Showsight May 2017

B r e e d e r s

C h r i s t i n e

L a M u r a g l i a a n d P e g g y H e l m i n g O w n e r s

M a r k & We n d y K e y s e r a n d C h r i s t i n e

L a m u r a g l i a H a n d l e r

A l e x i s D i t l ow

Alexis Dillow

JOVI S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 3

4 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 5

6 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 7

8 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 9

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW, BEST IN SPECIALTY AND NATIONAL SPECIALTYWINNING AMERICA’S #1 IRISH SETTER

Our deep appreciation

TO G ROU P J UDG E H E AT H E R L ANG F I E L D F OR R E COGN I Z I NG E L L A’ S OU T S TAND I NG B R E E D QUA L I T Y AND T Y P E

*SHOWS I GHT BREED & AL L BREED STAT S AS OF 3/31/17

10 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Owned by: MAR I LYN T I TLE , CAROLYN MCKENZ I E , PATR I C I A KUDLA, & SUZANNE WALKER Breeders: CHARL I E & SUZANNE WALKER Presented by: GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D ( 410 ) 822 - 2187

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 11

*

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/17

12 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 13

TO G R O U P J U DG E R I TA S . WA L K E R A N D B E S T I N S H OW J U DG E M R S . A N G E L A J . P O R P O R A our sincere appreciation M U L T I P L E G R O U P A N D B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

owned by JEANNE & CHARLES HURTY AND LYNNE & MARK FLORIAN bred by CHARLES & JEANNE HURTY presented by GREG STRONG, AKC REG’D, (410) 822-2187

14 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

*ShowSight breed stats as of 3/31/17

G R A N D C H A M P I O N CJ’s Sweet GEORGIA BROWN

A M E R I C A ’ S

PBGV BITCH

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 15

16 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 17

18 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 19

20 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

**

*

*all systems as of 3/31/1 **ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/17

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 21

Bronze Grand Champion WI LDEST DREAM GENU I NE ROCK N ROLL , CD RN RA (H IT )

Thank You Judge Mrs. Terry M. DePietro

ROCCO IS THE ONLY SWISSI E I N H ISTORY WITH A BEST AT BOTH ENDS ! 22 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

owned & loved by: JOANNE SCHOTTINGER TINA & JOHN BAILEY presented by: STEPHEN M. CABRAL 626.215.9040

Best in Show Winning

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 23

MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER | MULTIPLE GROUP PLACER

F O R R E C O G N I Z I N G A R I S TO ’ S F I N E T Y P E & Q U A L I T Y WH I C H M A D E H I M T H E # 1 S T. B E R N A R D * . THANK YOU JUDGES

24 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

* ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 3/31 / 17

Aristo GCHG ELBA’S ARISTO PRESTO, HOF , PE TOP 20 WORKING DOG

OWNED BY: ED & LINDA BAKER | ELBA SAINTS | HOPEWELL, NJ | ELBA1@AOL.COM EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED & LOVED BY: MELODY “SNOOKI” SALMI BRED BY: YVETTE FOSTER NO. 1 the SAINT BERNARD all systems* S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 25

ESTEEMED JUDGES FOR RECOGNIZING WILLY’S FINE QUALITIES.

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/17 BEARDED COLLIE *

OWNED BY ANNA MARIE YURA | BRED & CO-OWNED BY RAY HARRINGTON

26 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

DUNHILL WILL I AM

M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY JAMES BETTIS

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 27

TRI SORTS SUMMER HARVEST HSAS, NA, NAJ

Breed & All Breed *

Malinois 2 0 1 5 & 2 0 1 6 *

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/17 **SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS 2016 & 2015

Always Breeder/Owner/Handled by: LISA KNOCK Bred by: TRISORTS, LISA KNOCK & BARBARA VITARELLI

28 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Thank You Judge

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 29

T HANK Y OU J UDG E

Peri Norman for this win.

Owned by JOYCE ROWLAND & LAURIE YOUMANS Bred by JOYCE ROWLAND, LAURIE YOUMANS & MARTY YOUMANS GRIFFITH

NUMBER ONE All Systems 2 0 1 6 & 2 0 1 7 * *ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 3/31/17

30 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

type, temperament & balance. GRAND CHAMP I ON R E N E GAD E S PAY ’ N I T F ORWARD A T DAWN H E I R H S A s S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 31

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats 2016

32 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 33

34 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 35

36 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

®

®

A NEUROLOGICAL BREAKTHROUGH IS HERE

!

NEW

Ask your veterinarian about Purina ® Pro Plan ® Veterinary Diets NeuroCare. PurinaProPlanVeterinaryDiets.com

Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. Printed in USA.

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 37

38 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 39

40 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 41

42 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Our sincere appreciation to Judges Mr. Jack Simmons and Mrs. Linda Hurlburt for these fabulous group wins.

Owned by CHARLES HURTY, MARK FLORIAN & MARGARET CROPSEY Bred by MARGARET CROPSEY, CAROL STRONG, DANIELLE TALLMAN & JEANNE HURTY | Presented by GREG STRONG G C H B I H A R ’ S H E R E ’ S L OOK I N G AT YO U

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 43

AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cellular 863 640 8848 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 104 Cellular 863 712 8848 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com

ON THE COVER: SHAKESPEARE ENGLISH SETTER GCHB Esthete’s The Bard of Avon BN RA SH NA NAH NF Story page 39

512 686 3466 ext 103 MAILINg ADDRESS PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679 SHOWSIGHT THE DOG SHOWMAGAZINE Production Manager DIANE GREENE-WALSH Managing Editor CORTNY WHITE Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS, ARLENE CZECH, KATHERINE ELDREDGE, JACQUELYN FOGEL LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Ad & Editorial Design DIANE GREENE-WALSH CORTNY WHITE ERIKA RUTHERFORD, EMILY PLAMBECK

