Showsight Express: March 11, 2021

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

I am writing this month to update you on how the coronavirus crisis has affected our work at SHOWSIGHT , and to let you know the steps we have taken to continue our services to you during these trying days. For the first time in 29 years, our team was able to produce SHOWSIGHT and ship the magazine throughout America—while all of our staff worked remotely. This was only pos- sible because, three years ago, we instituted an all-digital production process. Your support has made this work possible. You are the reason why we are able to continue bringing you coverage of the country’s dog events, every single day at www.showsightmagazine.com and on our Social Media pages. Thank you! I also want to thank our dedicated staff, who are working harder than ever to provide the news that you want to read during these trying times. Our editorial and business departments have shifted priorities and resources to respond to the unprecedented events of 2020 and 2021. As you might imagine, back in April of last year when we all went into lockdown, I’d assumed that delivering coverage to you from many time zones (and across multiple content platforms) while the world was in isolation would not be an easy feat. The reality has been that, all of a sudden, we found that we had extra time on our hands, and this allowed our staff to become more motivated than ever. I must admit that our staff is the smartest, hardest working team in publishing business. Thank you for your support of them. Now, with all this extra time, we’d agreed that every week we would acknowledge the things that we need to improve from within and, most importantly, figure out what our community needs from us. I personally spoke with leaders from just about every dog show-related organiza- tion (from Superintendents, National Parent Clubs, Show Organizations, and AKC Board Mem- bers to Judges, Handlers, Breeders and Exhibitors) before we finalized all of the changes that we will be making. Look for several exciting opportunities from us as early as the next edition. In the coming days, you will receive our SPRING NEWSLETTER that will introduce one of the biggest developments by a magazine that we (or any dog show publication) has announced in the last decade. If you are not currently a subscriber to our newsletter, but you’re interested in receiving Breaking News, Trending Topics, and more, please head to www.showsightmagazine.com/news- letter / and sign-up for FREE . I respectfully ask that you consider supporting our organization’s continuing efforts to pro- duce a publication that showcases America’s top-winning purebred dogs. It is your support that allows our hard-working staff to produce the publication that you like advertise in—and judges like to read. Although I know that these are anxious and challenging times for all of us, and that you face many pressures on many fronts, we can and we will get through this year together. Please know that we are praying for you and that, because of you, we are not just hoping to survive, we are energized to live beautifully like never before. Lastly, since I love history, let’s mention WESTMINSTER ! Over the last 145 Years, the Westminster Kennel Club has survived two World Wars, the Great Depression, 9/11—and COVID-19. Although I can’t promise this, I do believe that dog shows will last forever. Experi- ence has taught the community of purebred dog breeders, handlers, and exhibitors that we can rely on the essential goodness, charity, and courage of the dog show people to meet the chal- lenges of a perilous hour. The BEST is yet to come.

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

CELEBRATING THE PAST...

KENNEL REVIEWAD 1989

51 YEARS A MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN MALTESE ASSOCIATION 38 YEARS A MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN SHIH TZU CLUB MULTIPLE YEARS TOP PRODUCER AWARD AMERICAN MALTESE ASSOCIATION 2020 WESTMINSTER BB WINNER AND PAST BEST OF BREEDS HANDLER/BREEDER/ AND OR OWNER OF MANY BEST IN SHOW AND GROUP WINNING DOGS IN VARIOUS BREEDS BESIDES MALTESE SHIH TZU, LHASA APSOS, TIBETAN TERRIERS, MINIATURE PINCHERS, NORFOLK TERRIERS, SILKY TERRIERS, STANDARD POODLES,

BICHON FRISE, HAVANESE AND CHINESE CRESTEDS WINNER OF THE QUAKER OATS TOY GROUP AWARD 1980 CH JOANNE-CHEN’S MINO MAYA DANCER WINNER OF QUAKER OATS TOY GROUP WINNER 1986 CH. CABRAND’S AGENT ORANGE V LOU WAN

MALTESE

...THE BEST IS YET TO COME!

2020 AKC TOY BREEDER OF THE YEAR LIFETIME AMA ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

with

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO & DARYL MARTIN

- MULTIPLE BIS & MULTIPLE BISS WINNER - GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

BOOM OR BOOMER?

THE SPORT OF DOGS CANNOT GO BACK TO THE FUTURE

H ere’s a question for the Baby Boomer generation: If you had a time machine, would you go back and relive your high school years? The answer given in response to this enigmatic ques- tion is most often, “No, but…” (Ah, there’s always a proviso when it comes to mat- ters of the hypothetical.) Most people indicate that, if given the chance, they’d only go back to high school if they could bring with them all the experience and wisdom they’d accumlated in life since graduation. Of course, even without the constraints of time, life doesn’t work this way. In fact, it’s the lessons learned from mistakes made that make life worth living. Solving problems allows us to move confidently towards the future. And although it may be helpful throughout this journey called “life” to look back on occasion, it is not actually possible to “live” in the past. Try as we might, those of us who are Baby Boomers cannot relive our glory days. Though we may not want to admit it, the future—including the future of the dog sport—belongs to today’s high school students. BOOM! In the 1985 blockbuster film, Back to the Future , director Robert Zemeckis allows viewers to travel back in time with Marty McFly, a skateboarding teen played by Michael J. Fox. The film’s protagonist is a “red-blooded American teen- ager” who accidently finds himself at this high school—30 years earlier—where he meets his future parents, inadvertly prevents their meeting, reconciles the couple’s relationship and, ultimately, travels in a time-traveling Delorean back to the future. The Academy Award-nominated picture gave movie-goers a chance to escape back to a simpler time, when suburban life was predictably safe—and preternaturally boring. So powerful was the pull in the 1980s to return to the post-war boom years of the 1950s that worldwide audiences spent more than $380 million in theater tickets. For $3.55, the decadence and disasters of the present could be forgotten—if only temporarily—by returning to a place framed in white picket fences and peopled with nice girls wearing Poodle skirts. Now, more than 35 years since Back to the Future was originally released, many Americans are finding themselves, yet again, looking back to simpler times—the 1980s! Who knew that we would one day be nostalgic for punk rock and spandex? Well, maybe Ray-Bans? The lesson to be learned here is a simple one: The past only “seems” kinder, sweeter, simpler… better than the present— and the future. In reality, all we really have is now. Despite the trials that we are all living through at the moment, the truth is that 35 years from now these will be the “good ol’ days” for a generation of Americans. Following are a few thoughts that may encourage Baby Boomer breeders, exhibitors, and judges to enjoy the present as we daydream about being behind the wheel of a time-traveling Tesla.

