Showsight Presents The Alaskan Malamute

“THE ALASKAN MALAMUTE IS AN AFFECTIONATE DOG AND IS EASY TO APPROACH. YOU WILL OFTEN FIND YOURSELF ADMIRING A RING OF WAGGING TAILS.”

overlooked when “out of coat”. Coat may vary in color from a light gray to shades of black, sable and red. The only solid color allowed is white. White is always the predominant color of the underbody, parts of the legs, feet and part of the face markings. We allow for a wide range of attractive facial mark- ings including a blaze, star, bar or gog- gles. Markings need not be even. The Malamute is mantled and although he may have a white collar, half collar or nape spot, uneven or broken color over the body is undesirable. To effectively evaluate the structure of the Alaskan Malamute you must be able to watch them in motion. If they are well built and balanced they should move effortlessly when trotting. They are powerful dogs but it should not look like it is hard work to get around a ring. The Malamute should be shown on a loose lead for a good working dog will drop their head, allowing for the best extension of their front assembly and

this should be balanced with a strong rear drive without excessive rear kick. Their motion must be balanced, effort- less and efficient. When viewed from the front or rear the legs will converge as speed increases. The Alaskan Malamute is an affec- tionate dog and is easy to approach. You will often find yourself admiring a ring of wagging tails. They may not however be best friends with dogs of the same sex and it is important to maintain ade- quate room between dogs and never crowd these dogs. Bitches in season can often cause males to be edgy and if one starts to make a grumble others may follow. Give dogs adequate room and divide classes when necessary. Remember it is the functional char- acteristics of this breed that are to be given consideration above all else. As the standard says, “Any indication of unsoundness in legs and feet, front or rear, standing or moving, is to be con- sidered a serious fault.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Shilon Bedford and her husband David have raised Alaskan Mala- mutes under the Black Ice name since the early 80’s. They are best known for producing top working sled dogs that are equally competitive in the show ring. Shilon is currently the head of the Alaskan Malamute Judges Educa- tion Committee. She judges the Work- ing Group, a portion of the Toy Group and several Non-Sporting breeds.

400 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , S EPTEMBER 2018

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