Showsight - May 2018

*all systems as of 3/31/18

WE WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION TO THOSE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED LOUIE HIS 27 BEST IN SHOWS. Mrs. Gayle Bontecou Ms. Bonnie Lindell Clark Mrs. Sara Futh Mrs. Ann Savory Bolus #2 amongst all breeds *

Mr. Doug Johnson

Mr. Jay Richardson Dr. Robert Indeglia Dr. John Ioia Ms. Carmen Haller

Dr. John Reeve Newson Mr. Kenneth McDermott Mrs. Patricia Hess Mrs. Cindy Meyer Mr. James Frederiksen Mr. William de Villeneuve Mr. David Miller Ms. Marie Ann Falconer

Mrs. Carolyn Taylor

Mr. Ralph Ambrosio Mr. Roland Pelland Ms. Melinda Lyon Mrs. Carolyn Taylor, Ms. Theresa Hundt Mr. Douglas Johnson Mr. Lloyd Amodei

GCHP ROADHOUSE’S LIFE OF THE PARTY, CA CGCA DN RATN

Mrs. Theresa Hundt

Rudzik.indd 1

#1 terrier * the nation’s *All systems as of 3/31/18

Owned by Dave Berry & Ellen Bannin | Bred by William Roadhouse & Daniel Casanova Presented by Kim Rudzik S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2018 • 3

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3.31.18

A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

Dear Friends,

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 | Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com

The show year is now in full swing. This is the time when pup - pies often make their first appearance in the ring, new specials are brought out and last year’s stars are looking to build on their previous accomplishments. Everyone has “big dreams” for the future at this time of year. Of course, we all want to win. But in order to achieve this goal, it is important to have each of the following in place. 1. A Great Quality Dog 2. A Handler the Dog loves to be with and show for. (This can be an Owner-Handler, Breeder/Owner-Handler or a Hired Professional Handler.) 3. An Advertising Strategy 4. Someone who’s willing to pay for items 1, 2 and 3. In some cases, one person is in charge of each of these things. At other times, multiple people play a role in a dog’s show career. Nevertheless, these four items are essential for success in the sport. SHOWSIGHT is here to help you with Numbers 3, 6 and 9. (I know, I told you about Number 3, but Numbers 6 and 9 are yours to discover. If you already knew the magnificence of 3, 6 and 9, then you would have the key to unlock the secrets of the universe!) Numbers 6 and 9 are the things we all have yet to discover—things we may never discover. However, it is the search for their discovery that is the fun part of showing dogs and what’s good for our sport. The search for these se - crets keeps us coming back to shows weekend after weekend, month after month, year after year. By now, I’m sure that you’ve noticed all the investments we’ve been making at SHOWSIGHT in 2018. Recently, we went big - ger in size and added more meaningful editorial. To our tal - ented staff, we’ve added experienced individuals who possess specific skills sets that provide our clients with the best value for every dollar spent. (And let’s not forget about giving thou - sands of our readers a publication they enjoy reading each and every month!) Our print publication is mailed to all AKC judges, many CKC judges and quite a few International judges. SHOWSIGHT is also delivered to many parent clubs and doz - ens of shows nationwide, week in and week out.

Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

ADVERTISING

And we’re nowhere near finished with our developments for the year!

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com 201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8128

We are continuing to grow our family because this is the only way that we will be able to give you much more of what you want. And isn’t that what it’s all about? Providing you with what you’ve been asking for? We want to be able to provide you with everything you need to achieve your goals in the sport. Your dog is a “Perfect 10” and we want to help you spread this message throughout the universe. Thank you for reading and make it a wonderful day!

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Post - age paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opin - ions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submit - ted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR - TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

AJ ARAPOVIC

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table of CONTENTS 14 SHOWSIGHT

234 260 268 274 283 286 294 318 320 322 324 326

NATIONAL SPECIALTY REVIEW Various Guest Experts

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

36 BECOMING Jacqueline Fogel

THE AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG Various Guest Experts

48 EQUAL JUDGING David W. Haddock 58 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 88 B IS FOR BITCH Dan Sayers

THE BULLDOG Various Guest Experts

THE FRENCH BULLDOG Various Guest Experts

CIRNECO DELL’ETNA Various Guest Experts

106 CONTRACTS FOR SHOW PUPS Lisa Curry, Esq.

MINIATURE SCHNAUZER Various Guest Experts

118 ON THE LINE

PORTUGUESE WATER DOG Various Guest Experts

Barbara “BJ” Andrews

134 COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL CANDIDS Photos by Booth 148 WONDERFUL WORLD OF WHIPPETS Dan Sayers

SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION By Daniel J. Cartier

ADVERTISING RATES

154 WESTMINSTER JUDGES PANEL Courtesy WKC

JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP Courtesy Westminster KC

162 MARCH MADNESS CLUSTER CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards 174 BREEDER VISIT By Allan Reznik 182 LOVELY LUXEMBOURG By Karl Donvil

SURVEY SAYS What Inspired You This Year?

THANK YOU FOR READING... From the Executive Editor

328 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! CONTACT US: 512.686.3466 | info@aramediagrp.com

192 SPORTING DOGS Various Guest Experts

subscriptions@aramediagrp.com www.showsightmagazine.com

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*DN stats as of 3/31/18

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SHOWSIGHT FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III

When I saw this photo my heart just sang. And I decided there weren’t words I could add to make more of an impact than did this image captured by the incomparable Sharon Carvalho, for here we have three superstars of the current dog show world, Houston & Tod- die Clark and Gabriel Rangel, lending their support to, hopefully, a long time future member of our sport. I cannot elaborate the depth feeling this brought out in me, but I do want to say this: ISN’T THAT WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT? As always, all my Best.

