German Shorthaired Pointer Breed Magazine - Showsight

POINTER GERMAN SHORTHAIRED

Let’s Talk Breed Education!

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Official Standard for the German Shorthaired Pointer General Appearance: The German Shorthaired Pointer is a versatile hunter, an all-purpose gun dog capable of high performance in field and water. The judgment of Shorthairs in the show ring reflects this basic characteristic. The overall picture which is created in the observer's eye is that of an aristocratic, well balanced, symmetrical animal with conformation indicating power, endurance and agility and a look of intelligence and animation. The dog is neither unduly small nor conspicuously large. It gives the impression of medium size, but is like the proper hunter, "with a short back, but standing over plenty of ground." Symmetry and field quality are most essential. A dog in hard and lean field condition is not to be penalized; however, overly fat or poorly muscled dogs are to be penalized. A dog well balanced in all points is preferable to one with outstanding good qualities and defects. Grace of outline, clean-cut head, sloping shoulders, deep chest, powerful back, strong quarters, good bone composition, adequate muscle, well carried tail and taut coat produce a look of nobility and indicate a heritage of purposefully conducted breeding. Further evidence of this heritage is movement which is balanced, alertly coordinated and without wasted motion. Size, Proportion, Substance: Size - height of dogs, measured at the withers, 23 to 25 inches. Height of bitches, measured at the withers, 21 to 23 inches. Deviations of one inch above or below the described heights are to be severely penalized. Weight of dogs 55 to 70 pounds. Weight of bitches 45 to 60 pounds. Proportion -measuring from the forechest to the rearmost projection of the rump and from the withers to the ground, the Shorthair is permissibly either square or slightly longer than he is tall. Substance -thin and fine bones are by no means desirable in a dog which must possess strength and be able to work over any type of terrain. The main importance is not laid so much on the size of bone, but rather on the bone being in proper proportion to the body. Bone structure too heavy or too light is a fault. Tall and leggy dogs, dogs which are ponderous because of excess substance, doggy bitches, and bitchy dogs are to be faulted. Head: The head is clean-cut, is neither too light nor too heavy, and is in proper proportion to the body. The eyes are of medium size, full of intelligence and expression, good-humored and yet radiating energy, neither protruding nor sunken. The eye is almond shaped, not circular. The preferred color is dark brown. Light yellow eyes are not desirable and are a fault. Closely set eyes are to be faulted. China or wall eyes are to be disqualified. The ears are broad and set fairly high, lie flat and never hang away from the head. Their placement is just above eye level. The ears when laid in front without being pulled, should extend to the corner of the mouth. In the case of heavier dogs, the ears are correspondingly longer. Ears too long or fleshy are to be faulted. The skull is reasonably broad, arched on the side and slightly round on top. Unlike the Pointer, the median line between the eyes at the forehead is not too deep and the occipital bone is not very conspicuous. The foreface rises gradually from nose to forehead. The rise is more strongly pronounced in the dog than in the bitch. The jaw is powerful and the muscles well developed. The line to the forehead rises gradually and never has a definite stop as that of the Pointer, but rather a stop-effect when viewed from the side, due to the position of the eyebrows. The muzzle is sufficiently long to enable the dog to seize game properly and be able to carry it for a long time. A pointed muzzle is not desirable. The depth is in the right proportion to the length, both in the muzzle and in the skull proper. The length of the muzzle should equal the length of skull. A dish-shaped muzzle is a fault. A definite Pointer stop is a serious fault. Too

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many wrinkles in the forehead is a fault. The nose is brown, the larger the better, and with nostrils well opened and broad. A spotted nose is not desirable. A flesh colored nose disqualifies. The chops fall away from the somewhat projecting nose. Lips are full and deep yet are never flewy. The teeth are strong and healthy. The molars intermesh properly. The bite is a true scissors bite. A perfect level bite is not desirable and must be penalized. Extreme overshot or undershot disqualifies. Neck, Topline, Body: The neck is of proper length to permit the jaws reaching game to be retrieved, sloping downwards on beautifully curving lines. The nape is rather muscular, becoming gradually larger toward the shoulders. Moderate throatiness is permitted. The skin is close and tight. The chest in general gives the impression of depth rather than breadth; for all that, it is in correct proportion to the other parts of the body. The chest reaches down to the elbows, the ribs forming the thorax show a rib spring and are not flat or slabsided; they are not perfectly round or barrel-shaped. The back ribs reach well down. The circumference of the thorax immediately behind the elbows is smaller than that of the thorax about a hand's breadth behind elbows, so that the upper arm has room for movement. Tuck-up is apparent. The back is short, strong, and straight with a slight rise from the root of the tail to the withers. The loin is strong, is of moderate length, and is slightly arched. An excessively long, roached or swayed back must be penalized. The hips are broad with hip sockets wide apart and fall slightly toward the tail in a graceful curve. A steep croup is a fault. The tail is set high and firm, and must be docked, leaving approximately 40 percent of its length. The tail hangs down when the dog is quiet and is held horizontally when he is walking. The tail must never be curved over the back toward the head when the dog is moving. A tail curved or bent toward the head is to be severely penalized. Forequarters: The shoulders are sloping, movable, and well covered with muscle. The shoulder blades lie flat and are well laid back nearing a 45 degree angle. The upper arm (the bones between the shoulder and elbow joint) is as long as possible, standing away somewhat from the trunk so that the straight and closely muscled legs, when viewed from the front, appear to be parallel. Elbows which stand away from the body or are too close result in toes turning inwards or outwards and must be faulted. Pasterns are strong, short and nearly vertical with a slight spring. Loose, short-bladed or straight shoulders must be faulted. Knuckling over is to be faulted. Dewclaws on the forelegs may be removed. The feet are compact, close-knit and round to spoon- shaped. The toes are sufficiently arched and heavily nailed. The pads are strong, hard and thick. Hindquarters: Thighs are strong and well muscled. Stifles are well bent. Hock joints are well angulated and strong with straight bone structure from hock to pad. Angulation of both stifle and hock joint is such as to achieve the optimal balance of drive and traction. Hocks turn neither in nor out. Cowhocked legs are a serious fault. Coat: The hair is short and thick and feels tough to the hand; it is somewhat longer on the underside of the tail and the back edges of the haunches. The hair is softer, thinner and shorter on the ears and the head. Any dog with long hair in the body coat is to be severely penalized. Color: The coat may be of solid liver or a combination of liver and white such as liver and white ticked, liver patched and white ticked, or liver roan. A dog with any area of black, red, orange, lemon or tan, or a dog solid white will be disqualified. Gait: A smooth lithe gait is essential. It is to be noted that as gait increases from the walk to a faster speed, the legs converge beneath the body. The tendency to single track is desirable. The

