Showsight Presents The Chinook

CHINOOK

Let’s Talk Breed Education!

JUDGING CHINOOKS WITH BREED STANDARD

By the Chinook Club of America

A

s you begin to examine the Chinook, you will see a large, tawny dog with dropped ears. You want to see a large head, more masti ff -like than

While it can be said that color does not pull the sled, color is a de fi ning character- istic of the Chinook. Its historical tawny coat has always set it apart from the other sledding breeds. Other colors have and always will occur, including white, black, and black and tan, but only the histori- cally correct tawny color is acceptable in the AKC show ring. “Tawny” may range from a pale honey to a deep reddish-gold. Dilutes do occur within these accept- able shades of tawny, causing a fading of the coat and pigment color and therefore are not preferred. Black masking, black pigment, dark eyeliner and apostrophe shaped eye markings at the inner eye cor- ners are preferred and highly desirable. Dark guard hairs may occur throughout the coat of adult Chinooks and may even appear like a saddle on the back of young Chinooks. Bu ff markings on the face and chest may also occur but white spots of broken pigment such as nape spots and blazes should be faulted. Th e texture and length of the coat is always important for a sled dog. A coarse, medium length outer coat should lay fl at over a softer, downy undercoat. Th inner coats do naturally occur during summer months and in warmer climates, but keep an eye out for coats that are too short or so long, the outline of the dog is obscured. Improper coats decrease a working dog’s e ffi ciency. When, and if, the Chinook you are examining stacks, you may notice that its

foxy. Th e ears … Oh my! Unlike other Spitz-type breeds, Chinook ears are pre- ferred dropped. Any ear carriage is accept- able, including pricked and helicopter ( fl y- ing out to the side like helicopter blades!) and matching is de fi nitely preferred. Th e expression should be a balance of intel- ligence and kindness. Dark, warm eyes should meet your gaze. Th e Chinook is a large dog, historically weighing nearly 100 pounds. In the 1980’s, only 11 breeding dogs remained. Since then, the Chinook has averaged in smaller sizes. However, they still need appropriate bone, size, muscle and structure to perform the job for which they were intended. Bone weight should be moderate enough to sup- port heavy work, but light enough to display grace. Size for males is 24-26 inches and 70-95 pounds. Th e average size of females is 22-24 inches and 50-70 pounds. Larger size and more substance are preferred but should not take the place of correct structure and movement. Chinooks are a slow maturing breed and will have a gangly appearance well into their 2nd and 3rd year of age. And while females may be more re fi ned than males, it should never be so discerning as to interfere with working compatibility.

“ITS HISTORICAL TAWNY COAT HAS ALWAYS SET IT APART FROM THE OTHER SLEDDING BREEDS.”

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“The Chinook is an impressive dog, WITH AN AQUILINE MUZZLE, DARK ALMOND EYES, BLACK EYE MARKINGS, A VARIETY OF EAR CARRIAGES, AND A TAWNY, CLOSE FITTING COAT.”

front legs turn out slightly. Th is is nor- mal and allows for a more e ffi cient trans- fer of energy. Front and back legs should be straight, strong, and in proportion to each other in length and angle. Feet are very important and should be tight and strong. Conformation should embody strength and grace. A Chinook in motion should be smooth, e ffi cient and e ff ortless. Pinched fronts, steep croups, weak and sloping toplines, and short front legs are common faults that trouble Chinooks. However, their enormous heart and desire to please their owners seems to overcome any challenge. Today, Chinooks remain unequalled as a successful house pet and recreational companion. Many owners are using their Chinooks for recreational pulling – sled- ding, skijoring, rigging, bikejoring, and scootering. Some Chinooks are earning Agility, Rally, Lure Coursing and Obedi- ence titles. Other Chinooks are tracking, performing therapy work, and even some herding. And all Chinooks enjoy close, active relationships with their owners, even if they do nothing more than share their time and a ff ection. After a hands-on, close examination of a Chinook, you should be left with a sense of strength, beauty, pride and a smile your face. Chinook Club of America has a list of approved mentors and presenters avail- able or if you have questions and would like to contact our Standard and Judges Education committee, please visit www. ChinookClubOfAmerica.org . You can fi nd our club documents, Breed Standard, breed info and many color photos here as well. If you would like a personal meeting

