Showsight Presents the Standard Schnauzer

“A SMALL WHITE SMUDGE ON THE CHEST SHOULD NOT BE FAULTED PROVIDED IT IS SMALLER THAN A QUARTER IN SIZE AND GREYING ON THE OLDER DOG’S MUZZLE OFTEN COMES WITH ADVANCED AGE AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A FAULT.”

be banded black and white. The overall shade or color value is determined by the width and pattern of the black bands on the white hairs. A lack of this banding or lack of a harsh wiry texture are considered seri- ous faults. Schnauzers also have a fine, soft undercoat. Grey is considered most desir- able, but a tan colored undercoat is not to be faulted in a pepper and salt dog. Black on black describes the color of the black Standard. They must have a harsh, wiry top coat and a soft black undercoat to be considered correct. A small white smudge on the chest should not be faulted provided it is smaller than a quarter in size and greying on the older dog’s muzzle often comes with advanced age and should not be considered a fault. Hair on the legs, called furnishings, are slightly longer than the body coat, but as the Standard reads, “These furnishings

and depth of chest equals the distance from brisket to ground. For a working dog the goal in move- ment is to cover the maximum distance with the least output of energy which results in good endurance. A smooth, ground-covering trot is the gold standard for judging and an indication of structural soundness. It is an important quality in the Standard Schnauzer. Though Standard Schnauzer structure is not unique among the square-built work- ing dogs, his coat is. His signature quality is his beautiful, wiry coat—harsh textured and thick, standing up slightly off the back. The color is either solid black or pepper and salt. The pepper and salt outer coat has a very unique color pattern consisting of banded hairs. Not grey, nor any other single color, the hairs in the top coat of the body should

the Working Group where they compete today along with the Giant Schnauzer. The Miniature Schnauzer remains in the Terrier Group. Standard Schnauzers are a good fit in the Working Group as their structure is similar to that of the other square-built working breeds, the Boxer, Great Dane, Doberman Pincher, Giant Schnauzer and German Pinscher. Though coats, size and head types differ, basic structure is similar in these breeds. Specifics include a body that is well-boned and muscular without coarse- ness, arched neck that flows smoothly into a short back, shoulder and forearm of equal length forming a 90-degree angle, straight backline sloping slightly down from the withers to the tail, pelvis set at 30 degrees, a moderately high tail set, well angulated rear in balance with the front and compact cat feet. Proportionately height equals length

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , J UNE 2019 • 269

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