TABLE OF CONTENTS MONTHLY COLUMNS 36 SHOWSIGHT • FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joseph Neil McGinnis 39 COVER STORY 44 TABLE OF CONTENTS 46 FROM THE PUBLISHER AJ Arapovic 50 THOUGHTS I HAD DRIVING HOME FROM THE DOG SHOW Caroline Coile 72 ON THE LINE by BJ Andrews 100 MY DOG IS ATE MY HOMEWORK Katherine Eldredge 106 BECOMING Jacquelyn Fogel 122 LOOKING THROUGH LINDA’S LENS Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 138 ON THE LOSS OF A PET Will Gibson, MD 142 THE SECOND TIME AROUND Pat Bullard 148 SURVEY SAYS 154 SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION Compiled by Daniel Cartier VARIETY GROUP FEATURE 177 SHOWSIGHT CELEBRATES SPORTING DOGS 210 THE AMERICANIZATION OF THE SPORTING BREEDS Doug Johnson BREED FEATURES BREED FEATURES 214 THE FRENCH BULLDOG 232 THE MASTIFF 251 THE AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD 262 THE CHINESE CRESTED 265 THE DALMATIAN 275 THE FLAT-COATED RETRIEVER NEWS & INFORMATION 284 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 256 COMING ATTRACTIONS 285 ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTION RATES 288 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

KELLI LAW, TERESA PATTEN Director, Social Media & Web Site DANIEL CARTIER DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________ Executive Editor Chief Media Consultant JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS 863 816 8848 EDITOR@ARAMEDIAGRP.COM _______________________________

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. 221 Indigo Lane, Georgetown, Texas 78628. President, AJ Arapovic. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COURTESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge United States. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

44 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W A N D B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y W I N N I N G

G R A N D C H A M P I O N T E R I T A I L S L O Y A L K N I G H T

own e d & b r e d b y T E R R Y L O HMU L L E R

NO. 1

p r e s e n t e d b y G R E G S T R O N G , A K C R E G ’ D , ( 4 1 0 ) 8 2 2 - 2 1 8 7

* S h owS i g h t a l l b r e e d s t a t s 2 0 1 5 & 2 0 1 6 * * S h owS i g h t b r e e d a n d a l l b r e e d s t a t s a s o f 3 . 3 1 . 1 7

2015 & 2016*

Our sincere gratitude to Judges Mr. Richard V. Miller and Mr. Rodney Herner for recognizing Percy’s outstanding quality and condition!

# 1 B R E E D & A L L B R E E D W E L S H T E R R I E R D O G **

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 45

46 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Champion Mon mour My Favorite We are proud to introduce

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 47

48 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 49

THOUGHTS I HAD DRIVING HOME FROM THE DOG SHOW

by CAROLINE COILE

W e’ve all been brought up on the lore of breed creation and distri- bution, whether our breeds arose from giant dogs spread like seeds along Hannibal’s travels or from island to island by seafaring Phoe- nicians or simply planted along the Silk Road. How else can we explain such far-flung relatives as those in the Sight- hound family or Mastiff family? Not so fast; apparently, there is another expla- nation, one actually supported by sci- ence rather than conjecture and a new genome analysis is turning what we thought we knew about breed creation upside down. The study ( Parker, Heidi G. et al. Genomic Analyses Reveal the Influ- ence of Geographic Origin, Migration, and Hybridization on Modern Dog Breed Development, Cell Reports, 19: 697-708 ) examined genomic data from the largest and most diverse group of breeds studied to date, amassing a dataset of 1,346 dogs representing 161 breeds, and adding to that an additional 405 dogs from another study using the same methods. The results? Most (78%) of the breeds fell into 29 multi-breed clades (family groups) of 2 to 16 breeds. If the criteria were relaxed a bit, then 151 breeds (93%) could be divided into 23 clades of 2 to 18 breeds each. This left only 11 breeds as “orphans”.

“...HAPLOTYPES DON’T LIE!”

Some of the clades go along with our general notions of groups and families. The Retriever clade has Retrievers, the Spaniel clade has Spaniels (including the Cavalier King Charles) and so on. See the table on page 56 of breeds and clades to find where your breed fits. There are some surprises—lots of them! The Tibetan Mastiff is grouped in the Asian Spitz clade, completely sepa- rate from the European Mastiff clade. Dalmatians are in the Setter and Point- ers clade, which isn’t that big a stretch, but still, and the breeds we group as Sighthounds are sprinkled amongst sev- eral different clades. We all know the Sighthound group has several “absolute” Sighthounds—the Greyhound, Borzoi, Afghan Hound and Saluki, all of which are assumed to be closely related. Not so. The Greyhound, Borzoi, Whippet, Irish Wolfhound, Scottish Deerhound and Italian Grey- hound are all a subgroup within the “UK Rural clade”, the other main division of which contains the Collie, Sheltie, Aus- sie, both Corgis, Border Collie, Kelpie, Australian Cattle Dog and Old English. The Saluki and Afghan Hound are in the

Mediterranean clade, with their clos- est relations the Anatolian Shepherd (okay, we knew there was Saluki blood in there somewhere), Azawakh, Levri- ero Meridionale and Sloughi—again, no big surprise, but then the Mastino Abru- zzese, Kuvasz (I always knew I liked them!)—and Komondor? And finally another Mediterranean subgroup, not as closely related—the Ibizan Hound, Cirneco, Pharaoh and Great Pyrenees! It’s not intuitive to think the Saluki is more closely related to the Komondor than it is to the Greyhound, but haplo- types don’t lie! While on the subject of Sighthounds, two other breeds labeled by the AKC as Sighthounds, the Basenji and Ridge- back, are in yet two other totally differ- ent clades. The Ridgeback shares a sub- group within the “European Mastiff” clade with the Great Dane, while the Basenji is a clade unto itself. The Nor- rbottenspets and the Podengos, also (controversially) designated as AKC Sighthounds, were not included in the study, but one can guess the Norrbot- tenspets would have fallen in the Nor- dic Spitz clade and the Podengo in the

WRONG FOR THE LAST CENTURY BREEDS, CLADES & HOW WE’VE BEEN

50 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

BEST IN SHOW STOPPER.

At ROYAL CANIN ® , we obsess over purebred dogs—and the perfect nutrition for each of them. ROYAL CANIN ® formulas are developed with your breed’s unique needs in mind for superior muscle tone, coat health and digestion. As a breed expert, you know the right nutrition can unlock the magnificence inside your dogs, and so do we. A Major Win for Breeders Join the Crown Partners Rewards Program Today! my.royalcanin.com

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 53

*

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/17

54 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 55

Cladogram of 161 Domestic Dog Breeds: Breeds that form unique clades supported by 100% of bootstraps are combined into triangles.