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forelegs reach well ahead as if to pull in the ground without giving the appearance of a hackney gait. The hindquarters drive the back legs smoothly and with great power. Temperament: The Shorthair is friendly, intelligent, and willing to please. The first impression is that of a keen enthusiasm for work without indication of nervous or flightly character. Disqualifications: China or wall eyes. Flesh colored nose. Extreme overshot or undershot. A dog with any area of black, red, orange, lemon, or tan, or a dog solid white.

Approved August 11, 1992 Effective September 30, 1992

THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER– A HISTORY

by PATTe TITuS, DebbIe KIng & CHRISTY FeATHeRSOn German Shorthaired Pointer Club of America

“ H ere is a group of dogs that can follow wounded game or track deer and boar, work with the fal- con, quarter ground close or wide, hold game on point, flush on command, mark and retrieve shot game, work in water and dense cover, withstand the cold and wet, and yet provide companionable loyalty and a ff ection for their owners.” Also referred to as a “jack of all trades” or “canine triath- lete” because of its ability to hunt, point & retrieve. “A good German short-haired pointer which knows its job is not sim- ply part of the equipment, it is the most important member of the team.” — Hunter Pointer Retriever, Th e Continental Gundog . Dogs that pointed were known to have existed in Europe as far back as the 13th century. In the 17th century Gesner, referred to them as vorstehund literally

translated, dog that stands before. Th e Germans and French called them quail dogs while the Italians referred to them as net-dogs. Not easily identified by type hunting dogs were found in all shapes, sizes, coat types and used in all types of hunting. At the end of the 17th century de Selincourt coined the generic term “gun- dogs” which separated the braques from the spaniels. According to him, setting dogs were braques that hunted with a high nose and stopped at the scent while span- iels hunted with a low nose following track and were used with falcons. Germany as we know it today did not exist, rather it was part of a large area of central Europe that subsequently became 360 states ruled by various Kings and Princes. When they weren’t at war with one another formal visits took place with invi- tations extended to go hunting and often

“THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER IS ALSO REFERRED TO AS A ‘JACK OF ALL TRADES’ OR ‘CANINE TRIATHLETE’ beCAuSe OF ITS AbIlITY TO HunT, POInT AnD ReTRIeve.”

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“PRIOR TO THE BEGINNING OF THE 18TH CENTURY THERE WERE ONLY A SMALL NUMBER OF POINTERS IN GERMANY AnD IT IS DuRIng THIS CenTuRY bReeDIng exPeRImenTS weRe DOne TO ImPROve THe quAlITIeS OF THOSe geRmAn DOgS.”

time dogs, in addi- tion to other items, were exchanged as prized gifts. Period writings indicate a braque or point- ing dog was being used throughout Central Europe, France, Italy and Spain and its con- formation was very

on how to get there, evident by some of the earlier breed prototypes. It is important to note the use of lower case “p” in the spell- ing of “pointer” as this is an indication of an attribute and not a proper name as in the English Pointer breed. Italian, French and the mediterranean region of Spain pointer stock was used along with the original German pointer and subsequently the Hannover Hound. By 1872, breed development continued but a standard set in 1879 eliminated a large number of breeding stock for not exhibiting the legendary ancient German lineage, i.e. didn’t look like the early Ger- man pointers. In 1887 at a field trial, the body type of Waldin (wh. 7/26/1884) brought renewed vigor and a turn in breed- ing development occurred. As Germany unified, it along with the German pointer continued to evolve. Unfortunately, two world wars involv- ing Germany caused vast gaps in the breeding stock. Some kennels that flour- ished before WWII found rebuilding afterward di ffi cult. Th ere was little to no information about the kennels of East Ger- many as very little of the breeding stock

much like that of the modern German pointer. Th ese dogs were white with brown marking or white speckled or brown spot- ted and hunted with their noses held high and highly sought after. With the improvement of firearms, it was popular to shoot birds on the fly and the use of pointers came into its own. By the middle of the 18th century, pointers were being used all over Europe as well as the British Isles. After the 1848 revolution the non-aristocracy of Germany had an opportunity to participate in shooting and subsequently own gundogs. Prior to the beginning of the 18th century there were only a small number of pointers in Germa-

ny and it is during this century that breed- ing experiments were done to improve the qualities of those German dogs. Since little was recorded not much was known about the results other than most of the crosses were done with dogs indigenous to Ger- many as Herr Seiger states, “ Th ere was no deeper knowledge in the art of breeding to play a major part in old-time Germany.” He further stated that breeders bred as they liked, but all were in agreement that they wanted a dog that would be an excellent performer in any type of work, whether in the field, forest or water. Th ey knew where they wanted to go and it was pretty much an educated guess

“bY 1872, bReeD DevelOPmenT COnTInueD buT A STAnDARD SeT In 1879 ELIMINATED A LARGE NUMBER

OF BREEDING STOCK FOR nOT exHIbITIng THe legenDARY AnCIenT geRmAn lIneAge...”

