Showsight November 2018

SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9.30.18

LAGOTTO ROMAGNOLO

2018 DPCA Top 20 Competition

Winner People’s Choice

Best of Breed Doberman Pincher Club of America Regional.

Thank you Judge Ms. Linda Krukar

Best in Show

Thank you Judge Dr. Robert D. Smith

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OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

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BULLDOG

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER Thank You from Our Family to Yours As you make plans to gather with family and friends this Thanks- giving, I’d like to extend my warmest wishes to you and your loved ones and give thanks for your continued support. The Showsight family has much for which we are grateful. The close of 2018 marks the end of our 26th year in publication, and this achievement is a credit to our team who has worked tire- lessly to make our publication the best in the industry. Year af- ter year, Showsight has gotten better because we continuously challenge the possibilities of who we are and what we can do. This year, we’ve welcomed many new talented team members whose contributions have helped us to push the boundaries even further. I am extremely proud of the exceptional work that we have ac- complished in 2018. Most notably, we’ve published more than 1,300 original pages of editorial, 10,000+ social media posts, conducted over 300 interviews, received more than 2,500 indus- try survey responses and brought you an excess of 3,000 pages of memorable advertising.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com

Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

Pausing to look back, it’s been a great year for Showsight .

I’d like to offer my sincerest appreciation to our clients and read- ers, hardworking staff and talented contributors for making our success possible. I couldn’t be more thankful. Nor could I be more excited about the plans we have for next year and for the opportunity to continue to serve ALL OF YOU. May you and your family enjoy the happiest of holidays and the very best at the year-end shows. See you at a show site near you!

Yours Sincerely,

ADVERTISING

AJ ARAPOVIC, FOUNDER/OWNER

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com, 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com, 201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com, 512 541 8128

ARAMEDIA GROUP aj@aramediagrp.com 512-541-8128 www.aramediagrp.com

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Post- age paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opin- ions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submit- ted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

To see more of ShowSight, please visit our website at showsightmagazine.com FOLLOW US AT instagram.com/showsight_dogshow facebook.com/ShowSight/ To see our other brands and services, please visit aramediagrp.com

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table of CONTENTS

14 SHOWSIGHT

250 254 268 272 275 287 295 299 309 321 332 338 341 346 348

SMOKE GETS IN THEIR EYES Dr. C. David McLaughlin

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

40 PRE-COLOMBIAN CANINES Dan Sayers

SURVEY SAYS Does your breed’s standard need to change? If so, how?

70 THE SEVEN SECRETS OF SHOW SUCCESS Michael and Cathy Dugan

FALLING LEAVES CLUSTER CANDIDS Photos by Joseph Cirincione

88 ON THE LINE BJ Andrews

BECOMING Jacquelyn Fogel

94 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr

MONTGOMERY COUNTY KENNEL CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jovana Danilovic

122 SHOWSIGHT INTERVIEWS Allan Reznik

THE GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG Various Guest Experts

142 SAFARI PET EXPO Kathy Caton-Musto

THE BEDLINGTON TERRIER Various Guest Experts

146 MORE ON FRONTS, ANGLES AND LANDMARKS Michelle Scott

THE LAGOTTO ROMAGNOLO Various Guest Experts

151 COLORADO LOVIN’

THE MINIATURE PINSCHER Various Guest Experts

LOTS OF LOVE AT THE 2018 RRCUS NATIONAL SPECIALTY Theresa M. Lyons

154 RATTAIL DAYS INTERNATIONAL Dan Sayers 170 HATBORO DOG CLUB CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards

THE POODLE Various Guest Experts

THE RUSSELL TERRIER Various Guest Experts

202 AKC NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Dennis Sprung

THE IRISH TERRIER Various Guest Experts

230 THE WESTMINSTER KENNEL 236 WESTERN DOGGIE ROUNDUP CANDIDS Photos by Sharon Carvalho 246 EUROPEAN DOG SHOW WARSCHAU 2018 Karl Donvil

THE BLOODHOUND Various Guest Experts

CLUB ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH CANINE DNA INNOVATOR EMBARK

COMING ATTRACTIONS

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! CONTACT US: 512.686.3466 | info@aramediagrp.com | subscriptions@aramediagrp.com | www.showsightmagazine.com

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I N T R O D U C I N G

TIMEB MB PUFF

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO BRED & OWNED BY DARYL MARTIN

o w n e r s o f 2 0 1 7 ’ s # 1 M A L T E S E

HIS HERITAGE OF BEST IN SHOW AND NATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNERS THROUGHOUT HIS LINEBRED PEDIGREE REFLECT HIS BEAUTY AND QUALITY.

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MALTESE

BL WING UP

T O Y G R O U P

SHOWN WINNING BEST OF WINNERS AND BEST BRED BY EXHIBITOR AT THE AMERICAN MALTESE REGIONAL DURING THE NATIONAL UNDER BRAD JENKINS.

