Showsight December 2017

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 10/31/17 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 10/31/17

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GCH. CENTARRA GET YOUR GAME ON SIRE: MULTI BIS/BISS CH. ANAHAB’S MARK IT SQUARE DAM: MULTI BIS/BISS GCH. “BRENDA”

ZELDA IS OWNED BY DIANE ADAMCIK, MARGARET HODGE & PAM LAPERRUQUE

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MULTIPLE SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW WINNING

RESERVE BEST IN SHOW THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. LOWELL (ARLENE) K. DAVIS GROUP 1

THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. JUNE A. PENTA

ZELDA IS CONDITIONED AND SHOWN BY PAM LAPERRUQUE

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GRAND CHAMPION RUMMER RUN'S OLYMPIC SLAM DUNK

G R A N D C H A M P I O N

ALL BREED & SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW WINNER

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THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. PAULA HARTINGER, MR. ROGER HARTINGER, MS. KAREN J. HYNEK AND MR. ROBERT L VANDIVER

RUMMER RUN OWNERS: STEVE & ANN ANDERSON HANDLER: RICK JUSTICE

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*All Systems as of 10/31/17

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O W N E D B Y Sharon Rapadas & Nancy Resetar Chances’ R Aussies B R E D B Y Kathy Kellog g Copper Hill Aussies P R E S E N T E D B Y Larry Fenner B o ur d ain M U LT I P L E B I S & B I S S W I N N I N G

G C H C O P P E R H I L L S N O R E S E R V A T I O N S

Thank you Judge K L AU S A N S E L M

Bourdain wishes B E S T O F L U C K to his girls,

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candids by © Je ff Hanlin & © Diana Han

T H E S N OW S TO R M I S H E A D E D N O RT H . . .

Hope & A K C S I L V E R C H A S C A C H U K C G C H C H A N C E S R I T W I L L S N O W A T C O P P E R H I L L

Thank you Judge L I N D S E Y G R I N E L S

# 3 N O H S * , 3 B I S N O H B I S S W I N N I N G , M U LT I P L E B E S T J R . M U LT I P L E G R O U P P L AC I N G S

WAT C H F O R T H E S E TWO AT R OYA L C A N I N & WE S TM I N S T E R

SEE THEM ON FACEBOOK

CHANCESRITWILLSNOWATCOPPERHILL

C O - O W N E D B Y Hope Peavey & Kathy Kellog g

P R E S E N T E D B Y Hope Peavey

B R E D B Y Sharon Rapadas & Nancy Resetar

Thank you Judge M I C H E L L E S C O T T

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*AKC NOHS stats 2017

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*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 10/31/17

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G R A N D C H AM P I ON MONAMOUR’S my favorite

T H A N K YOU JUDGES

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TOKIO IS OWNED BY MARILYN TITLE & CAROLYN MCKENZIE | BRED BY KAO MIICHI PRESENTED BY GREG STRONG | AKC REG’D | (410) 822-2187

G E O R G I A B R O W N THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED GEORGINA’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY

owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN bred by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D, (410) 822-2187

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ALL BREED & BREED*

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TRI SORTS SUMMER HARVEST HSAS , NA, NAJ , OAJ

OUR APPRECIATION TO JUDGES MARY MURPHY-EAST AND LINDA ROBEY

Always Breeder/Owner/Handled by: LISA KNOCK Bred by: TRISORTS | LISA KNOCK & BARBARA VITARELLI

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/17 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/17 **DN STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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*AL L SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/17

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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GROUP INC. AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cellular 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

DECEMBER 2017 VOLUME XXV, NUMBER 5

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687

SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567 TAMPA FL 33679

Planche Front Cover.indd 1

12/5/17 12:58 PM

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MONTHLY COLUMNS

38 TABLE OF CONTENTS 40 COVER STORY 44 SHOWSIGHT -- FROM THE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III 48 MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER AJ Arapovic 56 PUREBREDS IN PERIL? by Dan Sayers

THE DOG SHOWMAGAZINE _______________________________ EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 Chief Media Consultant JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 EDITOR@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________ Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS

64 BECOMING by Jacquelyn Fogel 78 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 80 PROACTIVE PROS by Dan Sayers 102 AROUND THE RINGS AT BARKTOBERFEST 114 CHEERLEADERS by Allan Reznik

128 LINES FROM LINDA by Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 198 DOG SHOW JOE by Joseph Neil McGinnis III 204 LEARNING ALL THE MOVING PARTS by Allan Reznik 214 SURVEY SAYS: What's the biggest misconception about breeders? BREED FEATURES BEARDED COLLIES 220 • BRUSSELS GRIFFON 228 • BULLMASTIFF 238 AMERICAN ESKIMO DOGS 261 • IRISH SETTERS 276 PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN 284 BREED STANDARDS BEARDED COLLIES 224 • BRUSSELS GRIFFON 238 • BULLMASTIFF 259 AMERICAN ESKIMO DOGS 274 • IRISH SETTERS 280 PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN 292 294 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION by Daniel J. Cartier 296 COMING ATTRACTIONS 297 ADVERTISING RATES 299 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director, Social Media & Web Site DANIEL CARTIER DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM ADVERTISING BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com