For all other branches, a gold star indicates 90% or better, black star 70%−89% and silver star 50%−69% bootstrap support. Breeds are listed on the perimeter of the circle. A small number of dogs do not cluster with the rest of their breed, indicated as follows: *Cane Paratore, +Peruvian Hairless Dog, #Sloughi, @Country-of-Origin Salukis, and ˆMiniature Xoloitzcuintli. (Chart courtesy of www.cell.com)

Mediterranean clade. Yet another breed that is obviously a Sighthound in appear- ance, the Xigou of China (they look like Roman-nosed Salukis) is also unrelated to Salukis or other Sighthounds and is instead genetically an Asian Spitz, more akin to sled dogs! There were 15 breeds (Belgian Ter- vuren, Belgian Sheepdog, Cane Corso, Bull Terrier, Miniature Bull Terrier, Rat Terrier, American Hairless Terrier, Lha- sa Apso, Saluki, Redbone Coonhound, Sloughi, Cane Paratore, Jack Russell Ter- rier, Xoloitzcuintli and Peruvian Hair- less) that formed more than one group-

ing or fell into different subgroups. Many of these are either considered breeds under development (usually newly recognized by the AKC), have distinct populations (such as the Jack Russell) or were sampled from distinct geographic areas. For example, the AKC Saluki formed a different grouping com- pared to Salukis from the Middle East; similarly, the AKC Cane Corso was dis- tinct from Italian Cane Corsos and AKC Tibetan Mastiffs were distinct from ones in China. Less than half the breeds had genetic evidence of crosses with breeds outside

of their clade and only six breeds had genetic evidence of crosses incorpo- rating dogs from eight or more clades. Some breeds shared haplotypes with several clades though. In most such cases, the breed in question either had significant input in the creation of sev- eral other breeds (as is the case with the Pug) or was itself recently created from several other breeds (as is the case with the Chinook). By comparing the shared haplotye lengths between breeds in which the known date of crossing occurred, the researchers were able to use shared

56 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

*

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 3/31/2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 57

THE CLADES AND THEIR BREEDS

Clade

Breed

Clade

Breed

Clade

Breed

Clade

Breed

Chinese Crested

Wild

Grey Wolf

Italian Greyhound

Dachshund

American Toy

Chihuahua

Basenji

Borzoi

Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen

Toy Manchester Terrier

Xigou

Irish Wolfhound

Pinscher

Tibetan Mastiff (COO)

Basset Hound

Miniature Pinscher

Scottish Deerhound

Tibetan Mastiff (USA)

Redbone Coonhound

Airedale Terrier

Siberian Husky

Scent Hound

Whippet

Kerry Blue Terrier

Beagle

Greenland Sledge Dog

Greyhound

Glen of Imaal Terrier

Asian Spitz

Foxhound

Alaskan Malamute

Old English Sheepdog

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Otterhound

Shiba Inu

Australian Cattle Dog

Irish Terrier

Akita

Bloodhound

UK Rural

Bedlington Terrier

Chinese Shar-Pei

English Springer Spaniel

Bearded Collie

Border Terrier

Chow Chow

Kelpie

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Parson Russell Terrier

Eurasier

Border Collie

Samoyed

American Cocker Spaniel

Jack Russell terrier

Terrier

Spaniel

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Finish Spitz

Wire Fox Terrier

Field Spaniel

Japanese Chin

Australian Terrier

Tibetan Spaniel

English Cocker Spaniel

Silky Terrier

Australian Shepherd

Asian Toy

Pekingese

Yorkshire Terrier

Collie

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever*

Lhasa Apso

Norwich Terrier

Shetland Sheepdog

Shih Tzu

Norfolk Terrier

Curly-Coated Retriever

Doberman Pinscher

Tibetan Terrier

Scottish Terrier

Giant Schnauzer

Irish Water Spaniel

Norwegian Elkhound

Cairn Terrier

Drover

Retriever

Black Russian Terrier

West Highland White Terrier

Newfoundland

Swedish Vallhund

Nordic Spitz

Rottweiler

Labrador Retriever

Icelandic Sheepdog

Miniature Xoloitzcuintli*

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Bernese Mountain Dog

Keeshond

Golden Retriever

Xoloitzcuintli*

Standard Schnauzer

Flat-Coated Retriever

Schnauzer

Peruvian Hairless Dog*

Alpine

Miniature Schnauzer

Dalmatian*

Leonberger

New World

Chinook

American Eskimo Dog

Saint Bernard

Weimaraner

Berger Picard

Small Spitz

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Volpino

Cane Paratore

Large Munsterlander

Pomeranian

German Shepherd Dog

Great Dane

Vizsla

Schipperke

Cane Corso (COO)

Great Pyrenees

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Papillon

Toy Spitz

Cane Corso (USA)

Brussels Griffon

Pharaoh Hound

German Wirehaired Pointer

Neapolitan Mastiff

Pug

Cirneco dell'Etna

Pointer Setter

Boerboel

Puli

German Shorthaired Pointer

Hungarian

Ibizan Hound

Bullmastiff

Pumi

Komondor

Spinone Italiano

English Mastiff

Coton de Tulear*

Portuguese Water Dog*

Kuvasz

American Staffordshire Terrier

Brittany

European Mastiff

Mastino Abruzzese

Irish Setter

Standard Poodle

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Mediterranean

Toy Poodle

Sloughi

English Setter

Poodle

Miniature Poodle

Miniature Bull Terrier

Levriero Meridionale

Gordon Setter

Bichon Frise

Briard

Bull Terrier

Azawakh

Havanese

French Bulldog

Bouvier des Flandres

Maltese

Anatolian Shepherd

Boston Terrier

Continental Herder

Rat Terrier

Afghan Hound

Belgian Malinois

Dogue de Bordeaux

Toy Fox Terrier

American Terrier

Saluki (COO)

Belgian Tervuren

Bulldog

American Hairless Terrier

Saluki (USA)