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“THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB OFFICIALLY RECOGNIZED THE BREED IN 1935 AnD bY 1938 THe SHORTHAIR wAS gAInIng bReeD STRengTH In THe mInneSOTA-wISCOnSIn AReAS wITH SOme OveR lAP InTO mICHIgAn.” “THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB OFFICIALLY RECOGNIZED THE BREED IN 1935 AnD bY 1938 THe SHORTHAIR wAS gAInIng bReeD STRengTH In THe mInneSOTA-wISCOnSIn AReAS wITH SOme OveR lAP InTO mICHIgAn.” AnD bY 1938 THe SHORTHAIR wAS gAInIng bReeD STRengTH In THe mInneSOTA-wISCOnSIn AReAS wITH SOme OveR lAP InTO mICHIgAn.”

shipping. On July 4, 1925 she whelped sev- en pups with one lost to pneumonia. Th e breed was not yet recognized by the AKC, so the litter was registered with “Everyuse” in the Field Dog Stud Book early in 1926. Having served on opposite sides in WWI, Walter Mangold and Ernest Rojem met in the late 1920s on a pheasant hunt in Nebraska and found in common their love of the breed. Th ey managed to import a breeding pair via Ernest’s brother in Ger- many—not easy because the Germans were hesitant to let their good dogs leave the country. By 1932, Joseph Burkhart, a former German gamekeeper living in Wisconsin began to import dogs. His three dogs; Bob v. Schwarenberg, Arta v. Hohreusch and Feldjager’s Grisette would impact the American breed as well as the foundations for many kennels yet to come. Jack Shattuck of Minnesota bought a pup from the Bob/Arta litter and established the Schwarenberg Kennel. Mr. Shattuck can be given credit for bringing recogni- tion to the breed when he campaigned Fritz v. Schwarenberg across the U.S. Fritz held to his credit, BOB at Morris & Essex and Westminster in 1940 and winning the Chicago International 4 years in a row. Fritz sired Rusty v. Schwarenberg, the breed’s first field and dual champion. Hjal- mar Olsen, another noteworthy, imported Denmark’s field GSP of the Year for fif- teen years. Hjalmar Olsen, like Jack Shat- tuck, acquired dogs from Joseph Burkhart, but Hjalmar is better known for acquir- shipping. On July 4, 1925 she whelped sev- en pups with one lost to pneumonia. Th e breed was not yet recognized by the AKC, so the litter was registered with “Everyuse” in the Field Dog Stud Book early in 1926. Having served on opposite sides in WWI, Walter Mangold and Ernest Rojem met in the late 1920s on a pheasant hunt in Nebraska and found in common their love of the breed. Th ey managed to import a breeding pair via Ernest’s brother in Ger- many—not easy because the Germans were hesitant to let their good dogs leave the country. By 1932, Joseph Burkhart, a former German gamekeeper living in Wisconsin began to import dogs. His three dogs; Bob v. Schwarenberg, Arta v. Hohreusch and Feldjager’s Grisette would impact the American breed as well as the foundations for many kennels yet to come. Jack Shattuck of Minnesota bought a pup from the Bob/Arta litter and established the Schwarenberg Kennel. Mr. Shattuck can be given credit for bringing recogni- tion to the breed when he campaigned Fritz v. Schwarenberg across the U.S. Fritz held to his credit, BOB at Morris & Essex and Westminster in 1940 and winning the Chicago International 4 years in a row. Fritz sired Rusty v. Schwarenberg, the breed’s first field and dual champion. Hjal- mar Olsen, another noteworthy, imported Denmark’s field GSP of the Year for fif- teen years. Hjalmar Olsen, like Jack Shat- tuck, acquired dogs from Joseph Burkhart, but Hjalmar is better known for acquir- shipping. On July 4, 1925 she whelped sev- en pups with one lost to pneumonia. Th e breed was not yet recognized by the AKC, so the litter was registered with “Everyuse” in the Field Dog Stud Book early in 1926. Having served on opposite sides in WWI, Walter Mangold and Ernest Rojem met in the late 1920s on a pheasant hunt in Nebraska and found in common their love of the breed. Th ey managed to import a breeding pair via Ernest’s brother in Ger- many—not easy because the Germans were hesitant to let their good dogs leave the country. By 1932, Joseph Burkhart, a former German gamekeeper living in Wisconsin began to import dogs. His three dogs; Bob v. Schwarenberg, Arta v. Hohreusch and Feldjager’s Grisette would impact the American breed as well as the foundations for many kennels yet to come. Jack Shattuck of Minnesota bought a pup from the Bob/Arta litter and established the Schwarenberg Kennel. Mr. Shattuck can be given credit for bringing recogni- tion to the breed when he campaigned Fritz v. Schwarenberg across the U.S. Fritz held to his credit, BOB at Morris & Essex and Westminster in 1940 and winning the Chicago International 4 years in a row. Fritz sired Rusty v. Schwarenberg, the breed’s first field and dual champion. Hjal- mar Olsen, another noteworthy, imported Denmark’s field GSP of the Year for fif- teen years. Hjalmar Olsen, like Jack Shat- tuck, acquired dogs from Joseph Burkhart, but Hjalmar is better known for acquir-