201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. 221 Indigo Lane, Georgetown, Texas 78628. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COURTESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 10/31/17 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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MULTI PLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER, BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER & GROUP WINNER

#1 COCKER SPANIEL ALL VARIETIES*

*ShowSi ght breed stats as of 10.31 . 17

PAM SULLIVAN FOR SUPPORTING SPADER THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER, PAULA RAMBO FOR WORKING YOUR BUTT OFF AND TRAVELING WITH ME TO HELP AT ALL THE SHOWS, RUI FOR BEING A PART OF SPADER’S LI FE FROM PUPPYHOOD, AND KAREN FOR CO-OWNERSHI P ON SUCH A GREAT DOG INSIDE AND OUT! THANK YOU!

OWN E D BY : KA R E N O S P E R ,

J E S S I CA L E GAT H & RU I D AS I LVA

B R E D BY : KA R E N O S P E R

P R E S E N T E D BY : J E S S I CA L E GAT H

S P O N S O R E D BY : PA M S U L L I VA N & PAU L A RA M B O

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P L A T I N U M G R A N D C H A M P I O N B E A C H S T O N E ’ S B L A C K L I S T

(CH Si l verha l l Santana x CH St i l l -Pi nes Hol iday Cheer )

© An i ta Bak 2017

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FROMTHE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

JOSEPHNEILM C GINNIS III

PILLORIED IN PENNSYLVANIA, JUDGING THE JUDGES and AKC/ROYAL CANIN’S SUPER SHOW

IT HARDLY SEEMS POSSIBLE that this is the twenty-fifth time I’ve gotten to affix my signature to a December issue of this magazine. And yet it has been that many years and that many wonderful times we’ve shared through our mutual love of purebred dogs. The people that I’ve met and cherish and might not otherwise have known make up a collection of bright minds and detemined hearts, all with a mutual goal: the preservation of the var- ied, fascinating dogs recognized by the American Kennel Club. Breeding quality dogs is an uphill battle even in the best of times and right now things have become a little tense. We’ve long ago learned that we should be our own best police and that in union we’re strong and our dogs are safe. It’s no wonder we’re a tight-knit bunch.

PHOTO: JOE DEPETRO

Steward?? Quite frankly I was most concerned and read further, but it turns out the wicked act perpetrated by the judge was that he or she simply didn’t put the guy up. (Sounded like it happened often enough that if it were me, I’d take a second look at my dog or my handling abil- ity.) Anyhow, I started poking around to see exactly how much traction these type think-tanks (or dunk-tanks) get and like anything else on the internet, it’s subject to a huge slab of salt. Were arbiters to be ranked by demeanor

Forefront in the minds of most are three topics: the legal nightmare that has befallen a longtime fellow fancier, the new requirements for judges seeking first-time or addi- tional breed approval, and AKC’s super show in Orlando. Let’s talk a little bit about all three. First, and certainly most distressing, is the situation in which Miniature Schnauzer expert Joan Huber is now enmeshed. At eighty-three years of age, and after untold time spent in the fancy—including being awarded Terrier Breeder of the Year in 2016 by AKC—Joan is now in the middle of a legal skirmish during which eighteen of her dogs were confiscated by Pennsylvania authorites in her absence, neutered and spayed and placed in foster homes. I’m told these were all champion or show- prospect dogs, so it’s a blow to her revered breeding pro- gram and in addition to breaking her heart. There are reports that Animal Rights’ Activists were instrumental in bringing about the complaint in the first place. It’s far from over yet and in the meantime Joan needs help. Her friend Shawne Imler has established a GoFundMe.com campaign by which those wishing to do so can help. We must all remember that if it can happen to one of us, it can happen to any one of us. Once I get more details I’ll share them; in the meantime we send our thoughts. I’ve often had strong thoughts about the way in which judges are pilloried online. Granted, I rarely pay too much attention to most of the naysayers because so much of it is very obviously spoiled grapes, but recently I ran across a piece that gave me immediate pause. An individ- ual—I was going to say “a self-appointed expert” but decided not to—who to my knowledge is not a judge ran a survey question, and it was quite amazingly phrased like this: “What do you do when faced with atrocious judging?” I had to read it twice. Atrocious?? What, did the judge stab one of the exhibitors? Beat a dog? Berate a

(rude or friendly or dignified or what- not), attentiveness, and kindness to exhibitors, I could go along with that. But I have a great big problem with what I read, and it goes back to what i was taught almost fifty years ago. At the time, learning the ropes, I heard ringside catty com- ments and asked a mentor of their worth. And she said: “Unless you have done all that is required to be approved to judge, and had your

At the time, learning the ropes, I heard ring- side catty comments and asked a mentor of their worth. And she said: “Unless you have and had your hands on every single dog in the class that very day, and watched each dog every moment in the ring, then you are not qualified to judge the judge.” done all that is required to be approved to judge,

hands on every single dog in the class that very day, and watched each dog every moment in the ring, you are not qualified to judge the judge.” I took it to mean you go in,