with Chinooks, feel free to contact our club or a Chinook breeder/exhibitor. On behalf of our Chinooks, we look forward to meeting you in the ring!!! Chinook Breed Standard GENERAL APPEARANCE —Th e Chinook was developed in the United States as a sled dog whose function was drafting and sled dog racing. Bred to combine the power of freighting breeds with the speed of the lighter racing sled dogs, he is an athletic, hard bodied dog showing good forward reach and rear extension in a seemingly tireless gait. Th e Chinook is an impressive dog, with an aquiline muzzle, dark almond eyes, black eye markings, a variety of ear carriages, and a tawny, close fi tting coat. His saber tail is held in a graceful sickle curve. Th e male should appear unquestionably mas- culine; the female should have a distinctly feminine look and be judged equally with the male. A digni fi ed and a ff ectionate family dog, the Chinook is known for his love of children. Th e Chinook is to be presented in a natural condition with no trimming. Th e following is a description of the ideal Chinook. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUB- STANCE —Th e Chinook is a slow matur- ing breed. SIZE — Ideal height at the withers: males 24 to 26 inches; females 22 to 24 inches. PROPORTION — When measuring from point of shoulder to the point of buttocks the Chinook is slightly longer than tall. Th e proportion of height to length of body being as 9:10 in ratio. SUBSTANCE — Muscular with moderate bone, a gender di ff erence is

easily discernable. Th e Chinook exempli- fi es a sound athlete in grace, muscle tone, movement, and carriage. HEAD —Th e HEAD is broad, wedge- shaped, and impressive but in balance with the size of the dog. Cheeks are well- developed and slightly rounded. Th e EXPRESSION is intelligent, inquisitive and kind. Th e EYES are medium in size and almond in shape with black rims. Th e eye can be any shade of brown but dark brown is preferred. Dark markings around the eye that accentuate the eye and give character are desirable. Extended black pigment in an apostrophe shape at the inner corner of each eye is preferred. Disquali fi cation: Any eye color other than brown. Th e EARS are set near the top line of the skull. Th ey are medium in size, V-shaped, and slightly rounded at the tip. Th e ear tip should be just long enough to reach the inside corner of the eye. Any ear type is allowed, including drop, prick, or propeller ears that main- tain a fold when at attention. For aes- thetic purposes, dropped and matched ears are preferred. Th e TOPSKULL is broad and slightly arched between the ears. When viewed from above, the top- skull is almost square, gradually narrow- ing and fl attening on top as it approaches the eyes. Th e STOP is moderate and marked with a central furrow extending up the topskull. Th e MUZZLE is aqui- line and shorter in length than the top- skull, measuring from nose to stop as 2:3 in ratio with stop to occiput. Viewed from the front, the muzzle is tapered to form a blunt wedge. Viewed from the side, the top of the muzzle to the nasal cartilage

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and the topskull are almost parallel. Th e nose is large, prominent and the leather is solid black. Th e lips are black. BITE —Th e Chinook has a full com- plement of strong teeth meeting in a scis- sors or a level bite. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY —Th e NECK is strong, balanced in length, arched, and covered with fur that forms a protective ru ff . Th e skin on the neck is pliable but a pendulous dewlap is a fault. Th e neck blends smoothly into the withers. TOPLINE —Th e back is straight, strong and level, with no sign of weakness. Th ere is a slight arch over the loins. Faults: sloping topline, roach or sway back. Th e BODY is well muscled and hard. Th e chest is mod- erately broad, well fi lled and deep, and nei- ther too broad or too narrow. Th e forechest has a prominent prosternum that extends beyond the point of shoulders when viewed from the side. Th e brisket reaches to or nearly to the elbows. Th e ribs are well sprung, oval in shape, fl attening toward the lower end to allow for elbow clearance and e ffi cient movement. Th e loins are muscular with a slight arch, having enough length to be athletic but still in proportion. Th e underline has a moderate tuck-up. Th e croup is muscular, slightly sloping, broad and without exaggeration. Faults: Narrow or barrel chest, dropped croup. TAIL —Th e saber tail is moderately set just below the level of the topline and is well coated with distinct but moderate fringing. It is broad at the base, tapering to the end and reaches to the hock with a slight curve at the tip when relaxed. When alert or moving, the tail is carried in a graceful sickle curve, neither curling to the side of the body nor touching the back. Th e tail should never be docked. Faults: low or high tail set. FOREQUARTERS —Th e shoulders are moderately laid back with the shoulder and upper arm forming an angle of approxi- mately 110 degrees. Th e shoulder blade and upper arm are equal in length. Th e forelegs are straight, well-muscled, with moderate, oval bone. When viewed from the front, the legs are parallel, and straight. Th e elbows turn neither in nor out. Th e pasterns are fl exible, moderate in length, strong, and slightly sloping when viewed from the side. Dewclaws may be removed. Th e FEET