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G C H S T O N E R U N A F T E R N O O N T E A All Breed Best in Show, Multiple Reserve Best in Show and Specialty Best in Show Winner

Reserve Best in Show, Specialty Best in Show and Multiple Group Winning.

Above: Best in Show Judge Mr. Gerardo Bernard.

Left: Best of Opposite Sex, Poodle Club of America, Judge Mr. Jack MacGillivray.

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA | raincliffepc@aol.com

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GRAND CHAMPION MONAMOUR’S

OU R A P P R E C I AT I ON A P P R E C I AT I ON & T H A N K YOU TO A L L T H E

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OWNED BY MARILYN TITLE & CAROLYN MCKENZIE

BRED BY KAO MIICHI PRESENTED BY GREG STRONG | AKC REG’D | (410) 822-2187

J U D G E S WHO H AV E R E COG N I Z E D TO K I O ’ S F I N E T Y P E & QUA L I T Y.

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*

**

*all systems as of 3/31/18

**ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/18

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thank you judges for recognizing Georgia

MR . J A I M E H U B B A R D , MR . R A L P H AMB R O S I A , MR . J OH N WA D E , MR . DAV I D R . M I L L E R A N D MR S . DO R O T H Y TAY L O R

CJ’s Sweet GEORGIA BROWN G R A N D C H A M P I O N

MU L T I P L E B E S T I N S H OW A N D R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H OW W I N N I N G

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OWN E D B Y J E A N N E & C H A R L E S H U R T Y L Y N N E & M A R K F L O R I A N

P R E S E N T E D B Y G R E G S T R O N G A K C R E G ’ D | 4 1 0 . 8 2 2 . 2 1 8 7

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G ROU P T H R E E

S H E N A NDOA H VA L L E Y K E NN E L C L U B , I N C .

our sincere appreciation to Judge Mrs. Rita Bell

G ROU P T H R E E

L E B A NON COUN T Y K E NN E L C L U B

our sincere appreciation to Judge Mr. Ken Murray

owned by VALERIE DIKER AKC BREEDER OF MERIT DIKERDACHS KENNEL NEW YORK, NY www.dikerdachs.com 212.628.7573

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GCHS Dikerdachs Lucky’s Bright Shining Star

MU LT I P L E B E ST I N S P E C I A LT Y S HOW

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 3/31/18 Longhaired Dachshund * five MU LT I P L E G ROU P W I NN I NG A TOP

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**

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/18

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Ad design by Linda Durham

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GCHB CH CENTARRA GET YOUR GAME ON SIRE: MULTI BIS/BISS CH ANAHAB’S MARK IT SQUARE DAM: MULTI BIS/BISS GCH “BRENDA”

ZELDA HITS A TRIFECTA!

Thank You Group Judge Mr. Larry C. Abbott and Breed Judge Mrs. Vicki L. Abbott

ZELDA IS OWNED BY DIANE ADAMCIK, MARGARET HODGE & PAM LAPERRUQUE

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Thank You Group Judge Mrs. Vicki L. Abbott and Breed Judge Mrs. Houston (Toddie) Clark

Thank you Group Judge Mrs. Houston (Toddie) Clark and Breed Judge Mrs. Donnell Richards

ZELDA IS CONDITIONED AND SHOWN BY PAM LAPERRUQUE | CENTARRA@GMAIL.COM

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Making BREED

history

THE F I RST AND ONLY MASTER HUNTER, BEST IN SHOW WINNER!

A true dual purpose dog . 9 YEARS YOUNG AND STILL GOING STRONG!

Thank you Judge Mr . Mi ke Jackman FOR THIS VERY SPECIAL WIN!

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FLATFORD RUFFLES AND FLOURISHES, MH

Owners : MARY FARWELL, MARVIN FARWELL, KAREN WELKE & TODD FARWELL Breeders : MARY FARWELL, MARVIN FARWELL & TODD FARWELL Handl er : CARLOS J. PUIG

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Becoming

Honor BY JACQUELINE FOGEL

I ’ve written about spor t smansh ip in the past. I’ve defended and criticized judges and breeders, profession- al handlers and dog show magazines. I’ve wondered about the future of our sport, and I’ve wondered about what the AKC is doing to keep breeding alive. I’ve questioned programs like Junior Showmanship and the National Owner-Han-

So when I got the message from the Korean buyer I was abso- lutely devastated. I spent one sleepless night ordering win records, verifying points and fretting about the situation. The next morning it became clear that I really only had one option open to me. I would have to bring her back to the States, put two more points on her, and send her back to Korea—at my expense. I had sold a champion. Honor demanded that I fulfill that obligation. Honor demanded that I would assume all of the expenses of correcting the error. Honor demanded that I act quickly and decisively, and apologize profusely for my mistake. Then we finished the bitch—for real. We checked points, made sure everybody was entered in the right classes and the win was recorded accurately in the judges’ books. We did not move her up to Best Of Breed on the second day so there would be “insurance” points if she won again, and she did. I sent immediate word to the Korean buyer that she was, indeed, finally a real champion. It was an expensive lesson for me (always make sure wins are recorded accurately, and don’t assume anything until the certificate arrives). I thought that would be the end of my tale of woe, but to my surprise there has been an interesting sequel. As I “HONOR IS UNCONDITIONAL, AND IT’S PRETTY MUCH A DICHOTOMY. YOU EITHER BEHAVE HONORABLY OR YOU DON’T. YOU EITHER FULFILL YOUR OBLIGATIONS OR YOU DON’T. IN SHORT, YOU DO EXACTLY WHAT YOU SAY YOU ARE GOING TO DO.”