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/17

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PILLORIED IN PENNSYLVANIA, JUDGING THE JUDGES and AKC/ROYAL CANIN’S SUPER SHOW FROMTHE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS CONTINUED

PUPPIES’ CHRISTMAS It’s the day before Christmas, and all through the house the puppies are squeaking an old rubber mouse. The wreath which had merrily hung on the door Is scattered in pieces all over the floor.

try your best, and be a good sport come what may. If for any reason you’re not happy spending money on an entry under that person down the line, nobodys holding a gun to your head to do so. So that’s how I always did, it and how I always will. And I thank Mrs. Thomas M. (Kay) Gately every day for the many things she taught me that have stood me in good stead. Now, don’t get me wrong; no one likes winning more than I did (and still do). But if we spray around the type of negativity I so often see online, no one wins and we all lose. And in that respect I want us all to be winners. Everybody is a winner at this years record-breaking AKC Royal Canin National Championship. With an entry of almost five thousand dogs, this show, AKC’s seventeeth, promises more than any event we’ve ever seen. The addition of the Puppy and Junior Stakes on Friday have gotten a tremendous response and Meet The Breeds® has the largest entry of breed booths in our history. Our Best Booth Contest promises to be tough! We simply can’t wait. We’ll look for you all week long in Orlando but please do visit our booth and say hello to some of the people behind the scenes that you don’t get to see quite as much as I’d like. We have a great team assembled for the fes- tivities but as always we have a stellar lineup of people in this magazine work- ing hard for you and for purebred dogs. We look forward to seeing you there. Now, one final note: As proud editor of this magazine since day one, I speak for everyone here when I wish you a fab- ulous time in Orlando, the very best of holiday seasons, and the very most promising New Year in your memory. And now for even more fun I have included the piece above right whose author is unknown but who deserves a round of applause. As do all of you for another year in service to the purebred dogs and the sport we love so much. And always remember... ShowSight Magazine wishes you all the Best!

The stockings that hung in a neat little row Now boast a hole in each dangling toe.

The tree was subjected to their bright-eyed whims, And now, although splendid, it’s missing some limbs. I catch them and hold them. Be good! I insist They lick me, then run off to see what they’ve missed. And now as I watch them the thought comes to me, That theirs is the spirit that Christmas should be. Should children and puppies yet show us the way, And teach us the joy that should come with this day? They bring us the message that’s written above, And tell us that, most of all, Christmas is love. —Anonymous

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MESSAGE FROMTHE PUBLISHER A YEAR IN REVIEW

AJ ARAPOVIC

Every year the dog show world brings more than its fair share of triumphs and challenges. You might even say that dog show years are a lot like dog years. ShowSight Magazine may be only 25 years old, but we packed several lifetimes of experience into our history-there is literally that much going on at any given time. That kind of experience has taught me to appreciate each year for its uniqueness. This year in particular, I will recall with a special fondness. It is perhaps, one of the finest and most impressive I’ve experienced to date. We have several ini- tiatives underway that will continue to give you top quality publications and most importantly expand and promote the sport of dogs, purebred dogs and its breeders to millions of dog lovers who aren’t familiar with purebred dogs and our fancy. From this point on almost everything we do, will be showcased not only to people within our sport but to millions outside of it as well. I am a huge believer that positive changes will start happening within our fancy as a whole, as more people are exposed to and educated about purebred dogs. Starting December 14th at the AKC National Championship we will start releasing details on how we will start reaching these millions of dog lovers outside our sport. I would like to thank the thousands of fanciers, who have dedicated most of their lives to this sport, who spent months help- ing us bring these initiatives to fruition. Now it is time to turn the talk into reality one step at a time. Meanwhile we were confronted with some of the biggest storms to hit the United States in decades: Hurricanes Irma, Maria and Harvey. I have witnessed and heard that many of our fanciers have responded to these natural disasters with fortitude, perseverance and resiliency. I am proud of our efforts to help people in need. Through the challenges and triumphs over the year, I have witnessed the Heart of our Fancy shine brighter than ever. For that, I’ll be forever grateful and proud to share the sport of dogs with you.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from my daughters Iryna & Adrianna, my wife Hanifa, our Aramedia Group employees, their families and me.

REMEMBER: “POSITIVE CHANGE IS POSSIBLE WHEN WE ACTIVATE CARING”

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B E S T ! I N ! S H OW

BO-BETT ’S FAVORITE PICK

BRED & CO-OWNED BY Carol Harris | OWNED BY Deborah Bahm

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EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY Ashlie Whitmore

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T H A N K Y O U

T O A L L T H E J U D G E S W H O H A V E A W A R D E D O U R B O Y ’ S F I N E T Y P E A N D Q U A L I T Y .