are tight, oval in shape, with arched toes, webbing between the toes, and with strong nails. Th e pads are thick, tough, and darkly pigmented. Th e front feet may turn slightly outward when standing. HINDQUARTERS —Th e hindquar- ters are muscular and strong, moderately angulated, and in balance with the fore- quarters. Th e slope of the pelvis is approxi- mately 30 degrees o ff the horizontal with the angle of the sti fl e at about 110 degrees. Th e upper and lower thigh muscles are well-de fi ned. Th e rear pasterns are paral- lel to each other, and perpendicular to the ground when viewed from any angle. Th e rear feet point straight ahead. Rear dew claws must be removed. COAT —Th e Chinook has a thick double coat lying close to the body. Th e outer coat is straight, strong, and coarse. Th e length of the outer coat is longer over the ru ff , shoulder blades, withers, breeches, and along the underline and the under- side of the tail but is never so long as to obscure the clean-cut outline of the dog. Th e undercoat is short and dense, downy in texture, providing insulation. Th e groin and inside of the rear legs are protected by coat. A winter coat feels soft and plush with coarser hair following the topline. A summer coat may be thinner, feel coarser, and should not be penalized. Th e tail is well-furred with feathering starting about four to fi ve inches from the root. Th ere is slight feathering of shorter hair along the back of the forelegs. Th e Chinook is shown naturally and trimming is not acceptable. Faults: Th in, sparse, or excessively short coat, long, rough, or shaggy coat, unpro- tected belly and/or groin. Trimming of the coat is to be severely penalized. COLOR — Tawny coloration, rang- ing from a pale honey to a deep reddish- gold, is a distinguishing characteristic of the Chinook. Dilute tawny, and its asso- ciated diluted pigmentation of nose, lips, pads, and eye rims, is acceptable but not preferred. It is desirable for the ears and muzzle to have darker coloring than the body. Th is darker ear and muzzle coloring runs from a tawny that is darker than the body to a black shading, with some black shading being the most preferred. A black apostrophe shape mark at the inner corner

of each eye is desirable. Symmetrical white or cream to pale gold markings are accept- able on the cheeks, throat, chest, breeches, and underside. Any other white markings are undesirable including blazes, socks, and scarves. Disquali fi cation: Any color other than tawny as described. GAIT —Th e Chinook’s gait is smooth, easy, and seemingly tireless. When viewed from the side, there should be good reach in the front and good extension in the rear, covering ground with minimal e ff ort. Viewed from behind, the rear pads should be fully visible. Th e back is strong and level when gaiting. As speed increas- es, the feet tend to converge toward a cen- ter line of gravity. TEMPERAMENT —Th e Chinook is an a ff ectionate and playful family com- panion with a special devotion toward children. He is a willing worker who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn. Th e Chinook is highly trainable, adapt- able, and versatile in his abilities. Gregari- ous with other dogs, the Chinook works well in teams and within family packs. Th e Chinook is a digni fi ed dog and some Chi- nooks may be reserved with strangers but should never appear shy or aggressive. Variations are penalized to the extent of the deviations. DISQUALIFICATIONS Any eye color other than brown. Any color other than tawny as described in this Standard. For more info contact: Sarah Day, CCA Publicity Director Cell: 925-330-9786 Sarah.day_78@yahoo.com

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CHINOOKS

C

By the Chinook Club of America

hinooks are a breed apart. Truly an American dog, they have accomplished much in the 96 years since the birth of the fi rst pup in New Hampshire.

laid close to his body. Most importantly, Chinook’s loving, easy-going disposition made him an ideal companion. Chinook was a “sport” and reproduced himself when bred to other dogs. His unique traits made “Chinook” the obvious choice for the breed’s name. To Chinook owners, however, the his- torical contributions pale in comparison to the characteristic gentle temperament, solid work ethic, and broad versatility that Chinook bestowed on his descendants and distinguishes them from sled dogs and other large breeds, making them uniquely American. His descendants are still tawny with a blocky head and a wash and wear coat that only sheds out once or twice a

year. Like Chinook, his descendants are characterized by service. Today’s Chi- nooks can still be found in harness – but that harness is just as likely to be pulling skis, bicycles and carts, as it is a sled. Other Chinooks carry packs and are as much at home in kayaks as they are on the couch. Chinooks love agility, rally, obedience, vis- iting hospitals and nursing homes as thera- py dogs, or in classrooms as “Tail Waggin’ Tutors” helping children learn to read. As a large breed, regular exercise and training will ensure a healthy Chinook that behaves appropriately. Harsh handling or lack of socialization may create a shy Chinook, but rarely an aggressive one. Chinooks need to be with their owners and don’t do