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THE RED RUSSIAN IS THE NEW BLACK

GCHB ALFA LAVAL AYRON DOG

O W N E D B Y ROY & JOANN KUSUMOTO P R E S E N T E D &

S P O I L E D B Y DARYL MARTIN B R E D B Y TANYA ZHUKOVSKAYA

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CHINESE CRESTED

A TOP RANKED CHINESE CRESTED *

S H O W N C A S U A L LY I N 2 0 1 8

MAKING A STATEMENT IN THE TOY GROUP WITH OVER A DOZEN GROUP PLACEMENTS RITA HOLLOWAY • DR. WANDA SPEDIACCI • DELORES BURKHOLDER ROBERT HUTTON • LARRY ABBOTT • VICKI ABBOTT • JOHN CONSTITINE STEVE HAYDEN • MELINDA LYONS • DENNY MOUNCE • DR. STEVE KEATING

* A L L S Y S T E M S A S O F 9 / 3 0 / 1 8

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Giving Thanks FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III

E ACH N OVEMBER , EVEN IN AN ELECTION YEAR , we wax nostalgic and take stock of the good things in our lives. Those of us in the dog world have an embarrassment of such riches, for we’re surrounded by wonderful people, involved in the world’s best sport, and of course dogs occupy almost all of our minds and every millimeter of our hearts. I do, though, wish I could remember to be this thank- ful every single day. Sometimes I do. Today’s one of those days. In the past few months I’ve had more than my share of enjoyable experiences and gotten to spend time with friends of long-standing and some brand-new. I am pictured with the lovely Mimi Eikov Winkler, Bichon breeder and head of Hospitality for Westchester weekend. I’ve been a fan of this lady for many years and it was great to have another chance to tell her so. More about this trip and several others next month but right now I want to say thank you, Mimi, for all your hard work. The amount of work that goes into the AKC National Champi- onshp boggles the mind, yet each year it gets better and bigger. The minds behind it see their way clear to providing us with an in- credible array of offerings during the weeklong celebration in Or- lando. Shortly after reading this—or perhaps during—you’ll be either ringside admiring the stiff competition in Otown or perhaps viewing it on a device so you don’t feel left out. I can’t stand that feeling so I always go; I’ve attended every event so far and don’t plan to miss any in the future. Again this year ShowSight ’s a sponsor of the Judges’ Luncheon and the Meet the Breeds® Best Booth con- test which I’m proud to chair yet again. Come to our booth, or look for us around the site; we plan to be there in full force and with bells (sleigh bells?) on. Well, wedged in between Thanksgiving and the end of the year holidays, ANC is truly in a festive season. I’m dedicating my holiday season to a woman who never failed to make her fellow human beings feel good. I flew to Kansas City to celebrate the life of a truly special lady, one that I have been proud to know and love for forty years: Marilyn E. Doll, my sister- in-law by marriage and a huge part of my life. Her death in August threw us all into the abyss, but that day we held hands and clung to each other as the memories flooded in and made us laugh, smile, and of course cry. Being with this group of people is always a pleasure for me, even when gathered in pain, because the Doll fam- ily is comprised of the most caring, kind individuals one can imag- ine. I have loved them all since day one, from Duane's generation down to the youngest to join the ranks. I felt strongly that Marilyn belonged in ShowSight . She and her late husband, Carroll, were two of our strongest supporters and biggest cheerleaders, especially in the early days when we strug- gled to get our publishing company off the ground. And Marilyn never failed to read this page, which she called my “letter,” and often wrote to react to its contents. Driving from the cemetery to the church for the service, I pulled to the side, hopped out, and shot the background photo that appears here because the vibrant, brilliant color of the foliage was an antidote to the dreary, dark day. Marilyn could have that effect, too. There is much more I could say about this great lady but right now I'm emotionally tapped out. Let me just say this. Marilyn spent every day of her life making our world a little brighter and better and more beautiful for the rest of us; I like to think that on her special day, Mother Nature did the same for Marilyn. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving Holiday. Until December, please remember: ShowSight Magazine wishes you all the Best!

Mimi Winkler and the editor Here’s wishing everyone best of luck at the final shows of the year, and a truly wonderful Holiday Season.

Marilyn E Doll

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Siba S TON E RU N A F T E R NOON T E A G R A N D C H A M P I O N MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNER SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW WINNER SPECIALTY BEST OF BREED WINNER

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA Assisted by Casey Bair

Thank you Judges | Group First | Mr. Kenneth Buxton, Mrs. Thora P. Brown and Mr. James Frederiksen | Best in Show | Mr. Alfred F. Ferruggiaro

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POODLE (STANDARD)

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PUG

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF9/30/18

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BRIARD

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MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW

Number One MALTESE DOG ALL BREED * Number One MALTESE NOHS F R 2018 ** Number Eleven ALL BREEDS NOHS FOR 2018 **

Always shaken, not stirred MALTESE

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Harry

AWARDED ANOTHER BEST IN SHOW SPECIALTY

BISS GCHB SEABREEZE THAT ONE PARTICULAR HARBOR

Many thanks to all the judges who recognize Harry’s quality

B R E D , OWN E D A N D H A N D L E D B Y S A N DY B I NGH AM - P O RT E R *ShowSight all breed stats as of 9/30/18 **AKC NOHS stats as of 10/12/18

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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BOXER

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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RETRIEVER (FLAT-COATED)

*

**

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 9/30/18 **ShowSight breed stats as of 9/30/18

B R E E D * *SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18 #5

#5 A K C G C H ** **AKC GCH STATS AS OF 9/30/18

C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S @ YA H O O . C O M

©TEDDY’S PIC

©TEDDY’S PIC

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S P E C I A L T Y BEST I N SHOW