ing Timm v. Altenau from Dr. Th ornton and in the later years, became synony- mous with the Moesgaard line. It is also noteworthy to mention Richard S. Johns, Ralph Parks and Bob Holcolmb as other post WWII importers of the breed. Th e American Kennel Club o ffi cially recognized the breed in 1935 and by 1938, the Shorthair was gaining breed strength in the Minnesota-Wisconsin areas with some overlap into Michigan. Th is allowed them to make application to the AKC for parent club status with Joseph Burkhart and Jack Shattuck being listed among the first o ffi cers. Th e charter was granted as the German Shorthaired Pointer Club of Amer- ica, Inc. Th eir charge was to define the true type of the breed of purebred dogs for which it was organized to promote and improve. Th eir first standard was adapted from the original German standard and with slight variation it was o ffi cially approved May of 1946. Th e articles and provision of the charter and constitution would allow for changes should that be necessary in the future. Th e GSPCA, Inc. underwent a revision in 1947, but the Minnesota club remained the parent club until 1953 when the AKC mandated the parent club became a separate organization. In 1962, the GSP- CA reorganized to its present structure. Th e first conformation standard approved in 1946 has undergone few changes with the most comprehensive in 1972 and again in 1992 to conform to the AKC format simi- lar to that of other AKC breed standards. Th e American Kennel Club o ffi cially recognized the breed in 1935 and by 1938, the Shorthair was gaining breed strength in the Minnesota-Wisconsin areas with some overlap into Michigan. Th is allowed them to make application to the AKC for parent club status with Joseph Burkhart and Jack Shattuck being listed among the first o ffi cers. Th e charter was granted as the German Shorthaired Pointer Club of Amer- ica, Inc. Th eir charge was to define the true type of the breed of purebred dogs for which it was organized to promote and improve. Th eir first standard was adapted from the original German standard and with slight variation it was o ffi cially approved May of 1946. Th e articles and provision of the charter and constitution would allow for changes should that be necessary in the future. Th e GSPCA, Inc. underwent a revision in 1947, but the Minnesota club remained the parent club until 1953 when the AKC mandated the parent club became a separate organization. In 1962, the GSP- CA reorganized to its present structure. Th e first conformation standard approved in 1946 has undergone few changes with the most comprehensive in 1972 and again in 1992 to conform to the AKC format simi- lar to that of other AKC breed standards. Th e American Kennel Club o ffi cially recognized the breed in 1935 and by 1938, the Shorthair was gaining breed strength in the Minnesota-Wisconsin areas with some overlap into Michigan. Th is allowed them to make application to the AKC for parent club status with Joseph Burkhart and Jack Shattuck being listed among the first o ffi cers. Th e charter was granted as the German Shorthaired Pointer Club of Amer- ica, Inc. Th eir charge was to define the true type of the breed of purebred dogs for which it was organized to promote and improve. Th eir first standard was adapted from the original German standard and with slight variation it was o ffi cially approved May of 1946. Th e articles and provision of the charter and constitution would allow for changes should that be necessary in the future. Th e GSPCA, Inc. underwent a revision in 1947, but the Minnesota club remained the parent club until 1953 when the AKC mandated the parent club became a separate organization. In 1962, the GSP- CA reorganized to its present structure. Th e first conformation standard approved in 1946 has undergone few changes with the most comprehensive in 1972 and again in 1992 to conform to the AKC format simi- lar to that of other AKC breed standards. ing Timm v. Altenau from Dr. Th ornton and in the later years, became synony- mous with the Moesgaard line. It is also noteworthy to mention Richard S. Johns, Ralph Parks and Bob Holcolmb as other post WWII importers of the breed. ing Timm v. Altenau from Dr. Th ornton and in the later years, became synony- mous with the Moesgaard line. It is also noteworthy to mention Richard S. Johns, Ralph Parks and Bob Holcolmb as other post WWII importers of the breed.