Belgian Sheepdog

Boxer

58 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

*Those with an asterisk are more tenuously assigned

*

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 3/31/17

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 59

B

haplotype length to estimate when other breeds were crossed or diverged. For example, the written history of the Golden Retriever says it dates from crosses to other breeds between 1868 and 1890. The haplo- type sharing between it and the Flat-Coat predicts it diverged around 1895. In anoth- er example, dating using haplotype sharing indicate all of the Bull and Terrier breeds date to 1860-1870, a heyday of dog fight- ing in Ireland. The researchers caution that such dates are approximations and can be influenced by selection for or against vari- ous traits as well as population size at the time of the cross. Most breeds within the various clades share haplotypes that point to creation during or since the Victorian era when we also know historically “pure” breeding became in vogue. However, the general lack of haplotype sharing between clades suggests that these general families of dogs existed long before. The data sug- gest the “Asian Spitz” and “Mediterranean” clades are the oldest, in line with previous studies that suggest the earliest dogs came from Central and East Asia. The classification may not always be intuitive, but that’s part of its value. For one thing, breeds that are genetically simi- lar are more likely to share diseases inher- ited from a common ancestor. Everybody knows Collie breeds are at risk for Collie Eye Anomaly, for example, but why do some Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers get CEA? It turns out the breeds all share the same identical-by-descent haplotype— and the genetic evidence suggests that Col- lies and/or Shelties actually contributed to the formation of the Toller. It goes the other way. Many of the UK Rural breeds share the MDR1 (multi-drug resistance 1) mutation. But it’s also been reported in the German Shepherd. The evidence shows the UK Rural breeds are linked to the GSD through the Australian

Shepherd or its predecessor, offering a clue to the GSD’s make up. It also explains the presence of MDR1 in the Chinook, which haplotype evidence shows has both GSD and Collie input. More importantly, breeds previously thought to be unrelated may now be suspect for diseases found in fel- low clade members. The Xoloitzcuintli also shares haplotypes with the GSD and Collie, leading to speculation as to whether they should be tested for the MRD1 mutation. More oddities exist when it comes to the “New World” clade, which unexpect- edly stars the German Shepherd. It’s pos- tulated that the GSD or an ancestor may have been introduced into New World breeds such as the Xolo and Peruvian Inca Orchid. In fact, the ancient hairless breeds show evidence of extensive crossing with European herding breeds, which would have been brought over by early settlers with their livestock. This seems to be the case throughout the Americas. Although Native American dogs have been present for at least 10,000 years, with the possible exception of the Carolina Dog and maybe one or two others, they are largely thought to be extinct. However, the presence of American breeds with no European hap- lotypes suggests that the Native American dogs could live on through the “American Terrier” (Rat Terrier, American Hairless Terrier and Toy Fox Terrier) and “Ameri- can Toy” (Chinese Crested and Chihua- hua) clades. Most breeds we actually think of as “American” are genetically mixes of European breeds. This research not only has implica- tions for many of the individual breeds included, but for our entire understanding of domestic breed distribution and devel- opment. We’ve always been led to believe that groups of similar looking or function- ing dogs arose through selection and were then spread throughout the world by trad-

ers, explaining how Salukis begat Grey- hounds, for example. But it turns out that’s not how it was. This research suggests that instead of developing in one area and spreading from there, the same changes occurred in multiple locations throughout the world, leading to dogs similar in phy- sique and function but not in relationship. Thus you have the Saluki, the Greyhound and Xiang, all of which clearly fit the Sight- hound mold—and apparently arose entire- ly independently of one another. If that is indeed the case, it explains some things, such as how the Saluki and Afghan Hound are behaviorally so different from the Greyhound or Whippet, but opens up even more baffling questions. For example, why do the Saluki, Greyhound and other “Sight- hounds” share so many odd blood param- eters, such as high hematocrit and low platelet count? It’s possible that they, too, arose independently simply from the need for speed...and if that’s the case, what oth- er physiological attributes might also have arisen independently to support function in unrelated breeds? Will this change the way we judge or breed dogs? No. But what if we find our- selves in a circumstance where we must cross with another breed, such as was done with the Dalmatian and Pointer? It turns out that cross was within a clade, which is probably one reason the result worked out as well as it did. It can also change the way we select dogs as pets. Last weekend I was approached by a spectator who was considering a Saluki, as he had loved his recently deceased Whippet’s personality so much. He was surprised to learn they were light years away in temperament. Now we may know to stay within a clade if we prefer one temperament type over another. For the entire research article go to http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/full- text/S2211-1247(17)30456-4.

LEASE/SALE Unique Grooming & Boarding Facility

magkennel@comcast.com | 508.668.0544 (Ask for Susan) Retail space & daycare • Offers great potential for increasing profits Located between Boston & Providence Easy access to all Interstates in New England MAGUIRE KENNEL FAMI LY OPERATED FOR 85 YEARS

$475 PER Y EAR | $69 PER MONTH

A J ARAPOV I C 8 6 3 . 6 4 0 . 8 8 4 8 | A J @ A R A M E D I A G R P. C O M

60 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Brandi GCHB MY SHE DANCES LIKE UMA THURMAN

O U R S I N C E R E A P P R E C I A T I O N T O M R . R O B E R T H U T T O N , M R . G A R R Y N E W T O N , M R S . M U R R E L P U R K H I S E R , A N D D R . R O N A L D S P R I T Z E R F O R A W A R D I N G B R A N D I I N T H E G R O U P .

THE FIRST AND ONLY MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING REDBONE BITCH

“Hunted from swamplands to mountains, the Redbone is surefooted and swift, even on the most difficult terrain. Well-balanced, with a flashy red coat, strong topline (neither roach nor sway backed), and a perfect 90- degree shoulder angle with equal angulation in the hindquarters.” Owned by Danielle York, Cole Vanover & Monty York Presented By Cole Vanover, Lost Heritage Hounds & Andrea Carter, True Shot Handling *SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/17 # 1 Redbone Coonhound *

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 61

62 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

G R A N D C H A M P I O N Flatbrook W H I S K E Y T O W N ’ S B L U E L A B E L J H

Owned by RICHARD & LAURIE BYRNE AND KRISTI RODNEY

Bred by KRISTI RODNEY

Handled by LAUREN HAY-LAVITT

Assisted by KAYCEE KLANG

FLASH! GROUP ONE AT THE RIO HONDO KENNEL CLUB! THANK YOU JUDGE MR. GREGORY ANDERSON.