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M I S S E V E L Y N G R E G O R Y

G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H E D E L W E I S S A L I T T L E F R E A K Y D E A K Y

O W N E D B Y T R A C E Y M A I G N E , H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S | B R E D & H A N D L E D B Y K A T H Y K N O L E S

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CHINESE SHAR-PEI, BORZOI

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SHIH TZU

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*SHOWSIGHTALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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CHIHUAHUA (SMOOTH COAT)

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*

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG

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*

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9.30.18

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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Pre-Colombian Canines

America’s First Dogs Were Working Partners BY DAN SAYERS, Illustrations courtesy A History of Dogs in the Early Americas by Marion Schwartz

L ong before C o l u m - bus sailed the ocean blue, the Americas were populated with ancient civilizations that made great use of the domesticated dog. When Europeans first made contact with the “Indians,” dogs had already been living in and around human set- tlements in the West- ern Hemisphere for roughly 25,000 years.

stories told to European explorers that represents a rich oral history that mythologized the relationship that existed between people and dogs in the New World. The tales below are part of a collection assembled by Mar- ion Schwartz in her book, A History of Dogs in the Early Americas , published in 1997 by Yale University Press. ARCTIC ORIGINALS Few of the indigenous peoples’ dogs survive to this day. Of those that do, most originated in the Far North (Alaskan Mala- mute, Canadian Eskimo Dog) or in Central and South America (Xoloitzcuintli, Peruvian Inca Orchid.) The dogs of the Arctic were considerably larger and stronger than those in subarctic regions. Their size and grit served the people of the North well through the ability to haul personal possessions and prey animals. “In pre-contact America, dogs carried loads by pulling a sledge or sled, wearing packs on their backs, or pull- ing a travois,” writes Schwartz. During winter months, the sledge was employed over much of the arctic. However, the author notes that throughout the summer season, the peoples of the Arctic used their dogs strictly as pack animals, carrying items such as tents, lumber and kettles. Schwartz quotes early explorer Samuel Hearne who recorded the following observa- tions during his 1772 expedition. “Dogs, in doing so, lessened the women’s load by carrying ‘these articles only,’ which are always lashed onto their [the dogs’] backs, much after the same manner as packs are, or used formerly to be, on pack horses.” Earlier French explorers, including Pierre La Véren- drye and Etienne de Bourgmont, also made note of how the

From the Arctic Circle to the Tierra del Fuego archipel- ago, dogs were assisting human communities in ways that seem perfectly suited to the modern idea of Working and Utility dogs. Domestic canines were used by some nations to pull heavy loads and by others to act as guards. Many were natural playmates and protectors of children. Oth- ers were natural retrievers. Because dogs were understood to share a kinship with wolves and other wild canids, they were frequently viewed as a living connection between wild nature and human culture. Unfortunately, a writ- ten record of Native American dogs is largely absent from the history books. What does survive is a collection of

The Dene people of the northern boreal forest shared a special bond with their parti-colored Hare Indian Dogs.

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SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

Pre-Colombian Canines: America’s First Dogs...

BY DAN SAYERS continued

Hauling seals in winter was one of the duties of the Inuit dogs in the Arctic North.

The dogs of the Assiniboin people pursued wounded Bison on the open prairie.

work of hauling supplies was the joint responsibility of both women and dogs. “They had no horses, and all their pos- sessions were loaded on dog travois and on the backs of women,” recorded de Bourgmont. Together, this labor force moved provisions over great distances in the harshest of climates and made life possible above the Arctic Circle. SOUTHERN MIGRATION “In about A.D. 800, a group of Ast- hapaskan speakers migrated from the western subarctic to the Southern Plains,” notes Schwartz of the peoples who brought backpacking dogs with them on their journey south. As stated by the author, the archaeological record indicates that only small dogs were present in the Southwest prior to this time period. According to Schwartz, “This evidence confirms that the north- erners brought their working dogs with them.” The immigrants also brought along their cultural and linguistic tra- ditions that helped to develop new nations such as the Navaho and the Apache. “In 1599 a Spaniard named Zaldivar witnessed the nomads, prob- ably Apache, with medium-sized shaggy dogs,” writes Schwartz of the 17th cen- tury chronicler. “They drive great trains of them,” the European recorded of the native peoples’ penchant for using dogs to carry supplies. “Each, girt ‘round its breast and haunches, carrying a load of flour at least one hundred pounds, travels as fast as his master.” Schwartz suggests that in all likelihood, this kind of weight was typically dragged by the dogs rather than carried. Such heavy loads would have required dogs bigger and stronger than those found in cen- tral North America. “Early travelers on the Great Plains frequently remarked on the resemblance between native

