeding program. I like How- ard’s idea of professionalizing breeders as the producers of quality livestock, not just people who walk around in left-handed circles with a cute dog. We need to be the experts the public and other professionals like veterinar- ians turn to when they have questions about our breeds. The animal rights organizations have been trying to demonize us for years and it’s time we stop allowing them to frame our issues

and define who we are and what we do. The public needs to start asking some real basic questions, like, “If all dogs are spayed and neutered, then where will the next generation of pets come from?” Isn’t it better that our pets be produced by professionals who know what they are doing and take pride in the dogs they produce, rather than by people who just produce puppies for profit alone? Why is a dog intentionally bred to make money better than a dog intentionally bred to preserve breed- type and health? Howards comment apparently struck a nerve with many of the delegates because it generated a lot of discussion during the delegate meetings the next two days. Hopefully the delegates and other people who attended the Educa- tion Summit will take this and other issues back to their clubs to begin some real substantive discussions. Now is a good time to start, while we still have a few people who want to continue breeding. Now is the time to connect in earnest with 4-H groups and FFA (Future Farmers of America) and pro- mote ourselves as breeders of quality livestock, not Mothers of Tots in Tiaras. As the Education Summit pro- gressed, it became clear to me that there has been a shift in perception both among breeders and with the AKC. We can no longer isolate ourselves from the wider public and we need to be better at allowing them in to see what we real- ly do. The pet-loving public is not our enemy. In fact they are the people who are most likely to keep us from falling into extinction as they tire of the lan- guage of animal rights rescue and the heartbreak and expense of living with poorly bred dogs. We need to educate them about the importance of finding professional breeders, not just profes- sional dog sellers. We need to be proud of our professionalism and encourage young people to join us in our profes- sional livestock breeding. The Summit also encouraged clubs to reach out to their show exhibitors to become club members and encour- aged shows to include venues like

dock-diving, barn hunt and fast-CAT to drawinspectatorsandperformanceevent competitors. Our own club, Kettle Moraine Kennel Club added both dock- diving and barn hunt this year and our conformation entries increased by 200. We want to bring in a fast-Cat compe- tition next year because a lot of our conformation exhibitors are excited about that venue. We continue to invite the public in to see what we offer and we are beginning to make progress at getting the attention of the Milwaukee media, though we could still use a lot of help in that department. For the first time in 20 years, I have allowed myself to feel the optimism of a future for professional dog breeding. I think the ship has turned. It was a long, slow slide into near oblivion, but I think perhaps a renaissance is near. Maybe we are not on the Titanic after all. The 2018 Education Summit was a gateway event. The AKC TV channel will be playing segments of the event and I encourage people who could not attend to seek out the program. Clubs and breeders still need more help and AKC needs to grow the departments who help clubs, breeders and public relations. The AKC must be bold, now. It must go into trou- bled clubs and help mediate solutions to their problems and it must learn from the clubs who are growing organically. They all need to get out of their offices in New York and Raleigh and attend the small shows in the Midwest, South and Pacific northwest to see what’s really happening in the dog show world. The big, glitzy shows don’t tell the story, the small shows do. We invite you to attend our shows and our meetings and help us to tell our stories to a media that has been educated by animal rights activ- ists. We invite the AKC to pave the way toward better relations with the schools and organizations that work with the kids who love livestock breeding. I think we finally have the AKC’s ear. Let’s just hope they keep listening and don’t become deaf to the clamor they are about to hear.

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OF THE TOP 100 * SHOW DOGS EAT THE SAME BRAND OF FOOD S

Would you ask what it is?

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HELPS KEEP SKIN & COAT IN EXCELLENT CONDITION

HELPS OPTIMIZE OXYGEN METABOLISM FOR INCREASED STAMINA

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*AKC Top Dogs SM All Breed Competition through December 31, 2017. The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors. Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. Printed in USA.