was rescued or survived. Breeder Gus- tav Machetanz barely managed to escape with a few dogs ahead of the approaching Russian army and resettle in West Ger- many. Th is is significant because his dog, Axel vom Wasserschling, proved to be an important post-war sire. During WWII the fascist government controlled hunting and the breeding of all hunting dogs with Hermann Goering the minister responsible for all matters relating to both. It is during this timeframe his edict that all of the clear white & liver dogs were to be destroyed because they did not blend with the woods like the solid liver and liver roans. Shortly after WWI, Dr. Charles R. Th ornton of Missoula, Montana saw an article with pictures in the National Sportsman about German Shorthair point- ers. After reading it several times he com- mented to his wife, “If those dogs don’t cost a million dollars, I am going to buy a pair,” which he did from Austrian breeder Edward Rindt with the bitch bred prior to shipping. Senta v Hohenbruck arrived after twenty-four days crated, but not the dog, having been killed in a car accident prior to was rescued or survived. Breeder Gus- tav Machetanz barely managed to escape with a few dogs ahead of the approaching Russian army and resettle in West Ger- many. Th is is significant because his dog, Axel vom Wasserschling, proved to be an important post-war sire. During WWII the fascist government controlled hunting and the breeding of all hunting dogs with Hermann Goering the minister responsible for all matters relating to both. It is during this timeframe his edict that all of the clear white & liver dogs were to be destroyed because they did not blend with the woods like the solid liver and liver roans. Shortly after WWI, Dr. Charles R. Th ornton of Missoula, Montana saw an article with pictures in the National Sportsman about German Shorthair point- ers. After reading it several times he com- mented to his wife, “If those dogs don’t cost a million dollars, I am going to buy a pair,” which he did from Austrian breeder Edward Rindt with the bitch bred prior to shipping. Senta v Hohenbruck arrived after twenty-four days crated, but not the dog, having been killed in a car accident prior to Shortly after WWI, Dr. Charles R. Th ornton of Missoula, Montana saw an article with pictures in the National Sportsman about German Shorthair point- ers. After reading it several times he com- mented to his wife, “If those dogs don’t cost a million dollars, I am going to buy a pair,” which he did from Austrian breeder Edward Rindt with the bitch bred prior to shipping. Senta v Hohenbruck arrived after twenty-four days crated, but not the dog, having been killed in a car accident prior to was rescued or survived. Breeder Gus- tav Machetanz barely managed to escape with a few dogs ahead of the approaching Russian army and resettle in West Ger- many. Th is is significant because his dog, Axel vom Wasserschling, proved to be an important post-war sire. During WWII the fascist government controlled hunting and the breeding of all hunting dogs with Hermann Goering the minister responsible for all matters relating to both. It is during this timeframe his edict that all of the clear white & liver dogs were to be destroyed because they did not blend with the woods like the solid liver and liver roans.

“THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB OFFICIALLY RECOGNIZED THE BREED IN 1935 AnD bY 1938 THe SHORTHAIR wAS gAInIng bReeD STRengTH In THe mInneSOTA-wISCOnSIn AReAS wITH SOme OveR lAP InTO mICHIgAn.”

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GSP-King-3.indd 3 GSP-King-3.indd 3

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shipping. On July 4, 1925 she whelped sev- en pups with one lost to pneumonia. Th e

ing Timm v. Altenau from Dr. Th ornton and in the later years, became synony-

GSP-King-3.indd 3

10/3/14 10:04 AM

JUDGING THE German Shorthaired Pointer

by Patte tituS, debbie KinG & ChriSty FeatherSton German Shorthaired Pointer Club of America

J udging the GSP should be simple because the breed is not extreme and does not place emphasis on one or two specific attributes. It is first and foremost an athletic, hard work- ing gun dog and should be considered as such when its structure and movement are being evaluated. A medium sized breed, the Shorthair should be balanced front and rear with every aspect of its structure care- fully thought out for it to do the multiple jobs for which it was developed. Temperament is of utmost importance for a dog to work well with people and oth- er dogs. Th ey should exhibit confidence, intelligence and a willingness to please. In the field, they should show a keen enthusi- asm for work, with assertive, bold and for- ward movement. Confident dogs will not exhibit nervousness, tucked tails or be shy. In the show ring, look for the confident dog moving with a purpose. Fault finding when judging potential breeding stock is non-productive both in the ring and in the whelping box; rather, look for the positives, i.e. breed type and soundness when moving. As you view the whole dog, look for size, balance and pro- portion. Is the bone in proportion, does the headpiece fit and correct for the dog’s sex? Note length of neck and legs in pro- portion to the body. Does it have a short firm back, correct tail set, tight feet, well let down hocks and is the dog in good condition? Underline and top line should not be parallel even on the dog that is slightly longer than tall. Th ere should be a slight slope from the base of the tail up to the withers and the coat should feel harsh to hand. Th e Head section of the Standard con- tains a lot of information, but the GSP is not a “head” breed, rather the attributes in this section are to produce a functional head with distinctive breed type. You are not looking for planes or boxes, descriptive terms in other sporting breed standards. Th e stop a ff ect is created by eyebrow place- ment and not within the bone structure.

Sophia flying around the agility course.

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in length and appropriately muscled on both the inside and out. Th e hock should be well let down, neither turning in or out while the dog is standing or moving. As the dog comes up to speed it is desired to single track. Th e tail is an extension of the spine and used as rudder for balance on both land and in the water while the dog works. Tails set too high or low because of a dropped o ff croup will not move e ffi ciently and tire sooner. Th e length of the tail is man made and should not factor into the overall eval- uation of the dog’s conformation. “Viewed From the Front one Should be able to See DEPTH OF CHEST WITH SLIGHT RIB SPRING.”

below indicate the short back standing over a lot of ground. Dogs with balanced front and rear angles will have a smooth ground-cover- ing stride with little e ff ort expended, thus allowing it to work longer while holding a firm top line. One should see extension from the shoulder, not lifting at the elbow or hackney at the pastern. Th e rear leg should extend behind, but rear feet kicking up and the hock lifting in a piston motion creating a bicycle or paddlewheel motion out behind the body provide very little for- ward propulsion. Upright blades and short

upper arms restrict forward reach and if set to far forward on the ribcage limit the dogs’ ability to balance and transfer weight e ffi ciently while moving. Viewed from the front, one should be able to see depth of chest with slight rib spring. Th e legs should be parallel with the elbows back under the dog, they should not appear to originate from the same place nor should the elbows “wing” out away from the body. As the dog moves, one should see clean forward movement. Viewed from behind, the upper thigh and second thigh should be approximate