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M U L T I P L E

G R O U P

P L A C I N G

J U G E R E D E L W E I S S

K I NG A R T H U R owned by M R S . K A R E N J ’ A N T H O N Y presented by G R E G S T R O N G | A K C R E G ’ D | ( 4 1 0 ) 8 2 2 - 2 1 8 7 S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2017 • 53

multiple group winning Champion

Grandcru Sine Qua Non

Greyhound All-Breed

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 10/31/17

Bred by Melanie Steele, Rindi Gaudet & Rose Tomlin Owned by Jeane Haverick & Melanie Steele

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All-Breed

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 10/31/17

Owned by Jeane Haverick & Kaileigh Gonzalez Bred by Clussexx Knl, Kaileigh Gonzalez & Jamie Hubbard

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The National Dog Show TEXT AND PHOTOS BY DAN SAYERS Have Millennials Evolved Past Purebreds?

It’s usually a pleasant surprise to find a purebred dog on the cover of a magazine. That is, one that’s not specifically a dog magazine. So, imagine my surprise when I opened a recent issue of a farm-to-table quarterly with a recognizable purebred under the masthead to find a story on farm dogs that read, in part, “Now that we’ve evolved past purebreds to embrace an inclusive, pro-rescue approach, almost any mutt can become the ultimate farm dog.” What? Of course, not just any dog is capable of herding, drafting, guarding or keeping a barnyard free of vermin. The irony of espousing a “pro-rescue” position while celebrating the virtues of working purebreds (the article introduced dogs of eight separate breeds) is misleading, to say

the least. How is it that such a paradox can appear in print today? This question caused me to consider how our understanding of dogs might be influenced by our experiences — and our age. Can our appreciation of purebreds be dependent on the generation into which we were born? Do Baby Boomers support purebred dogs out of a sense of nos- talgia, and have Millennials really evolved past purebreds?

The Silent Generation Today’s most senior breeders and exhibitors are part of a group born between 1925 and 1945 known as the Silent Generation. "Silents" are characterized as depres- sion-era children who came of age to become career- oriented adults who conformed to social norms. Employment opportunities were plentiful for this gen- eration whose members could afford to raise a family on a single income. The Silent Generation thrived in an economy that supported an expansion of the middle class into suburban developments. This lifestyle allowed many families to purchase a living — and lov- able — status symbol in the form of a purebred dog. Many of these new dog owners were encouraged to dip their toe into the conformation pond, and from this pool emerged today’s most experienced judges, show chairs, handlers, exhibitors and breeders. The men and women of this generation are our link to the sport’s earliest days. Some of its members even had first-hand experience with legendary figures such as Alva Rosenberg, Louis Murr and Percy Roberts. For a half- century or more, the Silent Generation has quietly hon- ored their mentors by producing families of dogs that conform to the breed standards and not the whims of fashion or fortune. Baby Boomers Born from the mid-1940s through the early ‘60s, the Baby Boomer generation is associated with increased affluence and a healthy skepticism. As a group, “Boomers” have been America’s wealthiest, with

income levels previously considered inconceivable. Although often criticized for their excessiveness, mem- bers of this generation are also altruistic and idealistic. They grew up during a time of dramatic social change when television brought home Civil Rights marches, “love-ins” and the Vietnam War. As a result, Baby Boomers got involved. And when the networks cov- ered more celebratory events such as the Olympic Games and the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, people flocked to convention centers across the U.S. to meet the athletes — including the dogs — they saw on TV. Participation in the dog sport grew during this period and registrations increased. However, with the advent of social media, the general public’s attitude toward purebred dogs began to change. The Internet appealed to a younger audience that embraced new technologies and the (mis)information that was readily available. As Boomer breeders continued to maintain business as usual, the next generation of potential fanciers was discovering other sources for finding a dog. Generation X Although there are no precise dates to de-mark Generation X, its members are generally considered those people born from the mid-1960s through the early ‘80s. Many “Gen Xers” grew up as “latchkey” kids since they were either children of divorce or had two parents working full-time. Frequently characterized as cynical and apathetic, members of Generation X are self-described as being happy and active. As adults,

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EVERY DAY, MORE TOP BREEDERS ARE TRUSTING ROYAL CANIN. At Royal Canin, we obsess about purebred dogs— and the perfect nutrition for each of them. ROYAL CANIN ® BREED HEALTH NUTRITION ® formulas are developed with your breed’s unique needs in mind. As a breeder, you know that tailored nutrition can unlock the magnificence inside your dogs, and so do we. Join the winning team! Enroll today in our Crown Partners ™ Breeder Rewards Program at my.royalcanin.com. Membership benefits include an average 20% savings, quarterly rewards, free puppy kits, free shipping and more!