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DACHSHUND (WIREHAIRED)

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Showsight Interviews: Milan Lint, Pouch Cove Kennels BY ALLAN REZNIK

Peggy Helming, Milan, Matisse, Michael Scott, Matisse's breeder Donna Gottdenker of Canada

1. Where did you grow up? Do you come from a doggy fam- ily? And if not, how did the interest in breeding and showing dogs begin? I grew up in rural Ohio and throughout my childhood par- ticipated in 4-H, competitively exhibiting ponies and horses. My parents were supportive, patient with me and my sib- lings having all sorts of pets and farm animals. At age 16, I purchased my first purebred dog, a less-than-stellar but very sweet male Newfoundland that I decided must be shown in the local puppy match. Given the quality of the dog (despite my certainty that he was the most handsome of Newfound- lands) this made for a tough beginning in the show ring. That said, the first-place ribbon (in a class of one) had me hooked. 2. Who were your mentors in the sport? How did your friend- ship/partnership with Peggy and David Helming of Pouch Cove fame begin? I attended my first Newfoundland National Specialty in September 1979, held in Ann Arbor, Michigan. That was an exciting adventure for me, as it was where I first met Peggy and David, as well as Janet and Alan Levine and Betty McDon- nell. Nearly 40 years later I remember that National Specialty like it was yesterday. The show was judged by Esther Mueller, who awarded BOB to Ch. Kilyka’s Black Bart, bred by Betty and presented by Gerlinde Hockla. As handsome as Bart was, I was especially taken with the BOS bitch owned and handled by the Levines, Ch. Ferryland’s Abby of Newton Ark, and the outstanding AOM dog owned and handled by the Helmings, Ch. Pouch Cove Gref of Newton Ark. Much to my surprise and delight, Abby and Gref were both sired by the top producer Ch. Kuhaia’s Rego, and believe me, it wasn’t long before I had a Rego daughter and granddaugh- ter at my home in Ohio! Those girls, by Rego and out of Pouch Cove and Newton Ark bitches, were the start of the New- foundland program. Over the next few years I did limited breedings, producing quality dogs with some success in the show ring.

3. What prompted your involvement in Portuguese Water Dogs? In 1984 I attend the AKC Centennial show held in Phila- delphia and had the opportunity to see Bill Trainor pilot the imported brown PWD Charlie De Alvalade to a group place- ment. I was intrigued by the breed, and once I began my uni- versity graduate studies I became increasingly interested in PWDs due to living space constraints that would not accom- modate the Newfs. I acquired my first PWD bitch in 1988, followed by a high- quality girl that completed her championship easily and ulti- mately produced three litters for us. David and Peggy acquired their first PWD from me, and that worked out especially well as I had completed my graduate studies and relocated to New York City, providing the opportunity to work closely together on the PWD breeding and show program. 4. The Pouch Cove dogs are known and admired around the world. Tell us about that, and the breeding philosophies you adhere to. Peg and I have bred approximately 75 PWD AKC con- formation champions and finished another ten or so stud fee puppies, including multiple top-rated, Best in Show and Working Group winners. To me, the most important show of the year is the PWDCA National Specialty, and we are par- ticularly proud of Pouch Cove’s results as reflected by win- ning three times BOB, four times BOS, five times WD/WB, and multiple wins in Puppy and Veteran Sweepstakes as well as Brood Bitch and Stud Dog. We have also owned the Number one PWD over five sepa- rate years, represented recently by the father and son Matisse (sired by Ch. Pouch Cove Caribe) and Preston, expertly pre- sented throughout their careers by Michael and Michelle Scott—who are a critical component of our show ring success. With 238 all-breed Best in Show wins to his credit, Matisse is the top-winning male show dog in US history, a two-time National Specialty winner, a three-time Westminster Working

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SAMI TOP 1 0 DOBERMAN* MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING

Group First under judge Dr. Roger S. Pritchard

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GCHS CADILLAC COCOA BUTTER KISSES RN, FDC, CA, BCAT, RATN, CGC, TKN, Achiever Dog

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BRED BY: Lori Spengler

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J ULY 2018 • 45

DOBERMAN

Showsight Interview: Milan Lint, Pouch Cove...