Th e dam was a Greenland Husky descend- ed from Admiral Peary’s lead-dog Polaris and the sire was a St. Bernard/Masti ff - type dog. Chinook was one of 3 pups. But Chinook was unique and the breed to this day does not share any of the Spitz traits typifying sled dog breeds. Unlike Huskies and Malamutes, Chinook was a large taw- ny dog with down ears and broad, blocky head, weighing 100 pounds. Unlike the bushy coats of Spitz breeds, Chinook’s coat

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tory had an even bigger role in mind for Walden and Chinook. Walden was appointed to head the Dog Department for Admiral Richard Byrd’s fi rst Antarctic Expedition in 1927. Walden and his sixteen Chinook dogs were described by Admiral Byrd as the backbone of the expedition transport. In fact, in 1931, Walden received the Con- gressional Medal for his part in Byrd’s Antarctic Expeditions. But more than a sled dog, Chinook’s gentle temperament allowed Byrd to take him to lectures and fund-raising events. Chinook became the signature dog of Byrd’s expeditions. Chinook made news around the world when he was 12 and was lost during an expediton. At Walden’s request, Route 113A from Tamworth to Wonalancet, New Hampshire, now bears the name “Chinook Trail” to honor his famous lead dog. Th e Depression forced Walden to sell his beloved Chinooks, but their imprint on American life continued. For a time, 4 )08 4 *()5 . "(";*/& 0 $50#&3 t

well if regularly left alone for long periods. Th ey are not good kennel dogs, not terri- torial and therefore, not good guard dogs. Chinooks are intelligent, sensitive, and catch on quickly to consistent train- ing. Th ey gravitate toward children and are gregarious with other dogs. Chinook Club of America attends many of the AKC Meet the Breeds. We’re the booth where children are “hand” holding a Chinook and Chinook kisses are always available! An amazing family dog coupled with work

ethic and versatility gave the Chinook a proud and historical past and o ff ers it a bright future! Arthur T. Walden, Chinook’s owner, was an explorer, author, innkeeper, and most importantly, a sled dog driver. Walden and his dog sled team, with Chi- nook in lead, were credited with bring- ing the sport of sled dog racing to New England and founded the New England Sled Dog Club in 1924; the oldest club of its kind still in operation. But his-

they were the face of Old Mother Hub- bard Dog Food. From the 1940s into the 60s, they were solely bred by Perry Greene in Waldoboro Maine and it was a Chi- nook named Charger that was obtained as a mascot for the Boeing Helicopters and sent to Vietnam. By the 1980’s, the breed almost died out, but e ff orts by breeders brought the breed back and it now num- bers about 1000 dogs. In 1991, Chinooks entered the UKC registry and in 2001 the breed began seeking AKC recognition. 2009 brought the unexpected honor of being named the state dog of New Hamp- shire, brought about by the e ff orts of New Hampshire’s Lurgio Middle School students. Chinooks entered AKC Miscel- laneous Class in 2010 and the Working Group in 2013. We currently have a few AKC Champions and a Group IV win in the Working Group. For more informa- tion and a list of Mentors and Presenters contact Th e Chinook Club of America: www.ChinookClubofAmerica.org Th e Chinook is unequalled by any oth- er breed in its success as a house pet while still maintaining its versatility as a work- ing dog. Created to be happy both in har- ness and at the hearth, the Chinook has overcome near extinction to once again enjoy the love of so many people around the world. From the South Pole in 1930 to the AKC Working Group in 2013, it has been a long journey for the Chinook… a journey on which the Chinook enthusi- astically embarks with happy barks and wagging tails. For more info contact: Sarah Day, CCA Publicity Director Cell: 925-330-9786 Sarah.day_78@yahoo.com

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H I S T O R Y

By Cheryl Brown

Chinooks The Chinook is truly a breed apart. An American treasure, they have come far since their beginnings on the quiet slopes of a New Hampshire farm some 90 years ago. The breeding of a Greenland Husky bitch, reported to descend from Admiral Peary’s lead- dog, Polaris, to a St. Bernard/Mastiff- type farm-dog produced a litter with 3 solid tawny pups. One pup stood out from the rest, displaying great intelli- gence, courage, work ethic and a gen- tle disposition. Chinook was a tawny dog weighing nearly 100 pounds, with a blocky head and flopped ears – his appearance was distinct. Though char- acteristically different from the other sled dogs on the farm, he was able to successfully reproduce his himself in his offspring. His owner, Arthur T. Walden, was so taken with Chinook and “Chinook’s dogs” that he felt he had created the perfect combination of loving companion and working dog. He named his kennel “Chinook Kennels” and though he continued to import dogs that would become known as Siberian Huskies and Alaskan Malamutes, he focused on breeding his Chinooks. Walden was an explorer, author, innkeeper, and most importantly, a sled dog driver. He had learned to