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Image used with permission. Royal Canin is not a sponsor of or affiliated with the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

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Purebreds in Peril BY DAN SAYERS continued

Purebred dogs could go the way of the dinosaurs if today’s fanciers can’t encourage the next generation of dog breeders. Courtesy Atlas of Animal Anatomy for Artists.

find little motivation to achieve milestones such as getting married or buying a house. Car and dog ownership can be likewise dubious. Without a car, most young people can’t get to work much less to a dog show. Consequently, Millennials have turned to the web in search of both job and dog only to discover that thousands of “rescue dogs” await. Perhaps this is why some consider purebreds to be passé and bourgeois. Maybe the Millennial generation more closely identifies with a hard luck story in the form of a mongrel produced for no other reason than to be “rescued” and loved. If this is the case, the future of pure- bred dogs may indeed be in peril. However, a preventive solution may exist through a clear message that a dog in need of work is every bit as valuable as a dog in need of rescuing and love. (This applies to Millennials too!) ■ Dan Sayers covers the dog sport with a particular interest in the peo- ple who’ve served to promote and preserve purebred dogs. His arti- cles feature breeders and exhibitors of the past as well as those who work tirelessly on behalf of the fancy today. A self-taught artist, Dan’s artwork is represented in collections worldwide and his illustrations appear in the award-winning Encyclopedia of K-9 Terminology by Ed and Pat Gilbert. Since 1981, Dan has exhibited primarily Sporting breeds and Hounds. He’s bred both Irish Water Spaniels and Rhodesian Ridgebacks and has judged a variety of match shows and sweepstakes, including the Irish Water Spaniel Club of America National Specialty twice.

they’re typically more peer-oriented than preceding gen- erations. Gen Xers' came of age during the technology boom and many successful start-ups can be attributed to their entrepreneurial spirit. This familiarity with — and dependency on — technology has forced changes in con- sumer behavior. Members of Generation X who are look- ing to find information on purebred dogs will begin their search online. Unfortunately for AKC Breeders of Merit, the distinction between a bona fide breeder and everyone else in cyber space is unclear. Web sites can be the great equalizer since every “breeding program” can appear legitimate online (thanks to images occasionally lifted from other web sites.) This can be of little consequence to a generation less rooted in the traditions of the past and more interested in what is new. Designer dogs, any- one? Millennials From the mid-1980s to early 2000s, a generation was born that has become expert in the fields of communications, media, and digital technologies. “Millennials” place an emphasis on creativity and meaningful work, and are less concerned with income and earnings than previous gen- erations. Because they entered the work force during the Great Recession of 2007-2012, they typically earn up to 20 percent less than their parents did. This financial con- dition has forced many Millennials to return home follow- ing college graduation. Saddled with student loans, many

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Introducing the AKC/ROYAL CANIN ® National All-Breed Puppy & Junior Stakes! For the first time ever, we invite you and your Puppy or Junior (6-18 months) to compete with other top breeders from across the country at the 2017 National Championship. Mark your calendar! December 15, 2017 (During the 2017 AKC National Championship) Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL We’ll see you at The Stakes As the event approaches, look for updates including entry details, information about judges and more in the premium list coming this September. WE HEARD YOU BREED GREAT ONES.

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2017 • 59

Fairytale Briards present

GCH. Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene

Deauville

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our sincere appreciation

to all the Judges who have recognized Deauville

owned and loved by Odile Smith presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d | (410) 822-2187

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*All Systems as of 10/31/17

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Becoming BY JACQUELYN FOGEL Encouraging Young People to Join Clubs and Compete In Conformation

Everybody knows that dog shows are getting smaller. Twenty years ago an average sized show drew 1500 - 2000 entries while large or prestigious shows drew entries of 2500 – 3000. I belonged to a Wisconsin club that hosted two shows every year. The winter show was in a metropolitan indoor location, and had an entry of nearly three thousand and a spectator gate of nearly $10,000.

A Combined Specialty club with 14 breeds joined us on Saturday. The smaller summer show was held out- doors with no spectator gate and entries of only 1500. These were the days before the AKC allowed clubs to do back-to-back shows. Club membership included at least twenty active volunteers of all ages, and it had a large treasury. We didn’t have Owner-Handler series, Grand Champions, reserved grooming or Best Anything competitions. The indoor show sometimes offered a weight-pull exhibition, but no other perfor- mance events. The outdoor show didn’t charge for parking and hosted no events to draw in spectators. This club was a money-generating machine, but it also had a very dark side to it. For most of the years I was a member we had a strong dictator-like president and vice-president, and a weak Treasurer who never asked questions. Our vice-president who was also the Treasurer of the Combined Specialty Clubs was caught stealing thousands of dollars from the Combined one year, and they successfully prosecuted him. However, even though I could document a shortage of around $9,000 in vendor revenue from the year before I took over that committee, the club didn’t want to create waves, so the President never told the rest of the mem- bership, and I was severely ostracized for trying to dis- credit one of our Founding Fathers. This man probably stole more than $12,000/year from the two clubs, and nobody was allowed to ask questions. People might want to blame the Treasurer, and to some extent it was his fault because he never asked for back-up data. He only counted what came in and never asked about why more wasn’t being documented. He trusted the Founding Father dictatorship to tell him what he need- ed to know. He was a pharmacist who was a good per- son but knew nothing about commonly accepted accounting practices. I was a young, naive, and an eas- ily vilified trouble-maker. I look back on those years and wonder what kept