BY ALLAN REZNIK continued

Group winner, and Best in Show win- ner at the 2013 AKC/ Eukanuba Invita- tional. Importantly, not only did Matisse win BOB at the 2014 National Specialty, he was also the sire of the Winners Dog, Winners Bitch, Reserve Winners Dog, Reserve Winners Bitch and Best Puppy in Show! Peg and I feel that our approach to producing healthy, happy and hand- some PWDs has worked to date. The PWD parent club in the US has been extremely active regarding health issues and related testing, and we have taken full advantage in utilizing identi- fied gene markers which has been a plus in improving the chances of producing extremely healthy dogs. That said, it is a real balance, as our breedings consist of much more than mixing one pile of health certificates with another. For us, in addition to the health clearances, the potential parents must also have the structure, carriage, demeanor, overall breed type and beauty that we prefer to admire and interact with each day. Making all of that come to fruition isn’t easy, but we keep on trying and hope- fully succeeding, despite occasional setbacks. 5. Please comment on your breed’s present condition and what trends might bear watching. Relative to the 1980s (when I first entered the breed), the PWDs of today are more sound in temperament and with less variation in breed type. Sim- ply put, we have pulled in the extremes where the current population of PWDs has a more definitive look. In my esti- mation those improvements have in no way negatively impacted the breed’s working ability.

Regarding trends, we have been par- ticularly focused on overall proportion and balance, as the breed was tending toward lower and longer—character- istics that Peg and I find less appeal- ing, and critically, are not in keeping with the breed standard. Our boys have helped in this regard, where the length of leg to length of back ratio and the resulting carriage across the breed is generally more appropriate and to our liking. 6. You keep a few Affenpinschers at your residence in New York City. Are all your large dogs housed at Pouch Cove? Tell us about the facilities and how the dogs are maintained. Mitch and I have three monkeys (Frieda, Berta and Greta) with us in the city, while Fiona remains with Ernes- to Lara. We have a country home in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and it is set up for the PWDs, and as you men- tion, Peg and Dave also have PWDs at their place in Flemington, New Jer- sey, serving as exercise buddies for the Newfs. Additionally, Michael and Michelle typically have at least one of our PWDs and as you might imagine, that is a tightly run operation with fantastic facilities matched with the best of care and conditioning. Regard- ing Pouch Cove, if you ever have the chance to visit Dave and Peg at their home be certain to take advantage of it. The combination of the spectacular property, the quality and care of the dogs, and the history and knowledge of the hosts is unique. Simply put, better mentors and friends do not exist, and I could go on and on about Peg and Dave’s attributes, accomplishments and contributions. That said, their

success in purebred dogs and their stature in the community are more than evident. 7. Now with your campaigning of the Old English Sheepdog, Elsa, after Matisse and Fiona, did you make a conscious decision to begin backing worthy show dogs of other breeds? What went into this decision? There is less to the story than what one might imagine. Simply put, we breed, own and exhibit PWDs, and with Peg and Dave’s guidance, Michael and Michelle’s presentation skills, and my partner Mitch’s patience and financial indulgence, PWDs are my primary focus. Mitch and I have owned Affens for many years, and while we completed championships on several, we are not breeders. We have the Affens as they are a great source of entertainment, making us laugh each and every day. That said, when seeing Fiona as a pup- py we knew she was something spe- cial, and we thought it would be fun to work with top-notch dog people such as Tina and Bill Truesdale, and Ernesto, on the two-year campaign that resulted in Fiona being the Number one Toy in 2017, and a two-time National Specialty winner. Elsa the OES came about in a very different manner. We do not breed or own OES, yet we very much admire and trust Colton and Heather, who had exhibited PWDs for us in past years—and, as many of your read- ers will remember, Colton and Swag- ger, Michael and Matisse provided the fancy with some of the great com- petition and sportsmanship in dog show history.

Fiona the Affenpinscher with Ernesto Lara and his team.

Milan Lint and Portuguese Water Dogs doing a morning TV interview to promote the 2018 Westminster dog show.