possessing “straight wide faces, heavy, but not short legs and ears that stood erect like those of a coyote… and their tails curved upward somewhat at the end, not like a coyote’s which lies straight.” By the time this particular account was written, dogs imported from Europe had further hybridized the local dogs and wolf-dog hybrids. This interbreeding of Old and New World canines provided new uses for the domesticated dogs of North America. DIVERSITY IN CALIFORNIA “At the time of contact, California was inhabited by people of diverse cul- tural and linguistic origin living side- by-side but maintaining separate ways of life,” Schwartz writes of the distinct cultures of the West Coast’s original human inhabitants. Perhaps not sur- prisingly, the role of the dog varied considerably among local communities. “Apparently, dogs were rare or absent in the area around San Francisco Bay,” the author notes. “Where present, dogs often received special treatment, being buried ‘like persons,’ given dog houses, and allowed to reside with owners.” Many of the dogs discovered in Cali- fornia were described by one Yurok source as “collie-sized, spotted black and white, with erect ears and no bark.” As noted by Schwartz, “They were imported from the North in small num- bers before European settlement.” Small dogs were also common in California. These are recorded as having been use- ful for catching squirrels and tracking rabbits to their burrow. The larger dogs were used to hunt fox. According to the author, not every group of people used dogs for hunting. In fact, a few communities used them as a source of food. “The southern Yokut raised dogs primarily for that purpose, considering

dogs and coyotes and wolves,” notes the author. “It appears that on the Plains, to a much greater degree than else- where, native dogs received frequent influxes of wolf blood—with or with- out the connivance of people.” These hybrid dogs were likely better suited to pursue the herds of elk and bison that were able to withstand the region’s extremely hot summers and threaten- ingly cold winters. INCREASED CROSSBREEDING Among the first Europeans to set foot in the New World, fur trappers and market hunters provided raw material for the domestic and overseas markets. These men worked the waterways of the Great Lakes and their tributaries where they became familiar with the dogs entrusted to the care of local wom- en. In her book, Schwartz shares a story told to ethnographer Gilbert Wilson by a Hidatsa woman. “From her story a pic- ture emerges of a well-trained work ani- mal highly valued by society as a whole and by women in particular,” the author shares. Through the telling of her story, Buffalo-Bird-Woman reveals that it was the job of women to see that their dogs were trained, fed and relieved. As retold in Schwartz’s book, “To produce good working dogs, Hidatsa women would select from a given litter three or four of the largest puppies. The rest would be killed to keep the bitch in good con- dition. Most male dogs were castrated.” The author notes that the women spent roughly four days training a dog to pull a travois by gradually increasing the load. “Four dogs were enough for the work required, and animals too old or too young to work were also kept in the lodge,” she writes. Various 19th- century reports describe these dogs as

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PEKINGESE

Pre-Colombian Canines: America’s First Dogs...

BY DAN SAYERS continued

dog meat a ‘special dainty.’” However, this was not at all a common practice among the area’s people. According to the author, “The northern Yokut, who felt that dogs possessed immortal souls, viewed the southern Yokut dog-eating habit with distaste.” A GENUINE PUREBRED A dog from the coastal Pacific North- west may likely have been the only genuine “purebred” dog bred in pre- contact North America. The extinct Salish Wool Dog was intentionally bred for its fur that was spun into yarn and woven into blankets. This dog’s unique role in society —that of a genuine “pet” —was a precursor of things to come. As Schwartz explains, “The Pacific North- west, with its plentiful supply of salmon and timber, provided its residents with riches unparalleled in other hunter- gatherer societies. Wealth, warfare, and elaborate rituals characterized the cul- tures of this area.” Among these rituals was a practice among the Salish people to segregate their small wool dogs from the common “village” dogs in order to prevent the kind of cross-breeding that was inevitable everywhere else on the continent. “These special dogs, with either thick white woolly hair or a long brownish-black coat, were sheared twice a year and kept on islands to pre- vent interbreeding with hunting dogs,” writes Schwartz. “Each day women would paddle out to the dogs’ islands with food and water.” During the winter months, the small dogs were brought into the communities’ large plank hous- es where they became companions to the women who spun their coats into yarn. “To produce the blankets, women combined sheared dog hair with moun- tain goat wool, adding goose down and the fluff of the fireweed plant, and then rubbed the fibers with white clay,” according to Schwartz who indicates that a woman’s wealth was counted in the number of dogs she owned. When Captain George Vancouver charted the region in 1792 for the British Crown, he made an entry in his journal that makes mention of North America’s first pure- bred. “The dogs belonging to this tribe of Indians were numerous, and much resembled those of Pomerania, though in general somewhat larger. They were all shorn as close to the skin as sheep are in England,” he noted. Ironically, it was the introduction of sheep from Great Britain that made the Salish Wool Dog obsolete in its native land. Ultimately, its unique role within its wealthy com- munity of traders could not save this purebred dog from extinction.

The dogs of the Ojibwa people pulled toboggans that were introduced by European explorers.

Commonly used to hunt rabbit and chase deer, the native dogs of California were said to be barkless.

The coat of the Salish Wool Dog of the Pacific Northwest was interwoven with mountain goat hair to create blankets.

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© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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SEALYHAM TERRIER

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CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

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POODLE (STANDARD)

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*

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SPANIEL (SUSSEX)

**

*ShowSight breed & all breed breed stats as of 9/30/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 9/30/18

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SILKY TERRIER

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GCHP OCEANO DARBYDALES’S XECUTIVE DECISION

Thank you Dr. Anthony DiNardo, Mr. Dennis McCoy, and Mr. John P. Wade for the Bests, and Mrs. Eva Berg, Ms. Susan Godek, Ms. Debra Thornton, Mr. Edd E. Bivin, and Ms. Faye Strauss for the Group wins.