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“THE NOSE SHOULD BE LARGE, DARK BROWN AND BROAD, aS iF looKinG at the end oF a double barrel ShotGun.”

dark iris color that will remain as they age into their adult years. Th e nose should be large, dark brown and broad, as if looking at the end of a double barrel shotgun. Th e correct bite is scissor with molars properly intermeshing but teeth aren’t counted. Extreme over or undershot is a DQ and a muzzle that is too short or is lacking depth will a ff ect a dog’s ability to pick up and carry game over distance. Th e neck tapers at the nape and widens slightly as it blends into the shoulder. Th ere should be su ffi cient length of neck for the dog to pick up and retrieve game but not so long it will tire over distance. Does the shoulder blade lay back and on the rib cage blending smoothly? Th e upper arm should

be long, returning back in a compliment angle placing elbows in a support posi- tion along side the rib cage. Th e area just behind the elbow will be slightly smaller in circumference than a hand’s width back allowing the elbow to work and stay under the dog for balance during movement. Th e pro-sternum should have proper fill in older dogs. Note depth of chest, at least to the elbow and adequate length of ribcage with slight spring not width thus allowing adequate heart and lung func- tion. Th e back is short and strong with a perceivable slope from the withers to the base of the tail and a perceivable rise from the bottom of the chest up and into the tuck up. Neither is exaggerated, but some dogs with level top lines or rears higher

than their withers may be stacked with the rear quarter stretched well out behind to give the impression of a sloping top line. Th e Standard allows for square or slightly longer than tall dog, the latter does not mean a long bodied dog with short legs. A slightly longer than tall dog will still be in proportion, whereas the one with a long body with short legs will not. Th e term short back standing over a lot of ground is based on a well laid back shoul- der blade and a complimentary forward tilt of the sacrum (pelvis) with forequar- ter angles matching hindquarter angles. Imagine a trapezoid superimposed on the side of the dog with the sidelines running through the middle of the shoulder blade and pelvis. Th e parallel lines above and

“THE NECK TAPERS AT THE NAPE

and widenS SliGhtly aS it blendS into the Shoulder.”

dual Champion and national Field trial Champion liebmeister roll tide—only the 8th dog in history to have this title. he is also the winner of the american Kennel Club Pointing breed Gun dog Championship (retrieving stake) in april 1998.

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all of the German Shorthaired Pointer pictures on this page are best of Show winners.

A GSP’s feet should be tight with suf- ficient arch in the toes, not flat or splayed, they may be round or spoon shaped and webbed. Th ere should be good depth of pad to cushion and protect while working long hours, over rough terrain or in areas known for sand burrs, thorny brush and rocky soil. Th eir nails are heavy and tough and should not be guillotined back to the end of the toe. Nails should be trimmed to a length that allows the foot traction with- out slipping but not so long as to cause the toes to turn sideways or the feet to spread. Th ere is no preference for a specific coat pattern or head marking, while you may prefer one as opposed to another, please do not let that factor into your decision when evaluating structure and e ffi cient movement. Do keep in mind light comes forward and dark recedes. You may have two dogs and or bitches with the same exact structure that may not appear that way because of their coat pattern or head marking. Th is is why it is important to

put your hands on the dogs. Th e liver color may vary from very dark like bitter- sweet chocolate to lighter shades. Th e liver GSP is genetically “bb.” It is important to understand regardless of darkness of color, the nose pigment will be liver and there are no black hairs intermingled with the liver color to make the ticked and roan areas look darker. Th e white Piebald and extreme white Piebald coat pattern has been in the breed since the very first dog Hecktor I was reg- istered in the German Studbook in 1879. Judges should view dogs with this coat pat- tern no di ff erent than their solid liver, liver patched, roan or ticked counterparts. Judge the total package do not get caught up with a personal color or coat pattern preference. Let movement be the deciding factor if two dogs are very close in positive attributes to the Breed Standard. Always keep in mind this is a hard working gun dog bred for multiple purposes. Type and soundness should always be foremost.

“THERE IS NO PREFERENCE For a SPeCiFiC Coat Pattern or head marKinG...”

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THE HALLMARKS OF THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

BY MAXINE D. MOINIER GSPCA JUDGES EDUCATION COORDINATOR T o convey to judges and dog fanciers the “Hallmarks” of the German Shorthaired Pointer (GSP), over 40 German Shorthaired Pointer Club of America breed mentors, breeders, and judges were asked to share their thoughts on a few questions. Respondents had from 25 years to over 50 years of experience in the breed. In their responses to the questions, a theme emerged: These breed experts would like judges and breeders to be reminded that, as with other breeds, the GSP has unique Hallmarks that clearly identify it as a GSP versus a Weimaraner, versus a Vizsla, versus a Pointer. These short-coated Sporting breeds do have traits in common; however, they are very different breeds and should be judged as such. Silhouettes of these four breeds are included here to help demonstrate the breed differences.