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 63

64 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

*

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 65

*All systems as of 3/31/2017

66 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/17

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 67

by BJ ANDREWS ON THE LINE

UNIVERSITY STUDY CONFIRMS WHAT DOG TRAINERS AND OWNERS HAVE ALWAYS KNOWN— DOGS LOVE HAPPY FACES & FEAR FROWNS, BUT HERE’S WHAT YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT EYES T he University of Helsinki studied responses of 31 dogs when they were presented with photographs of people with different facial expressions. The researchers interspersed the human faces with different breeds of dogs, all showing either a threatening, pleasant or neutral expression. As the photos changed on the screen, another machine directed infrared light at the dog’s eyes (was that safe?) to mea- sure and record the eye movements. The result was pretty clear in that dogs read human facial expressions. Dogs look first at the eyes to gauge mood and intent. Then they look at the middle of the face whether human or canine. The report explained that “different emotions are associated with different patterns of wrinkles on the snout.” To that we would add that flared nostrils in both humans and animals communicate both fear and aggression depending on the situation. Picture a startled horse

or an angry man. The open nostrils are easily seen on a horse but you’ve seen in people, even children. Surprisingly the Finnish study showed that dogs look least at the mouth. No explanation was offered other than the observation that people (who were also tested) “spend a lot of time looking at the mouth to decode emotional expressions.” My personal opinion is that dogs do notice another dog’s mouth as in a dog simply lifting its lips to signal “don’t come any closer to my food bowl.” The report concluded that “dogs paid more attention when the expres- sion was threatening.” Well duh! What was interesting is that the dogs actu- ally tried to avoid looking at photos of “negative or threatening human faces.” Observant dog owners know dogs will look away when we are angry

and seek eye contact to enforce a scold- ing so clearly, dogs can read what’s coming even in a photo of someone else’s face. “The ability to recognize human facial expressions, as well as other human cues, does not appear to be innate. Rather the dogs acquire it as they come to associate, say, a smile with a reward, like extra doggie treats or affection,” according to Monique Udell, who studies canine cogni- tion and behavior at the University of Florida. She explained “We know that dogs are very good at picking up on subtle cues given by humans” and “It is interesting that picture discrimina- tions of this type can be trained in dogs as well.” Have you ever sat very still and observed your mother dog silently teach her puppies? They quickly learn

DOGS REACT TO HUMAN FACIAL EXPRESSIONS

68 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

“THEY MAKE IT THEIR BUSINESS TO READ OUR MOOD, AVOIDING OUR ANGER, MAKING US LAUGH JUST WHEN WE’RE READY TO CRY AND BY ALWAYS, ALWAYS ‘BEING THERE’ WHEN WE NEED THEM.”

to watch her posture and facial expres- sion. When beginning to find meat interesting, the pups will try to invade her food bowl or check out her juicy bone. They will be met with utter stillness of her body and lifted lips. She may firmly plant her chin on the edge of the food bowl or on top of her bone, a clear signal of possession any human can recognize. Look closer and you’ll note her facial expression has changed, she is looking “hard” at her toddlers and if they come closer, she’ll “show teeth” before resort- ing to snapping at a particularly bold (or stupid) puppy. Miho Nagasawa of Azabu Univer- sity, writing for Animal Cognition says “This study has shown that dogs that live closely with humans are also able to recognize positive facial expres- sions, indicating that these dogs have

acquired the social skills helpful to survive. The ability to learn to dis- criminate human facial expressions must have helped dogs to adapt to human society.” Well, you already knew all that but it’s nice to know that other smart people do too. Then, just when you think the professor knows more than you do, he says, “The reason for this difference is not clear. We can specu- late that it might have to do with evo- lution and the genetic wiring of ani- mals.” The scientist probably doesn’t own a dog but he is observant about human nature and dog behavior. “People tend to avoid coming in con- tact with situations which do not seem to be set up for a happy outcome and so it appears to be with dogs. The dogs often engage in a sort of ‘ostrich- head in the sand’ behavior, to avoid

confronting anything negative, and in this case it involves not looking at or paying attention to a human face which has an angry expression.” Most handlers and professional dog trainers know all of this. They avoid frowning and to keep the dog happy and enthusiastic about performing, they too put on a happy face. Dogs respond more to our emotions than any other non-human species. Dogs don’t fake expressions. When they have a happy face, the “smile” is absolutely genuine. They make it their business to read our mood, avoiding our anger, making us laugh just when we’re ready to cry and by always, always “being there” when we need them. Just thinking about how and why dogs came to us is enough to make you smile. So put on your happy face and give your best friend a hug!

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Central Florida

Fairgrounds Orlando, FL JOIN US FOR A FUN FILLED DAY!

• Start Time: 10 am • Guest Speaker: Frank Sabella • Lunch provided by Grills Seafood Deck • Bring your dog and dress appropriately for the show ring

• In conjunction with the Orlando cluster all breed dog shows • Free junior showmanship workshop open to anyone under the age of 18 • Half hour educational seminars

FOR INFORMATION & REGISTRATION, CONTACT JENNY DEVLIN juniorjubilee@yahoo.com | 321.438.1442 | visit the Junior Jubilee Facebook page SPONSORS: BREVARD KC/CENTRAL FLORIDA KC/SPACE COAST KC

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 71

SWEEPS THE SPECIALTY WEEKEND IN HARR I SBURG

Best of Breed

BR IARD CLUB OF AMER ICA & ATLANT IC STATES BR IARD CLUB

10 10

SHOWS

B E S T OF BR E EDS

4 5

GROUP F I RS T S

GROUP S ECONDS

J UDGE S K I M L E B LANC , W I L L I AM SANDY GUNN , LAWR ENCE T E RR I CONE , JAN PAU L K AND GROUP J UDGE S K E K E KAHN , LAWR ENCE T E RR I CONE , PAT HAS T I NGS , HEAT HE R LANGF I E LD , SANDRA K I NG , DE BORAH GSCHWENDE R , ROB E R T S T I NE , J UNE P EN TA AND E L I ZAB E T H MU T HARD . T hank you