me going in a top-heavy system rigged to keep the newcomers in their place. The club meetings weren’t fun, but they were short. Most of us just listened to the Old Boys and their wives tell us what was going to happen at the shows. We were told what we could vol- unteer to do, and we were expected to show up, shut up and do what we were told. I joined the club along with another young woman about my same age. We played the game differently. She nudged her way into the Old Boy Club with stories and promises she never intended to keep, while I was a staunch know-it-all, we-can-make-this-better irritant who demanded accountability and professionalism. She advanced through the leadership structure a lot faster than I did, and became show chair for the large winter show after only a few years’ membership. It took me 10 years to finally get the chairmanship of the summer show – after nobody else wanted it, and I had chaired every other sub-committee. She had no trouble getting vol- unteers to work, while I struggled to get my subcom- mittees filled. Thankfully the summer show was held with another all-breed club, and they handled most set-up and take down duties. That was one highlight of my learning experience – learning to negotiate with another club over responsibilities and hiring judges and logistical issues both club had to accept. Mostly I remember struggling to get work done and be accept- ed by the Old Boy Club. The acceptance never hap- pened – the Old Boys just gradually moved away, died or went to jail. And yet, I remember those years somewhat nostal- gically. I learned a lot about the inner workings of dog clubs, dog shows and dog breeders. I wanted to be accepted, even if the Old Boy Club never embraced my abilities. I just worked harder. I wanted to advance in a merit system – by breeding great dogs and exhibiting them in the best manner possible, and doing great work within the club structure. I am still not sure I

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is like A GI RL BE ING PRETTY? “

Don’t you know that A MAN BE ING R ICH

photo by © Gina Clear Photography

You wouldn’t marry a girl just because she’s pretty,

BUT MY GOODNESS, ” - M a r i l y n M o n r o e

f r e n c h i e b i t c h *

Mu l t i p l e Gr o u p P l a c i n g | B I SS Wi nn i n g

PECHE MIGNON DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL’S BEST FRIEND

lovingly presented by DEBRA MATT INGLY bred by ROBERT SMI TH AND STEPHEN MI L LER OF PECHE MIGNON FRENCH BUL LDOGS owned by DEBRA MATT INGLY, KENNY MATT INGLY, TRACY GR I FF I TH, CAROL HURST-NEVI L LE, ROBERT SMI TH & STEPHEN MI L LER

D E B R A M AT T I NG LY. C OM P E C H E M I GNON F R E N C H B U L L D OG S . C OM

*ShowSight breed stats as of 10/31/17

Becoming: Encouraging Young People to Compete

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

chose the right path. Most of the people I know who have been hugely successful in the dog world played a combination game of politics and merit. I expected to get noticed for my good work, while they made sure people in the right places noticed them when they did good work – or any work. It’s been a real struggle to advance in a world that rarely identifies competence without being pointed towards it by somebody with a loud voice and lots of political connections. I learned a lot, but never made it into the inner power circle of that club. Fortunately the next club I joined operated much differently, though the occasional internal power struggles were still exhausting. This brings me to the question I raised with this

success would attract as many people as it always had. Surely the club would recognize competence and reward it with praise and plaques. Except it doesn’t work like that. Patience is no longer a virtue, it’s a hin- drance to forward progress. As with every social change, there are positives and negatives. While I love the world-wide connections technology has made possible, I am also discovering that depth of understanding and knowledge is not being transmitted at the same speed. I don’t know how to shorten the learning path for true understanding of a breed standard. It took me 5-10 years to truly under- stand the finer points in my breeds and to be able to distinguish great dogs from merely good-enough dogs. It’s been a life-long process of training my eye to see what I need to know in a few seconds. I did not rely upon pictures, I relied upon hands-on tutoring with mentors, some that I saw only once or twice every year. Sometimes I’d verify what I thought I was seeing in photos with hands-on examinations and eyewitness accounts of movement. That was useful until photo- shopping made virtually all photos irrelevant to deter- mine a dog’s quality. Yet shopping from photos and video is how current buyers are selecingt the breeders from whom they want to purchase a dog. It’s easier to shop the magazines than do the leg-work and study required to truly learn a breed, then search for the best to buy. Grooming breeds have particular challenges because so much can be hidden with good grooming and expert photoshopping. As I have been mentoring new breeders and judges in bedlingtons, I am con- cerned that none of them know the breed should have flat shoulder blades, or even what that means. Even fewer seem to understand how to recognize or breed a V-front, not just scissor one in. These are breed char- acteristics that are easily lost if breeders don’t pay attention. Perhaps it doesn’t matter. Maybe, in our Fast New World, none of this really matters. Maybe we should just accept that breed judg- ing has morphed into a grooming contest, and a gener- ic understanding of movement. Maybe I am wrong – again – in my approach to dog show competitions. Maybe, to attract new, young exhibitors we should just give in to the world they are used to experiencing. If a dog looks like a picture of the dogs they see in mag- azines, or is ranked #1 then look no further – that must be the best one. If it has a head, four legs, runs fast and is beautifully groomed, who cares if it should have a rolling gait or flat shoulder blades, or a pendulum front or a prominent sternum? It’s still a pure-bred if not always a well-bred dog. Then all we have to do is teach grooming, conditioning and training to our sport’s newcomers. That will take far less time than teaching them the finer points of the breed standard,

article’s title. How do we interest and encourage the current generation of young people to join clubs and compete with their dogs? They are not used to functioning in a world that expects them to “pay their dues” for a long time before they are noticed. They are used to a world that is increasingly being influenced by technology, and they know they’re the ones who understand how to utilize the technology better than the oldsters they will replace. They are used to having a lot of options, and have no fear of moving to a different passion if the one they’re in isn’t paying back the emotional or financial