BY DAN SAYERS

WEIMARANER

BOOM OR BOOMER?

ENJOY THE SHOW A Zoom meeting is a great way to keep in touch with friends and family, but it’s a poor substitute for a legitmate Meet and Greet. Social greetings that are dependant on social cues aren’t quite the same when they’re experienced on a screen where the participants resemble the celebrities from Hollywood Squares or the cast of The Brady Bunch. Though handshakes, hand-waving, and hugs may be in short supply now, their reemergence in a post-pandemic world is all but assured. BREED THIS! Slowing down isn’t always easy to do, especially when the momentum of your life has had you functioning at breakneck speed for the last 35 years. However, with nowhere to go and all the time in the world to get there, tasks that once seemed like chores can become reliable stress relievers; cleaning, making household repairs, and gardening can stave off those feelings of doom and gloom. (It really is a good idea to stop and smell the roses.) When all else fails, there’s always the transformative power of aerobic exercise or opening a bottle of wine. SPECIALTIES ARE SPECIAL There are some skills in life that do, in fact, need to be relearned. Who knew that driving would be one of them? With so many fam- ily cars and RVs sheltering in place, countless drivers have very likely lost the ability to parallel park or back out of the driveway with confidence. Despite the millions of valid driver’s licenses issued, the return to the open road requires that every motorist proceed with extreme caution. (Or maybe it’s time to dust-off that old bicycle—again.) HIGH PERFORMANCE What is it they say about opinions? Oh right, everybody has one. For many stay-at-home fanciers, mixing social distancing with social media has only proven a point your mother likely impressed upon you when you were a teenager: If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all. Oversharing—and opining—in the digital age can be ruinous to friendships as well as reputations. Before hitting the “send” button, it’s best to remember another piece of advice your mother probably gave you: Keep your opin- ions to yourself. FASHION FORWARD For dog people, “family” often includes a small circle of friends who share our breed devotion and our commitment to the sport. These are the people who remind us who we are. But in a world where everyone has been disconnected physically, if not techno- logically, the relationships we share with the people we care about most have become even more important to our sense of personal well-being. Whenever we all eventually return to showing dogs again, the experience will likely be akin to a very significant family reunion; a purebred pow wow. BACK TO BASICS The real reason that today’s Baby Boomers have a tendency to view the past through rose-colored glasses is pretty basic. Like it or not, we’re all runnng out of time. There is no going backwards and, just like watching a classic film, the desire to time-travel “back to the future” only offers a pleasant escape from the trials and tribulations of today. (And nobody needs to be reminded of how challenging the last year has been!) The past doesn’t really exist anymore—for anyone. It exists only in our memories and on old VCR tapes. We can’t go back; we can only press “forward.”

WHAT IS IT THEY SAY ABOUT

OPINIONS? OH RIGHT, EVERYBODY HAS ONE.

FOR MANY STAY-AT-HOME FANCIERS, MIXING SOCIAL DISTANCING WITH SOCIAL MEDIA HAS ONLY PROVEN A POINT YOUR MOTHER LIKELY IMPRESSED UPON YOU WHEN YOU WERE A TEENAGER: IF YOU CAN’T SAY SOMETHING NICE, DON’T SAY ANYTHING AT ALL.

The best that any of us can hope to do is to take what we’ve learned from the past year, and make a difference today—for a better tomorrow. There’s absolutely no reason why the future can’t be bright. Just ask Marty McFly.

*

GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen (CH Rhapsody’s Stairway To Heaven ROM* x Multi CH Am GCHG Always Pearl ROM*) Zen

#2 #3 MALTESE * MALTESE * ALL BREED BREED

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

*AKC STATS AS OF 1/31/2021

MALTESE

POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

AKC CH, RUS. CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS

Win 2021 #1 BiewerTerrier

*AKC standings as of All Breed 2/24/21 ALL BREED STANDINGS *

Thank you Judges Ms. Kimberly Meredity, Ms. Inge Semenschen, and Mr. Timothy Robbins

Owned by: Michele Lyons, Cindi Iken, Theresa Tafoya, and Daniel Yona Bred by: Olga Ptichenko

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

BIEWER TERRIER

POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

AKC GCH, RUS. CH, UKC CH IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA

Thank you Judges Mr. Raymund Filburn, Jr., Ms. Elizabeth Muthard, Ms. Lew Olson, and Ms. Donnelle Richards Owned by: Michele Lyons, Daniel Yona, and Theresa Tafoya Donny *AKC standings as of Breed 2/24/21 BREED STANDINGS * 2021 #1 BiewerTerrier GRAND CHAMPION FIRST BiewerTerrier

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

Andy SHUT UP AND KISS ME GCH XERALANE’S

LHASA APSO

1 No. Lhasa Apso NO. 14 NON-SPORTING ALL-BREED

*

*

Sincere appreciation to judges Mr. Timothy Catterson & Ms. Gloria Kerr

Team Andy XERALANE KENNEL, ADRIAN AGARD, EARL TAKAHASHI, BONNIE PRATO, CLIVE HARROLD & CAROL AGARD Handled by DEVON KIPP

*AKC all breed stats as of 1/31/21

NORWICH TERRIER

Delilah’s grandmother

CH SOYARA'S CHANTILLY LACE MBIS, MBISS #1 BORZOI 2002, 2003, and 2004 Borzoi Club of America National Specialty BIS (@8.5 yrs old)

Delilah’s uncle

GCHG SOYARA’S THE FLYING DUTCHMAN MBISS #1 BORZOI - BREED 2014

Delilah’s dam

GCHB SOYARA’S CARMEN FANTASY

Specialty BOS, Specialty WB, Group Placer

BORZOI

*

*

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 1/31/21

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/21 POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