drive dog teams during the Alaskan gold rush. When he returned to his home in New Hampshire, he brought his love for adventure with him. Walden and his dog sled team, with Chinook in lead, were credited with bringing the sport of sled dog racing to New England and founding the New England Sled Dog Club in 1924; the oldest club of its kind still in opera- tion. But Walden and Chinook would play an even bigger role in history than either could have ever imagined. Attracting the attention of Admiral Richard Byrd, Walden was asked to head the Dog Department for Byrd’s first Antarctic Expedition in 1927. Walden and his sixteen Chinook dogs were described by Admiral Byrd as the backbone of the expedition transport. In fact, in 1931, Walden received the Congressional Medal for his part in Byrd’s Antarctic Expeditions. President Hoover went on to declare a Chinook, Paugus, and his owner, as America’s most typical “boy and his dog.” Chinook was so much more than a commanding lead-dog. Chinook’s gen- tle temperament and playful personali-

Backroads Kayak

ty allowed Byrd to take him to lectures and fund-raising events. Chinook became the signature dog of Byrd’s expeditions. He became the symbol of

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a sled dog to both adults and children everywhere. He was even commemo- rated as a Steiff stuffed animal. He was so famous that when Chinook was lost in Antarctica during the expedition, it made headline news around the world! At Walden’s request, Route 113A from Tamworth to Wonalancet, New Hampshire, was named “Chinook Trail” to honor his beloved dog. It still bears this name today. When Walden returned from Antarctica, the Depression had already taken a toll on his farm. Heartbroken after the loss of Chinook, Walden sold his Chinook Kennels to Eva “Short” Seeley, and the remaining Chinooks to Julia Lombard, whose family owned Old Mother Hubbard Dog Food. Short Seeley went forward breeding Siberian Huskies and Alaskan Malamutes at the Chinook Kennels and would register the first of their kind with the American Kennel Club. Julia went on to breed Chinooks with Walden’s direction until his death in 1947. She then sold her Chinooks to Perry Greene in Waldoboro, Maine, who was the sole breeder of the Chinooks until his death in 1963. During these years, Greene actively promoted the Chinook as a recreational companion and cherished part of American histo- ry. He even sold a Chinook named Charger to Boeing Helicopter. Charger became the mascot for Chinook Helicopter Divisions during the Vietnam War. After Greene’s death, the breed was shuffled around until it came to rest at the Sukeforth Kennel in Maine. By the early 1980’s, the breed had almost drifted into lure and extinction. With only 11 breeding dogs remaining, their

future was uncertain. It was their rich history and the impressions made on the hearts of children that would save the breed. Children that had grown up loving the Chinook went searching for them as adults, finding these remain- ing dogs at their most critical moment. Together, these few breeders joined their efforts and created a genetic plan for successful breeding. In 1991, Chinooks entered the UKC registry and in 2001 the breed began registering with the AKC Foundation Stock Service. In 2004, the Chinook Club of America was created to help protect and promote the Chinook as it contin- ued its journey with the AKC. After many years of hard work, through the dedication of many people, the Chinook entered AKC Miscellaneous Class in July 2010. Today the Chinook enjoys quiet com- forts in homes all over the world; once again, imprinting on the hearts of chil- dren. In 2009, the unexpected honor of being named the state dog of New

Hampshire was brought about by the efforts of New Hampshire’s Lurgio Middle School kids. With over 1000 dogs alive today, the Chinook has escaped the grasp of extinction. As it moves into the ranks of a breed recog- nized by the American Kennel Club, it reclaims its rightful place in American history. In the AKC show ring, expect the Chinook to retain its uniqueness. A large, tawny, almost mongrel looking sled dog with floppy ears may seem out of place among other fancier, fluffier breeds. Though the Chinook’s unexpected appearance and gregari- ousness may seem unrefined, their intelligence and deep, intuitive senses display a keen potential. The Chinook has successfully claimed a niche in the