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*

**

*all systems as of 5/31/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 5/31/18

S how S ight M agazine , J uly 2018 • 47

NEWFOUNDLAND

Showsight Interview: Milan Lint, Pouch Cove...

BY ALLAN REZNIK continued

associated with club membership and participation. I would, of course, like to see great- er participation in local kennel clubs by breeders, exhibitors and, frankly, professional handlers who make their living from these events. To that point, I was both pleased and proud when Michael and Michelle became actively involved in the Westchester and Mor- ris & Essex clubs. Great events don’t just happen—it instead takes the time, effort and energy of many. 9. The sport has changed greatly since you began as a breeder-exhibitor. What are your thoughts on the state of the fancy and the declining number of breeders? How do we encourage newcomers to join us, and remain in the sport? On this topic I may differ from many others in the sport. While I have a healthy respect for the past and very much enjoy discussing breeding programs and dogs of historical signifi- cance, my focus is much more on today and tomorrow. Despite what many dog people profess, “the good old days” are too often remembered as much better than what they really were. Relatedly, there is no greater turn-off to a new- comer than suggesting that our better days are behind us rather than ahead of us. For one, I don’t believe it. And even if I did, it is hardly the pitch I would use in getting others involved in purebred dogs. All in all, I am buoyant about the future given tremendous progress in overall education, advancements in dog health, gene markers, sophisti- cated breeding practices and greater geographic access to alternative blood- lines. Simply put, we know so much

As timing would have it, our young PWD special was not going to be quite ready for the big leagues in 2018, and I had by chance spotted Elsa in the breed ring at a show in 2017. While I am in no way an OES expert, it didn’t take a genius to recognize her as a great one. Ironically, Elsa lost the breed that day, instead taking BOS, yet I was unde- terred. At dinner that evening Heather and Colton discussed their hopes and dreams for the coming year. My sense was that, given their enthusiasm and confidence, a financial boost would enable Elsa and Heather to get on the road, making terrific things happen. That has been great to see and to be a small part of. Going forward, I have no plans to present breeds other than PWDs and Affens, and even if I did, working with the “right team” is paramount for me. That is not surprising, once you are accustomed to the Helmings, Scotts, Truesdales, Johnsons and Ernesto! 8. You have been a longtime club offi- cer in several organizations. Why is this important to you and how do you respond to breeder-exhibitors who do not belong to their local kennel club? I am currently the Treasurer for the Kennel Club of Philadelphia, the Vice President of the Morris & Essex Kennel Club, and, until recently, President of the Hatboro Dog Club. Longtime pure- bred dog enthusiasts typically enjoy well-planned events. That planning and execution requires time and effort, and I feel something of an obligation to do my part—as appropriately instilled in me over many years by David. Plus, I very much value the camaraderie

more about dogs of interest—not only the phenotype, but the detailed under- lying genetic map. And for those breeds where markers are not yet available— get moving! While my fellow PWD enthusiasts can be highly (and some- times overly) passionate regarding these issues, our collective efforts have made a tremendous and positive differ- ence in overall breed health. Regarding number of breeders, we are indeed increasingly dependent on smaller-scale programs and that isn’t changing. It is therefore incumbent on me to learn about, visit and assess puppies from multiple breeders vs. one larger facility. We are doing our best to make that adjustment, as it is highly unlikely that we will experience large scale programs—especially in a breed such as PWDs that don’t do well in those settings. 10. Finally, tell us a little about Milan Lint outside of dogs... your profession, your hobbies. As previously mentioned, Mitch and I have lived in New York City for 25 years, though we are originally from Ohio, and are both graduates of the Ohio State University. Mitch is a longtime (20-year) partner at Ernst & Young, leading a large business that requires global travel. I am a Manag- ing Director at BlackRock Investments and will shortly celebrate my 22-year anniversary. We have been fortunate both personally and professionally, perpetuating the addiction to pure- bred dogs, vintage autos, and exten- sive personal travel. That said, our favorite moments are invariably with friends, Affens and PWDs in beautiful Bucks County.

Milan and Mitch Berlin, Christmas 2017 in Brooklyn, NY.