Presented By: Kim & Gigi Griffith Loved & Owned By: Kathy Wortham Co-Owned By: Mary W. Price & Carol Bergmann Bred By: Gigi Griffith & Carol Bergmann

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NEWFOUNDLAND

#1 Newfoundland All Systems * #11 Working Dog **

2x National Specialty Winner Judges Choice Winner

*all systems as of 9/30/18 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 9/30/18

“the BEST days take our breath away!”

©In Focus by Miguel

©Gigi Griffith

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DACHSHUND (WIREHAIRED)

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*

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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BRUSSELS GRIFFON

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B E S T I N S H O W & S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W

SilverGrandChampion SMASH JP COPENHAGEN

thank you JUDGES

BEST IN SHOW J U D G E MR . M I C H A E L F A U L K N E R GROUP 1ST J U D G E . MR . R I C H A R D M I L L E R

A L L B R E E D * ONE number

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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TOY POODLE

PROUDLY OWNED BY C A T H Y & J E R R Y G A U C H E PERFECTLY PRESENTED BY M R . K A Z H O S A K A

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M u l t i p l e G r o u p W i n n i n g • M u l t i p l e G r o u p P l a c i n g Elgwood N Highpoint’s Summit

AMAZING LAST FEW WEEKS CLIFF HAS BEEN HONORED WITH 14 GROUP PLACEMENTS WE WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION TO THOSE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED CLIFF’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY.

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NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND

OWNED BY KATHI MOLLOY, HIGHPOINT ELKHOUNDS, AKC BREEDER OF MERIT BRED & CO-OWNED BY DONNA G. WEEKS, ELGWOOD ELKHOUNDS HANDLED BY PAUL CATTERSON, AKC REGISTERED

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

N o r w e g i a n E l k h o u n d M a l e *

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PULI

*DN AND SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2018

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Ari

BRED & OWNED BY Mary Frances Burleson Marburl Boxers Dallas, TX maryfrances@ebby.com Amy Bieri Happy Tails Boxers Island Lake, IL EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY Lori McClain Ferguson lorimcferguson@gmail.com

S H O W N S E L E C T I V E L Y I N 2 0 1 8 B R E E D T Y P E D O E S M A T T E R

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BOXER

Yours Truly B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N I N G , G R A N D C H A M P I O N Marburl and Happy Tails

to Specialty judges Clay Coady & Jim Noe on back-to-back wins at the Miami Valley Boxer Club and the Greater Cincinnati Boxer Club, also to Breeder/Judges Pat Healy and Butch Engel for the back-to-back Specialty wins at the Minnesota Boxer Club and to ALL of the judges who have appreciated her thus far, we are looking forward to the future! Our sincerest gratitude

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The Seven Secrets of Show Success Be a Kennel BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN

YOU CAN’T COMPETE WITH JUST ONE DOG More than once at a dog show, a dog own- er would approach us and say “When are you going to let me win?” Typically, it’s a dog owner who has

thank God!) the facility gives us a lot of flexibility in housing, whelping and training our dogs. A successful kennel is not just a facility. It’s better defined by the goals and attitudes of the breeder who has decided to work long-term to produce outstanding dogs whether they are destined for conformation, water trials, obedience, thera- py, tracking or just being a great pet. A good definition of a successful kennel would include: • A planned breeding program. • Generations of successful dogs with each generation building and improving upon the previous ones. • Multiple champions over the years that provide good choices for future breeding decisions; not just one dog, no matter how great. • A winning tradition; what does your kennel stand for? • A facility that supports and enhances the goals and aspirations of the breeders and the kennel. • A marketing program that uses multiple platforms to advance and advertise the kennel to the public and to the fancy. • Being an AKC Breeder of Merit and adhering to all ethical and professional standards of your breed club and the AKC. • The personal ability to not think too much about the time and money your program is costing you (We believe this is called “denial”). WHAT IS A FORMAL BREEDING PROGRAM AND WHY DOES IT MAKE A WINNING DIFFERENCE? The answer to this question has been very eloquently defined and refined by Patricia Trotter in her book, and by Dr. Carmen Battaglia in many articles. They are among the best experts in terms of practical experience and knowledge. They really drill down to the genetic issues and questions that arise in successful breeding programs. When Cathy first became serious about breeding PWDs, she had a long time PWD breeder ask he why she never bred to dogs other than her own. Cathy’s response was simple; she needed to define what an “Aviator” PWD looks like before she could outcross to other lines. Our foundation stock consisted of dogs that were from other breeders. We admired the health and temperament of their dogs and, of course, their excellent conformation. These foundation dogs, all loosely related, allowed us to cre- ate a line bred dog that showed quality and consistency. Once a type was set and health was assured, then we could begin adding different pieces of pedigree. Today, we continue to move forward with new pedigree components to strengthen our program. Typically, we’re planning three years into the future about what we hope to achieve from breeding and what we want to avoid. Because we have several bitches in the queue all the time, we can mix and match breedings to constantly improve our line. The goal should always be to try to produce a better dog every time a breeding is done. WHAT DOES BUILDING BREED CHAMPIONS EVERY YEAR DO TO FIND THE GREAT DOGS WHO WILL TAKE YOU TO THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF COMPETITION?