dler competitions. But I haven’t written about honor among us dog show people. I haven’t addressed the necessary bonds of trust, we must have for each other, and what it means to act honorably. We need to talk. Officially, honor as a verb means to regard with great respect or fulfill an obligation or keep an agreement. It doesn’t specify conditions like “If I have enough time,” or “if some- thing more interesting doesn’t pop up on my list of things to do,” or “If I remember it.” Honor is unconditional, and it’s pretty much a dichotomy. You either behave honorably or you don’t. You either fulfill your obligations or you don’t. In short, you do exactly what you say you are going to do. This issue came up for me in a recent puppy sale I made to a buyer in Korea. I sold the Korean buyer an AKC champion bitch, and made all the arrangements to fly her there. About two weeks after she arrived in Korea I heard from the buyer who said he was checking AKC records and discovered that the bitch I sent only had 13 points. I was as shocked as a person can be. I very closely monitor all of the points on my dogs, and the AKC web site has made it increasingly easy to do that. I knew I had finished her championship. I had not even entered her in a show for 10 months because I was so sure she was finished. Well, I was wrong, and the dog I sent to Korea still needed two points to become an AKC champion. I am not at all sure what happened, though I suspect there was a recording error somewhere along the line. A bitch I was showing at the same time is recorded as having 27 points— an unusually large number and quite a few more than I usu- ally put on a dog even when looking for that elusive second major. The Korean bitch had started her winning early with a 3-point major at a Terrier specialty, under a breeder judge. It was not hard to put points on her—she is a beautiful, elegant dog with a fabulous head and graceful movement. Her second major came quickly—the day before our National Specialty under a renowned Terrier judge. I stopped showing her just two months later because I thought she was finished. Unfortunately for me I did not keep a written record of her wins because I always rely upon the AKC records. Neither do I take photographs of single-point wins. I didn’t know I was going to be selling her, so I was not as diligent as I could have been. And because I manage a large number of breeding dogs in two breeds, I did not notice that her championship certifi- cate was not among the others I was receiving around that time. It was a comedy of small errors that led up to this point.

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MULT BIS, MULTI BISS, GCHG OCEANO DARBYDALES'S XECUTIVE DECISION

2017 - 2018 THE

AL L SYS TEMS Newfound l and* T he #8 Wo r k i ng Dog * * 2017 NAT I ONA L SPEC I A LT Y WI NNER MU LT I P L E BES T I N SHOW MU LT I P L E BES T I N SPEC I A LT Y SHOW

©G Griffith

Presented by: Kim & Gigi Griffith Loved & Owned by: Kathy Wortham Co-Owned by: Mary W. Price & Carol Bergmann Bred by: Gigi Griffith & Carol Bergmann Our appreciation to Judge, Mr. Houston Clark for this Group Win

*All systems as of 3/31/18 **DN stats as of 3/31/18

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Becoming: Honor

BY JACQUELINE FOGEL continued

“LET ME BE CLEAR: THERE IS A DEFINITE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UNINTENTIONAL BEHAVIORS THAT RESULT IN MISTAKES AND POOR DECISIONS, AND INTENTIONAL BEHAVIORS DESIGNED TO MISLEAD AND OBSCURE. THERE IS NO DISHONOR IN MISTAKES AND POOR DECISIONS OR BAD JUDGMENT.”

was taking the win—New Champion photo, I was telling the judge the story of my mistake. The judge turned to me and said, “Well at least you did things the right way. I know of a well-known breeder in another breed who simply entered another dog under the unfin- ished dog’s registration number. I guess he didn’t think we could tell the differ ence between a cream-colored really nice dog and a red, not-so-wonderful dog.” I must admit, that solution to my problem had not even occurred to me. It certainly would have been a lot less expensive, and everybody knows all Bedlingtons look pretty much alike. That could have worked. Even the peo- ple I travel with sometimes hand me the wrong dog to show in the classes. If I had the entire breed entry, who would ever check or know who the actual dogs were? The AKC relies upon the honor system, so how would they know which dog was actually attached to the registration number? The honor system. The AKC relies on the honor system to keep its stud book accurate. That means all of us who participate in the system are expected to behave honorably. There are no qualifiers here. You don’t get to opt out of behaving hon- orably because it’s too expensive, or too

much trouble, or because other people do it. Let me be clear: there is a definite difference between unintentional behaviors that result in mistakes and poor decisions, and intentional behav- iors designed to mislead and obscure. There is no dishonor in mistakes and poor decisions or bad judgment. Yet the end results are often the same whether they are the product of inten- tional misdeeds, or unintentional poor judgement. People end up getting dogs that are not as good as they are repre- sented to be. However, uninformed breeders are simply making poor choic- es. They are not trying to deceive, and they are not falsifying base information. The integrity of the stud book remains intact in spite of their poor decisions. Anyone can easily see which dogs con- tributed to the mediocrity in front of them. The people who intentionally deceive are damaging the integrity of an entire system based upon an expec- tation of honor and truth. Those actions are far more serious and destructive in the long run. I know the dog-show stories as well as anybody. I know some people have finished less than worthy dogs by entering a good dog with the lesser dog’s number. I wonder why someone

who knows better would do that just to put a title on an unworthy dog. I don’t understand how that benefits the breed or breeding programs. Find it a nice pet home and move forward. It’s not the end of the world if your dog or bitch does not achieve a ROM, a Grand Championship or top-twenty invitation. The future of the breeds relies upon an accurate stud book, and that requires that people do not lie. I think our popular culture is enter- ing a new, unsavory era where lying is expected and tolerated more than in any time I can remember. I’d like to bring back the idea that we are only as good as our word. I made a mistake when I sold the unfinished bitch to a Korean buyer. And that mistake cost me a lot. But it did not cost me the relationship with people I hope will take a beautiful bloodline into the future. Mistakes will happen, but the true measure of a per- son is how they handle the corrections. Ultimately all we as breeders really have is our reputation, and I want mine to include the concept of honor. Our stud book also requires that we all act honorably. If we care about our legacy and the future of our dogs we must treat each other with respect and honor. It’s the only way to build trust, and the only way to move forward.