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family and their need to be active. The Chinook is ready and willing to join its family hiking, biking, skiing, boating, or sledding. They love to participate in 4-H, obedience, agility, rally-o, track- ing, and even herding. Chinooks enjoy therapy work with the elderly, sick, and especially with children in classrooms. After a hard day of working, the Chinook is happy to curl up at your feet and peacefully thump his tail. Chinook Club of America attends many of AKC Meet the Breeds events. CCA is the booth where children are “hand” holding a Chinook and Chinook kisses are always available! Please come visit us and learn more about America’s unique and versatile recreational family companion. Visit us on the web: www.ChinookClubofAmerica.org Chinook Breed Standard GENERAL APPEARANCE – The Chinook was developed in the United States as a sled dog whose function was drafting and sled dog racing. Bred to combine the power of freighting breeds with the speed of the lighter racing sled dogs, he is an athletic, hard bodied dog showing good for- ward reach and rear extension in a seemingly tireless gait. The Chinook is an impressive dog, with an aquiline muzzle, dark almond eyes, black eye markings, a variety of ear carriages, and a tawny, close fitting coat. His saber tail is held in a graceful sickle curve. The male should appear unquestionably masculine; the female should have a distinctly feminine look and be judged equally with the male. A dignified and affectionate family dog, the Chinook is known for his love

of children. The Chinook is to be pre- sented in a natural condition with no trimming. The following is a descrip- tion of the ideal Chinook. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE – The Chinook is a slow maturing breed. SIZE – Ideal height at the withers: males 24 to 26 inches; females 22 to 24 inches. PROPORTION – When measuring from point of shoulder to the point of buttocks the Chinook is slightly longer than tall. The propor- tion of height to length of body being as 9:10 in ratio. SUBSTANCE – Muscular with moderate bone, a gen- der difference is easily discernable. The Chinook exemplifies a sound ath- lete in grace, muscle tone, movement, and carriage. HEAD – The HEAD is broad, wedge- shaped, and impressive but in balance with the size of the dog. Cheeks are well-developed and slightly rounded. The EXPRESSION is intelligent, inquisi- tive and kind. The EYES are medium in size and almond in shape with black rims. The eye can be any shade of brown but dark brown is preferred. Dark markings around the eye that accentuate the eye and give character are desirable. Extended black pigment in an apostrophe shape at the inner corner of each eye is preferred. Disqualification: Any eye color other than brown. The EARS are set near the top line of the skull. They are medium in size, V-shaped, and slightly rounded at the tip. The ear tip should be just long enough to reach the inside corner

dog world by finding a balance between pet and working dog.

Strongly bonded to their owners, they yearn for companionship. Their bond cultivates a willingness to please and a desire to assist in any activity. Together, Chinook and owner can accomplish almost any task. The Chinook is perfect for an active family that desires to have their dog accompany them on all their adven- tures. They do not thrive under harsh handling or chronic kenneling. They need an environment that can help ful- fill their drive to connect with their

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sickle curve, neither curling to the side of the body nor touching the back. The tail should never be docked. Faults: low or high tail set. FOREQUARTERS – The shoulders are moderately laid back with the shoul- der and upper arm forming an angle of approximately 110 degrees. The shoul- der blade and upper arm are equal in length. The forelegs are straight, well- muscled, with moderate, oval bone. When viewed from the front, the legs are parallel, and straight. The elbows turn neither in nor out. The pasterns are flexible, moderate in length, strong, and slightly sloping when viewed from the side. Dewclaws may be removed. The FEET are tight, oval in shape, with arched toes, webbing between the toes, and with strong nails. The pads are thick, tough, and darkly pigmented. The front feet may turn slightly outward when standing. HINDQUARTERS – The hindquarters are muscular and strong, moderately angulated, and in balance with the forequarters. The slope of the pelvis is approximately 30 degrees off the hori- zontal with the angle of the stifle at about 110 degrees. The upper and lower thigh muscles are well-defined. The rear pasterns are parallel to each other, and perpendicular to the ground when viewed from any angle. The rear feet point straight ahead. Rear dew claws must be removed. COAT – The Chinook has a thick dou- ble coat lying close to the body. The outer coat is straight, strong, and

of the eye. Any ear type is allowed, including drop, prick, or propeller ears that maintain a fold when at attention. For aesthetic purposes, dropped and matched ears are preferred. The TOP- SKULL is broad and slightly arched between the ears. When viewed from above, the topskull is almost square, gradually narrowing and flattening on top as it approaches the eyes. The STOP is moderate and marked with a central furrow extending up the top- skull. The MUZZLE is aquiline and shorter in length than the topskull, measuring from nose to stop as 2:3 in ratio with stop to occiput. Viewed from the front, the muzzle is tapered to form a blunt wedge. Viewed from the side, the top of the muzzle to the nasal cartilage and the topskull are almost parallel. The nose is large, prominent and the leather is solid black. The lips are black. BITE – The Chinook has a full comple- ment of strong teeth meeting in a scis- sors or a level bite. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY – The NECK is strong, balanced in length, arched, and covered with fur that forms a pro- tective ruff. The skin on the neck is pli- able but a pendulous dewlap is a fault. The neck blends smoothly into the withers. TOPLINE – The back is straight, strong and level, with no sign of weakness. There is a slight arch over the loins. Faults: sloping topline, roach

