Showsight - June 2018

T o r r i d Z o n e P o r t u g u e s e W a t e r D o g s

p r o u d l y a n n o u n c e s o u r f i r s t P l a t i n u m G r a n d C h a m p i o n , B l a z e , G C H P T o r r i d Z o n e S m o k e F r o m A D i s t a n t F i r e .

A t j u s t 3 y e a r s o l d , B l a z e i s h o n o r e d t o b e t h e f i r s t b i t c h t o j o i n t h e e l i t e g r o u p o f P l a t i n u m P o r t u g u e s e W a t e r d o g s :

p l a t i n u m g r a n d c h a m p i o n

M B I S M B I S S G C H P C l a i r c r e e k I m p r e s s i o n D e M a t i s s e R N M A T I S S E

Own e d by Donna G o t t d e nk e r , M i l an L i n t & P e g gy H e lm i ng

p l a t i n u m g r a n d c h a m p i o n

U K C B I S C H A K C G C H P D a n d e l i o n ’ s M a x - w e l l ’ s S i l v e r H a m m e r A O M R N T K N G C G M A X

Own e d by V i c t o r i a A . Mo rr o & W i l l i am F. Varr , I I I , MD

p l a t i n u m g r a n d c h a m p i o n

G C H P B I S S B I S R B I S A s t a ’ s N y t e F l y t e C G C O D I N

Own e d by J o B e lt on , Pau l B e lt on & B i l l Wat e r s br e d by Mat t h ew Dav i s & B i l l Wat e r s

p l a t i n u m g r a n d c h a m p i o n

G C H P S e a w o r t h y ’ s P l a n o f A t t a c k , C G C P A T T O N

Own e d by Nancy V e nc i l l & Mary S a lvary br e d by Mary & R on S a lvary & Dona l d P owe l l

O w n e d b y B e t h M e r c i e r & M a r g a r e t D e F o r e

a g e n t C J F a v r e

W e a r e f o r e v e r g r a t e f u l t o o u r o u t s t a n d i n g h a n d l e r , C J F a v r e a n d h i s t e a m a t C a n i n e S p e c i a l i s t s , t h e j u d g e s w h o h a v e r e c o g n i z e d B l a z e a n d e v e r y o n e i n t h e d o g s h o w c o m m u n i t y w h o h a s s u p p o r t e d u s i n t h i s j o u r n e y .

a s s i s t e d b y A n g e l a C h a s e

* S h o w S i g h t b r e e d & a l l b r e e d s t a t s a s 4 / 3 0 / 1 8

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M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n i n g & R e s e r v e B e s t I N S h o w w i n n i n g

T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E p l a t i n u m g r a n d c h a m p i o n

b r e e d *

a l l b r e e d *

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED AND ALL BREED STATS AS OF MARCH 2018

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER CELEBRATING YOU! Did you know that more than 80 percent of show dogs are handled by their owners? Without owner-handlers, the fancy wouldn’t be what it is today. Now is a good time for us to celebrate and thank each of our owner-handlers. The success of our shows is the result of their dedica- tion and hard work. Did you know there are approximately 22,000 AKC events held each year? Ladies and Gentleman, our sport is growing—and it’s not slowing down. One of the big reasons for this growth is the introduction of the National Owner-Handled Series. Since its introduction a little more than five years ago, this competition has helped the fancy to grow year after year. So, let’s be sure to thank the clubs that have offered this series as well as those that are looking to introduce it as part of their show weekend. The more clubs that offer the series, the better it will be for our sport. Show chairs, please remember that what’s good for the fancy is good for your club as well. I remember when the Owner-Handled Series was introduced. Almost everyone thought it wasn’t going to be special. Some even thought that it was a second-tier competition. But with a positive attitude, a willingness to accept change and, most importantly, a lot of hard work, the series has become a success and the number of owner-handlers overall has skyrocketed. The Owner-Handled Series is a reminder that there are many reasons to exhibit your “per- fect” dog, not just for the ratings systems and winning at all costs. We do have to thank the American Kennel Club for instituting the series and for listening to you. They’ve been working hard making improve- ments for the better. Yes, there is long way to go. But everything takes time and refinements are sure to be made toward perfecting the point system, making the event more prestigious, and getting more clubs in- volved. As they say, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” If our attitude remains positive, we can ignore the trouble-makers and bring a smile back to dog shows. If we have the will to work hard to make things better, we can achieve anything. Why did I mention trouble-makers and the negative crowd? Well, be- cause there aren’t as many of them as you might think. Over 98 percent of the people in our sport are amazing, positive people who want the sport to thrive. But then you have that two percent who just don’t share the same goals as the positive people who want to be happy, enjoy the dogs and make dog shows a perfect weekend getaway—a vacation! So, why do a lot of people think that the sport is hurting? Simple an- swer: Man, oh man, that two percent is loud and the 98 percent is often too quiet. The reality is that every community has positive and negative people, mean people and nice people, liars and honest people. This is true for our sport too. But most of us can agree to work together by being positive, motivational and loving. Together, we can continue to celebrate the sport. Let’s take this opportunity to focus on building our community, continuing to support one another, and welcoming new dog owners into our sport. I would like to apologize for getting sidetracked a bit, because this was supposed to be a 300 to 500-word message just about owner-handlers. But while laying down in my living room typing this message, my emo- tions led me elsewhere. We all deserve to be thanked. From the AKC to the professional handler, breeder, judge, photographer, groomer, supportive husband and wife and, of course, the owner-handler, let’s celebrate one another by saying, “Thank you.” Live, Laugh, Love and Exhibit all of those Perfect Dogs!