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P

W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

Ginger GCH SCOTT'S G C H P D U N H I L L S T E E L E R N A T I O N x G C H S C O T T ’ S G L A M O R G I R L LADY LIBERTY

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/18 #1 BEARDED COLLIE ALL BREED*

BRED & OWNED BY TOM WATHAN & CAROL (SCOTT) WATHAN, JORGE & SUSIE ASSISTED BY KATE BATZNER, KAYCEE KLANG, EDGAR VILLANUEVA & JORDAN OLIVERA

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Uniform Judging Can coat throw off the most discerning eye? BY DAVID W. HADDOCK

R esponsible dog judging entails much more than ring time; it is a life long pursuit of edu- cation. Years ago, a person who had the eye, experience, and education to properly critique a dog or a dog situation was known as a “good dog man.” Today, we all know men and women who fit that descrip- tion, and those of us who intently take the responsibility aspire to achieve that worthy distinction.

Photo by Sharon Carvalho

While I enjoy it, I take the judging of dogs seriously. I have been humbled as a breed judge, and I am much less likely to be overtly critical of the choices made by fellow judges, particularly as I venture beyond my own breed and into judging others that are not as familiar to my eye or experience. When multiple exhibits possess the type, temperament, and sound- ness we seek in our ideal breed dog, there is room for honest disagreement. In the dog community, there is a wealth of knowl- edge for those who seek it. On many occasions, it has been my great pleasure to interact with the most revered of our fancy. When I keep my mouth shut and my ears open during the group judging, to and from the show site, or over a dinner or drink back at the hotel, I can usually pick up some valuable absolutes that enlighten my canine education. I am relatively new to “the club,” and the simple truth is I have much more to learn than to teach. Except with this article I do wish to teach—or rather remind—my colleagues of a simple, yet salient truth. There’s a dog under that coat! This axiom

should resonate with all who seek to preserve breed type and are passionate about the integrity of all “long- coated” breeds. At almost any judging seminar and particularly those involving long-coated dogs, we are reminded again and again to “put your hands on the dogs” and get under the coat. Still, I regularly observe long- coated dogs being judged with only the slightest hands-on evaluation. I wonder how the manipula- tion of such a minor part of breed type can so over- whelm the more important characteristics beneath it. Neither coat, nor the silhouette it presents, are type. Let me put this in perspective. Coat is a component of type. In the Alaskan Malamute, the double coat is an obvious survival characteristic of the breed. The coarse guard coat is water repellent. Together with the insulating undercoat, the Malamute retains body heat and can survive in extreme temperatures—a vital requirement for its function. Nevertheless, a Mala- mute with correct coat but without the correct head, bite, eyes, or ears necessary for survival will cease

“JUDGES SHOULD LOOK FIRST FOR REQUISITE BREED TYPE AND REWARD THE ATHLETE PRESENTED IN THE CORRECT UNIFORM THAT BEST EXHIBITS THESE UNDERLYING ATTRIBUTES. NOW THAT WOULD BE BEAUTIFUL!”

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FIRST EVER GRAND CHAMPION GOLD DUAL CHAMPION HERDING DOG IN THE AKC Multiple Group placing and Multiple HIT/RHIT GCHG DC WILDFIRE'S MY BOY FOUR RN HSAds HSBd HIAds HIBd HXAs HXBd HXAdM 4 GCHS Bayshore’s Hot Chocolate at Avatar HSAs CGC x GCH OTCHWildfire from Sydney UDX3 OM6 VER RA HSAds HSBd HIAd HIBd OA OAJ OF

Thank you judge Harry “Butch” Schulman for awarding 4 his Gold Championship and judge BrianWinstrom for awarding 4 his Herding Championship in March 2018.

Breeder/Owner/Handler: Carol Michel, 260-415-1123 at Windswept Farms Conformation Handlers: Greg Wessel & KimHalcom Herding Handler: Carol Michel Clear. TNS CEA CL CERF and BAER Hips - Good

© 4Ever Photography & Design

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Uniform Judging: Can a coat throw off...

BY DAVID W. HADDOCK continued

“...COATS ARE UNIFORMS AND MANY ARE TAILORED TO CONSTRUCT A PICTURE OF BREED TYPE.”

David is the long-serving President of the Nashville Dog Training Club, where he has been instrumental in developing multiple ven- ues for canine performance. During his tenure, the club has gained national recogni- tion for its semiannual 4-day agility trials and multiple venues for obedience, rally, tracking, and lure cours- ing. He is also a member of the Nashville Kennel Club, Santa Barbara Kennel Club, Westchester Kennel Club, and the Westminster Kennel Club, where he serves on the Dog Committee. David is a nationally recognized obedi- ence judge, having adjudicat- ed at over 300 trials in 40+ states. He is also approved for several breeds within the Working Group. David is a graduate of Washington & Lee University (BA, 1983) and Columbia University (MBA, 1987). He spent his early professional career with New York-based real estate and finance com- panies before embarking on a successful entrepreneurial career, first in the health-care field and later in consumer products. He was a founding partner and/or executive in multiple start-ups and early stage businesses, includ- ing Windy Hill Pet Food, a roll-up ultimately acquired by Mars Pedigree. He has worked internationally as a pet industry consultant, and owns and manages several niche brands within the pet food industry.

