Showsight Presents the Welsh Terrier

TERRIER WELSH

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THE WELSH TERRIER

RICHARD POWELL

Welsh Terriers in obedience, tracking and Earthdog. I am an AKC Breeder of Merit and a Parent Club Approved Breed Men- tor. I am also involved in WTCARES, the parent club rescue.

1. Describe the breed in three words. RP: Size, substance and quality. KR: Moderate, sturdy and basic.

I have owned and bred Welsh Terriers for roughly thirty years. I am honored to have been asked to judge the National Specialty for the second time in 2016. I have also judged the breed in Canada, South America and in Scandi- navia. I live in central Pennsylvania with my wife, Sue and we have raised two sons whilst running a busy kennel and small farm. We are about to move to a new house with much less

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? RP: Square, substantial and a brick-on-brick head. KR: Type, correct size, substance. Dogs with great shoulders should be acknowledged, as they are so hard to come by and so easily lost in a breeding program. 3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated? RP: No. KR: The size is always important. The standard reads males to be 15” with a range of 15-15 ½ ” being acceptable. It is very easy for the size to creep up. It’s been a long time since I saw a 15” male. Heads and necks are becoming too long. The heads are compared to a brick. They should be clean with level planes, but should never resemble a Wire Fox Terrier head. “DOGS WITH GREAT SHOULDERS SHOULD BE ACKNOWLEDGED, AS THEY ARE SO HARD TO COME BY AND SO EASILY LOST IN A BREEDING PROGRAM.”

land where, apart from enjoying time with the dogs, I hope to be able to expand the garden and continue showing chickens. I have shown dogs since I was ten years old, English Cockers in Junior handling, then English Setters and then all sorts of Terriers. Right now we are concentrating on the Welsh and Dachshunds in a very limited way. I have been judging for over ten years. My favorite assignments are the specialties but I must say judging huge entries of English Setters at champi- onship shows in England has been exciting. KATHY ROST I reside in New Boston, Michigan. I am the Executive Administrative Assistant at the Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University. I am an avid knitter. I have had dogs all my life; with 59 years of showing dog and two years judging. I acquired my first Welsh Terrier in 1968 and have bred them exclusively ever since under the kennel name of Brynmawr. I have also served on several dog club boards and am pres- ently a board member of the Ann Arbor Kennel Club and Past President of the Welsh Terrier Club of America. In almost 50 years in the Breed (Brynmawr Welsh Terriers) I have bred over 30 Champions, including several BIS-winning Welsh and a National Specialty Winner. I have participated and titled

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welsh terrier Q&A

WITH RICHARD POWELL & KATHY ROST

“EVERY TERRIER BREED WAS DESIGNED TO DO A CERTAIN JOB IN A SPECIFIC AREA AND THE STANDARDS WERE WRITTEN CAREFULLY FOR EACH BREED TO PERFORM ITS JOB. THE NUANCES FOR DIFFERENT BREEDS ARE SO IMPORTANT AND THIS IS WHY NEW JUDGES HAVE TO LEARN.”

4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? RP: There have been some really great ones in the past that were probably better than anything being shown now but overall, the breed is in better shape at the present time. KR: I do believe that the quality of the overall Welsh right now is high. Breeders are paying attention to the stan- dard and the overall physical soundness of the breed. 5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? RP: I think there is still this mind set that a Welsh has to be thick. New judges are told that compared to a Fox Ter- rier or a Lakeland, the Welsh has to be the cart-horse as compared to the thoroughbred. A Welsh is the same size as a Fox Terrier, but weighing two pounds more—this is in the bone. Some judges, both old and new, see loaded shoulders and thick necks as being “Welshy”; however, I think that we are getting away from this mentality. KR: They are a moderate dog. Though we love the short backs, the Welsh Terrier is a “square” breed. They should not look like a miniature Airedale. I also think color is sometimes misunderstood. The grizzle coat is perfectly acceptable as well as dogs with darker jackets. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. RP: As are many other Terriers, this breed is on the low entry list. This means that they are often just handed to new judges with little research and experience. This is wrong. Every Terrier breed was designed to do a certain job in a specific area and the standards were written carefully for each breed to perform its job. The nuances for different breeds are so important and this is why