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com

Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

ADVERTISING

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com 201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Post- age paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opin- ions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submit- ted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

AJ ARAPOVIC

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table of CONTENTS 14 SHOWSIGHT

194 200 206 214 244 249 263 275 278 291

BUCKS COUNTY KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards LEBANON COUNTY KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

38 THE SEVEN SECRETS TO SHOW SUCCESS Michael and Cathy Dugan 50 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr

MEMORIES CAPTURED Linda Ayers Turner Knorr

76 SUITCASES WITH WHEELS Dan Sayers 90 AKC LEGISLATOR OF THE YEAR Samantha Seymour

NON SPORTING DOGS Various Guest Experts

NATIONAL SPECIALTY REVIEW Various Guest Experts

100 BECOMING Jacqueline Fogel 114 ON THE LINE

THE OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG Various Guest Experts

THE AUSTRALIAN TERRIER Various Guest Experts

Barbara “BJ” Andrews

120 BREEDER INTERVIEW Allan Reznik 128 PENN TREATY 134 FOOT-TIMING IN THE AGE OF WI-FI Dan Sayers KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards 168 BRABO 2018 CACIB SHOW Karl Donvil

THE GERMAN PINSCHER Various Guest Experts

THE NORWICH TERRIER Various Guest Experts

THE WHIPPET Various Guest Experts

298 ADVERTISING RATES

184 SURVEY SAYS What’s the biggest

300

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

misconception about your breed?

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! CONTACT US: 512.686.3466 | info@aramediagrp.com | subscriptions@aramediagrp.com | www.showsightmagazine.com

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18

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A Different Kind of SPRING BREAK FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III IT’S A QUESTION I’VE PONDERED FOR MANY YEARS: Do Dog Fanciers get enough time away to really appreciate who we are and what we do? I’m not just talking about time away from actual shows, because it seems we can easily spread our dog activities in action and conversation to cover 24/7. But doing something else? We just never seem to have enough time. And yet I feel it’s imperative to balance our drive and enthusi- asm for this sport with some down time whether it be outside the confines of the show circuit or to simply spend a day or two as a wide-eyed spectator, not a dueling participant. And so it was with shock I noticed five days on my calendar with nothing sheduled. Nothing. For a man who hasn’t had an actual vacation in twenty-seven years, that’s pretty un-nerving. What on earth was I to do? Granted, much of my travel involves pleasure, but all of my travel is work-related. So seeing an empty space, I immediately rummaged around to see what I could get into, in my spare time. And lo and behold those dates bracketed the weekend which I like to call I § LI: Ladies Kennel Association’s two shows and Long Island KC’s Sunday extravaganza all on the same site and featuring special events not often seen elsewhere. It’s also the core nucleus of a group of people whose company I enjoy greatly and I was fairly itching to fly to Long Island and simply hang out for three days with nothing to do but enjoy the dogs and the people there, Plane tickets and hotels and dinner plans intact, I made ready for a wonderful trip. And trip I did. (Actually, I fell.) After incurring a fairly serious set of injuries in a household accident I found myself immobile and disgusted. My long-time motto, If you can’t add anything positive to an event, at least do not de- tract, kicked in. Without serviceable ankles and knees I figured I’d be about as much fun as a broken three-point major, so I detracted myself from the fun things planned and tried my best to heed the advice of medical personnel who recommended rest. Which I hate. Luckily I’m a dog fancier and in between this job which I was still able to do, and various other information sources, I was able to keep in touch with my friends and their dogs. One who loomed large during this period was Jere Marder, not just because we have an interview with her in this issue,

but because she’s always been an inspiration to me in how she balances a very full life with her extremely successful hobby: dogs. I used to marvel when friends, visiting Chicago’s Gold Coast for the first time, would catch a glimpse of one or two or three—and one time four!—stunning looking Old English Sheepdogs walking proudly with their owners and say “Good grief—that’s as good as most you see in the ring.” I was happy to share that Jere lived a block away and quite surely they were from her bloodline.(They were all in full coat, too. In Chicago. Jere knows how to train her puppy owners.) Jere’s one of many of us making her mark on our world— on the world—by doing what we do and doing it right. And keeping everything in perspective. I dusted off this twenty-five- year-old photo of us dancing at one of the first ShowSight West- minster Parties because it says a lot: It shows the spirit most of us spread around as much as possible. It doesn’t mean we’re not serious, but it means we have it all in balance.