to function. The Malamute with- out a strong neck, powerfully balanced movement, or good feet will not complete its job in the snow. Despite its proper coat, the Malamute described could not perform its function and should not be rewarded. Likewise, in breeds where coat is more cloak than comfort and scissoring is the norm, we must not allow it or its groomer to distract us from the rest of the dog. According to its breed standard, the Portuguese Water Dog should present “an indelible impression of strength, spirit and soundness.” Shown in multiple presentations of the two coat types and clips allowed, the gifted groomer can sculpt a dog from the “profuse, thickly plant- ed” coat. One must look beyond this important, but diminished distraction, and seek a robust and spirited dog of moderate propor- tion. Unlike Samson, the strength of the dog is not in the hair! The correct Portuguese water dog head is “distinctively large, well proportioned with excep- tional breadth of topskull,” an essential part of a body that is “ruggedly built” and “well- knit.” No amount or style of hair should camouflage this construc- tion. This mariner requires the muscle and substance that will take it through a full day of work on water and land. Coat can’t do that! Think of it like this: Coats are uniforms and many are tailored to construct a picture of breed type. Crafting a dog’s uniform no more indicates correct form and func- tion than wearing an NFL jersey makes a Hall of Fame quarter- back. Regardless of the uniform, we should require that under-

neath it are the components that make the dog singularly prepared, equipped, and willing to perform duties associated with its task. Recently (and too often), I have heard it said that a winning exhibit is “beautiful” or “pretty,” an apparent, if not singular jus- tification for its reward. Such terms are not breed specific. A generic show dog can be pretty, and devoid a standard, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. When an exhibit best exudes the essen- tial characteristics outlined in the breed standard, “beautiful” is the result, not the reason. “Pretty” is as pretty does! Judges should look first for requisite breed type and reward the athlete presented in the correct uniform that best exhibits these underly- ing attributes. Now that would be beautiful! A native of Wichita, Kan- sas, David obtained his first purebred dog in the 1970’s, during which time he owner- handled the Alaskan Malam ute to an obedience title and conformation championship. He later acquired Portuguese Water Dogs, handling one of the first PWDs to achieve both Breed Championship and Utility Dog titles. He is a former board member of the PWD parent club and has authored several PWD articles that have appeared in national publications. David and his family have also owned and exhibited Border Terriers, Parson Rus- sell Terriers, Havanese, Chi- huahuas, Toy Fox Terriers, Whippets, and Samoyeds.

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*

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 3/31/18

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Pumpkin PUMPKIN PIE G C H C H E V A L I E R S D U R O L A N D ’ S

H A N D L E D B Y J A S O N S TA R R

B R E D & OWN E D B Y D . M I C H A E L B I T Z , M . D . , E S Q .

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number A N A T O L I A N S H E P H E R D * ONE

* S H OW S I G H T B R E E D & A L L B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 3 / 3 1 / 1 8

P H OTO S B Y © P H Y L L I S E N S L E Y P H OTO G R A P H Y

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s i lver grand champ i on BIS WI LDEST DREAM GENUINE ROCK N ROLL , CD rn RA (HI T )

Thank you judge MR. james noe for the group win

owned by Joanne Schottinger, Tina & John Bailey bred by Tina & John Bailey handled by Ron Mattson

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#3 Greater Swiss Mountain Dog *

* ShowSight breed stats as of 3/31/18

On a winning streak f irst 32 SHOWS OUT 32 BEST OF BREEDS

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*

*

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/18

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Lines From Linda The Collie Club of America Quarter Century Group In- ducts Roy L. Ayers and Marcia Keller into Hall of Fame BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

T he Col- lie Club of A m e r i c a ’ s Q u a r t e r Century Collie Group gathered in Norfolk, Virginia, to celebrate two legendary induct- ees into their Hall of Fame, my father, Roy L. Ayers, Conrad Col- lies and Marcia Keller, Marnus Collies. This year’s event was held on board the spirit of Norfolk. As the yacht

Roy L. Ayers January 27, 1920 – September 19, 1993

Judging assignments took the Ayers to every state in the union, including Alaska and one of his favorite show sights Hawaii. Roy judged in Australia, New Zealand, South Ameri- ca, The West Indies, The Bahamas, Puerto Rico, and in every province in Canada as well as other countries. We remem- ber his stateliness, aristocratic air and contagious smile as he judged our Collie Club of America National Specialty Shows in Louisville, Kentucky and Tulsa, Oklahoma. Our Nation- al Show of 1987 in Atlanta, Georgia was a tribute to Roy and Hazel. Always a Georgian, Roy trained hunting dogs as a young boy. He owned dogs all of his life and after his marriage to Hazel, Collies became their family pets. Then the show bug bit him. He became a successful breeder and exhibitor of Col- lies. His Conrad Collies captured Best in Show wins in this country as well as others. Just after World War II, when Japan held one of its first post war shows, it was one of Roy Ayers’ Conrad Collies which captured Best in Show. His dogs won the “Best in South” award two separate years. Two others, Ch. Conrad’s Music Maestro and Ch. Poplar Stop The Music were selected by Dog World magazine to represent the “ideal Collie” for their breed standards. He bred Ch. Conrad’s Sweet Expression, the first female Collie champion in Georgia. His concept of always doing things the right way, fueled by his genuine love for people and dogs endeared him to canine fanciers of all breeds, and he was elected to lead numerous dog club organizations: As President for five years and Vice President for one year, Roy lead the Southeastern Association of Kennel Clubs. He was the Atlanta Kennel Club’s Delegate to the American Kennel Club. The Collie Club of Georgia elected Roy the first State Director to the Collie Club of Amer- ica, and he served again as Director in 1976. He served as their President and Show Chairman for eight years. As Presi- dent of the Atlanta Kennel Club for five years and Vice Presi- dent another five years Roy and Hazel held positions on every committee of the club at some time. He was on the Board of Directors for over 25 years and was honored by the first Lifetime Achievement Award as a memorial to Roy. The club also established the “Roy Ayers Scholarship” as a permanent yearly endowment for the University of Georgia’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Roy was a lifetime member of the Oldtimers of the Kennel World. During the first five years of its beginning, Roy served on the Board of Directors of the Senior Conformation Judges Association. He traveled all over the country teaching breed seminars, giving training lessons and sharing his knowledge with others. Roy Ayers was the first judge in the history of our breed to become an all-breed judge. Both of his children became AKC judges, a rarity in the sport. Many dog publications featured articles written by Roy. He was a monthly columnist for Collie Review magazine and was a regular contributor for the favorite Dog World magazine, which presented him with their Award for Outstanding Ser- vice to Dogs. He is included in Who’s Who in American Dog- dom, Outstanding Distinguished Personalities of the South, and Who’s Judging Your Dog. Roy Ayers competence and sound judgment have become legendary. He remains the model that his successors seek to