Milan and his Affenpinschers

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S how S ight M agazine , J uly 2018 • 49

*

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 6/14/18

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WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON

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SHE’LL STEAL YOUR HEART!

T H A N K Y O U G R O U P F I R S T J U D G E D R . D A N I E L D O W L I N G

P R O U D L Y O W N E D B Y C A T H Y & J E R R Y G A U C H E P E R F E C T L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y M R . K A Z H O S A K A

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TOY POODLE

TOY POODLE ALL BREED * AMERICA’S #1

T H A N K Y O U B I S J U D G E M R . A N T H O N Y K E L L Y

A L L B R E E D & S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R MBIS MBISS GCHB SMASH JP COPENHAGEN

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* S H O W S I G H T A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 1 8

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & B E S T O F B R E E D W I N N E R A T W E S T M I N S T E R K E N N E L C L U B

B R E D A N D OWN E D BY A N G E L A M . S A N D E R S , S A N D E R L I N M I N I AT U R E P I N S C H E R S

P R O F E S S I ON A L LY H A N D L E D BY K I M BY R D , P H A

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MINIATURE PINSCHER

i s n o w . . .

B E S T I N S H O W & B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H S A N D E R L I N D A N C E S T H R U T H E G A L A X Y

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N E W F O U N D L A N D C L U B O F A M E R I C A N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y 2 0 1 8 J K&M PHOTO KEY4PRINTS T O P S H OW B I T CH 2 0 1 7 OWN E D B Y M a r k & W e n d y K e y s e r & C h r i s t i n e L a M u r a g l i a E X C L U S I V E L Y HA ND L E D B Y A l e x i s D i t l o w B R E D B Y C h r i s t i n e L a M u r a g l i a & P e g g y H e l m i n g NEWFOUNDLAND 56 • S how S ight M agazine , J uly 2018

POUCH COVE’S L I V I N ’ ON A PRAYER Jovi S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N S how S ight M agazine , J uly 2018 • 57

Dance With Me

G R O U P 1 : M R S . D E B B I E C A M P B E L L - F R E E M A N

B R E E D E R S / O W N E R S : S U S A N L a C R O I X H A M I L & E V E L Y N J O N E S H A N D L E R S : B R U C E & T A R A S C H U L T Z A S S I S T E D B Y : M I K E B E R R Y

BLOODHOUND

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G R A N D C H A M P I O N

G R O U P 1 : M R . C O L I N H A M I L T O N ( A U S T R A L I A )

number one Bloodhound * *

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 5/31/18

S how S ight M agazine , J uly 2018 • 59

Fairytale Briards present

bronze grand champion

Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene Thank you Judges Mrs. Malgorzata Supronowicz, Mr. Allan Brown, Mr. Tomasz Borkowski & Mrs. Donna J. Buxton for awarding Deauville

owned & loved by Odile Smith

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d (410) 822-2187

assisted by Melissa LoPinto

BRIARD

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Deauville Multiple Group & Best in Specialty ShowWinning

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M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W & M U L T I P L E S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R D U N H I L L W I L L I A M WILLY

NUMBE B E A R D E D

BEARDED COLLIE

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OWN E D B Y A N N A M A R I E Y U R A

B R E D & C O - OWN E D B Y R A Y H A R R I N G T O N

E X C L U S I V E L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y J A M E S B E T T I S

© H o l l o w a y 2 0 1 8

ER ONE C O L L I E *

* S H OWS I G H T B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 5 / 1 8 / 1 8