72 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

GCh. If It Quacks Like a Duck DEJA VU POPSAKADOO

Owned by: TARI WELCH Bred by: 2016 AKC HERDING BREEDERS OF THE YEAR, DOMINIQUE DUBE AND TERRY MILLER *DN STATS AS OF 3/31/17 1 A L L B R E E D * #

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 73

Champion BRONZE GCH SAUSAGE STABLES V WOLDORF MARGRETE SS GROUP PLACING TOP 5 SMOOTH DACHSHUND 2017 * Maggie

Maggie & Kim pictured with Judge, Mrs. Toddie Clark

Our Sincere Appreciation. . . to all judges who have recognized Maggie’s fine type and quality OWNED BY: Roger Becker • BRED BY: Miki Perry & Steve Wolden PRESENTED BY: Kim Marie Haupt • ALSO HANDLED BY: Owner

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 3/31/17

74 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

A r a n i s l e S ta r O f S a n J a c i n t o Best in Show Grand Champion JJ

# 1 All Breed* *ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/17

C h S c h o o n e r ' s S p i r i t O f S h e r m a n x D i a m o n d F ro s t S o p h i a

Bred by Brad & Sharon McDannald Owned by Caroline Blair, Chas Blair and Dr. Carmen Herbel Spears

Handled by Erregen Kennels, LLC and Tommy & Susan Katzenstein

Assisted by Caroline Blair

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 75

Sundae Champion Hampton Court Broxden Any Given Sundae

GCH Broxden Waybroke Halstan Heritage x CH Kemosabe Broxden Ranch Dressing

Bred by: Victor Malzoni, JR and Phil & Amy Booth

Owned by: Dr. Carmen Herbel Spears, Victor Malzoni, JR, and Phil & Amy Booth

Handled by: Erregen Kennels, LLC, and Tommy & Susan Katzenstein

Assisted by: Caroline Blair susantl@aol.com

76 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

G R A N D C H A M P I O N T A B O X P C A R Y S E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N I N G

Owned & bred by: D R . C A R M E N H E R B E L S P E A R S & R E N E E B R U N S Presented by: T H O M A S & S U S A N K A T Z E N S T E I N Don’t Stop Believing O U R J O U R N E Y C O N T I N U E S . . .

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 77

Etzel

T H A N K Y O U E S T E E M E D J U D G E S

NEUDORF NOBLE KING ETZEL Grand Champion

owned by FRANZ NEUWIRTH

handled by OSCAR QUIROS

78 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

r e s e rv e b e s t i n show w i nn i ng

LUCAS Grand Champion NEUDORF’S Cool Hand Luke

Two No. G E R M A N

W I R E H A I R E D P O I N T E R *

Thank you Esteemed Judges

owned by FRANZ NEUWIRTH & CHRISTINE WHITMORE

handled by OSCAR QUIROS

assisted by CARLOS AVALOS

*ShowS ight breed s tat s as of 3/31/17

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 79

Multiple Best In Specialty Winner

Nani Breica N Crosswinds Aloha

2016 National Specialty Winner

Youngest National Specialty Winner in the History of the Breed at 10 months of age

80 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Starting Where he left off

Best of Breed WCWDC Specialty Eastern Futurity/Maturity Weekend

Ms. JoAnne M. Buehler

Owners: Derek Beatty / Suzanne Burns Chris Grisell / Jess Doub

Owner Handled: Derek Beatty

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 81

82 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 83

# 1 BRUSSELS GRIFFON FOR 2016 *

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/17

THANK YOU ESTEEMED JUDGES.

84 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

OWNED BY: RUTH PEREIRA & PAM WALDRON

HANDLED EXCLUSIVELY BY: PAUL CATTERSON

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 85

THANK YOU E S T E EMED J UDGE S

86 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

BLAZE T H A N K Y O U E S T E E M E D J U D G E S S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 89

P R O U D L Y P R E S E N T I N G Multiple Group Placing King Arthur G C H . J U G E R E D E LW E I S S

TO J UDGE S MRS . KEKE KAHN AND MR . ROBERT SHREVE FOR RECOGN I Z I NG ARTHUR ’ S OUT S TAND I NG BREED TY PE Our Sincere Appreciation

90 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Owned by: M R S . K A R E N J ’ A N T H O N Y Presented by: G R E G S T R O N G A K C R E G ’ D | ( 4 1 0 ) 8 2 2 - 2 1 8 7

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 91

Stella * ShowSight all breed stats as of 12/31/16 *ShowSight all breed stats 2016 **ShowSight all breed & breed stats as of 3/31/17 America’s #2 Great Pyrenees for 2016 Al l -Breed * 92 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

a No. 4 all breed ** No. 3 breed ** bred & owned by SUSAN BLEVENS presented by RICK KRIEGER, PHA & JENNY KRIEGER, PHA co-bred by VALERIE SEELEY ©Debra Fisher Goldstein GreatPyrPhotos.com B I S B I S S G C H P Y R L E S S NO - B R A I N E R X G C H P Y R L E S S R A Z Z L E D A Z Z L E M U L T I P L E B I S & R B I S , B I S S PYRLESS & ASHBY SHE’S ALL THAT! No. 1 bitch ** G R E AT P Y R E N E E S Award of Merit JUDY COOPER, BREEDER/JUDGE Great Pyrenees National Specialty Group Placements: March 30 DR. STEVE KEATING Finger Lakes KC April 21 DR. JACK H. IRELAND Springfield KC April 23 MR. ROBERT ROBINSON South Windsor KC T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S !