new judges have to learn. I think it is really necessary to attend kennels, specialties and to go to the Montgom- ery County weekend at least one time, to get a grip on these breeds. If this does not happen, the chances that Terrier judging will become generic like so many other breeds is very likely. KR: Welsh Terriers are very strong in quality right now. Last year the top 6 were all Best in Show winners. And the dogs coming up in the classes also show promising qual- ity. It is an exciting time for the breed right now. 7. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? RP: There have been lots of funny things happen and when I am judging or showing, I try to have a good time, but one memory constantly makes me smile thinking about it. I was judging in Atlantic City, New Jersey and this gentle- man in a kilt was showing a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I went up to him and said, “Good morning” and then start- ed to go over the dog. As I was getting close to the rear end, he said, “Oh excuse me” I stopped and exclaimed, “Yes?” He said, “Sorry, he just farted.” Not quite knowing what to do, I decided to stand back and let the air clear, so to speak, and in doing so, the moment got to me and I started to laugh hysterically! Lydia Coleman Hutchinson was doing Toys in the next ring, and asked, “What is so funny?” I told her and she could see the funny side of it too. Whilst judging, people say the funniest things. KR: At an outdoor show that was particularly windy and rainy day, I was desperately trying to anchor my wig while showing my puppy. We were doing pretty good until we were asked to spar. As we came to the center of the ring, my wig departed from my head. The Welsh sprang into action and KILLED it dead. The prey drive is obviously alive and well in the Welsh Terrier!

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JUDGING THE WELSH TERRIER

by BRUCE SCHWARTZ

HISTORY S mall black and tan dogs were first mentioned in 55 B.C. by Julius Caesar as he sent messages back home. Cen- turies later when Briton won the war over Wales those black and tan dogs remained in the northern region of the British Isles. John Marvin, in his Book of All Terriers , cites a poem written about 1450 which describes a red and black working Terrier:

WELSH TERRIER BREED STANDARD: GENERAL APPEARANCE The Welsh Terrier is a sturdy, com- pact, rugged dog of medium size with a coarse wire-textured coat. The legs, underbody and head are tan; the jacket black (or occasionally grizzle). The tail is docked to length meant to complete the image of a “square dog” approxi- mately as high as he is long. The move- ment is a terrier trot typical of the long- legged terrier. It is effortless, with good reach and drive. The Welsh Terrier is friendly, outgoing to people and other dogs, showing spirit and courage. The “Welsh Terrier expression” comes from the set, color, and position of the eyes combined with the use of the ears. As any class of dogs enters the ring, the primary chore is to discern which dog exhibits those qualities that define breed type. The first thing to under- stand are the general qualities that define a Welsh Terrier. They are WIRE- COATED, BLACK and TAN, SQUARE, SOLID, STURDY AND CONFIDENT. Like most breeds, the operative word in the standard is MODERATE. The Welsh has a “working dog” appearance, however, they should never be coarse, short-legged or unattractive. Although the Welsh Terrier is less likely to start a squabble than some other terriers, they should not back down from a confronta- tion and once challenged will be just as likely to finish any fight. The standard describes the color of the furnishings and head as being tan. They should be a rich tan—or what we more com- monly would probably considered to be brown. The black or grizzle jacket

are equally acceptable. The eyes are set wide apart, squarely in the head. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE Males are about 15 inches at the with- ers, with an acceptable range between 15 and 15.12. Bitches may be propor- tionally smaller. Twenty pounds is con- sidered an average weight, varying a few pounds depending on the height of the dog and the density of bone. Both dog and bitch appear solid and of good substance. The range in size of dogs and bitches which are being exhibited should be of concern to both breeders and judges. On the small end you have many bitch- es which are lacking in bone and body and whose legs are not long enough to give them the appearance of a square dog. On the large size, you have dogs exceeding 16” which may appear to be puppy Airedales and lack spring of rib and have a long and somewhat narrow head. Neither a short-legged bitch or a tall and lanky dog should be rewarded as they lack correct breed type. You may also find a short-legged dog and a tall and lanky bitch. HEAD The entire head is rectangular. The eyes are small, dark brown and almond- shaped, well set in the skull. They are placed fairly far apart. The size, shape, color and position of the eyes give the steady, confident but alert expression that is typical of the Welsh Terrier. The ears are V-shaped, small, but not too thin. The fold is just above the topline of the skull. The ears are carried for- ward close to the cheek with the tips

You gave me a dignified (picked) Stick-and a good bitch,

A black, red-bellied terrier bitch To Throttle the brown pole-cat And to tear up the red fox. It is commonly accepted that this description was of the dog that was to become what we today call a Welsh Ter- rier. In the mid 1800s dog shows were evolving and people were showing Old English Black and Tan Terriers or Old English Wirehaired Black and Tan Terri- ers. As a breed, the Welsh Terrier gained recognition around 1884 and the Welsh Terrier Club was formed in England in 1886. Just two years later the first Welsh Terriers landed in America. These dogs belonged to the common man. He helped him to keep his domain free from predators and vermin. They are diggers who work in the soil. The dirt is propelled by their front legs between their spread hind legs. Their drop ears prevent lose dirt from enter- ing the ear canals. Like many other terriers, they work badger and fox.