Carol Dean with GCh. DeLaPassion Valdinera ByReQuest

CAROL DEAN DeLaPassion Poodles BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? I was born in Greenwich, Connecticut. I grew up and went to school in Carmel, New York, in southern Putnam County. Do you come from a doggy family? If not, how did the interest in breeding and show- ing purebred dogs begin? I grew up in a dog and horse family. We had pet dogs from my earliest recol- lection. Our show dog experience began with my step-father who was the Director of Parks and Recreation in Bedford, New York. He became associated with Peggy Westphal, accomplished Dachshund and Cocker Spaniel breeder, and a noted art- ist who was active in community events. We had two pet Dachshunds with many health issues. In his interaction with Peggy, she enlightened him to the difference that a quality, health-tested animal makes. He purchased for our family two Dachs- hunds that Peggy wanted finished, and that sparked our interest in dog shows. My mother, Ann Smith, then Dolan, grew up in Scotland. She owned Bearded Collies as a child. Once we started attending dog shows, she became interested in the process of getting them recognized in this country. She imported two British dogs, became involved with the foundation of the Bearded Collie Club of America, the keeping of the stud book, showing them in the Miscellaneous Class and, finally, seeing them AKC recognized. It was a huge undertaking and I have a lot of respect for the people behind the new breeds that I see being recognized today. Who were your mentors in the sport? Please elaborate on their influence. My earlier mentors were Peggy Westphal and Judy Anderson. They empha- sized honesty and good sportsmanship, but most of all that showing and breeding dogs should be fun. The family atmosphere at dog shows at that time was what I remember most about it. I also actively showed horses at that time, so the dogs were something I dabbled in more than dedicated myself to.

GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

CAROL DEAN, DeLaPASSION POODLES

In the two years I spent at Dassin Farm, I learned more about animal hus- bandry, coat care, breeding philosophy, and managing a breeding program than I could ever have thought possible. Everything that I do in my breeding program now is based on what I learned listening to Buddy talk on long drives from one show to another. No book, no website, and no webinar could ever teach me the things I learned from him. Presen- tation was something Joseph excelled in, and at the time he possessed a patience Buddy didn’t have. He would work with you on a brushing and drying tech- nique, scissoring skills, and the finishing touches of banding and spraying up. All of these techniques I’ve adapted myself, but I couldn’t have learned without his expertise. Eventually, as often happens, the travel, the sheer volume of work, and the responsibility for the dogs began to make me enjoy it less. I realized, by watching the difficult chore of pleasing clients, that being a professional handler was not some- thing I really wanted for myself. I loved the dogs, I loved the breed, but I needed to find a way to support myself and have a more home-based life. At that point, I was lucky to find a local grooming shop that had a big Poodle, Bichon, and “scis- sor breed” clientele. While I knew that I’d miss the team and the camaraderie of working for a handler, it was time. During the time I was assisting Bud- dy and Joseph, I was fortunate enough to develop a personal relationship with my 40-year partner, Michael Carothers. He traveled, on and off, with Buddy and Joseph, assisting them, and he shared my passion for the Dassin family of dogs. Together with Buddy and Joseph, Michael and I co-owned our foundation Standard, Ch. Dassin Daybreak, bred by Delores Solomon. She was a consummate Dassin type, and in three litters she pro- duced 10 champions. Until Buddy’s death,

kept coming back into my mind. I asked to be off for the week of Poodle Club of America (at that time held in Ludwigs Corner, Pennsylvania, in June), to go and observe—lawn chair, sun hat, and catalog in hand. I watched for three days and I was hooked. Having been a breeder’s daughter prior to being an assistant, the breeder in me was starting to grow. As I watched during the three days, one family of dogs stood out in my mind. The type, the movement, and the presen- tation appealed to my uneducated eye. I thought that if I was going to do that much work, then that is what I wanted them to look like. At the end of the week- end, I approached Bud Dickey and Joseph Vergnetti, and explained that after the Forsyths’ retirement I would be looking for a new job. Although it wouldn’t be until after The Garden, could they keep me in mind should they need an assistant? Buddy’s quick retort, “Look around, sister, does it look like we need help?” unnerved me at the time, but his quick wit became something I loved most about him dur- ing our relationship. Over the next few months, we got to know each other when they came to East Coast dog shows. Both Bud and Joseph felt a weekend at the ken- nel and a weekend at the shows with them was something I should try before making a commitment. We agreed on two week- ends, and things began to fall into place. The weekend that I went out for the “test run,” Christine Foster Nethery joined me. At that time, she assisted Dave and Erica McCurley, and we shared a house in Beth- lehem, Connecticut. I had never seen a breeding operation like Dassin Farm. It amazed me, intimi- dated me—and I was hooked. Following the weekend, I had a firm commitment on a job and Christine had purchased a Stan- dard Poodle puppy, Ch. Dassin Dakota, who was her “foot in the door” for her now successful Boxwood Standard Poodles breeding program.

Anne Smith (then Dolan) with Ch. Glen Eire Willie Wonderful

After graduating from college, I felt the need for a break from the academic scene. Vet school was my goal, but even at that time I felt veterinarians would be best served by working with breeders, show kennels, and groomers to have a more well- rounded aspect of this segment that needed veterinary service to function efficiently. I was fortunate to connect with Bob and Jane Forsyth. Assisting them and learning from Bonnie and Mark Threl- fall changed the direction I had planned for myself. I am not sure that anyone was more knowledgeable or better equipped to train you than Bonnie and Mark were. The Threlfalls left the Forsyths to go out and launch their own successful careers. The step up taught me about busi- ness management, kennel management, and animal husbandry, and the impor- tance of maintaining good relationships with other handlers and breeders. It was an invaluable education. Bob and Jane were good enough to give all of their assis- tants a fair timeframe to investigate other options before publicly announcing their retirement at Westminster in 1981. One of the benefits of working there was hav- ing an exposure to a wide variety of breeds. While I was there, they showed a few ran- dom Poodles, mostly for clients who had used them before they became a specialty breed. From the beginning, Poodles fasci- nated me. The beauty, the trim, and their intelligence all piqued my interest. When they did have one to show, I was fortu- nate to have developed a friendship with Michael Dachel, who at that point assisted Bill Trainor. He would set-aside the time to try to show me and teach me the basics to make the dog presentable in the ring. Dee Shepherd and Sue Lackey, who assist- ed Wendell Sammett, were a great resource as well. When it came time to make a plan, fol- lowing Bob and Jane’s retirement, I con- sidered all of my options. The Poodles just

