Chihuahua Breed Magazine - Showsight

CHIHUAHUA Q&A

This breed is a heartbreak breed when it comes to whelping pup- pies, having necessary C-sections due to the size of the dome, and just tiny weights; very small, fragile sometimes at birth. Breeding Chihuahuas is tough on the emotions, but so worthwhile after the hard part is over.

What don’t most people know about the breed? Most people don’t realize how Terrier-like Chihuahuas are. They make wonder- ful watch dogs. Chihuahuas are also capable of rally, obedience, and many other performance events. Can I talk about the Chihuahua’s “saucy” expression, “apple dome” head and”sickle” tail? The alert expression of the Chihuahua has erect ears, erect posture, up on his toes. and the tail is held in a sickle or rounded sickle position. The sickle tail is the finishing touch to a beautiful, level topline. The head of a Chihuahua should be similar to an apple, with or without a molera, thus the reference to the apple-headed dome. The head should be rounded from ear to ear, dome-shaped and ears at 45 degrees. What about correct proportion for the breed? The breed should be slightly longer than tall. But overall, should be balanced, pleas- ing to the eye. Not too big-boned, not too elegant in bone, but moderate and balanced. Are there key differences between Smooth Coats and Long Coats? The Smooth coat dog and the Long coat dog are identical except for coat. Can I speak to any preferences for solid, marked or splashed coats? All colors are acceptable: solid, marked, or splashed. Mark- ings can be misleading, and can make the appearance of a dip in the level topline that is not really there. Judges must be careful of this. Color should not be a factor in determining which dog is best. Is the typical Chihuahua a dependable show dog and affection- ate companion? The Chihuahua is a loyal companion. They make a wonderful devoted pet. As a show dog, it is sometimes challeng- ing; they are confident, full of themselves. They can be sparred in the ring, go nose to nose with each other, and be big in their heads. They tend to keep you on your toes, and they can have feisty personalities! What are the challenges of breeding and keeping the world’s smallest purebred dog? This breed is a heartbreak breed when it comes to whelping puppies, having necessary C-sections due to the size of the dome, and just tiny weights; very small, fragile some- times at birth. Breeding Chihuahuas is tough on the emotions, but so worthwhile after the hard part is over. The first thing I explain to people about this breed is that you must keep them safe, that’s number one. They can’t jump off the sofa or out of your arms, fall down stairs, or rough house too much. They can be injured if not kept safe. They can escape through fences. Some can climb. They are athletic and fast runners, but they are the biggest joy. They love to be with you, and they love to get in the backpack and go. They carry well in a nice, comfy bag. What’s the most comical thing I’ve ever witnessed at a dog show? I guess my funniest story is just carrying my dog to and from the ring in my backpack. People see her pop her head out of the bag and they laugh.

they generally have, this raises the cost of the puppies. Sometimes free-whelping bitches need a section because a puppy has become stuck, and any time you put a dog this small under general anesthe- sia bad things can happen. Their joys are like those of most other dogs, i.e. their happiness when they see you return home. The most comical thing I’ve ever witnessed at a dog show? One thing that happened at a National Specialty was that my little girl got so excited playing with her toy that it got free from her grip and “flew” into the crowd of spectators, which they enjoyed also. And one time I was in the ring with a first timer and she started circling in one place so fast that I thought she was going to turn into but- ter like the tiger did in the old fairy tale we heard as children. The crowd thought this was funny, but me, not so much. I do believe that was her last time in the ring. I’d also like to share that Liz Bliss, a very wise lady who had been in the breed for many years, once said that breeding Chihuahuas was not for the faint of heart and this is very true. I was also privi- leged to visit Grace Shroyer’s home on several occasions and listen to her many stories of showing dogs and the many well-known and respected old time breeders she had known. Few of our newbies know that we all owe Grace a debt as she was the beginning breeder of long coats as we know them today. She had truly wonderful long coats and she had much wisdom to impart to this newbie. I cher- ished every single lesson. LOWOLFSON I’m currently living in

North Central Florida and have been for 19 years. I was born and raised in Balti- more, Maryland, and gradu- ated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County with a Bachelor’s degree and graduate credits in psychology and education. I am retired from a career in Police and Correctional Train- ing. I was the Chief of the Academy for correctional offi- cers for the state of Maryland.

I have shown and bred under the kennel name Mahogany since 1982. I showed and bred English Setters for 30 years and I have shown and bred Chihuahuas for the last 11 years. During this span of 38 years, I have shown in conformation, obedience, rally and bred many champions. Presently, my spouse, Roz, and I own Sew What Again! Canine Embroidery. We vend at dog shows and I compete with my dogs all over the country. I love showing my dogs. I love traveling, restaurants, and visiting with friends.

184 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JUNE 2020

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