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The Seven Secrets to Show Success Understanding the Game BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN

dog food and product producers perform. It is part of a $50 billion industry, but ultimately it is the circus. Every week- end, the performers break down the tents, put the animals into trucks and travel to the next show. Like the circus, this traveling show becomes tight-knit and protective of the world they produce week after week. For new owners, this carni- val atmosphere can seem unfriendly and hard to penetrate. One of the problems of our sport is that new owners are not always welcomed as much as they should be, even though they are the lifeblood of the future of our sport. When you attend a major dog show it really does have the atmosphere of a three-ring circus. At any time, dogs are in the conformation ring, running through agility courses, doing obedience, tracking or whatever, while handlers and assistants are feverishly running back and forth to the rings. The ringmaster (the superintendent) tries to keep everything happening simultaneously. While there are many avenues of competition available, we opted for conformation and performance work. For us, if we were going to make the kind of plunge of time and money necessary to win and promote our breed, the conformation ring made the most sense in terms of time, money and expo- sure. Performance work gives our owners another venue to work with their dogs. Television networks, pet food manu- facturers and pet products and services providers spend mil- lions of dollars promoting and showing events like Westmin- ster, focusing on conformation. When Ladybug won groups on national television it advanced the breed as well as our own kennel. And we figured out a way to succeed in a different model. For many decades, being successful in a breed required that an owner be part of the “club” and receive the blessing of the old guard in order to do well. While we honor the many breeders and competitors of the last century who have built the world of dog shows for their efforts and the foundation they have built, things are changing. WHAT ABOUT THOSE JUDGES, ANYWAY? As with any sport, fans love to blame the umpires, referees and judges if things don’t go the way they like. Dog shows are no different. If anything, judges get a lot of heat from the fancy because judging in the ring looks so subjective to new competitors. Once you understand how long and arduous the process is to become an AKC judge, you begin to appreciate the skills and time and talent required. As Cathy was going through the process and now has mul- tiple breeds, we have both attended many judges’ education seminars and training. We’ve had the chance to get to know other judges and get a reality check about the world of an AKC judge. More than one judge has talked about the fact that it took years and tens of thousands of dollars to get to the point where they started getting regular assignments. New provisional judges get paid practically nothing if anything. Instead, a new judge flies across the country to get the hon- or of paying their own expenses and maybe get a free meal, and hopefully an entry big enough to be observed by the AKC rep. The next time you see a person judging at any show, much less the big ones, appreciate that they spent years in the trenches getting there. There are over 3,000 AKC judges in the country but only a few hundred have been approved to judge a group or a best in show.

SO, YOU’VE DECIDED TO MAKE THE LEAP…

By the time you have decided to compete at a high level at the big dog shows, you’ve already abandoned logic and rea- son and have drunk the kool-aid of the lure of competition. Ok, maybe a little dramatic, but not much. All of us started at some point on a fairly basic level. We loved our dogs, had fun with them, played with them, perhaps watched a dog show on television and sensed there was a whole other world out there that had to do with dogs. One of the many great positive elements of purebred dogs and the shows is that everyone can find their own level of involvement and enjoyment. There are thousands of owners of purebred dogs who never compete with their dogs and are very comfortable and happy to live with their wonderful creatures. We never call our dogs “dogs”; we refer to them as fur-people and talk to them in sentences because we believe that PWDs are that smart. We work as hard to communicate that belief with our pet owners as we do our show homes because we want to owners to have a fabulous experience, no matter what level they have decided to play. For many owners, showing their own dogs and compet- ing just enough to get a championship is more than enough. The dog world is a big tent with an activity suited to every desire and need. Whether it’s conformation, agility, water tri- als, obedience, tracking, field trials, carting; you name it, it’s all there for the new enthusiast. Even when you have made the personal commitment nec- essary to succeed at a high level in dog shows, you know it’s not going to last forever. After a wild ride with Ladybug for three years, the existential questions loomed: “Now what!” Because we’ve had the chance to be involved in dog breeding and shows for over 30 years, we now have an opportunity to continue to be involved in other ways. While we continue to breed dogs and compete, the AKC provides many opportunities for judging, ring stewarding, involvement with breed and all-breed clubs, writing, being mentors to our owners and others in the business and build- ing a positive legacy from the success we have enjoyed. An important part of the commitment to participant in dog shows is an understanding that the sport cannot survive unless we recruit, retain and mentor new owners. “Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the greatest show on earth! In the center ring…” The world of dog shows is a community much like the circus. Every week a collection of performers from the AKC, dogs, dog clubs, breeders, pet and show owners, judges, professional handlers, show superintendents, the media, and

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