While I love the world-wide connections technology has made possible, I am also discovering that depth of under- standing and knowledge is not being transmitted at the same speed.

rewards they expect. The younger people today have witnessed changes happen at a phenomenal rate, and assume this is the way things have always been. They pay a lot less attention to the wisdom of older people, and a lot more attention to their peers in a world of rules they are redefining and making up as they go. This is really uncomfortable for those of us who learned the dog trade at the former snail’s pace. We studied with the masters, read books, attended a lot of training sessions, bred some puppies, learned some more, went to a lot of club meetings and Specialties and were generally content to wait our turn for great- ness to find us. Surely the good judges would find our superior dogs. Surely the public would want to buy our well-bred, predictable, healthy puppies. Surely the young people coming up after us would want to learn from our expertise. Surely a slow, measured path to

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Becoming: Encouraging Young People to Compete

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

how to breed it and where to find dogs that have the characteristics that will reproduce what they need. If we want to speed things up, then it makes sense to drop out the part of the process that consumes the most time – breeding for correctness. Or we could still expect quality dogs, but accept less–than-great grooming and training. However, this would require that judges also be educated in the finer points of the breeds, and how grooming can enhance or mask those qualities. Much as the purist in me hates to admit, maybe it’s easier to give up on quality breed- ing than to try teaching judges to look past grooming. It could be a partial competition equalizer if judges could accept less-than-perfect grooming in their class judging. Perhaps we could even encourage more peo- ple to show terriers if they didn’t have to spend so

Young people are used to learning at institutions, not through apprenticeships. Academies for Junior Breeders and Groomers may be the only way to reach a young generation. Grooming is well on its way in that direction with competitive groomers learning complicated trims and techniques at seminars and competitions. Breeding institutions have a long way to go to catch up – or start. In the meantime much infor- mation is being lost as the generations who studied with mentors retires. Nor does breeding generate rev- enue as quickly or consistently as grooming. That’s an obstacle that will need to be seriously addressed soon- er rather than later. We also need to encourage young people to join clubs, and give them real work to do to keep them interested. My local Rotary Club found a great way to encourage young people to join. We

much time learning how to groom their dogs to perfection, or pay high fees to professional groomers every time they want to exhibit. I think we are already well down the path of lesser quality breeding and higher quality grooming, because it’s the path of least resis- tance. Unfortunately it has also led us down the exclusionary path of giving great advantage to dogs that are professionally groomed and exhibited – and that is another dis- couraging factor for the Fast New World generation. They can still buy a pretty good dog, but the process of learning how to groom and show it to perfection can take a long time if it is not their primary occupation, and it seldom is. Given the new set of rules pre- sented by the Fast New World gen- eration, I am struggling with ideas to encourage more exhibitors.

recruited a 23-year old member to become president, and let him go forward with whatever he wanted to try. It’s been rejuvenating for all members, and has certainly helped to recruit more young members. If conformation competition is going to survive it will have to change from the bottom up, and appeal more to the Fast World gen- eration. I think the change will be determined more by the people who will be carrying it forward than the people like me who learned under a different system. I hate to see the wisdom of the older breed- ers lost, but it’s entirely possible that the younger generation just doesn’t want to function in that world, and doesn’t care what’s lost. Perhaps all we need to do now is find all of those young Fast World generation people who love dogs, and just get out of their way. ■

Given the new set of rules presented by the Fast New World generation, I am struggling with ideas to encourage more exhibitors. Nothing about the breeding, conditioning, train- ing and grooming of dogs comes quickly or easily. All of it takes time...

Nothing about the breeding, conditioning, training and grooming of dogs comes quickly or easily. All of it takes time – a commodity this new generation does not want to spend on their dogs. This young generation does not want to spend a lot of time “paying dues” to an archaic system that mostly rewards longevity and connections. That’s why performance events are becoming so popular while conformation declines. If they spend time with their dogs, they want it to be fun, not work. I don’t know how to make breeding and grooming sound like fun. The rewards are always deferred. I do know that they need to feel a sense of accomplishment much sooner than I did when I entered the system. I don’t see any young people wanting to wait 10 years to begin having credibility. That’s not how they work.