POINTER

WEIMARANER

GSP

VIZSLA

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THE HALLMARKS OF THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

COLLAGE OF ALL-TIME FAVORITE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTERS

Please enjoy the sum of the observations from the GSPCA breed experts who were polled: 1) How would you describe the Hallmarks of the GSP breed to a judge? • A medium-sized, aristocratic, balanced dog with a head proportionate to the body, showing strength and depth, and with compact, round, tight feet. Balanced, smooth reach; with strong drive to cover plenty of ground with little effort. • Judges should be focusing on sound structure and a bal- anced, typey silhouette—first and foremost, the whole picture; proved by a ground-covering, fluid trot. • The GSP is a short-backed dog that should be more square than long. • An aristocratic and athletic dog that is intelligent, with an expression reflecting intelligence and kindness. • A GSP is medium in size, square or slightly off-square in outline, with a docked tail, and a short, thick coat that is liver or liver and white in color. • The most obvious would be the colors (liver or liver and white) and a short, hard or “tough to the touch” coat. Those who developed the GSP at some point must have decided that liver (or liver and white) was one of the Hallmarks that set the breed apart visually from the other “chicken dogs” being used in Germany. They eliminated all other colors through selective breeding. They also understood that a tough coat would shed water, dirt, and briars. • Although GSPs are not considered a “Head Breed,” the heads are distinct from other gundogs. The head should be clean cut and in proportion to the dog's body. The eyes

should be almond-shaped and never round, and the defini- tive eyebrow should give the dog a pleasing, intelligent, and very approachable expression. There should never be a pronounced stop as in the (English) Pointer, but a gradual rise—never a stop. The rise is somewhat more pronounced in dogs than in the bitches. The ear set should be slightly above the eye level. The length of ear and the way it lies should never give the impression of a hound-like appearance, and it should enhance the expression. The muzzle should be deep and have a sufficient underjaw to enable the dog to perform in water and on land when carrying a bird as large as a goose, pheasant or chukar. • Capable, functional, intelligent, all-purpose gundog. Short- backed, aristocratic, regal. Giving the impression, imme- diately, that they can do the job that they were bred to do. Dark almond eyes, proper angulation to allow the smooth, effortless movement. SOUND movement. This is supposed to be a multi-functional breed; they need to be able to move soundly and effortlessly. Sound, solid temperament. • In my opinion, the primary Hallmark of the GSP is its coat texture. Others that I consider Hallmarks: Nose large, broad; nostrils well open (double barrel shotgun) and, viewed in profile, the tip (rhinarium) slopes slightly down- ward. (This is not a Roman nose, which would begin in the bone structure prior to the nose leather.) Feet are tight, with strong nails and thick/hard pads. • Overall symmetry and power. A sturdily-built, medium- sized hunting dog with strong, balanced angulation to cover ground without wasted effort.

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THE HALLMARKS OF THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

FROM A BREEDER’S PERSPECTIVE: 2a) What should judges be rewarding in the show ring? • A MEDIUM-sized, balanced dog that moves smoothly with balanced reach and drive. Although not a “head breed,” the proportion and strength of the head is very important for function. Tight, compact, round feet. • Judges should be focusing on sound structure and a bal- anced, typey silhouette—first and foremost, the whole picture; proved by a ground-covering fluid trot. • Sound, solid movement, solid temperament, and correct structure that includes proper angles and strong, solid toplines. Proper front and rear angles. Regal in appearance. • Judges should be rewarding dogs that are sturdily built to do a full day’s hunting; those with the balance and symmetry to move effortlessly. This comes from an evenly-matched sloping front and well-turned rear, with a strong back to support both. Also, rib spring and rib depth are needed for endurance. 2b) What are the judges missing when judging this breed? • Besides the need for correct angulation, forechest, depth of chest, and movement, judges are missing that the best dog might be the one that DOES NOT look like all the others in color, size, and/or shape. Inferior dogs might be in the majority at a show, but rewarding them in favor of “consis- tency in judging” is not in the best interest of the breed. • There are nuances of each of the breeds that are specific to each. They are not interchangeable, with just a different coat color. Also, they are missing the round eyes, poor condition- ing, slab-sidedness and [incorrect] type. Type in a GSP is

dramatically different from an (English) Pointer, Vizsla or Weimaraner. • MEDIUM SIZE, proper balanced movement, correct head type with strong UNDERJAW, compact tight feet. Too many mediocre, generic dogs instead of aristocratic. • An aristocratic, balanced-moving dog with a beautiful head (including a correct underjaw) and tight, compact, round/ spoon feet. • Too many judges are rewarding extreme side gait; over- reaching fronts due to over-angulated rears. Dogs that are long and low. They misunderstand “with a short back, standing over plenty of ground.” Please reward bitches that are the correct size of 21 to 23 inches. • Proper shoulder layback with good length of upper arm, which allows for reach. A flashy mover may not be as correct as an easy-going, efficient mover that would function well in the field. A dog with a longer back may be flashy in side gait, but is not clean on the down and back. • Many judges IMO are willing to put up dogs above standard height, which is to be severely faulted. We are also witness- ing ponderous dogs being awarded that could never hold up long-term in the field. Many also judge more on the stack than on movement. While hunting, GSPs are expected to hold a point for long periods of time; however, the majority of their time in the field is [spent] moving. An oversized, unbalanced dog has a much harder time of being able to hunt all day long, let alone for most of its life. • Dogs/bitches a lot longer than tall. When this was added to the standard in 1992, dogs/bitches were measured, and

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THE HALLMARKS OF THE GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

Please judge our dogs on the move. When in doubt, move them again!

longer than tall was considered to be 5 percent, but not longer than 10 percent longer than height at the withers… described as “slightly off square.” Thus, if a dog is 23 inches at the withers, to be considered slightly longer than tall (measuring from the forechest to the rearmost projection of the rump), the length per the standard would be 25.3 inches long at the max of 10 percent, and 24.2 if using the minimum of 5 percent. 2c) What would you like to see judges reward in the show ring? • The Standard, correct movement, soundness, and type. • An aristocratic, balanced-moving dog with a beautiful head (including a correct underjaw) and tight, compact, round/ spoon feet. • Dogs and bitches that are the correct size, clean and efficient movement, and dogs that are more square than long. • A good, honest Shorthair that is correct to the standard in all areas. These dogs/bitches are often overlooked because they aren’t flashy. • Correct angulation (sloping shoulders and strong rears) should be rewarded. Equally straight front and rear angula- tion may have symmetry, but they do not provide the power- ful, ground-covering gait needed for high-performance as a hunting dog. The proper front and the depth of chest needed for endurance. Correctly carried tails, without excessive curl, should also be rewarded. • I would love to see judges who have a good understanding of what GSPs are expected to do in the field. Always awarding good breeding stock, keeping type, balance, movement, and size in mind, not just a “showman” or a well-presented dog.