Well, except for me; balancing alone, much less dancing, is off the calendar pro tem. Now going on five weeks without being fluidly mo- bile gives me great admiration for those who deal with problems like this full-time. I just can’t wait to get out of this (or any) chair. Spe- cial thanks to Barbara Miller, Susan Sprung, Viola Burgos and Michael Canalizo for helping me make and then un-make my plans which are now on hold for next year. By then I’ll be ready to boogie and I hope you will be, too. I will see you there.

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A L L B R E E D B E S T I N S H O W , M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W A N D S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R & M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

two STANDARD POODLE * N UMB E R

THANK YOU JUDGE MR. MICHAEL CANALIZO

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA raincliffepc@aol.com

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 4/30/18

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J U D G E : J O H N R . B OOZ E R

H A N D L E R : L U I Z A N TO N I O A B R E U

J U D G E : C O N N I E H . C L A R K

H A N D L E R : L U I Z A N TO N I O A B R E U

A T O N L Y 6 M O N T H S O F A G E T H I S R A R E B R E E D D A N D I E D I N M O N T T E R R I E R P U P P Y W E N T 5 / 5 / 5 H I S F I R S T 3 D A Y S O F S H O W I N G . S P E C I A L T H A N K S TO T H E J U D G E S , H A N D L E R A N D B R E E D E R S .

N EW C H A M P I O N U N D E R J U D G E D O N N A J . F R A N C I S

CH King ' s Mtn. H E N R Y H I G G I N S

T E R E S A “ P U N A ” B E L L L U I Z A N T O N I O A B R E U

O W N E D B Y

H A N D L E D B Y

B R E D B Y B E T T Y - A N N E S T E N M A R K , S A N D R A P R E T A R I H I C K S O N & B J P U M F R E Y

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MU L T I P L E B E S T I N S H OW & R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G

CJ’s Sweet GEORGIA BROWN G R A N D C H A M P I O N

J U DG E M R . R O B E R T H U T TO N F O R R E C OG N I Z I N G O U R G I R L ! our deep appreciation to

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OWN E D B Y J E A N N E & C H A R L E S H U R T Y L Y N N E & M A R K F L O R I A N

P R E S E N T E D B Y G R E G S T R O N G A K C R E G ’ D | 4 1 0 . 8 2 2 . 2 1 8 7

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18

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F I RST 40 SHOWS OUT 40 BEST OF BREEDS on a winning streak

b e s t i n s h o w w i n n i n g

WI LDEST DREAM GENUINE ROCK N ROLL , CD rn RA (HI T ) silver grand champion

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog * All breed number three THANK YOU JUDGES Mrs. Patricia A. Sosa, MR. JOHN Ramirez , Mr. Bruce Voran & Mr. James Noe FOR THE GROUP PLACEMENTs

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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*All systems as of 4/30/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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The Seven Secrets to Show Success Have a Lot of Money or Know Where to Find It BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN

with Milan Lint and Peggy Helming, Digit’s owners and dined with them in New York at Westminster laughing about how hard we tried to beat each other. Ladybug had a great year we thought with 88 Best of Breeds, 41 group wins, a Best in Show and Best of Opposite at Westminster. The price tag for this fun? Only eighty grand for the year. THAT YEAR REALLY WAS “CHEAP” By now we were still relative rookies at this level of show- ing but we were learning from our mistakes. Now we knew it was going to take a much more detailed and comprehensive campaign that would include the professional handler, bet- ter bonuses, entries, photos, vet expenses, travel and lodg- ing, postage and most important advertising. We’ll talk about each of these areas. ADVERTISING? FOR WHAT? In Ladybug’s first year, we spent $17,000 for 19 ads in major dog publications only to discover we were just learning about how important this program was for successful dog careers. There are national dog magazines, group publications and breed magazines. All of these are focused on different mar- kets and you need to be in all of them to market your dog. The national magazines include ShowSight, Dogs in Review, Dog News, and the Canine Chronicle. For the Working Group we worked with The Working Dog Digest and for our breed, we looked to The Courier. We also learned how important it is to find a really creative ad designer who can create a theme and build a brand around your dog. We found Derek Glas after the first year and our ads really stood out in the magazines as he developed the Ladybug theme. Many of these magazines are distributed at dog shows around the country, mailed to subscribers and, most impor- tant, mailed to AKC judges. At the average dog show, it’s near- ly impossible for dog judges to know which dogs belong to what owner or kennel, nor are they supposed to think about that. Over the course of several years, we tracked 350 judges who judged PWDs and found to our relief that AKC judges are generally competent, fair-minded and impartial. Are there some who have some bias about curly versus wavy hair or lion cut versus retriever cut? Sure, but very few. FINDING A GOOD DOG To campaign a dog, however, requires that you create a “buzz” among judges and the fancy. In sports of all kinds, including pooches, everyone likes to root for a winner (your direct competition excluded). We discovered that the more Ladybug won, the better known she became and judges and show participants looked for her in the ring. Judges talk to each other (no surprise there), and when they find an out- standing example of a breed they often pass that informa- tion along. By the time Ladybug finished her career with 20 BIS, 88 group ones, 170 groups placements, 300 Best of Breeds and multiple wins at big shows and specialties, there were few judges who had not seen her in the ring. In addi- tion to that, we ramped up our advertising to well over $70,000 a year. Finally, it’s important to meet and build a relationship with editors. They have incredible experience and judgment about the dog world and can be invaluable with generous advice. In almost every case, these editors have been in the dog fancy for