or sway back. The BODY is well mus- cled and hard. The chest is moderately broad, well filled and deep, and nei- ther too broad or too narrow. The forechest has a prominent prosternum that extends beyond the point of shoulders when viewed from the side. The brisket reaches to or nearly to the elbows. The ribs are well sprung, oval in shape, flattening toward the lower end to allow for elbow clearance and efficient movement. The loins are mus- cular with a slight arch, having enough length to be athletic but still in propor- tion. The underline has a moderate tuck-up. The croup is muscular, slightly sloping, broad and without exaggera- tion. Faults: Narrow or barrel chest, dropped croup. TAIL – The saber tail is moderately set just below the level of the topline and is well coated with dis- tinct but moderate fringing. It is broad at the base, tapering to the end and reaches to the hock with a slight curve at the tip when relaxed. When alert or moving, the tail is carried in a graceful

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desirable. Symmetrical white or cream to pale gold markings are acceptable on the cheeks, throat, chest, breeches, and underside. Any other white mark- ings are undesirable including blazes, socks, and scarves. Disqualification: Any color other than tawny as described. GAIT – The Chinook’s gait is smooth, easy, and seemingly tireless. When viewed from the side, there should be good reach in the front and good extension in the rear, covering ground with minimal effort. Viewed from behind, the rear pads should be fully visible. The back is strong and level when gaiting. As speed increases, the feet tend to converge toward a center line of gravity. TEMPERAMENT – The Chinook is an affectionate and playful family com- panion with a special devotion toward children. He is a willing worker who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn. The Chinook is highly trainable, adaptable, and versatile in his abilities. Gregarious with other dogs, the Chinook works well in teams and within family packs. The Chinook is a dignified dog and some Chinooks may be reserved with strangers but should never appear shy or aggressive. Variations are penalized to the extent of the deviations DISQUALIFICATIONS Any eye color other than brown. Any color other than tawny as described in this Standard.

may be thinner, feel coarser, and should not be penalized. The tail is well-furred with feathering starting about four to five inches from the root. There is slight feathering of shorter hair along the back of the forelegs. The Chinook is shown naturally and trim- ming is not acceptable. Faults: Thin, sparse, or excessively short coat, long, rough, or shaggy coat, unprotected belly and/or groin. Trimming of the coat is to be severely penalized. COLOR – Tawny coloration, ranging from a pale honey to a deep reddish- gold, is a distinguishing characteristic of the Chinook. Dilute tawny, and its associated diluted pigmentation of nose, lips, pads, and eye rims, is acceptable but not preferred. It is desirable for the ears and muzzle to have darker coloring than the body. This darker ear and muzzle coloring runs from a tawny that is darker than the body to a black shading, with some black shading being the most preferred. A black apostrophe shape mark at the inner corner of each eye is

coarse. The length of the outer coat is longer over the ruff, shoulder blades, withers, breeches, and along the underline and the underside of the tail but is never so long as to obscure the clean-cut outline of the dog. The undercoat is short and dense, downy in texture, providing insulation. The groin and inside of the rear legs are protected by coat. A winter coat feels soft and plush with coarser hair fol- lowing the topline. A summer coat

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J u d g i n g C h i n o o k s

Judging Chinooks Please welcome the Chinook to Miscellaneous Class! True to its nature, the Chinook enters the ring slowly, but with great enthusiasm. Since it is likely you’ve never seen a Chinook in the fur, we want to pre- pare you for your first meeting. As a breed first developed as a sled dog, the Chinook is often lumped with other Spitz-type breeds. However, at first glance, you will probably ques- tion that association. With a deeper, hands on examination, you will dis- cover that underneath that different appearance is the build of a versatile working sled dog. The Chinook was created in the early 1900’s, at the same time (and at the very same Chinook Kennels!) that the Siberian Huskies and Alaskan Malamutes were being imported to the U.S. for recreation and work. Arthur Walden wanted to find a happy medium by combining tremendous strength and power, speed, and friend- ly temperament to create the perfect working dog. He was successful. Not only did his Chinook team establish records for their work on Admiral Byrd’s first Antarctic Expedition, they became unequalled by any other breed in their success as a house pet as well as a working dog that could be used in conjunction with winter sports. Their kind, loving and depen- dent personality and unique appear- ance set them apart from other sled- ding breeds. The Chinook Club of America firmly believes in embracing the fundamental traditions of the his- torical Chinook. As a versatile breed, a natural vari- ance in type and structure is to be