Ch. Oaktown Gone Rogue

Ch. DeLaPassion Coachella ByReQuest

Thank you to Breed and Group judge: Dr. Valeria Rickard

Thank you to Breed judge: Mrs. Jacquel ine Stacy and Group judge: Mr. Rodney R. Merry

G C H C A B E R N E T ’ S M E R C U R Y R I S I N G

Bred & Owned by Mary and Scott Olund, Chris Manelopoulos and Rachel Corbin | Presented by Olivia Hodgkinson and Ethan Coye

POODLE (STANDARD)

CAROL DEAN, DeLaPASSION POODLES

I begged, I wheedled and, finally, got her to agree to at least consider it. She agreed to look at her, found her just as appealing as we did, and agreed to let us use him. Her first litter by Bennie produced three champions, two of which have had significant impact in my breeding program. Through Chelsay, I connected with Mark and Christine Waldrop. That con- nection, combined with Nancy’s longtime association with Ianthe Bloomquist’s Bali- wick Toy Poodles, allowed me access to another strong family of Toys. Combining the qualities of the Foxmore family with qualities of the Baliwick/Apogee Toys has given me a type that I’m happy with and a direction to head toward in the future. The DeLaPassion Poodles are widely known, highly successful and well respected. What breeding philosophies do you adhere to? My breeding philosophy is strongly rooted in my foundation of working with Dassin Farm. I’m a strong linebreeder. I believe that when you outcross, it needs to be to a family equally as strong, with the attributes you seek. I think you work to improve one thing at a time, not to try to reach multiple goals in one litter. How many dogs do you currently house? Tell us about your facilities and how the dogs are maintained. I currently house more stud dogs than brood bitches. I’m fortunate, in the grooming shop, that I have many clients who enjoy a retired show dog as a compan- ion. The stud dogs make excellent pets and my clients have little problem housebreak- ing them and allowing me access to them. I’m less eager to place a bitch that must be bred. In breeding Toys, things can and do go wrong. I’m not really prepared to expect a family to deal with that possibility. I don’t feel Toys make great kennel dogs, so all my dogs are house dogs. If they go to my handler, I prefer that they go as young as between five and six months before they become true house pets. Who were/are some of your most signifi- cant Poodles, both in the whelping box and the show ring? My most significant Standards were my foundation bitch, Ch. Dassin Daybreak, and her grandsons, Ch. Dassin Despierita and Ch. Dassin Banderas DeLaPassion. Another favorite Standard was Steven and Joanne Kirk’s Miki Moto son, Ch. DeLa- Passion Easy Come Easy Go. “Ben” was a multiple Group and Specialty winner. InToys, we would have nothing without Dezi as our foundation. Her granddaugh- ter, Ch. DeLaPassion Madame X ByRe- Quest, significantly affected our program.

GCh. DeLaPassion ByReQuest Peter Pan

GCh. DeLaPassion ByReQuest Peter Pan

No “Toy heads” or “Toy temperaments” are acceptable to me. The biggest compli- ment I get is when people remark that our Toys “look like little Standards” because this is my interpretation of the breed stan- dard. My first improvement came with adding the impressive Foxmore dog, Ch. Foxmore Xclamation Mark, owned and bred by Janet Reed and Patti Jason. He immediately raised the bar for me, pro- ducing better coats and temperaments than the generation before. He was the sire of my top-producing Ch. DeLaPas- sion Madame X ByReQuest who produced eight champions for Wendy and me. I would be remiss in not including the impact that Chelsay Paul Grubb has had both in my life and in my success in the ring. Her mother was a grooming client, and Chelsay began to visit and play with the Standard puppies as a young child. She would then visit, lead break puppies, and eventually began to attend dog shows with us. Fast forward to her adult life, marriage to Nick, and a successful handling career. I was instantly drawn to a young special that she was showing, owned by Mark and Christine Waldrop. Ch. Debrocks Avra had that charisma and presence that just “wowed” me. I went home, looked up her pedigree, and began to research her sire, Ch. Apogee Baliwick Bountiful. Fortunately, his breeder and owner was Nancy Hafner. Nancy had always been very encouraging to me as a Standard breeder, and had been willing to answer any questions I had as I was learning about the Toys. We had par- ticipated in her judges education seminars for several years. At the last one that we’d attended, she had brought a dog that both Wendy and I found really appealing. When I called and asked her about him—happy coincidence—he was Avra’s father! (Nancy is a strong line breeder herself.) She wasn’t really enthusiastic about letting him be used on “Mimsy,” who was an outcross; breeding her to “Bennie” would be another outcross.

we worked together, producing more than 60 champion Standards while still using the Dassin prefix. After Buddy’s death, the dynamic changed for all of us. Michael no longer enjoyed the shows and opted to end his involvement. Joseph no longer wanted to share the kennel name and, at that time, the DeLaPassion Poodles began. Over the next few years, I continued to breed the Standards and finished 15 more, but their size and the sheer volume of work was starting to wear on me. In addition, trying to manage the health issues in the variety made it increasingly stressful to breed them and to sell them to companion homes. The Toys at that point fell into my lap. Dr. Barbara Allan of Bagatelle Poodles was both a client of Buddy and Joseph, and a personal friend of mine. She suf- fered a serious stroke at the time and had to move into assisted living where she was only allowed to have one pet. Her friends rallied around and each took one or two of her dogs. I took a 13-year-old brown bitch, figuring she could live out her life with us, and a young champion bitch whose litter I had recently had to whelp, as Barbara was growing less able to do so. Ch. Primrose Desiree O’Bagatelle, “Dezi,” quickly won me over to a variety I honestly had never had much interest in. With the knowledge I had gained from working with the Stan- dards, and Dezi as a foundation bitch, the DeLaPassion Toys were off to a good start. I, admittedly, dabbled at first, not really sure in which direction I wanted to go. It was also at this time that I devel- oped a friendship and partnership with Wendy Penn of ByReQuest Poodles. She joined me in our Toy Poodle undertak- ing, for better and for worse! In my sec- ond and third generations, I began to see what appealed to me. I feel strongly that our breed should be “three variet- ies, with one standard.” To me, there is no cutting slack because they are Toys.