I remember a few years ago watching a cute dog win his group at Westminster and was particularly interested because I admired the Hollywood celebrity who owned the handsome gent. I casually asked, “What does it cost to show a dog and win that many Best in Shows?” The reply stunned me. The answer was a reputed three-quarters of a million dollars. “How could that be?” I continued. The old hand, a long time friend of Cathy’s, looked at me with kind- ness as though I was his somewhat dim-witted nephew and explained to me about shows attended across the country every weekend, huge handler contracts, advertising and inci- dentals including photos, entries and bonuses. But then a dog named “Ladybug” came along and we pon- dered the unthinkable: campaigning Ladybug to go to the next level. We had watched our dogs compete at Westminster and the AKC Nationals, not to mention our breed Regional’s and Nationals and we had always done well; sometimes win- ning major prizes. We also watched dogs actually win Groups and Best in Shows and realized we weren’t quite there yet. We talked about what it meant to make a large financial and time commitment and explored what it really takes to compete at a whole different level. We knew enough success- ful owners and professional handlers to develop a plan and goals for Ladybug and decided to try it for a year. After all, it was only money; a lot of money. Fellow fanciers finished a dog with over 100 Best in Shows and intimated that he only spent about half a million for that result. We knew we were not in that league and decided to campaign on the “cheap”. “CHEAP” IS A RELATIVE TERM Ladybug’s first year was on the east coast with a compe- tent breeder/handler and she started winning group place- ments almost immediately. Within six months she was grab- bing group ones and then finally popped a “Best in Show” under Judge Ken McDermott in Chester Valley, PA. We read the email from the handler and Cathy cried in joy at Lady- bug’s first BIS. Cathy had won a Best in Show with a Dalma- tian in Alaska several years before but this was a real BIS at a big show on the east coast. The hook had been set and off we went. In her first year of major competition, Ladybug finished as the number two Portuguese Water Dog in the country. The number one PWD, CH Pouchcove’s Monkey See Monkey Do, “Digit”, beat Ladybug on the last day of the year at the last show of the year, winning by only 24 breed points for the number one spot. We had also enjoyed a friendly competition

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18

The Seven Secrets to Show Success:

BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN continued

“EVEN WITH ALL OF THE PIECES IN PLACE THAT WE’VE MENTIONED NONE OF IT WOULD HAVE WORKED WITHOUT A COMPREHENSIVE BUSINESS STRATEGY.”

decades, often with their own dogs, and are committed to excellence in shows and breeds. Ladybug ended up on six covers of major magazines and these can cost as much as $6,000 for a single cover. Covers are often reserved months in advance, but getting one is worth every penny. THE PROFESSIONAL HAN- DLER; YOUR BEST FRIEND Our handlers have shown our dogs for years and they take their craft to a higher level with Ladybug. A great dog has to have a great handler who has created that special bond that deliv- ers bravado performances in the ring. When we campaigned a dog like Lady- bug, where we competed became as important as the competition itself. We looked for big shows with lots of points and hopefully with veteran judges who knew the breed inside and out. The buzz about Ladybug grew quick- ly as she won 80% of her best of breed appearances and got a group placement 60% of the time after that. Once the Best in Show wins started coming, people expected her to win and the fancy start- ed rooting for her. No PWD had ever won at her pace and PWD owners were delighted to see our breed highlighted by a great dog. When people watched her compete on TV it just added to the program. It could not have happened without our handlers showing Ladybug like a thoroughbred. With fees, bonus- es, and travel costs we learned that reasonable costs will exceed $80,000 a year. PHOTOS AND MORE After we covered advertising and our handler, we found that things like photos, entry fees and vet costs were also substantial. As part of our cam- paign, we always had a photo taken when Ladybug won and sent a copy of that photo with a Ladybug thank you card. It was a genuine gesture on our part; we really appreciate good judges. Like editors, the photographers have spent their lives and careers with dog shows. They too can become valuable resources and friends. Yes, part of the definition of a “good judge” is one who puts up one of our dogs, but we know