slipped away from the dock our new president Tom Coen and Treasurer Heather Newcomb welcomed everyone. They also introduced special guests judges Gwen Means, Joseph Reno and Daniel Cardoza, Jr. and Dr. Diane E. Brown, Chief Executive Officer of AKC Canine Health Foundation. Presi- dent Coen thanked retiring President James Holliday for his 11 years on the Board and as President QCCG. HOF honoree Marcia Keller’s husband Ron Keller was surrounded by family members including daughter Carrie Lenhart and her husband Gary, Susan Curtis-Lenhart, grand- daughter-in-law, Kelly Curtis-Lenhart, granddaughter Chris- tine McDowell, daughter and granddaughter Emily McDow- ell. Roy Ayers family members present included Roy Ayers, Jr. and his wife Lina, daughter Linda Ayers Turner Knorr, grand- son Todd Turner and adopted family members Judy Cooper and Steve and Robette Johns. Continuing the traditions of Ralph Morrison, Murray Drucker and Chip and Pat Atkins, HOF placards featur- ing accomplishments of the honorees were made and dis- played by Leslie and Don Jeszewski the guardians of these historic treasures.

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Cooper AMER I CAN GRAND CHAMP I ON & CANAD I AN CHAMP I ON ERREGEN’S LITTLE DEUCE COUPE BRED BY: Thomas Katzenstein & Julie Trombley OWNED BY: Thomas & Susan Katzenstein & Dr. Carmen Herbel Spears PRESENTED BY: Brenda Combs

THANK YOU JUDGE DR. STEVE KEATING

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Lines From Linda: The Collie Club of America...

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

Sterling Albert Payson Terhune

Marcia obtained her license to judge collies in 1967 and had the honor of judging the Collie Club of America show twice as well as the Canadian Col- lie National show. Her greatest pleasure was deciding breedings, training puppies, and men- toring other collie enthusiasts. Her Mar- nus dogs have had a strong influence in numerous other Collie lines. Roy Ayers Jr. delivered an emotional tribute to his father followed by a Pow- erPoint presentation by Ayers grandson Todd Turner, in the middle of which Todd, without hesitation, said, “We need a doctor. Is there a doctor here?” At the back of the ship the lovely Spens- er Hardin, “Collie Daughter” of Leslie Jeszewski collapsed with Leslie catch- ing her to break the fall. CCA Members Dr. Kathy Leenhouts and nurse Mary Forfa rushed to care for Spenser who thankfully is now fine, but she had to miss the remainder of the national activities. Calling to check on her, Ayers grandson Todd asked Spenser “What was it about me that made you sick.” And a new friendship began! A popular part of the evening was Turner’s presentation which included wonderful old photos of Roy Ayers awarding wins to collies shown by many on board the ship. Examples included Sally Tabb garnering an All- Breed Best in Show at age 11, big wins for Tom Coen and Don Jeszewski, next year’s National Judge Butch Schulman winning at age nine and QCCG past President James Holiday at age 13 were enjoyed by the crowd. When another Ayers Best in Show award popped up on the screen, an excited Pam Eddy shouted “That’s Me!” With Ron Keller looking on, Carrie Lenhart delivered a powerful presen- tation on her beloved Mother Marcia Keller ending with sound of Marcia’s voice from an interview taped with George Horn in 2008. We will always remember Roy L. Ayers, Marcia Keller and all the follow- ing HOF inductees!

(1872-1942) Sunnybank

1985 Elisabeth B. Browning (1893-1984) Tokalon Florence Cummings (1887-1972) Arrowhill Fred Kem (1889-1945) Lodestone Mrs. William H. Long, Jr. (1905-1971) Noranda W.R. Van Dyck

emulate. We are grateful to him for his deep dedication to the highest prin- cipals of the sport of purebred dogs. Roy’s creed when he went into the show ring was: “I have no friends and I have no enemies – I am judging man’s best friend to the best of my ability.” That he did!