Jackie Fogel got her first purebred basset in 1969, but her real education in the world of AKC dogs and shows started in 1979 when she moved to Wisconsin and whelped her first home-bred champion. In 1995 Jackie got a bedlington terrier from David Ramsey of the famous Willow Wind line. She has bred and shown numerous #1 bedlingtons, and continues to actively breed both bassets and bedlingtons. In 2007 Jackie began judging, and is approved to judge 6 breeds. She owns and manages Cedar Creek Pet Resort, and is active in the Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, Keep Your Pets, Inc., (a non-profit she founded), and the local Rotary club. Jackie writes for ShowSight Magazine, the basset column in the Gazette, and a pet column in a local magazine.

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*

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 10/31/17

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2017 • 73

*ShowSight Breed Point System 10/31/17

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One NUMBER PEKE *

W I N N E R O F 3 8 A L L B R E E D B E S T I N S H OW S

# 4 TOY DOG ** Owned by Rick Ly & Hiram Stewart *ShowSight all breed stats as of 10/31/17 **ShowSight breed stats as of 10/31/17

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Lucas

G R A N D C H A M P I O N

HIWINS LUCAS AT DABUEW

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2017 • 77

On The Line THE WOLF IN YOUR DOG? BY BARBARA J. ANDREWS W hat is the ori- gin of the dog? Was he really a wolf or was he

13000 BC, the dog became the first domesticated species.” — TheDogPlace.org We’re also told Canis lupus familiaris came to us 30,000 years ago because we had scraps of meat around the entrance to our cave. “No way. Here’s the hole in that donut, we didn’t eat meat back then!!!”— TheDogPlace.org The fact is, the wolf is the wolf and along with the coyote and fox, he does not domesticate. Yet we know that “dog” was the first domesticated species. There is no mystery here. The “first undisputed dog remains” were found buried beside human remains 14,700 years ago, with “disputed remains occurring 36,000 years ago.”— Wikipedia All archeological evidence proves a bond between the dog and mankind that is unequalled in the animal kingdom. It also brings into question how and if the dog evolved. Inter- estingly (and thankfully!) we have not subdued the wolf as a species. Wolf remains the undisputed symbol of the wild even as his global territory shrinks and his hide is a bounty- paid trophy. But don’t you find it interesting that when the mammoth became an elephant and the saber-toothed giant became today’s tiger, their former forms disappeared? The

always a dog? Bedtime story or professorial paper, the FACT is, nobody knows and few agree. Theories abound; you’ve probably read a few. Your “domestic dog evolved from European wolves… between 18,800 and 32,100 years ago— The-Scientist.com. Ignoring

the 14,000 year discrepancy, Wikipedia nails it: “Where the genetic divergence of dog and wolf took place remains con- troversial, with the most plausible proposals spanning West- ern Europe, Central Asia and East Asia.” So the fact is, no one knows when wolf first met man or even if the dog is descended from the wolf. The closest we can come seems to be cave drawings and Native American lore but that was post-prehistoric. Sure, there are similarities between wolf and dog; both love to dig holes. Dogs still turn around a time or two before laying down. Put those two things together and you’ve got a wolf digging a den or making a bed in the brush. We are told “The closest living relative of the dog is the gray wolf and there is no evidence of any other canine contributing to its genetic lineage.”— Wikipedia But then there’s the not-living. We can read- ily believe the genetic connection between the gray wolf and Canis dirus as shown in this skeleton. The Dire Wolf evolved in the New World and is believed to have become extinct in the Americas near the end of the Pleisto- cene epoch. So there’s early wolf (Wolfhound size) but what if the Creator-Evolution didn’t cut the wolf and the dog from the same DNA? As advanced as DNA science is, there is still no evidence that the wolf is a direct ancestor of the dog. Some universities mention a “genetic connection” while other researchers care- fully refer only to a “common ancestor.” Most dog lovers believe God gave us the dog as an exam- ple of the honesty and devotion mankind should emulate. But dogs are rarely mentioned in the Bible other than as an offhand reference. That makes sense because the dog goes back much further than Biblical records. “In about

only prehistoric connection we have is the Dire Wolf and he hardly resembles a Chihuahua! Think—if in fact, the Wolf became Dog as is com- monly believed, how could he have also remained him- self, virtually unchanged for thousands of years while at

the same time he simultaneously morphed into such diverse descendants? The Bison is still a bison and crocodile and tur- tles haven’t changed in 150 million years. While theories abound, who can explain how dog, unlike any species on earth, evolved into so many differ- ent sizes and coat types and behavioral characteristics? A rodent may take different forms but he remains a “rat” and a bird may be as little as a sparrow or as large as an eagle but it is still a bird and all they instinctively fear man. Leave your horse unfenced and unfed and he will be off to greener pastures. Ditto your cat. Among all living creatures, dog is unique in that he will not leave you. Scientists may tame and gentle a wolf but first they have to confine it. If the wolf gets loose, he’s gone. Only the dog will stay with you through deadly threat, abuse or even starvation. No other species that will do that. None. Let us hope that the wolf and the bald eagle remain unchanged as symbols of American freedom. In the mean- time, the dog, whether descended from the wolf or a creation we can’t explain, is unchallenged as Man’s Best Friend. For more on the wolf-human bond, type “TheDogPlace dogs changed evolution” in your search engine.

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