*Pending AKC confirmation NORFOLK TERRIER

CAROL DEAN, DeLaPASSION POODLES

Both Wendy and I feel very fortunate that Ianthe shared the outstanding Ch. Baliwick Baby Gaga with us for her show career and two litters. All four of her pup- pies are champions and contributing to our breeding programs. Currently, her son, Ch. Baliwick Breaking the Rules, is co-owned with Martin Gregory and has been the start of a satisfying partnership. My high point as a breeder/owner-han- dler is a dog that I loved from the moment I clippered him the first time. GCh. DeLa- Passion Valdinera ByReQuest was truly a group effort. His co-owners, Kate Horn- ik, DVM and Kasie Podijil, DVM did everything they could to raise him to his potential, and I could have never had him prepared without the encouragement and push from Chelsay and Nick. I’d sent him to them to get ready for PCA, but Chelsay called me that night and said, “You show him, you can do this.” I was doubtful, but she was right. At seven months old, he was not only Winners Dog from the Bred-By Class, but was awarded BOS to BOV at our National Specialty under breeder- judge Jordan Chamberlain. Working with friends is one of the most satisfying parts of breeding for me. Linda McFadden sharing the beautiful white bitch, Ch. Oaktown Gone Rogue, “Stormy Daniels,” sired by Ch. DeLaPassion Undeniable ByReQuest, led to another thrilling PCA as Chelsay piloted Stormy to BOW from the 9-12 Class under the esteemed Toy breeder, Sharon Stevens. Co-owning this beautiful bitch and looking forward to what she will produce is, indeed, exciting. Each dog or bitch that I keep is sig- nificant in its own way to our breeding program. I rarely breed a bitch that isn’t finished. However, the current COVID-19 situation has caused me to reevaluate this position to some extent.

Left: GCh. DeLaPassion ByReQuest Peter Pan. Right: GCh. DeLaPassion Valdinera ByReQuest

Please comment positively on your breed’s present condition and what trends might bear watching. I’m encouraged that most breeders are branching out and working (if not them- selves, then with others) to have their Poo- dles be the multi-purpose dogs they are. I see lots of conformation-bred Poodles doing a variety of performance sports and field work. I think the growing acceptance of the Modified Continental trim is a defi- nite plus as it allows dogs to more easily do a variety of functions and still compete in conformation. The continued work of breeders to monitor their dogs’ health and use the ever-expanding health testing available is also a plus, and speaks positive- ly for our future. The sport has changed greatly since you first began participating. What are your thoughts on the state of the fancy and the declining number of breeders? How do we encourage newcomers to join us? I suppose change in any aspect of life is just the nature of it. I read about people complaining about too many dog shows, handlers having an edge, and the dog with the wealthiest backer doing the winning. I still believe, as I did 40 years ago, that a good dog, well presented, will do its share of winning. I believe an owner-handler who does it right can compete on any level. If I didn’t believe this I would stop breed- ing and showing dogs. While I think it is important to encourage newcomers to the sport, I’m not entirely sure the sport itself is to blame. I think we live in an instant gratification society, and that is simply not how dog shows work. It takes time, and the desire to learn and do the work, to do it successfully. I also think the many aspects of dog sports are more appealing to young people. Activities like agility, barn hunt, and scent work are all less subjective and more score based. I think when people

show an interest in breeding and showing dogs, we need to nurture that. But, unless it is a two-way street, that’s not always easy. Where do you see your breeding program in the next decade or two? I would hope that within the next decade I will be able to maintain the type we’ve worked toward developing, continu- ing to improve, as we all do, with each suc- cessive generation. Sometimes you take a turn that doesn’t give you the results you would have hoped, so you regroup and move on. Although I don’t think you should ever be satisfied with what you have, I am extremely happy with the prog- ress that we have made and look forward to what we will have in the future. I have been extremely fortunate in hav- ing breeders I respect utilize my stud dogs. I’m looking forward to seeing what these dogs will add to programs other than my own. I’m also encouraged by the dogs that performance people have purchased from me and by the success these dogs have had. I’m looking forward to seeing what these multi-purpose dogs can contribute to my program as well. Finally, tell us a little about Carol outside of dogs…your profession, your hobbies. I’m really all about the dogs. My busi- ness is the grooming shop, which allows me to bring my dogs with me, to raise lit- ters without having to leave them at home, and to schedule my life around the dog shows I want to attend. I enjoy mentoring both Poodle enthusiasts and promising groomers. Watching someone’s skills grow gives me a tremendous amount of satisfac- tion. I also enjoy reproduction in all its phases, raising neonates, and helping other breeders succeed with problematic whelp- ing. I enjoy learning about all aspects of our breed, our sport, and new scientific developments. I don’t think that that will ever get old for me.

Ch. Baliwick Breakin the Rules

*

*

*AKC all breed stats as of 1/31/21 MINIATURE SCHNAUZER

POODLE (STANDARD)

18 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SPRING EDITION

AMERICAN FOXHOUND

*

*

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SPRING EDITION | 19

*AKC STATS 2020

*

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/20

POODLE ( MINIATURE)

ALWAYS BREEDER/ OWNER HANDLED

BEST IN SHOW–MR. DANA CLINE GROUP FIRST–MRS. PATRICIA TROTTER THANK YOU JUDGES! OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION TO EVERYONE WHO HAS RECOGNIZED THE QUALITY OF THIS OUTSTANDING BICHON BITCH.