(1892-1967) Honeybrook

1986 Chris Cassleman (1894-1969) Hertzville Michael J. Kennedy (1892-1979)

Marcia Kay Keller 1928—2010

Bellhaven Kennel Manager

Ada Shirley

Marcia Kay was born March 28, 1928 in Buffalo, New York. Her educational years growing up were in multiple plac- es, as finding employment for her father during the depression required moving between the Bronx and various suburbs of Buffalo. As long standing childhood friendships were difficult to maintain, reading was her one constant. After reading her first Terhune collie story she just had to locate every one of them. A teenage job at a local collie ken- nel led to a friendship with William Schwinger of Harswing Collies. As Bill had been president of the Collie Club of America during the 1940s, visitors at his home were many great collie breeders and judges of that time. Some of them who became Marcia’s mentors were Doc McCain, Tom Halpin, Art Alexander, Ed Myers and Gus Sigritz. These associations helped in forming the image of the collie that she later felt best matched the Collie Standard. In 1946 she picked the kennel name of Marnus. Her husband, Ronald Keller came into the picture at a dog show in 1952. By the late 1960s Marnus col- lies had developed a look that was eas- ily recognized. Through the years of numerous champions there have also been notable wins, including Best of Breed at the Collie Club of America show along with Best In Show awards, all owner handled by her.

(1914-1979) Shirhaven Rudd Weatherwax (1908-1985) Charles Wernsman (1897-1952) Arken 1987 Margaret Haserot (1891-198) Pebble Ledge Edwin J. Myers (1905-1986) Ardenhill

1988 Grace E. Christie

(1882-1980) Saint Adrian

Clara M. Lunt (1886-1953) Alstead Gustave Sigritz

1984 Dr. Oda Prescott Bennett (1886-1944) Tazwell Florence Bell Ilch (1891-1982) Bellhaven Dr. James Price McCain (1892-1957) Cainbroke Edwin L. Pickhardt (1894-1969)

(1914-1970) Cherrivale

1989 Art Alexander (1918-1960) Tri Acres Mary Browning Beresford (1916-1955) Poplar Ted Kattell

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/18

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/18

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Lines From Linda: The Collie Club of America...

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

Leslie and Don Jeszewski congratulating Ron Keller

Spenser Hardin and Todd Turner, when Todd began speaking, Spenser passed out!

Tom and Naomi Coen celebrating with Heather Newcomb

Tom Coen and Heather Newcomb

(1887-1974) Borco

(1837-1913) Cragston R.L. “Rick” Rickenbaugh (1906-1987) Bannerblu

Roneill LaVerne Walker (1919-1995) San Lori

1991 Isabelle Butler (1914-1980) Kinmont Noel Denton (1917-1982) Deep South Dorothy Gerth

2004 Hilda Rickenbaugh (1907-1998) Bannerblu

1994 Brian Carabine

(1907-1973) Erin’s Own

(1922-1986) Gerthstone Lillian Wernsman (1883-1971) Arken 1992 Frank Ashbey (1915-1971) Ben Butler (1908-1976) Kinmont Mrs. W. Henry Gray (1893-1978) Wooley’s Lane Thomas M. Halpin (1895-1958) Hertzville

Eric Knight

2008 Chip Atkins

(1897-1943) Benjamin J.H. Rikert (1893-1978) Col’ lover

(1927-2001) Lode-Ark Stephen J. Field (1910-2001) Parader 2009 Billy Aschenbrener (1926-2001) Abbehurst

1995 W.E. Mason

(Circa 1967-1941) Southport

Alva Rosenburg (1892-1973)

2010 Sandy Tuttle

1998 Bobbee Roos

(1934-2003) Kasan/ Arrowhill

(1924-1993) Wickmere

2011 Bettie Crawford (1927-1999) Celestial

2000 Lois Hillman

1993 John Pierpoint Morgan

(1915-1995)

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R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

G R A N D C H A M P I O N MILEKA’S AT LAST

O W N E D & B R E D B Y S A L L Y O ’ C O N N E L L , M I L E K A S I B E R I A N S

E X P E R T L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y M R . A R V I N D D E B R A G A N C A

O U R A P P R E C I A T I O N T O J U D G E M R . N A T H A N I E L H O R N

O U R A P P R E C I A T I O N T O J U D G E M R . H O U S T O N C L A R K

O U R A P P R E C I A T I O N T O J U D G E M R . W I L L I A M D e V I L L E N E U V E

R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

G R A N D C H A M P I O N MILEKA’S AT LAST

Lines From Linda: The Collie Club of America...

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

2013 Al Forthal

2014 Marion Otteraaen

2016 Pat Starkweather

2017 Ted Kjellstorm

2018 Roy L. Ayers

(1920-1993) Conrad

Marcia Keller

(1928-2010) Marnus

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Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene Bronze Grand Champion Best in Specialty & Multiple Group winner

Mr. Bruce Voran. Thank you to judge

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Deauville Fairytale Briards present owned & loved by Odile Smith | presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d, (410) 822-2187 | assisted by Melissa LoPinto S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2018 • 73

M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W

o w n e d b y A N N A M A R I E Y U R A

b r e d & c o - o w n e d b y R AY H A R R I N G TO N

e x c l u s i v e l y p r e s e n t e d b y J A M E S B E T T I S

G R O U P O N E J U D G E S

D R . J O S E L U I S PAY R O , M R . R I C K G SW E N D E R , M R S . L I N D A R I E D E L & M S . D E N I S E D E A N

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& B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N E R

WILLY D U N H I L L W I L L I A M S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2018 • 75

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G R A N D C H A M P I O N Wonderlands Darby V Wolf Creek m u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n i n g

Thank you to all the judges who have recognized our beautiful girl.

bred by Ed Ferrell & John Conely owned by Julie Tittl & Julia Foster-Hess, (810) 625-5551 handled by Julia Foster-Hess photos by ©Christina Freitag 2017

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B A R K B A R K ’ S S E T T I N G T H E W O R L D O N F I R E G R O U P W I N N E R , B R E E D W I N N E R F R O M C L A S S E S , S C L A S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

O W N E D & B R E D B Y J O H N & C L A I R E O ’ N E I L L | B A R K B A R K S A M O Y E D S J U D G E D A V I D H A D D O C K