one dog that they have purchased and are trying to show it themselves in the ring. One woman was persistent and Cathy tried to explain that we had been doing this for over 30 years and we had several dogs competing in the ring, including dogs that belonged to other breeders that had been bred to our dogs. At a recent dog show, nearly 40% of the PWD entry were Aviator dogs or bred to Aviator dogs. This didn’t happen overnight. There have been examples of owners having one great dog that did very well in the show ring and then disappeared from view. They were owners, not breeders or a kennel. One great dog will not produce generations of great dogs unless you have a breeding plan, some sense of what you want to produce, mentors to guide your way and a kennel that sup- ports and promotes your breed and your brand. When you watch Westminster or any big show, you’ll notice that the winners are almost always descendants of many other cham- pions developed from breeders and kennels working together for years. Patricia Craig Trotter’s fabulous book “Born To Win, Breed To Succeed” is the bible of dog breeders who are serious about their craft. We highly recommend it. Pat’s comprehen- sive approach to breeding and competing is informative and funny, too. She has the sense of realism and humor about our sport that comes from decades of success. In her book, Pat talks about the days of dog kennels even here in the United States that were reminiscent of thoroughbred horse farms in their grandness and expense. Those days are largely gone as the sport has expanded and brought in new owners and breeders. Few of us can afford that level of cost and new mod- els of successful kennels have been developed instead. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A KENNEL? Today, most breeders operate small kennels that may have one litter every year or two and raise their litters in their homes. Many of these breeders are exceptional and have pro- duced many champions over the years. This is a popular mod- el that will produce the occasional champion. It’s also a fairly low-cost way to be involved in the show dog business. Most homes can be adapted to provide safe, sanitary conditions for dogs to be whelped and raised. There are also breeders who have developed more elabo- rate facilities to allow them to broaden their breeding hori- zons. In our case, we got lucky. A friend of Cathy’s was a canine research veterinarian at U.C. Davis in California. She built a two-acre property that includes a house and board- ing facility that included multiple dog runs, dog proof fenc- ing (mounted in concrete), bathing and exam areas and ken- nels that could accommodate up at eighty dogs at its peak. Although Cathy had been involved in breeding before, having the right facility helped her become a real kennel. While we only have a few dogs on the property (not even close to 80,

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*

*ShowSight breed stats as of 9/30/18

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BICHON FRISE

The Seven Secrets of Show Success: Be a Kennel BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN continued

“AS A BREEDER, WHAT ELSE IS THERE TO STRIVE FOR? BE A KENNEL!”

I was once told by a judge and fel- low breeder, “You show the dogs you have!” If that’s all you are prepared to do, you will go nowhere fast. In the last fifteen years, Aviator Kennel has produced six to ten new PWD champi- ons every year producing a formidable “bench” with over 110 PWD AKC Cham- pions to date. Prior to that we produced over 70 Dalmatian and Brittany champi- ons. This gives us the option of know- ing when a dog should begin competi- tion and when a dog will be ready for breeding in the future. We never want to put a young dog out in the show ring until we really feel that the dog is ready to be competitive and get their championship. Because of this, our dogs gener- ally finish their championship in 12-20 shows, making the experience much easier and less costly for their owners. In our experience, the cost of finish- ing a champion is about $5-8,000 with entry fees, grooming, handling, and other costs, so we want to make this process as efficient as possible. If you only have one or two dogs to work with, you limit your options for show suc- cess. We’ve seen dogs dragged around for many months trying to get a cham- pionship and years after that because it was the only dog the breeder or owner had available. Typically, we will take a potential show dog to a dog show once they’re at least six months old. That gives us the chance to observe the dog in the hectic chaos of a show and see how they react. We’ve noticed that the really strong show dogs are instantly curious, watch- ing everything going on around them. At ringside dogs like Ladybug, even as a puppy, watched the other PWDs intently, learning from the process. Because we always have several dogs coming of age at different times we have the chance to plan when and what dogs will be showing two years ahead of time. We try not to compete against ourselves and with multiple dogs avail- able for showing we can phase in new dogs as others finish their champion- ships. Sometimes, we have to hold a dog out for a while because they’re simply not quite ready for the ring. We’ve had boys who had to wait until they were

First, you have to have enough dogs year after year competing successfully in dog shows. Having one or two dogs is fine but that won’t build longevity and consistency that displays your breed- ing program. We’ve had many judges and competitors talk about the fact that they can recognize an “Aviator” dog in the ring. Cathy breeds to consistency that displays the best attributes, move- ment and type of PWDs. It is our goal that we create a common “look” for our dogs that keeps them competitive and desirable. Recently, “Jedi” a dog we bred who lives in South Korea, sweep several shows in the Philippines. The owner/handler told us that several of the American judges immediately spot- ted Jedi as an Aviator-bred dog; they rec- ognized the “type.” Second, you have to be willing to use multiple marketing tools to make people aware of your kennel. You have to think about yourself as a “brand” and not just a breeder. We use advertis- ing, our web site, emails and mailings, going to dog shows and seminars, being active in dog clubs, and working as an AKC judge and as a ring steward. In all of these situations you have the chance to network and interact with other peo- ple in the dog world. Does it pay off? We have placed dogs in China, Korea, the Philippines, Aus- tralia, France, Brazil, Portugal, Croatia, South Africa and Germany, as well as all over the United States and Canada. Why would we do that? It’s a lot of extra work, but it expands the footprint of our brand immeasurably. For example, when the international standards for PWDs began to restrict the amount of white that can be exhibited on a PWD, we got inquiries from Australia, where they have a lot of white dogs. An established breeder there pur- chased a male and female from different litters and breeding lines so she could start her new program there. We keep the dogs here until they were almost a year old, trained them and finished both of their AKC championships and then sent them to Australia where they both have achieved their championships. We do this in an effort to enhance the qual- ity and consistency of PWDs with our own special imprint. As a breeder, what else is there to strive for? Be a kennel!