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“THE NECK IS NEVER TO APPEAR SWAN-LIKE OR STUFFY. LIKE EVERY OTHER DESCRIPTION IN THE WELSH STANDARD, IT IS MODERATE AND NEVER OUT OF BALANCE WITH THE ENTIRE CHARACTER OF THE DOG.”

falling to, or toward, the outside cor- ners of the eyes when the dog is at rest. The ears move slightly up and forward when at attention. Skull—The foreface is strong with powerful, punishing jaws. It is only slightly narrower than the backskull. There is a slight stop. The backskull is of equal length to the foreface. They are on parallel planes in profile. The backskull is smooth and flat (not domed) between the ears. There are no wrinkles between the ears. The cheeks are flat and clean (not bulging). The Welsh Terrier head should never be confused with that of an Airedale Terrier, Fox Terrier or Lakeland Terrier. Think of the correct balance as being a series of halves. The skull is ½ the length of the head, the muzzle is ½ the length of the head and the width of the backskull is ½ of its length. Like every- thing else about the Welsh Terrier, you have a moderate head, not exaggerated in length, width or refinement. The placement of the eyes (fairly far apart) imparts the strength which is required by our standard. A correctly balanced skull with eyes set too close together will result in a foreign expression as will eyes that are not set in the skull. A large, light, or combination of these traits resulting in a “prominent” eye are faults which are unacceptable to me. The ear leather of the Welsh is heavier than that of the Fox Terrier. The muzzle is one-half the length of the entire head from tip of nose to occiput. The foreface in front of the eyes is well made up. The furnishings on the foreface are trimmed to com- plete without exaggeration the total rectangular outline. The muzzle is strong and squared off, never snipy. The nose is black and squared off. The lips are black and tight. A scissors bite is preferred, but a level bite is acceptable. Either one has complete dentition. The teeth are large and strong, set in power- ful, vise-like jaws. Please note that our standard calls for a black nose—regardless of the season!

When viewed from above, the ani- mal should never appear to lack rib or be over-done. Dogs which are over- done in body will appear to be short on leg when viewed from the side. Among the most objectionable faults I find in a terrier is a low set tail (when the stan- dard calls for a well set tail). In addition, I like to see a fairly straight tail that does not bounce as the dog moves. When a dog is in an excited state, I do not find it objectionable for the tail to tend to somewhat come over the back. This should not be confused with a gay tail that curves over the back. A tail with a kink (bend towards either side of the dog) is a major fault to me. FOREQUARTERS The front is straight. The shoulders are long, sloping and well laid back. The legs are straight and muscular with upright and powerful pasterns. The feet are small, round, and catlike. The pads are thick and black. The nails are strong and black; any dewclaws are removed. The standard statement that “the front is straight” refers to the front legs and not to the front assembly. A dog with short, mincing steps is highly objectionable to me. These dogs lack front angulation and often side-wind because their front movement cannot keep up with their hind action. When examining a terrier, please take the time to look at the feet. These are one of their primary “tools of their trade” and shouldn’t be over-looked. Weak pas- terns are also hard to over-look. HINDQUARTERS The hindquarters are strong and muscular with well-developed second thighs and the stifles well bent. The hocks are moderately straight, paral- lel and short from joint to ground. The feet should be the same as in the forequarters. Please make special note that our standard calls for a well-developed sec- ond thigh—something that is difficult to find. A good “shelf” behind the tail is another desirable trait—it may also be