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B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W I N G

J U D G E B E T T Y N E L S O N P O L L O C K H A N D L E D B Y L A U R E N H A Y - L A V I T T

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L

R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

S I LVER GRAND CHAMPION

BO-BETT MADE ESPEC I ALLY FOR DEBMAR

thank you

J U D G E D R . C A R O L WH I T E - MO S E R

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Lark B R E D B Y C A R O L H A R R I S

OWN E D B Y D E B O R A H B A HM & A S H L I E WH I T MO R E P R E S E N T E D B Y A S H L I E WH I T MO R E

thank you

J U D G E M R . R A L P H ( S O N N Y ) A M B R O S I O

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M U LT I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y S H O W W I N N I N G & B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N SHALIMAR & OAKWOOD MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE RENEGADE

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O U R S I N C E R E A P P R E C I A T I O N T O J U D G E S V I R G I N I A LY N E A N D D AV I D B O L U S F O R T H I S S T R O N G R E C O G N I T I O N .

B R E D & O W N E D B Y J A C Q U E L Y N J O H N S O N , C H R I S A N N M O O R E & R O B E R T M O O R E P R E S E N T E D B Y K I M & G I G I G R I F F I T H | C O - O W N E D B Y K E L L I W A T K I N S & K I M G R I F F I T H

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M S . H E A T H E R L A N G F E L D A N D M R . M I K E J A C K M A N .

B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N L A N BU R ’ S S I MP LY R I V E T I N G

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Bred by: JON WOODRING # 6 BEAGLE

ALL BREED * *ShowSight all breed stats as of 2/28/18

Owned by: ELIZABETH SOHNLE

Handled by: JERI EL DISSI

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A Reading from the Book of Face Dog Moms and Dads Don’t Use Bad Words BY DAN SAYERS A few years ago, I received a Facebook message from a local man who asked if he

could stop by to meet my dogs. He worked in the next town and hoped to spend time getting acquainted with the breed that I’ve enjoyed for 35 years. On the day he came to visit, he turned out to be a knowledgeable individual whom the dogs took to instantly. He had a wonderful manner with my dogs

and seemed to understand the breed’s complicated relation- ship with strangers. (Whenever he ignored them, their desire for his attention only increased!) Our conversation was only slightly less convoluted. As we talked, I became aware of the dual nature of our conversation. As I discussed breed–spe- cific characteristics using terms such as ringlet and puce, he spoke effusively about how much he adored his previous dogs. He waxed poetic about the love he had for his girls, as I referred to mine as bitches. “Oh, I can’t use that word,” he said. “I just don’t feel comfortable saying the ‘B’ word.” When I first got on Facebook I was confused by many of the posts I read. I couldn’t understand why some people were using social media to write messages to their mothers. I found it particularly strange that so many posts began with the salu- tation, “Mom.” (I always thought that mothers appreciated a phone call from their adult children.) Time and time again I read curious messages addressed to “mom” that mentioned everything from being hungry or bored to being unhappy with some aspect of daily life. I was initially confused until I realized that all of these posts were accompanied by a photo of a dog that appeared either guilty or forlorn. I eventually understood that these people were posting Facebook mes- sages not to their own mothers, but rather to themselves in the voice of their dogs. For example, “Mom, are you going to give me some of that turkey dinner that’s sitting on the coun- ter?” This kind of digital declaration demonstrated to me that it’s not just “pet people” that talk about their dogs as though they are human. Social media has transformed some serious dog people into dog moms and dads! For better or worse, some of the very same people who initially decried the use of the term “furbaby” now public- ly expose their internal anthropomorphism through self- addressed letters in the voice of their own animals. As charm- ing as these Facebook posts may be, their virtual delivery reveals just how effective the animal rights’ movement has been in altering our view of both our dogs and ourselves. Social media has revealed that many of us who’ve pledged allegiance to the breed standards really view our dogs as chil- dren—not breeding stock. Some dog folk have proven that they are every bit as likely to abstain from using the “B” word as are the people who schedule a kennel visit. After all, how many breeders’ websites have pages for “Our Girls” and “Our Boys?” This shift in our vocabulary may seem insignificant to some, but it is symptomatic of a larger societal movement away from the keeping of dogs as companion animals towards a belief that we are all “pet parents” whose “children” just happen to have fur and four legs. These treasured girls and boys have rights and they should be pampered, not petted.

(And it doesn’t hurt if they have a hard–luck rescue story that puts Oliver Twist to shame.) In the not–too–distant future, this New World view of dogs as children could impact our sport in ways unforeseen. Societal pressure could one day force ring stewards to call for the Puppy Boy 6–9 Class and the Open Girl Class. (Bred– By–Exhibitor Classes might well be eliminated when it is declared that all deserving dogs are “rescued” and not actual- ly bred.) There may even come a day when dogs are brought into the show ring in strollers and baby backpacks instead of on collars and leads. Although this suggestion seems ridic- ulous to today’s serious fanciers, the dog–loving public has an increasing appetite for contests that are high on “cute” and low on conformation. To a growing number of people, every dog deserves a ribbon and the idea that one dog is more deserving than another seems utterly implausible, if not rep- rehensible. Through social media, this attitude is reinforced by those charming—but not so innocuous—odes to mom. Each post shakes the very foundation upon which our sport is built. They have the ability to change our understanding and appreciation of the dog and wipe out the legacy of our shared relationship that has developed over tens of thousands of years. To serious fanciers, our love for dogs is best expressed through breed preservation that includes the language we use to honor our common history. It shouldn’t be minimized by the use of cute terms of endearment, thoughtlessly typed and posted along with an equally cute photo. Cute is for kids. B is for bitches.

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