almost three until they had grown into their show bodies. WHY DO YOUR CO-OWN- ERS REALLY MATTER, WHETHER FOR PETS OR SHOW DOGS? We sell all of our dogs on contracts whether for show homes, pet homes or fellow breeders. As a responsible breeder this should be a required part of the process and is required by most national and regional clubs. Since Mike is a lawyer, he has worked hard to fine- tune our contracts adjusting to new conditions and people as they arise. If a new buyer is reluctant to sign a con- tract, that should be a big “red flag” for a breeder. The best way to get rid of a “friend” is to do business without a contract. With a well-written contract everyone knows what the requirements and expectations are for owning a pure bred dog. Co-ownership is the best means as a breeder of ensuring that the owner will do what we want with the dog. Once a pet has been spayed or neutered or a show dog has finished their career, then the breeder can sign off AKC Registra- tion solely to the owner. More impor- tant, having co-owners creates partners in the show dog world. If you have done your job as a breeder and worked fairly and supportively with new owners you will build a cadre of people who love their dogs and support their breeders as well. The only way we can grow and sur- vive as a sport is to recruit, train and mentor new pure bred dog owners. Co- ownership is a great vehicle for that. We also stay in touch with our owners, show or pet, even after we’ve signed off on their papers. They are our best friends in the dog world and our best sales people for Aviator Kennel. Most of our sales come from referrals from past owners. More than once, we’ve gotten a call from a new buyer who has met an Aviator dog taking a walk. There is no better advertising. HOW DO YOU CREATE A WINNING TRADITION FOR YOUR KENNEL; A “BUZZ” FOR YOUR BRAND?

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NORFOLK TERRIER

America ' s Number One

A S C O B C O C K E R S PA N I E L 2 0 1 8 *

MULTIPLE SPECIALTY WINNING, MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING & RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING

MBIS S GCHG CH SOUNDV I EW ’ S MAST ER OF THE NORTH

thank you judge s

P R E S E N T E D B Y J E S S I C A L E G AT H

B R E D & OWN E D B Y J U D I T H & E R I C WE B B

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SPANIEL (COCKER) ASCOB

*all systems as of 9/30/18

©Nor Cal Bulldogger

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ALASKAN MALAMUTE

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THANK YOU JUDGES

DEVON KENNEL CLUB MS. PATRICIA NEMIROVSKY DE ALSINA MONTGOMERY COUNTY KENNEL CLUB MR. KENNETH MCDERMOTT

HATBORO KENNEL CLUB MR. JAMIE HUBBARD

BREEDERS KATHLEEN MCINDOE, MARIPI WOOLDRIDGE & JENNIFER STEVENS

OWNERS KATHLEEN MCINDOE, MARIPI WOOLDRIDGE, JENNIFER STEVENS & TENNA GRENAAE

HANDLERS TRACY SZARAS & LUIS ABREU

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LAKELAND TERRIER

George T H R E E C O N S E C U T I V E W I N N E R O F M C K C B O B W I N S

G R A N D C H A M P I O N

T R O U BA D O U R H I - K E L T E R R Y D A L E GCh Lucania Delzar’s Forever Edward x Hi-Kel Terrydale The Eyes Have It At Tooray CA

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Whether you currently have none or one that is ordinary, dated and poorly functioning… we’ll create one that reflects today’s best practices, captures your audience, and better positions you to gain their business. Why us?... We create beautiful websites for breeders, kennel clubs, handlers, groomers, boarding kennels and more. As publishers of some of the world’s most respec-ted dog show publications (ShowSight, Top Notch Toys, etc.), we bring years of design experience to the table, along with a deep understanding of the dog show world and it’s needs. We’ll design your website with the following cru-cial parts a successful website: • Accessible to ALL users • Well Planned Architecture and Flow • Well-Formatted content that’s easy to scan and easy on the eyes • Fast Loading • Clear, User-friendly Navigation • Usable forms, so you can capture the information you need (Visitor Analytics) • Compatible on all mobile devices We want to earn your business and create something extraordinary that speaks to the needs of your audience in a clear…, specific… and persuasive manner… and compels them to take action! At no cost, we’ll go over your unique needs…the who, the what and the why… and we’ll present you with a game plan on how to get started. Contact us today! AJ Arapovic, FOUNDER/CEO aj@aramediagrp.com | 512.541.8128 www.vicitdigital.com • Browser Consistency • Good Error Handling • Contrasting Color Scheme • Search Engine Optimization (SEO) • Easy to Update OUR DESIGN TEAM WOULD LOVE TO CREATE A NEWWEBSITE FOR YOU