expected. It is recommended that you meet and put your hands on several Chinooks from different areas of the U.S. before developing a firm inter- pretation of the Standard. It is impor- tant to have knowledge of the rich his- tory to understand what traits are unique to the Chinook – essentially – what characteristics make a “Chinook a Chinook.” Always keep in mind that form must follow function. A Chinook must be able to perform his job as a working dog and his conformation must speak to you of his ability to effortlessly accomplish this task. As the Chinook enters the ring, you will meet a thinking dog. He may be cautious and take a few moments to adjust to his surroundings before

relaxing with a wag of his graceful sickle tail. The Chinook may remain a bit aloof but is usually seen boister- ously bouncing around the ring. Their friendly temperament may make it challenging for them to stand still in the ring, however this warm personali- ty is a treasured characteristic of the breed. Be prepared for dancing feet and licking tongues! As you begin to examine the Chinook, don’t feel shocked when you see a large, tawny dog with dropped ears. You want to see a large head, more mastiff-like than foxy. The ears … Oh my! Unlike other Spitz-type breeds, Chinook ears are preferred dropped. Any ear carriage is accept- able, including pricked and helicopter (flying out to the side like helicopter blades!) and matching is definitely preferred. The expression should be a balance of intelligence and kindness.

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Dark, warm eyes should meet your gaze. The Chinook is a large dog, histori- cally weighing nearly 100 pounds. In the 1980’s, only 11 breeding dogs remained. Since then, the Chinook has averaged in smaller sizes. However, they still need appropriate bone, size, muscle and structure to perform the job for which they were intended. Bone weight should be moderate enough to support heavy work, but light enough to display grace. Size for males is 24-26 inches and 70-95 pounds. The average size of females is 22-24 inches and 50-70 pounds. Larger size and more sub- stance are preferred but should not take the place of correct structure and movement. Chinooks are a slow maturing breed and will have a gangly appearance well into their 2 nd and 3 rd year of age. And while females may be more refined than males, it should never be so discerning as to interfere with working compatibility. While it can be said that color does not pull the sled, color is a defining characteristic of the Chinook. Its his- torical tawny coat has always set it apart from the other sledding breeds. Other colors have and always will occur, including white, black, and black and tan, but only the historically correct tawny color is acceptable in the AKC show ring. “Tawny” may range from a pale honey to a deep reddish-gold. Dilutes do occur within these acceptable shades of tawny, causing a fading of the coat and pig- ment color and therefore are not pre- ferred. Black masking, black pigment, dark eyeliner and apostrophe shaped eye markings at the inner eye corners

front legs are common faults that trou- ble Chinooks. However, their enor- mous heart and desire to please their owners seems to overcome any chal- lenge. Today, Chinooks remain unequalled as a successful house pet and active, athletic companion. Many owners are using their Chinooks for recreational pulling – sledding, skijoring, rigging, bikejoring, and scootering. Some Chinooks are earning Agility and Obedience titles. Other Chinooks are tracking, performing therapy work, and even some herding. And all Chinooks enjoy close, active relation- ships with their owners, even if they do nothing more than share their time and affection. After a hands-on, close examination of a Chinook, you should be left with a sense of strength, beau- ty, pride and a smile your face. Chinook Club of America is develop- ing a Judges Education presentation and we look forward to introducing AKC judges to our wonderful breed in 2011. If you have questions and would like to contact our Standard and Judges Education committee, please visit www.ChinookClubOfAmerica.org You can find our club documents, Breed Standard, breed info and many color photos here as well. If you would like a personal meeting with Chinooks, feel free to contact our club or a Chinook breeder/exhibitor. On behalf of our Chinooks, we look forward to meeting you in the ring!!

are preferred and highly desirable. Dark guard hairs may occur through- out the coat of adult Chinooks and may even appear like a saddle on the back of young Chinooks. Buff mark- ings on the face and chest may also occur but white spots of broken pig- ment such as nape spots and blazes should be faulted. The texture and length of the coat is always important for a sled dog. A coarse, medium length outer coat should lay flat over a softer, downy undercoat. Thinner coats do naturally occur during summer month and in warmer climates, but keep an eye out for coats that are too short or too long. Improper coats decrease a working dog’s efficiency. When, and if, the Chinook you are examining stacks, you may notice that its front legs turn out slightly. This is normal and allows for a more efficient transfer of energy. Front and back legs should be straight, strong, and in pro- portion to each other in length and angle. Feet are very important and should be tight and strong. Conformation should embody strength and grace. A Chinook in motion should be smooth, efficient and effort- less. Pinched fronts, steep croups, weak and sloping toplines, and short

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