how hard it is to become a judge and get assignments. Of the 3,000 plus AKC judges, only a few hundred get any regular work. As Cathy began her training to become an AKC judge, I often attended the semi- nars and training with her. I discov- ered that the requirements and hurdles demanded by the AKC to become a judge were a lot worse than law school; that was easy! While individual photos and entry fees don’t sound like much, they add up when you consider that Ladybug competed in 400 dog shows over three years. Do the math. FINDING PARTNERS, THE CRITICAL COMPONENT By the end of our first year, it became obvious to us that if we were going to take Ladybug’s competition to a high level we were going to have to have partners. At first, we talked to fellow breeders to join us in “Team Ladybug” to promote her show career and sell some puppy futures for her future litters. Paul and Judy Archam- beau of Bela Vista Kennel in Santa Rosa, California, and Matthew Davis and Bill Waters of Asta PWDs in Reno, Nevada became our first partners and helped a lot both financially and as cheerleaders for Ladybug. Even with their help and our own resources we knew we needed more. We didn’t take vacations anymore (Hel- lo Pomona, Goodbye Paris) because we didn’t have the time or the discretion- ary money. We turned to our handlers to help us recruit a major partner. In the dog business, it’s the role of the profes- sional handler to find a major backer. After all, it’s to their benefit to fund a serious campaign and they know peo- ple in the business better than anyone. Ultimately, we were introduced to Victor Malzoni and the game changed. Victor is a very successful real estate developer in San Paulo, Brazil who has been a dog enthusiast his whole life. Primarily a terrier breeder and backer, Victor has successfully campaigned numerous terriers for years. During the time he helped with Ladybug, he also campaigned several top winning terri- ers with his fellow breeder Jerson Valle. Victor became a close friend, advisor

and financial backer for us and Ladybug. We found that Victor is a true dog lover and one of the classiest persons we have ever met. If everyone in the dog world was like Victor they’d have to remake “Best In Show”. His vast experience was critical to Ladybug’s success as well as splitting the costs of competition with us. One of the reasons he was delighted to work with us with Ladybug was the absence of PWDs in Brazil, a Portuguese speaking country. DO YOU HAVE A PLAN? Even with all of the pieces in place that we’ve mentioned none of it would have worked without a comprehensive business strategy. First with Team Lady- bug and then with Victor Malzoni, we started each year with very specific goals about shows, goals and measuring increasing success. We put together an advertising campaign based on when various magazines were published so that Ladybug was in the fancy’s eye con- stantly. We tracked shows nine months in the future to see where the largest entry and best judges were going to be so we could plan our travel sched- ule. We’ll talk more about this in an upcoming article about “Understanding the Game”. IS IT WORTH IT? In the last three years of her compe- tition, the combined costs approached $200,000 each year. Was it worth it? Looking back we have made terrific connections and friendships with some of the best people in the world of dogs. Ladybug’s success has elevated aware- ness and acceptance of Portuguese Water Dogs to a level never enjoyed before. It’s not unusual anymore for a PWD to pop a group win as it was for many decades. In fact, after Ladybug a great champion PWD named “Matisse”, owned by our old friends Milan Lint and Peggy Helming, went on to win 238 Best In Shows! Judges had begun to look for PWDs in the ring. While we still compete with our dogs and have had seven #1 PWDs in the last decade, we know we won’t do the campaign again, even if we found a dog as great as Ladybug which is highly unlikely. But, what a ride it was!

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Bred & Owned by KELLIE WILLIAMS & DIANA ROCKWELL Handled by LISA BETTIS & RYAN WOLFE Assisted by SOMMER FERGUSON

THANK YOU JUDGES MR. RICK GESCHWENDER FOR THE BEST IN SHOW AND MR. RICHARD MILLER FOR THE GROUP 1.

RINGO B R A Z O S S K I R I N G O S T A R R A T R I V E N D E L L Best in Show Winning • Grand Champion

HP52014801

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NEWFOUNDLAND CLUB OF AMERICA NATIONAL SPECIALTY 2018 SilverGrandChampion NCA SELECT WINNER • THANK YOU JUDGE MRS . THERESA L . HUNDT

NEWFOUNDLAND CLUB OF AMERICA TOP SHOW BITCH 2017 TOP TWENTY PARTICIPANT/COMPETITOR

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P O U C H COV E ' S L I V I N ' O N A P R AY E R

OWNED BY MARK & WENDY KEYSER & CHRISTINE LAMURAGLIA EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY ALEXIS DITLOW | BRED BY CHRISTINE LAMURAGLIA & PEGGY HELMING S how S ight M agazine , J une 2018 • 45

Our sincere appreciation to Judge Ms. Theresa L. Hundt for this National Specialty win!

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 4/30/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/18

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2017 & 2018 NATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER | TOP 20 JUDGE'S CHOICE MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW | MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW #1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS * #12 WORKING DOG **

GCHP OCEANO DARBYDALES'S XECUTIVE DECISION

Presented By: Kim & Gigi Griffith | Loved & Owned By: Kathy Wortham Co-Owned By: Mary W. Price & Carol Bergmann | Bred By: Gigi Griffith & Carol Bergmann

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the view never changes...