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

a l l b r e e d * #7

b r e e d * * #6

M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n e r

R e s e r v e B e s t I n S h o w w i n n e r

* ShowS i gh t a l l br e e d s tat s a s o f 9 / 3 0 / 1 8

* * ShowS i gh t br e e d s tat s a s o f 9 / 3 0 / 1 8

Own e d by B e t h Me r c i e r & Mar gar e t D e F o r e

T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E platinum grand champion hand l e d by C J Favr e a s s i s t e d by ang e l a cha s e

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STANDING STILL OR ON THE MOVE KAI IS ON TOP

THANK YOU JUDGE MR. FRED BASSET

THANK YOU JUDGE MR. ROBERT STEIN

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CHINESE CRESTED

MULTI PLE B I S & B I SS GCHP KAYLEN’S GENERAL KAI PANDA

BRED & OWNED BY VIRGINIA DORRIS & KAY PEISER

PRESENTED BY KAY PEISER

CHINESE CRESTED BREED & ALL BREED *

TOY DOG *

* AKC STATS THROUGH 10/16/18

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*

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/18

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IRISH TERRIER

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On the Line

The Vaccine-Diabetes Connection BY BJ ANDREWS

O ne thing pets and p e o p l e have in common is vaccine overuse so as a dog owner or a parent with school-age children, you need to know how this can drastically impact your family a year from now. I know, you’ve heard all about “vac- cine damage” and “over-vaccination” but

epidemics of Type 1 Diabetes, Obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes/ Metabolic Syndrome.” Okay, you’re thinking that is their opinion. Correct. But it is one shared by a growing majority of medical and veteri- nary professionals. Vaccines.net said, “Both animal data and human data indicates that vaccines alter the risk of develop- ing diabetes. Vaccines probably affect the risk of diabetes by modulating the immune system. The data in humans shows a strong association between immunization and the risk of insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) Type I diabetes, an autoimmune disease.” Is it the dog food? I’m smiling because that is one of the first questions we ask but evidence continues to mount in volumes of veterinary and medical press releases such as “the (diabetes) epidemic is occurring in other highly immunized mammals including grass fed horses”. Horses? When I had horses in the 70s, we had good pasture and supplemented that with oats. Vaccines were only tetanus (horses are always banging themselves on fencing) and maybe encephalitis. We never heard of yearly vaccines. Summing up the problem with over-vaccination but add- ing a new twist, a prominent veterinary researcher offered this sobering observation “One major problem with vaccines is the “one dose fits all approach”, where in order to induce protection in the 1% with the weakest immune system you are over stimulating the immune system of the remaining 99% of the population and this is leading to epidemics of inflammatory diseases.” Vaccines have prevented horrible human disease such as polio, diphtheria, tetanus, and smallpox but sadly, these medical advances seem to have created an onslaught of 20th century over-vaccination. The resulting increase in the diabe- tes rate in both humans and animals speaks loudly. Today the medical community is awash with promotions for a new vaccine protocol. CNN, WebMD, Healthline; all major sites all carrying the same bottled message, i.e. TB vac- cine “linked to”, “shows promise” and “leads to” “blood sugar improvement”, “better Type 1 diabetes control” and “shows promise against juvenile diabetes” etc. I sure hope that is true because a PRnewswire release shows the rate of diabetes diagnoses in pets has “increased by 32 percent in canines and 16 percent in felines!” So what is causing this epidemic-like increase in a here- tofore unheard of canine disease? It is too much processed grain in dog food? I’m not a veterinarian but if he or she is literally “old school” (before many course materials were pro- vided by vaccine and pet food producers) your veterinarian may have an answer. I do. Feed more meat and less corn and wheat. I have never had a dog with diabetes nor do I know anyone who has. I know people like you who take time to learn about canine nutrition and who know better than to over-vaccinate their dogs. And that is the message. Thank science and big-minded veterinarians like Patricia Jordan, author of Mark Of The Beast and for concise “instant information” on the vaccine industry. Type II vaccine history in your search engine. One more thing, if your bitch is bred or due to be bred, be sure to see II Gestational Diabetes, also in TheDogPlace.org.

the soaring rate of diabetes is new. TheDogPlace.org has a whole section devoted to the downside of vaccines but like all of us, it recognizes the value of human and animal vac- cines. I don’t have to cite the eradication of polio, diphtheria, typhoid and in dogs, the number of dogs saved by rabies and parvo vaccines. We get it. But what you may not know is the newly documented dia- betes risks associated with over-vaccination and changes in the medical system that allows that to happen in both people and pets. Dr. Harris Coulter stated in 2012 “The current data shows that vaccines are much more dangerous than the public is lead to believe.” I think you would give a big “10-4” to that. In his book DPT A Shot in the Dark, Dr. Coulter states, “The DPT vaccine was the start of the diabetes epidemic, however once the glucose metabolism pathway is rendered dysfunc- tional, then of course the sugary foods, starchy and geneti- cally engineered cereal food-like particles are playing a part in the severity of diabetes and other diseases.” He made a bold summary statement “vaccines produce diabetes”. World-renowned canine reproduction authority, Patricia Jordan, DVM, CVA, CTCVH, agrees “Vaccines are causing the

“VACCINES HAVE PREVENTED HORRIBLE HUMAN DISEASE SUCH AS POLIO, DIPHTHERIA, TETANUS, AND SMALLPOX...”

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