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 93

B R E D T O T H E S T A N D A R D B O R N F O R T H E H U N T

MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING GROUP AND BEST IN SHOWWINNING CHAMPION PHAERERIN GRACA

Owner: Candace Hanscom | Qui tador Also Owned By: John Fi tzpatr ick, DVM & Lance McGinness | PhaerEr in Breeder: J . Fi tzpatr ick, DVM, L. McGinness & S. Far ia

94 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

FIRST PEQUENO BITCH TO BE AWARDED AN ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW GRACA

CHAMPION PHAERERIN GRACA BEST IN SHOW

OUR SINCERE APPRECIATION To Best In Show Judge Mr. James Ham, & Group Judge Ms. Barbara O’Neill for these honors

Beautifully Presented by: Kevin Chestnut AKC Registered Handler

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 95

G C H S C H S I L H O U E T T E G A L A T E A N R I V E R R U N - H E R E C O M E S A R A I N B O W

G C h . C h . R a i n b o w ’ s H e r e C o m e s T h e S u n x C h . S a s s y ’ s P r o m i s e s o f F a n t a s y

Thank you Judge Ms. Mary Benedict

bred & handled by: MARY DOYLE LANDES | bred by: SANDY SCHWEDLER & DEBBIE HOLLAND owned by: ELENA GELDKOP | handled by: DEBBIE HOLLAND & THE FANTASY TEAM

96 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

2 x C O N S E C U T I V E National Specialty Winner G C H B F A N T A S Y ’ S S U N S H I N E S U P E R M A N C H . C O U N T R Y V I E W G I V E M Y R E G A R D S R O M X C H . B E L L V U E ’ S K A R M E L K I S S

MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING

Thank you Judge Ms. Mary Benedict

bred by: DEBBIE HOLLAND & JODY OSTROWSKI GREENBERG | owned by: DEBBIE HOLLAND, fancollies@gmail.com & ELENA GELDKOP, egeldkop@aol.com exclusively handled by: DEBBIE HOLLAND 2 0 1 7 Na t i o n a l Sp e c i a l t y AWARD O F ME R I T 2 0 1 6 Na t i o n a l Sp e c i a l t y B E S T O F VAR I E T Y

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 97

Pixie BIS GCHG

Bo-Bett’s Favorite Pick

T H A N K Y O U E S T E E M E D J U D G E S F O R A D M I R I N G P I X I E .

Bred & Co -Owned by Carol Harris Owned by Deborah Bahm Exclusively Presented by Ashlie Whitmore

98 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Pixie&Ashlie on a roll

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 99

O n April 22nd, 2017, a March for Science was held in Washington DC, along with more than 600 satel- lite marches throughout the country and around the world. While the event has come and gone, support for sci- ence is not just a one-day thing. Science impacts our lives every single day and it also impacts our dogs. Here is why we should all support funding for scientific research and learning. MEDICATIONS Admittedly, I have drugs on the brain thanks to my pharmacology course this semester. But modern medicine is a huge boon to all of us and enables our dogs to live much happier, more com- fortable lives. Fenbendazole (Panacur ® , for example) is to keep puppies worm- free and enable them to use all of the nutrients that they ingest for their own growth instead of supporting parasites. Metronidazole is for those moments of dietary indiscretion that lead to stinky nightmares. Ivermectin and milbemy- cin oxime is to prevent heartworm infection. Glucosamine and chondroi- tin protect their joints. Doxycycline treats Lyme disease and a wide variety of topical and oral medications that can

be given to repel or kill ticks to prevent getting Lyme in the first place. Meloxi- cam and carprofen is to ease pain and inflammation. Some medications origi- nally come from plants or other natural sources, but scientists are the ones who work to figure out how much of a sub- stance is needed to be effective, how much is safe to give and veterinarians determine which drug is appropriate for each given situation. VACCINATIONS & TITERS Vaccinations play an incomparable role in preventing illness. Rabies is a horrific disease with extremely high mortality, but widespread use of the rabies vaccine has significantly decreased the incidence in our cor- ner of the world. This also protects us, because humans are more likely to get bitten by a dog than a wild ani- mal. A rabies vaccine for a dog is typi- cally in the $15–20 range, whereas my pre-exposure rabies series was over $800 (reportedly a steal!) and post- exposure rabies series can run over $3,000 according to the Center for Disease Control. Distemper, parvo, hepatitis and parainfluenza are four other diseases that we don’t have to worry about

nearly as much thanks to vaccina- tion. The rattlesnake vaccine can save your dog’s life from a rattler bite and the Bordetella vaccine can spare your dog from kennel cough or lessen the effects depending on what strain your dog is exposed to. Leptospirosis and Lyme vaccines are becoming safer and more effective. And for the dogs that have severe reactions to vaccines (which are not very common) or those with immune system deficiencies, we can run titers to determine whether or not a vac- cine is actually necessary. In a nutshell, titers measure the amount of antibodies for a particular disease that are present in your dog’s bloodstream, which evalu- ates whether or not your dog is protect- ed from that disease. Titers are also used to deter- mine how long a vaccine is good for, which helps us to develop the best possible vaccination regimen that both protects our beloved dogs and eliminates unnecessary vacci- nations. We have already seen the shift from one-year to three-year vac- cines and there is evidence that some vaccines may be good for much longer periods of time. This is not true of all vaccines, however. PARASITE SCREENING While tapeworms do count as a natural weight loss method, infection with parasites is not fun. Today we have a variety of diagnostic tests that allow us to determine if a dog has a para- site infection and identify what it is.

DOGS MARCH FOR SCIENCE 100 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Many parasites are zoonotic, so identifying and treating infect- ed dogs protects not only them but the people who love and live with them.

Pepe MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING TOPSFIELD-SANCHU POPPYCOCK

Group Two Group Two

MS. CELESTE GONZALEZ APRIL 9TH, 2017 | SHAWNEE KENNEL CLUB

MRS. GLORIA GERINGER APRIL 2ND, 2017 | GREATER MONROE KENNEL CLUB

Bred by CLAUDIA ORLANDI, GUILLERMO GONZALEZ, SUE FRISCHMANN & NANCY RICHMOND Owned by CLAUDIA ORLANDI, NIKET RELE, GUILLERMO GONZALEZ, SUE FRISCHMANN & CLAIRE STEIDEL Handled by Breeder/Owner SUE FRISCHMANN W W W . T O P S F I E L D B A S S E T S . C O M

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 101

No.1 All Breed*

MULTIPLE BISS AND NATIONAL SPECIALTY BIS, BOS, BOW, SWEEPS, FUTURITY AND 2X MATURITY

MULTIPLE BIS, RESERVE BIS AND GROUP PLACEMENTS

thank you judges F O R S E E I N G T H E Q U A L I T Y I N M O N K E Y ’ S S T R U C T U R E A N D M O V E M E N T

102 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Gold Grand Champion

B Y - U - C A L ’ S MO N K E Y O N T H E B AY O U

“There is nothing accidental about quality.”