BICHON FRISE

HILLWOOD HOT CHILD IN THE CITY MULTIPLE ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW & MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING

BREEDERS/OWNERS ELLEN M. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA & MATT ABBOTT

BREEDER PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLER LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

THANK you J U D G E S M R . R A N D Y E . G A R R E N A N D M S . K A T H R Y N A . C O W S E R T F O R A W A R D I N G O U R B O Y

O w n e r : K A R E N P I P K I N • B r e e d e r s : K A R E N P I P K I N & J A N E G E N T Z E N • H a n d l e r : D Y L A N K I P P RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

GRACERIDGE COURAGE SIR LANCELOT OF CJS RANCH JOHNNY silver grand champion

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE

CH DELL-ROSS BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES X CH OVERO P I NKAL I C IOUS AX OAJ

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED RUBY’S QUALITY AND MOVEMENT.

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

Ruby

Personality

& Movement

OWNED BY JENNIFER PORTER DELMER

CO-OWNED & BRED BY JAIME BRAGG

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

BRITTANY

THANK YOU JUDGES FOR REWARDING CONAR’ S TRUE TERRIER TYPE SHAROL CANDACE WAY

DARRYL VICE

GRACE FRITZ

KEN MURRAY

ALFRED FERRUGGIARRO

TERRY STACY

JACQUEL INE L . STACY

APRI L CLYDE B I SS

GEORGE WRIGHT B I SS

DIANE ONDO B I SS

RODNEY HERNER B I SS

CINDY MEYER

MARY JANE CARBERRY

AL ICE WATKINS

APRI L CLYDE

WI LL IAM DEVI LLENEUVE

EL I ZABETH MUTHARD

GALE YOUNG

SYDNEY L . MARX

©David Sombach

B R E D B Y : T E R R I VA N D E Z A N D E •

H A N D L E D B Y : J A M E S D I C K S O N •

OW N E D B Y : N I N A WA R R E N

IRISH TERRIER

B R E E Z Y ’ S C H A R M I N G C O N A R T I S T G C H G M E R R Y M A C Z T R I K I N G X C H B R E E Z Y ’ S H O T T O P I C silver grand champion

M U LT I P L E S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R • M U LT I P L E G R O U P P L A C E M E N T S • G R O U P W I N N E R

©David Sombach

* A KC B R E E D S TAT S A S O F 1 2 / 3 1 / 2 0 4 X B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R 2 0 2 0 & NUMBER ONE I R I S H T E R R I E R *

MBIS SBIS GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

THE NATION’S NUMBER ONE HOUND * AND AMONG THE TOP FOUR OF ALL BREEDS * Gait When running free, the Afghan Hound moves at a gallop, showing great elasticity and spring in his smooth, powerful stride. When on a loose lead, the Afghan can trot at a fast pace; stepping along, he has the appearance of placing the hind feet directly in the foot prints of the front feet, both thrown straight ahead. Moving with head and tail high, the whole appearance of the Afghan Hound is one of great style and beauty. Body The back line appearing practically level from the shoulders to the loin. Strong and powerful loin and slightly arched, falling away toward the stern, with the hipbones very pronounced; well ribbed and tucked up in flanks. The height at the shoulders equals the distance from the chest to the buttocks; the brisket well let down, and of medium width.

Finding these elements in a balanced, square form without extremes is to be prized in the Afghan Hound. His perfect temperament: “aloof and dignified, yet gay” is a hallmark of the Grandeur Line.

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

AFGHAN HOUND

*AKC stats as of 1/31/21

MBIS SBIS GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

© JOHN ASHBEY

#18 2020 * AKC TOP 25 ALL-BREED TOTALS *

GREAT DANE

OWNED BY JAYME LEMAIRE BRED BY CYNDI HARDY EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY PAUL LEVESQUE

*AKC STATS 2020

& PAUL

MANY T HANKS T O JUDGE , MS . WANDA HEP L ER , FOR RECOGN I Z I NG LOU I E I N AN ENT RY OF 70+ BEAU T I FUL GREAT DANES

MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING GCHB KMA LEMAIRE’S GLADIATOR GCH CH MJM N MA I T AU BE T T ER BE L I EVE I T CGC x KMA BEDROCK WI L L NVR B DA SAME

BRED & OWNED BY TIMARU ANATOLIANS & SALUKIS, REG. JOHN & LESLEY BRABYN WWW.SALMONCREEKRANCH.COM EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY STUART MCGRAW & JUSTINE SPIERS JUSTARTBORZOI@GMAIL.COM

BIS OH-BIS RBIS GCHS TIMARU TALLULAH

ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD DOG

SINCE THERE HAVE BEEN NO SHOWS IN CALIFORNIA, BEAR & TALLULAH WENT TO FLORIDA FOR 8 SHOWS AND CONQUERED: Suwannee Valley KC of FL (1) Judge Cathy Daugherty BOB - Tallulah Suwannee Valley KC of FL (2) Judge William Daugherty BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah Space Coast KC Judge Judith Daniels BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah Brevard KC Judge Douglas Holloway BOB: Tallulah & BOS: Bear Central Florida KC Judge Hal Biermann BOB: Tallulah & BOS: Bear Central Florida Working Group Judge Joseph Napolitano BOB: Bear & BOS: Tallulah AKC National Championship OH Finals Judge Cindy Stansel BOB: Tallullah AKC National Championship Judge Robin Stansell BOB: Bear & BOS Tallulah GENERATION SPECIALTY- WINNING LITTERMATES. BEAR WILL BE TAKING OVER RING DUTIES WHILE TALLULAH IS ON MATERNITY LEAVE. BRED & OWNED BY TIMARU ANATOLIANS & SALUKIS, REG. JOHN & LESLEY BRABYN WWW.SALMONCREEKRANCH.COM EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY STUART MCGRAW & JUSTINE SPIERS JUSTARTBORZOI@GMAIL.COM WE ARE SO PROUD OF THESE THIRD

BISS OH-BIS GCH TIMARU BEKCI AYISI

# 1 NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND IN BREED *

*AKC STATS AS OF 1/31/21

P INK I S MAKING NEW FANS . THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE REWARDED THI S YOUNG BI TCH. #1 BI TCH ALL BREED * BOB AT AKC NAT IONAL CHAMP IONSHI P SHOW IN ORL ANDO UNDER JUDGE MR. RICHARD REYNOLDS .