UNLESS YOU’RE the LEAD DOG,

• Winner of 40 Specialty Best in Shows • Westminster Best of Breed 2017 & 2018 • National Specialty Winner • A Top 20 Hound in Limited All-Breed Appearances ** Finn M B I S M S B I S N S B I S G C H G AGHA DJARI’S FIFTH DIMENSION OF SURA 48 • S how S ight M agazine , J une 2018

#1 A m e r i c a ’ s

Afghan Hound ALL -SYSTEMS *

accomplishments FINN’S RECENT

include Best in Show wins at Western Hound Association under Stewart Dankner and Camille McArdle as well as back-to-back Best In Show wins at Mississippi Valley Kennel Club under Jocelyne Gagné and Sydney Marx.

bred by Stefan Boieck

owned by Suzanne J. Neill, Jamie Souza Bartlett & Christine O’Connor

handled exclusively by Alicia Morrison Jones

*all systems as of 4/30/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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Lines from Linda Trends vs The Standard BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR N ew York’s f a s h i o n w e e k i n t r o -

As Christians, we study the Bible and pray for guidance in our interpretation of its written word. Perhaps we should pray that breeders, exhibitors and judges will consider our AKC Breed Standards as the Bible of our sport, that we will ignore the so-called trends and be blessed with our judg- ments of interpreting the standards correctly. Speaking of fashion statements, Houston and Toddie Clark were recently gifted by their children with a long wished for a trip to Branson, Missouri. Not wanting to miss out on the fun, their kids decided to go too. Once there they had the great idea to commemorate the occasion by donning western attire for photographs. Know you will enjoy seeing one of this beautiful family’s memories captured on film. The shotgun wedding photo shoot must have put the Clarks in the mood as Houston and Toddie are renewing their wedding vows this month at the Saint Terese Catholic Church in Tennessee. This special family could set the standard them- selves of what we all wish to emulate. While the world has focused on a recent Royal Wedding, AKC Executive Secretary Gina Dinardo and Pete Gwynne married in Greenwich, Connecticut. Gina and Pete are hon- eymooning in Paris and Barcelona, two places where fashion trends set the standard. Gina has promised to share wedding pictures and we can hardly wait! Congratulations Gina and Pete from the entire Showsight team!

duces exciting trends and a new outlook on what’s to come. My own city Greenville’s week of fashion shows mirrored the activi- ties of those taking place in the Big Apple. I loved being a part of all of the excitement. Recently the dog world’s social media has been filled with

discussions about dog grooming trends. Right or wrong the internet can drive us crazy with all of the “know it all” opin- ions on what is right and wrong. Thankfully we have specific guidelines for what should and should not be. Let’s just stick with the AKC Breed Standards! Trends have little meaning if we evaluate the whole dog in relationship to its breed standard.

The Houston Clark Family Front row: Daughter Debbie Clark Cowan and Toddie Clark Back row: Son-in-Law Ricky Cowan, Son-in Law Carson Combs, Daughter Sharon Clark Combs, Daughter-in-Law Trish Clark, Son Jay Clark, Houston Clark

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Ask your veterinarian about Purina ® Pro Plan ® Veterinary Diets NeuroCare. ProPlanVeterinaryDiets.com

Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A.

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© HOLLOWAY

M U L T I P L E S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W & B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

B I S SMASH JP COPENHAGEN

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R S . H E L E N T O M B T A Y L O R

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number one AMERICA’ S TOY POODLE AL L BREED *

S H E ’ L L S T E A L Y O U R H E A R T !

A L L B R E E D & S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

O W N E D B Y C A T H Y & J E R R Y G A U C H E H O U S T O N , T E X A S P E R F E C T L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y M R . K A Z H O S A K A

* S H O W S I G H T A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 4 / 3 0 / 1 8

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A C H A M P I O N LUNN ' S XTRAORDINARE OF MARLYN

JUDGE JAMES FANKHAUSER & JUDGE SHAROL WAY

Owned by MARILYN D. TITLE & CAROLYN MCKENZIE

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Alston

Bred by KRISTA A. MUSIL | Presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D (410) 822-2187

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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Multiple GroupWinner & Best in SpecialtyWinner

Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene Bronze Grand Champion

Thank you Judge Mr. Roger Hartinger

owned & loved by Odile Smith

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, 410-822-2187

assisted by Melissa Lopinto

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Fairytale Briards Present Deauville S how S ight M agazine , J une 2018 • 63

Thank You G R O U P O N E J U D G E S M R . R I C K G SW E N D E R • M R S . L I N D A R I E D E L D R . J O S E L U I S PAY R O • M S . D E N I S E D E A N OWN E D BY A N N A M A R I E Y U R A B R E D & C O - OWN E D BY R AY H A R R I N G TO N

E X C L U S I V E LY P R E S E N T E D BY J A M E S B E T T I S

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Multiple America’s R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N E R & B E S T I N S H OW S P E C I A LT Y N U M B E R O N E B E A R D E D C O L L I E * * S H OWS I G H T B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 4 / 3 0 / 1 8

Gold Grand Champion D U N H I L L W I L L I A M WILLY S how S ight M agazine , J une 2018 • 65

L WE WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND MR. GARY L. DOERGE • MRS. ANNE KATONA MRS. CATHERINE BELL • DR. CAROLWHITE-MOSER MR. RALPH (SONNY) AMBROSIO

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATON TO THESE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED LARK