BRED AND OWNED BY: SHARON AND STEVE CALHOUN (BY-U-CAL) AND BETTE WILLIAMS (BRIARCREST) | HANDLED BY: NANCY PEARSON *ShowSight all breed stats as of 3/31/17

S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017 • 103

then leave her with the stud dog for weeks and then do some more waiting before they found out if the breeding even worked. Today, we have so much more control over the process. Brucel- losis checks tell us whether or not one of the breeding dogs has an infection of Brucella canis, a zoonotic infection that causes abortion in a variety of mam- malian species. Fertility checks allow us to know whether or not a stud dog is fertile and what his sperm count is. Progesterone levels in the blood allow us to track where a bitch is in her cycle and determine when she will ovulate, which in turn allows us to pinpoint the best time to breed. We can ship semen across the world, or freeze it to save and use generations later. Artificial insemi- nation allows us to breed a bitch with- out the dog present, even depositing the semen directly into the uterus. Ultrasound tells us if the bitch is pregnant or not and allows the veteri- narian to further refine due date estima- tions and estimate the size of the litter. An x-ray about a week before the lit- ter is due can give an accurate puppy count, enabling the breeder to know when the bitch is truly done delivering and to identify problems faster and get Both of these areas allow us to capture a moment in time and view it again and again. We generally think of photos and videos as having sentimen- tal value, but they are also so much more: a record of growth and develop- ment in a breeder’s lines, a progress report for a dog recovering from an injury, a means for a veterinarian or coach to evaluate a dog’s condition and These are just a few of the ways that science has benefitted our dogs. The medical breakthroughs are endless, not to mention studies in canine behavior and how they learn. Almost everything we do with our dogs is impacted by sci- entific progress in one way or another. Science is not about politics. It is about constantly learning and refining, so that we can better understand our world and improve the quality of the lives within it. the bitch to a vet quickly. PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY performance long-distance. ...& SO MUCH MORE

The form of Progressive Retinal Atrophy in Irish Setters has an early onset. Breeders used to have to do test breedings—intentionally breeding a young, unaffected dog or bitch to a dog/bitch that had gone blind due to PRA—in order to determine whether the young Setter was or was not a carrier for the gene. This method of testing was itself scientific, if incredibly resource-heavy and poten- tially heartbreaking. Today, the science has further evolved so that breeders and owners can send in a blood sample for a dog’s DNA to be evaluated. This has made it much easier for breeders to identify carriers and breed away from this problem, without the risk of pro- ducing a bunch of affected puppies. We could only be so lucky if one day every genetic defect has a test like this! Unfortunately, many heritable dis- eases do not have a simple inheritance pattern, or can be caused by a vari- ety of genes or gene mutations. This makes it much more difficult to create a simple and reliable test. The develop- ment of any genetic test also requires equipment, personnel, DNA samples to work with and funding to cover all of the costs associated with those things (equipment, salaries and stipends, elec- tricity, computers and software, ship- ping of equipment and samples, etc.). If you want to see progress on a genetic disease present in your breed, be sure to support any research projects! NUTRITION Scientific study has given us an understanding of what nutrients canines need to survive and different foods that are either beneficial or harm- ful. We know that large breed puppies should be fed foods that are less nutrient rich, because growing too fast leads to bone problems. We know that dogs can have sensitivities or allergies to certain ingredients and we can use tests and/or food trials to figure out which ingredi- ent is the problem and then avoid it. We know that supplementing with Vitamin C can help prevent or resolve some uri- nary tract infections and that dogs that have had a bout of pancreatitis should be fed low-fat diets to avoid a relapse. BREEDING TOOLS Once upon a time, breeders had to just wait for a bitch to come in heat and

MEDICAL PROCEDURES We can also thank science for the medical procedures that we have today, from dental cleanings to Caesarean sec- tions to orthopedic surgery to repair a severe fracture. Surgeons today don’t have to go in blind—they already have an understanding of anatomy and how to go about a procedure, because oth- ers before them have documented what they found and what worked best. We have digital x-rays, ultrasound, CT scans and MRIs to get a look at what is going on inside a dog’s body without having to do surgery first. Studies can also give insight into how to get the best results out of a pro- cedure, such as how often to do dental cleanings or what age is best to spay or neuter to still get optimal growth. GENETIC TESTING Many conditions and diseases either are inherited or have a genetic element. Thanks to the work of scientists, we have been able to locate the respon- sible genes for some of these problems and can now test dogs to determine whether or not they carry the gene. One example is the MDR1 mutation that causes dogs of several breeds to be highly sensitive to certain medi- cations (Ivermectin being the most famous). My Australian Shepherd was clear by parentage (both of her par- ents had been tested and were Normal/ Normal), but if we hadn’t known that, we could have sent in a cheek swab to determine her genotype. Had she come back Normal/Mutant or Mutant/Mutant, I would have known to inform any vet- erinarian that saw her so that we could avoid using drugs that were dangerous for her.

104 • S how S ight M agazine , M ay 2017

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52-53 Page 54-55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74-75 Page 76-77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96-97 Page 98-99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 Page 149 Page 150 Page 151 Page 152 Page 153 Page 154 Page 155 Page 156 Page 157 Page 158 Page 159 Page 160 Page 161 Page 162 Page 163 Page 164 Page 165 Page 166 Page 167 Page 168 Page 169 Page 170 Page 171 Page 172 Page 173 Page 174 Page 175 Page 176 Page 177 Page 178 Page 179 Page 180 Page 181 Page 182 Page 183 Page 184 Page 185 Page 186 Page 187 Page 188 Page 189 Page 190 Page 191 Page 192 Page 193 Page 194 Page 195 Page 196 Page 197 Page 198 Page 199 Page 200 Page 201 Page 202 Page 203 Page 204 Page 205 Page 206

showsightmagazine.com

Powered by