BREEDERS : KATHI MOLLOY, AKC BREEDER OF MERI T, PAT & RICHARD GAMSBY

OWNERS : KATHI MOLLOY & PAT GAMSBY

NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND

HIGHPOINT’S BJORNLASS RAISE YOUR GLASS

S I RE : MB I S MB I SS CH VIN-MELCA’S TOP O’ THE MARK DAM: CH BJORN LASS HIGHPOINT MADAME X (SCUL LY)

G R A N D C H A M P I O N H O O R AY H E N RY V. TA N I K A Z A R I Henry

T E A M H E N RY Presented by Ernesto Lara AKC Registered, PHA Bred by Mieke Cooijmans Owned by Judith Epperson & Bradley Phifer

AFFENPINSCHER

E R N E STO &

H E N RY

MONKEYS ARE

ALWAYS PLAYFUL

HE SHOWS THAT WAY TOO!

MULTI BIS AND BISS, CH WILDISLE WARLOCK

WARLOCK WINNING HIS FIRST NATIONAL SPECIALTY IN 1974 FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR–CLASS AT 13 MONTHS

WARLOCK FINISHED GOING BIS FROM THE BRED BY EXHIBITOR CLASS AT HIS 5TH SHOW BREEDER/OWNER: JILL R. BREGY, WILDISLE, REG.

IRISH WOLFHOUND

Warlock

OF THE IWCA AND MULTIPLE WINNER OF IWANE AND IWCC SPECIALTIES the only four time winner

MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

number four number five

BREED *

ALL BREED *

MRS. PATRICIA TROTTER, MR. JON COLE, MS. LEW OLSON, MR. JOHN CONSTANTINE-AMODEI, MR. DANA CLINE, MRS. CINDY LANE, MR. RICHARD MILLER, MRS. ANNE KATONA, & MR. VAN BLEVINS Special thanks to these judges who have thought so highly of Lincoln

LINCOLN HAS BEEN BURNING UP THE RING SINCE MAKING HIS DEBUT AT 6 MONTHS OLD, FINISHING HIS CHAMPIONSHIP WITH 4 BIG MAJORS, THEN AS A MOVE-UP SPECIAL AGAINST TOP RANKED COMPETITION WINNING A BOB, 2 X BOS, MULTIPLE BOBOH, OH GROUP WINS & PLACEMENTS, AND HAS 4 5PT GCH MAJORS, ALL BY 7 MONTHS OLD, AND THEY’VE ONLY JUST BEGUN...

BOSTON TERRIER

*AKC STATS AS OF 2/17/21

Lincoln SIRE: GCH. HESSENVILLA’S FIRESTARTER BY KENNEDY N DELMIST CH KENNEDY’S HOT ROD LINCOLN AT CROSSROADS

DAM: KENNEDY’S SWARMIN’ FOR BEE-YONCE

BRED BY: SARAH & VICKI KENNEDY & DENISE WEISS

OWNED BY: DEBBIE & ROB KIRKPATRICK & SARAH KENNEDY

HANDLED BY: DEBBIE KIRKPATRICK

Looking toward the future, and it sure looks bright

MUSCULAR AND ATHLETIC WHILE MOVING WITH CONSIDERABLE EASE AND ELEGANCE. number one C A N E C O R S O *

CANE CORSO

R B I S B I S S G C H G C A S T L E G U A R D S P I R I T R I D G E M AG I C A L S E B E C F D C T T R AT S C G C A C G C U sebec Sebec

I C E YC R E E KC A N E C O R S O . C O M I C E YC R E E KC C @ G M A I L . C O M

Reserve best in show W I N N I N G C A N E C O R S O

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/21

LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS by LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

MY HEART BELONGS TO DADDY HONORING ROY AYERS A VALENTINE’S PARTY GATHERING AT THE GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA, HOME OF JIM AND LINDA KNORR WHAT GREAT MEMORIES WE HAVE OF THOSE PRESENT FOR THE CELEBRATION WHO ARE NO LONGER WITH US TODAY: ROY AND HAZEL AYERS, MICHELE BILLINGS, RICHARD CHASHOUDIAN, ANNE ROGERS CLARK, GLENDA DAWKINS, BILL AND JEANINE DWELLY, JANE FORSYTH, EARL GRAHAM, DR. RICHARD GREATHOUSE, REP. TERRY HASKINS, JIM KNORR, ROBERT LIGON, DR. HARRY SMITH, COLEEN WILLIAMS, AND JEAN WITT.

GCHS Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend

2021

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

rhodesian all systems *

*AKC stats as of 1/31/21

hound *

THANK YOU JUDGE MS. JOANNE M. BUEHLER

RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS

*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS

Multiple B S & Specialty Winner GCHG DOUBLOON’S EXTREME GAMER MISTER

4th Generation National SpecialtyWinner 4th Generation BISWinner Always Owner Handled

DoubloonWheatens elenamlanda@gmail.com NUMBER SEVEN TERRIER* | NUMBER ONEWHEATEN ALL SYSTEMS 2020* Elena Landa

Shown in 2020, not yet in 2021

*AKC stats 2020

SOFT COATED WHEATEN TERRIER

LOOKING BACK THROUGH LINDA’S LENS

BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLERS: BARBARA & DR. GARY MCNEILL

BREEDERS OF MERIT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 405-833-1774 SILVERLAKEGSPS.COM

©HAN 2020

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED ETHEL’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY. LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING WHAT 2021 WILL BRING US.

:

2 019 N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R B I S, M R B I S, M B I S S, G C H G SilverLakes C G C A, T K A THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINES

MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING 2019 NATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER TRIPLE CROWN BISS NATIONAL SPECIALTY WEEK ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW MULTIPLE ALL BREED RESERVE BEST IN SHOW MULTIPLE REGIONAL SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW

s SS

multiple

B ISS wi nn i ng

group

wi nn i ng

owned by

JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO

MOLLY LATHAM

L ISA BURROFF

bred by

KERRI KOTT

HOLLY H . SCHORR

always owner

handled by

L ISA BURROFF

photos by

holloway

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

beautiful &

standard are always i n style

tessa GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY

GCH • BISS • RBIS JADESTAR N CAIRNCROSS W I L D W I L D WE S T

C H C A I R N C R O S S S KY L I N E I N S Y N C x C H . J A D E S TA R R I ATA OFA Chic # 152556

“ C I S CO ” I S P I C T U R E D W I N N I N G A G R OU P T H R E E AT CO R P U S C H R I S T I KC U N D E R J U D G E D E L R I C H A R D S . WEWOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED CISCO!