In summary, when judging our breed, please envision the dis- tinct Hallmarks that identify the GSP: The German Shorthaired Pointer is a versatile hunter—an all- purpose gun dog capable of high performance in field and water, which should be reflected in the show ring. The GSP should give the impres- sion of an aristocratic, well balanced, symmetrical animal with confor- mation indicating power, endurance and agility with a look of intel- ligence and animation. The GSP is a “short backed” hunter standing over plenty of ground. GSPs are a medium-sized, square or “slightly” longer than tall dog. It is interesting to note that the “or slightly longer than” was added to the standard in the ‘90s. Symmetry and field quality are most essential in this breed. A dog in field condition is not to be penalized; however, overly fat or poorly muscled dogs are to be penalized. A dog that is well-balanced in all points is preferable to one with outstanding good qualities and defects. Grace of out- line, clean-cut head, sloping shoulders, deep chest, powerful back, strong quarters, good bone composition, adequate muscle, well- carried tail, and taut coat produce the look of nobility and indicate a heritage of purposefully conducted breeding. Further evidence of this heritage is movement, which is balanced, alertly coordinated, and without wasted motion. Thank you to all the breed mentors, breeders, and judges who contributed to this article.

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Q&A: German Shorthaired Pointer

MAUREEN DAY I currently live on Long Island, NY but will be relocating to Raleigh, NC shortly. I also recently retired from a major transportation agency in New York City, which is a wonder- ful feeling. There is so much to do outside of work and I now have more time to devote to my “loves.” I hesitate to say that I have been “involved in dogs” most of my life, but my family was not. So from the 1970s on I have been involved in breed- ing, showing in conformation and I dabbled in field trialing for a bit. I have been judging and enjoying the learning facet of dogs for about 15 years. KAREN NAUER I live in Colorado Springs, CO. I am a Clinical Consultant (RN with a MBA) with Cigna. I’ve been in the dog world for more years than I care to admit, my mother started showing Bedlington Terriers before I was born. My dad wanted a hunt- ing dog and purchased our first GSP in 1963. I loved showing GSPs—no more hours of grooming! I started judging in 2003. WILLIAM R. RUSSELL I live in Edgewood, Washington, a little south of Seattle, Washington. I am retired, but I bowl 3 days a week and stay busy with Kennel Clubs and I travel a lot. I have been show- ing dogs since 1959 and judging for around 40 years. We have had and did show Beagles, Basset Hounds, German Shep- herds, Papillons, Maltese and Brussels Griffons. I have been in the Marine Corps and was an electrician before I retired. We had 4 children and I still bowl with 2 of them. I have 12 grandchildren.

the elegant but powerful look of a versatile hunting dog that could work all day in the field. KN: Short backed, correct gait and athletic condition. 3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? MD: Excessive speed when gaiting. This excessive speed is distorting the smooth and effortless gait. The dog is either charging, strung up or out of control. Also, I have noticed lately that many exhibitors are overstretching the rear. This really changes that silhouette. KN: Too long in the loin and exaggerated rear angles. WR: Some dogs are getting too long of a body. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? MD: I think they are getting better and I am seeing some really nice dogs. Of course this depends on the part of the country where you are judging. KN: Many breeders have worked hard to maintain correct type and movement in our breed. We are lucky because so many people in our breed show in conformation and do performance in the field and other events keeping structure in mind for success in all venues. I have loved dogs from years past and dogs being shown today. WR: I think they are about the same. We had a few great dogs then and a few great dogs now. 5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? MD: I think some new judges don’t get the versatility and hunting tasks that this breed was bred for and should be able to do. When I field trialed years ago, I watched this breed keep up with the Pointer and several other breeds that are major contenders in that arena. The GSP has to have the stamina and correct body type to do that job. KN: Short backed standing over a lot of ground, judges and exhibitors interpret this to be long in the loin instead of athletic presence. WR: The overall balance is very important. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share? MD: This breed should always have a keen, alert, focused attitude. To me that look is just the icing on a well- balanced, properly proportioned German Shorthaired Pointer. I always enjoy judging this breed. KN: GSPs need to have good health, conditioning and tem- perament to be successful in all events as well as being a great family dog. WR: I love to judge the GSP. Most of the people who show this breed have them well trained and ready to work.

1. Describe the breed in three words. MD: Medium size, well-balanced and elegant.

KN: Versatile, intelligent and athletic. WR: Balance, power and animation.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? MD: My must haves are short backed, good muscle tone and proper proportions with good substance as well as correct angles that produce the correct movement. Silhouette on first impression always includes the short backed, but standing over plenty of ground, as described in the standard. Along with proper neck length and fit into shoulders, this gives you that lovely outline. These “must haves,” along with the ease of movement, provide

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