Showsight Presents The Airedale Terrier

AIREDALE TERRIER THE

1. Where do you live? What is your occupation? How many years in dogs? 2. Do you have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? 3. What is it about the Airedale Terrier that makes the breed so appealing? 4. Can you speak to the breed’s versatility? Its trainability? 5. Do you compete in Performance Events with your dogs? 6. How much care does the Airedale’s coat require for the show ring? 7. Any suggestions when it comes to sparring in the ring? 8. What are some best practices for keeping an Airedale in good condition? 9. Any advice for someone thinking about sharing life with the “King of Terriers?” 10. Just for fun: Do you have a humorous tale you can tell about your experiences showing Airedales? 11. Is there anything else you’ d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. ANNE BARLOW I live in the Austin, Texas, area and currently own a boarding kennel. I’ve been in dogs for 40 years! The dogs (breeding, showing, judging) are an all encompass- ing part of my life. I do have many other interests that I wouldn’t consider hobbies. I’ve been a fan of horse racing since I was a little kid, love Astro’s baseball and all Baylor sports. What is it about the Airedale Terrier that makes the breed so appealing? For me it is their appearance, personality, size, and gameness. Can I speak to the breed’s versatility? It is a very versatile breed, but not every dog excels at every sport. I have competed with mine in conformation, agility, obedience, barn hunt, scent work, coursing ability, fast cat. I have also put CGCs and Trick Dog titles on several of mine. How much care does the Airedale’s coat require for the show ring? A lot! You’ve caught me at a time when I am conditioning two bitches for the shows. About 8-10 hours a week for both of them combined. Any suggestions when it comes to sparring in the ring? Every judge should spar this breed—I only take two at a time out and try and keep them three feet or so apart. What are some best practices for keeping an Airedale in good condition? Mine spend a great amount of time outside October- May. They are in rock hard condition as they are constantly up and down and they are out with three to four pack-mates at a time. But walking them is another option and they love to go where you do. Any advice for someone thinking about sharing life with the “King of Terriers?” Before you buy one, be sure you understand that this isn’t a Labrador or a Golden. Their daily motivations for doing everything is very different—they are independent thinkers and independent hunters. So while they are happy to make you happy it is often when they feel like it not necessarily when you want them to. But this is also a very individual trait. I’ve got several that are very easily trained and compliant. And a

couple that look at you when you tell them to do something like they are thinking, “I’ll get around to that when I feel like it.” I find mine are impossible to train as far as counter surfing. They know they aren’t supposed to do it and simply wait until I leave the kitchen. It doesn’t matter how many times they are caught in the act and corrected; they keep doing it. APRIL CLYDE I have lived continuously

with Airedale Terriers since 1979. Along with my hus- band, Todd Clyde, I have an active breeding program that has produced BIS winners; #1 Airedale Terriers in US and in England; Westminster winners; multiple successful performance dogs and count- less beloved family pets. I have served on the Airedale Terrier Club of America

Board for the past 23 years and have held numerous positions including President. I have been the breed JEC for about the last 20 years. In addition, I co-authored our most current Illustrated Breed Standard and led the development of the Airedale Terrier Versatility Award program. I served as an AKC Delegate for the California Airedale club for about five years. I am active in local all-breed clubs serving as Assistant Show Chair and an officer. I currently am an AKC conformation judge and I judge all Terrier breeds and four Non-Sporting breeds. I live in Selbyville, Delaware. I am retired from a 40-year career as a health care executive in 2017. I grew up with Poodles (all three sizes) as family pets and acquired my first Airedale Ter- rier in 1979. I have lived with Airedales continuously since then. I began exhibiting in conformation in about 1983 and bred my first litter in 1986. I began to judge the breed in 2006. Do I have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? I enjoy reading, traveling and playing poker. What is it about the Airedale Terrier that makes the breed so appealing? The blend of Terrier and Hound that created the breed has produced a dog that is alert, active and protective, but is also sweet and comical. They are true companions who love to be with their owners and be a participant in whatever their owner wants to do. They love active sports such as hiking and hunting, but also enjoy a quiet evening at home. Airedales are smart, trainable, healthy and confident. Can I speak to the breed’s versatility and trainability? The breed has the mental sharpness and physical stamina to success- fully compete in a wide variety of dog sports including obedi- ence, agility, rally, tracking, dock diving, fast cat, barn hunt, scent work, trick dog, therapy dog and anything else their own- er can think of ! They are also natural hunters of small furry game (groundhogs, rabbits, etc.) and can be trained to bird hunt activities such as upland hunting and water retrieving. They are eligible to compete AKC Spaniel Hunt Tests, AKC Fur Tracking and Trailing Tests and AKC Retriever Hunting

174 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JUNE 2020

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