SETTER (IRISH)

CISCO & C A R LO S

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY CARLOS CARRIZO

ASSISTED BY SONOHO YAMADA

OWNED BY KATHLEEN CROCKER

BRED BY KATHLEEN CROCKER AND JANET SMITH (JADESTAR)

*

*

YORKSHIRE TERRIER

*

*

*AKC breed & all breed stats as of 1/31/21

BORDER TERRIER

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

TEMPERAMENT, PERSONALITY AND SOUNDNESS W hat is the one thing that is difficult to assess in the dog show ring? It’s the heart of the dog. I’m not refer- ring to the physical heart, but the mental “heart” of the dog—the willingness to do what it takes to get the job done. In race horses, it means the drive to run and beat all others to the finish line. In a dog, it is the mindset to keep going until the dog simply cannot take another step. It means performing beyond one’s physical limita- tions simply because of the will to do so. The fact is that many dogs that are not very well-structured can still per- form the duties for which they were developed. These dogs actually out-per- form their structure due to their strong work ethic (temperament), and will continue to work until they physically breakdown. The well-structured dog that also has the drive to accomplish tasks set by his master will be able to work far longer than his less well put together brethren, and will suffer much less damage to his body. A dog that lacks correct angulation in both front and rear, but is balanced in this lack of angulation, may well be exhausted at the end of the day because he had to take far more steps than a well-angled dog of the same breed. This dog, however, will live to work another day, whereas the dog that is unbalanced with an upright shoulder assembly (but with a well- angled hindquarter) will eventually breakdown in the front and will no longer be able to work. We are all aware of the results of Nobel laureate Ivan Pavlov’s 1906 research program designed to identify the basic types of canine temperament. “Despite this auspicious start, the study of temperament and personality in animals did not evolve into a major area of research except, of course, in humans. Yet, pet owners and practitioners working with dogs have long recognized that temper- ament is important. It influences an individual’s behavior and responses to the environment. Groups interested in temperament have ranged from private dog owners and dogs breeders to professional animal handlers and animal-research scientists; they have been consumed with such practical issues as matching dogs to appropriate homes and with understanding basic theoretical issues in animal behavior.” 1

“THE FACT IS THAT MANY

DOGS THAT ARE NOT VERY WELL- STRUCTURED CAN STILL PERFORM THE DUTIES FOR WHICH THEY WERE DEVELOPED.”

*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 9/30/20

PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

From Pavlov to Clarence Pfaffenberger’s 1963 classic, The New Knowledge of Dog Behavior; The Landmark work that established the science of puppy temperament testing and socialization. “Is it hered- ity or environment that shapes the dog? Researchers J.P. Scott and John L. Fuller, authors of Genetics and Social Behavior of the Dog, bred and cross-bred dogs in their quest to understand human heredity and behavior. Their research yielded a gold mine of data that Pfaffenberger turned into practical information for dog breeders and trainers. Learn about the critical stages of puppy development, how breed differences make dogs suitable for spe- cialized work, and how to breed and socialize temperamentally sound dogs. Reprint of a 1963 classic. Today’s experts recommend ‘The New Knowledge of Dog Behavior.’ Every time I hear someone talking about dogs as being hard-wired for behavior; or self-cen- tered, food-seeking gluttons, eager to be manipulated with a tidbit or click, I get out my copy of this book and my faith in dog and man is rejuvenated.” 2 From these two researchers until today, the information on dog behavior has blossomed into a new industry of its own, and even to “veterinarian behaviorists” who now specialize in correcting the errant behavior of dogs. “IN THIS DAY AND AGE, VERY FEW DOGS GET TO PERFORM THE TASKS FOR WHICH THEY WERE DEVELOPED. TEMPERAMENT SHOULD BE A PRIMARY CONSIDERATION WHEN PLANNING A BREEDING.”

Just what is meant by temperament? In its most basic sense, it is the mental (and physical) reaction to a stimulus. It is difficult to separate temperament from personality in the canine. In humans, temperament is defined as the basic, biologically inherited tenden- cies of an individual, whereas personality is described as the result of the interaction between the temperament and the environment. In the canine, these are wrapped up into one word—temperament! Canines, having been domesticated from the wolf, have what is called a “pack mentality.” This pack order or pack hierarchy consists of the alpha dogs, the middle-of-the-road type of dogs, and the submissive dogs. This hierarchy is ingrained within each dog and cannot be changed. Understanding this pecking order is crucial to understanding the temperament of the individual dog. From this basic pack mentality, each breed was developed for a specific function, whether it be finding birds or game, tracking man or animal, gathering and moving livestock, ridding the world of vermin, assisting man in his daily work whether it be by pull- ing a cart, protecting the home or business, or simply by sitting in someone’s lap offering love and support as only a dog can. So, within the various groups, you will find a wide range of differing personalities from breed to breed. “Each dog breed has a specific standard with certain charac- teristics for a particular breed. Retrievers instinctively retrieve because it’s in the DNA. Terriers may retrieve a ball, but their instincts tell them to grab and shake the ball instead of bringing it back. Sled dogs are born to run ahead of a sled, but cuddling on the couch isn’t something most of them enjoy doing. Guardian breeds are perfectly happy spending their days and nights protect- ing a flock of sheep, far from human interactions. Some breeds have a good work ethic and a willingness to do specific tasks, and some are independent and capable of making decisions on their own. However, this doesn’t mean that every herding dog wants to manage a flock or that all scent hounds are eager to hit the trail, and all retrievers like to get in water. It all depends on a dog’s indi- vidual temperament/personality.” 3 In this day and age, very few dogs get to perform the tasks for which they were developed. Temperament should be a primary consideration when planning a breeding. We must try to produce biddable dogs that can fit into just about any situation and be reli- able enough to go out in public without the owner having diffi- culty controlling the dog. It does not matter what the breed of dog is—it must be able to fit into modern society! As breeders, we must

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