OWN E D B Y D E B O R A H B A HM & A S H L I E WH I T MO R E

B R E D B Y C A R O L H A R R I S

P R E S E N T E D B Y A S H L I E WH I T MO R E

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Lark

photo by ©Mel i a

BO-BETT MADE ESPECIALLY FOR DEBMAR

R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

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* AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/17/18

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P

W I N N I N G

GCH SCOTT'S

LADY LIBERTY

G C H P D U N H I L L S T E E L E R N A T I O N x T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S Ginger G C H S C O T T ’ S G L A M O R G I R L

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#1 BEARDED COLLIE ALL BREED * *SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/330/18

BRED & OWNED BY TOM WATHAN & CAROL (SCOTT) WATHAN

CO-BRED & HANDLED BY JORGE & SUSIE OLIVERA

ASSISTED BY KATE BATZNER, KAYCEE KLANG, EDGAR VILLANUEVA & JORDAN OLIVERA

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G R A N D C H A M P I O N Wonderlands Darby V Wolf Creek m u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n i n g

Thank you Judge Mrs. Sandra E. King for this win.

bred by Ed Ferrell & John Conely owned by Julie Tittl & Julia Foster-Hess, (810) 625-5551 handled by Julia Foster-Hess candid photo by ©Christina Freitag 2017

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and Julia

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Suitcases with Wheels

A Simple Solution to a ‘Doggone’ Problem BY DAN SAYERS T he best solu- tion to a problem is often the simplest.

“MAYBE THE WAY TO TURN AROUND DECLINING REGISTRATIONS AND SHRINKING ENTRIES IS TO PUT ‘WHEELS’ ON THE DOG SPORT TO MAKE THINGS EASIER FOR EVERYONE INVOLVED.”

Remem- ber luggage without wheels? Me neither. Ever since that first passenger strolled through an airport terminal with a free- wheeling “Rollaboard” by his side, the days of the hardshell suitcase were numbered. Vir- tually overnight, the problem of carrying

heavy suitcases through busy airports became a thing of the past. And as the market for suitcases without wheels dried up, the demand for rolling luggage only grew and grew. All it took was a few casters and a retractable handle and—voila— problem solved. Maybe the dog fancy should take a lesson from the lug- gage industry. Maybe the way to turn around declining reg- istrations and shrinking entries is to put “wheels” on the dog sport to make things easier for everyone involved. Maybe there’s a way to grow the sport of dogs by trying something so doggone obvious that’s it’s never been tried before. It’s no secret that participation at most conformation shows has been on the decline in America for more than a decade. After years of unprecedented growth that witnessed an increase in the number of All-Breed, Limited Breed and Specialty dog clubs in the late 1990s and early 2000s, inter- est in the exhibition of purebred dogs fell dramatically. The reasons for the sudden downturn were many and varied. An aging population, a decrease in disposable income and an increase in personal expenses, a dearth of affordable show sites (particularly in urban areas), and a growing dependency on technology all contributed to the sport’s decline. So too did competition from online registries, the influence of the AR movement, and interest in “designer” dogs. Perhaps noth- ing redirected the public’s attention away from purebred dogs as did images of Hurricane Katrina’s victims and the rescue movement that followed in its wake. “Rescue” dogs have since become symbols of compassion. They have all but replaced the purebred dog as a status symbol in the hearts and minds of many of today’s dog lovers. For the entirety of its existence, the AKC and its member clubs managed to carry on with a production-based business model that all but assured steady growth through registra- tions. Conformation shows brought purebred dogs to the attention of the general public thereby increasing interest in both breeding and exhibition. As more and more Americans desired a purebred dog, the AKC provided proof of pedigree and a place where recognized breeds could be assembled under one roof. This system worked exceedingly well, until it didn’t. In the new millennium, the purebred dog community and the American Kennel Club must compete with an entirely new attitude toward dog ownership. To remain relevant, the sport of dogs needs to install a new “set of wheels” that makes it easier for everyone to navigate through the 21st century.

A simple set of wheels solved the problem of carrying a heavy suitcase.

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Suitcases with Wheels: A Simple Solution to a...

BY DAN SAYERS continued

When registrations and show entries initially began to decrease, the AKC did try something different. The organiza- tion rebranding itself as a champion for all dogs, allowing mixed and ran- dom-bred dogs to compete in an ever- expanding list of performance events. The move was met with consternation from the old-guard, but it also proved prophetic. As Conformation entries dwindled, participation in Rally, Agility, Scent Work and Coursing Ability Tests grew. They expanded, in part, because they were open to any and all dogs. However, to stem the tide of shrinking show entries, the sport expected more from the people already participating in it. Loyalists were rewarded with an expanded array of Conformation titles and awards that grew to include Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum Grand Cham- pionships, Reserve Best in Show wins, and points awarded for Reserve Win- ners at National Specialties. Conforma- tion 4-6 Month Beginner Puppy and Pee Wee Special Events were eventu- ally offered at many shows. Many “new” breeds were enrolled in the Foun- dation Stock Service and Miscella- neous Class, with full AKC recogni- tion granted in quick succession to any number of breeds. Eventually, the sport began to resemble an over- stuffed piece of luggage that had yet to develop a set of wheels. So many events were crammed into one suit- case that the sport had become nearly impossible to carry! Fortunately, the AKC has always done two things exceedingly well: Uphold the integrity of the registry, and approve dog shows. These are the

strengths that are necessary to save the sport. Unfortunately, these pillars upon which the sport is built aren’t terribly exciting in today’s hi-tech world. Dog- loving people today are more interested in finding a dog on a match-making website than at a dog show. And who can blame them? Those websites are designed to tug on heartstrings in a way that dog shows—with all their efficien- cies—cannot. So, how can we encour- age people to participate in dog shows when they have so many choices else- where? The answer is to give them what they want. Perhaps it’s time for the AKC to offer something along the lines of a Certifi- cate of Evaluation that offers a fun and stress-free introduction to the organi- zation and its activities. This non-com- petitive award would offer anyone with an AKC-registered purebred an oppor- tunity to learn about their dog and its breed through a hands-on evaluation undertaken by an “examiner” approved by the parent club. This would in no way replace the Championship title, as it removes the competitive element from the examination procedure. The process would be less intimidating to the novice and easier for them to understanding. Evaluations could take place anywhere and at any time for a nominal fee. They could even be held as adjuncts to licensed events. All that would be required is for a dog owner to bring his or her AKC-registered dog to an official evaluator whose job would be to compare the dog to the standard and provide a numerical “score.” A breed-specific scorecard could be developed by the AKC in consultation

with the parent clubs, and a point sys- tem used as a basis for scoring. The Scale of Points could even be resurrect- ed for those breeds whose standards no longer include them. Five passing scores (each totaling 70 points or more out of 100) would earn the certificate. This informal evaluation could encour- age conversation about both the dog and the standard while providing a plat- form for interaction similar to a Meet the Breeds event. A dog need not be trained to perfection and it needn’t be groomed to within an inch of its life. In fact, the off-color dog on a flexi lead with a poor haircut and distracted man- ner could provide an ideal opportunity for education and instruction. The dog’s owner who walks away with a failing score could receive valuable informa- tion as to why color is important in her dog’s breed and learn how a pair of clippers can change coat texture for- ever. Evaluators could offer suggestions for training and introduce pet owners to alternatives for that flexi lead. Even diet and veterinary care could be dis- cussed. Of course, dog breeders pro- vide this kind of service all the time, but a formal certificate could convert many of today’s digital dog lovers into tomorrow’s exhibitors. It’s something worth considering. With so many ways to spend their time and money, purebred dog owners expect more for their devotion than two minutes in the ring and an errant point of the finger. It’s time for the AKC and the sport of dogs to get back to basics and reinvent a system that’s become too burdensome. It’s time to put wheels on the dog sport!

“WHEN REGISTRATIONS AND SHOW ENTRIES INITIALLY BEGAN TO DECREASE, THE AKC DID TRY SOMETHING DIFFERENT. THE ORGANIZATION REBRANDING ITSELF AS A CHAMPION FOR ALL DOGS, ALLOWING MIXED AND RANDOM-BRED DOGS TO COMPETE IN AN EVER-EXPANDING LIST OF PERFORMANCE EVENTS.”

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flash!

3 GROUP WINS & A RESERVE BEST IN SHOW! SWEPT THE KEYSTONE-GARDEN CLUSTER!

thank you judges

RUTH ZIMMERMAN & ROGER HARTINGER

for these wins

One number BOSTON TERRIER BREED & ALL BREED * AMERICA’S * S H O W S I G H T B R E E D & A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 4 / 3 0 / 1 8

B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N E R M U L T I P L E S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

C A N D I D P H O T O B Y © B A R B A R A P I E R C Y S N Y D E R

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MU LT I B I S S G C H B S H A L I MA R & O A KWO O D ME S S A G E I N A B O T T L E R E N E G A D E

Ou r thanks t o J U D G E V I R G I N I A L Y N E F O R H E R R E P E A T E D A P P R E C I A T I O N O F S N A P P L E !

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

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NO. 2 A C D B I T C H A L L B R E E D * i n l i m i t e d s h o w i n g . . .

Br e ede r s-Ow n e r s : Jacque l yn Johnson Ch r i s Ann Moo r e Robe r t Moo r e

Co-Ow n e r s : Ke l l i Wa t k i ns K im Gr i f f i t h

Pr e s e n t ed by : K im & G i g i Gr i f f i t h

©GGriffith

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Owned & Presented by Dr. Anita Tate

Bred by Lisa Popescu, Octavian Popescu, Helen Witt & James Witt

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 4/30/18

© Royal Canin

#2 ALL BREED *

Group Winning Mul t iple Group Placing Mul t iple Best in Special ty Show Winner Mul t iple NOHS Best in Show Winner 2018 Westminster Best of Breed Winner

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MBISS GCHS WILLAMETTE’S LOOKOUT CATCHING FIRE DS DM CA CGC TKN KATNISS S how S ight M agazine , J une 2018 • 85

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