In order to correctly judge the Welsh Terrier head, you should always use your hand to determine the “full-ness” of the muzzle. Don’t let head furnish- ings mislead you into thinking the dog has the strength required—feel it! The Welsh standard also calls for complete dentition. It doesn’t require you to count teeth, as in a Doberman or Rottweiler, but please check the entire mouth for missing teeth and fault accordingly. Keep in mind that the Terrier does his job with his mouth. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY The neck is of moderate length and thickness, slightly arched and slop- ing gracefully into the shoulders. The throat is clean with no excess of skin. The neck is never to appear swan- like or stuffy. Like every other descrip- tion in the Welsh Standard, it is moder- ate and never out of balance with the entire character of the dog. The topline is level. It should not slope and the withers should always be the high point. The root of the tail should NEVER appear to be higher than the withers. One of the major problems of the breed is the appearance of run- ning down hill. In judging, I consider this to be one of the most serious faults and one that you will encounter on a regular basis. The body shows good substance and is well ribbed up. There is good depth of brisket and moderate width of chest. The loin is strong and moderately short. The tail is docked to a length approxi- mately level (on an imaginary line) with the occiput, to complete the square image of the whole dog. The root of the tail is set well up on the back. It is carried upright. The dog should be viewed from both the side and from above to determine the breadth and depth of the body. The body and length of leg should each contribute equal amounts to the total height of the dog. That is the Welsh Terrier should neither be long or short on leg.

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“THERE IS NO NEED TO RUN YOUR ENTIRE HAND THROUGH THE COAT TO DETERMINE THE QUALITY. FEEL A SMALL PATCH NEAR THE CENTER OF THE BACK AND LIFT TO CHECK FOR UNDERCOAT.”

described as “butt behind the tail”. This adds to the appearance of a well set tail and a strong-muscled thigh. COAT The coat is hard, wiry, and dense with a close-fitting thick jacket. There is a short, soft undercoat. Furnishings on muzzle, legs, and quarters are dense and wiry. One of the hallmarks of a terrier is the quality of their coat. A poor qual- ity coat is never acceptable. One of the hallmarks of a terrier judge is their abil- ity to ascertain the quality of the coat without mauling the dog. There is no need to run your entire hand through the coat to determine the quality. Feel a small patch near the center of the back and lift to check for undercoat. If the dog has a good quality of furnishing, they will likewise have a good quality undercoat. If they have sparse furnish- ings, they will have the same type of undercoat. You can also be certain that a dog with a coat of good texture also has the proper color. Quality of texture and color go together. You won’t find a poor quality coat with correct color. COLOR The jacket is black, spreading up onto the neck, down onto the tail and into the upper thighs. The legs, quar- ters, and head are clear tan. The tan is a deep reddish color, with slightly lighter shades acceptable. A grizzle jacket is also acceptable. Many new terrier judges are very concerned with the natural color of the dogs being exhibited. What should concern you is the texture of the coat

and furnishings. I have NEVER seen a dog with good texture and bad color or good (natural) color and bad texture. I really believe if you judge with this in mind you will never make a mistake. So, reward good texture and it will have naturally good color. I doubt that this will ever be a decid- ing factor, but I also greatly prefer clean tan markings. I find black in the tan(a smutty mixture) to be unattractive. On the other side, these dogs tend to have very harsh coats with the best color. GAIT The movement is straight, free and effortless, with good reach in front, strong drive behind, with feet naturally tending to converge toward a median line of travel as speed increases. These are working dogs which need to travel some distance. Restrict- ed, choppy movement should not be rewarded. TEMPERAMENT The Welsh Terrier is a game dog- alert, aware, spirited-but at the same time, is friendly and shows self control. Intelligence and desire to please are evi- dent in his attitude. A specimen exhibit- ing an overly aggressive attitude, or shy- ness, should be penalized. A shy, frantic, crazed, spooky, dis- traught, unsure, distressed, flustered, agitated, uneasy dog should never be rewarded. Disposition is a problem in our breed and rewarding unaccept- able behavior only encourages breed- ers, handlers and exhibitors to make excuses for dogs which should not be included in breeding programs.

This behavior can be seen in dogs that fail to pay attention to their handlers and are distracted by sounds which most other dogs ignore. They are often constantly “flicking” their ears and appear to be in fear of the “sky fall- ing”. I can’t stress this point enough. I really believe there is no better com- panion than a Welsh Terrier with a good temperament, and as judges, it is our responsibility to intelligently evaluate this characteristic. Some judges spar dogs others don’t. I do so if I believe it will help me evaluate two dogs who might not be using them- selves at their best. Some dogs show just as well for toys or bait. Others will never look as good as with another animal. If you do spar, please do not bring out more than two (or possibly three) dogs at any one time. This will prevent you from losing control of your ring, having a dog fight on your hand and not truly being able to see the dog, which is the entire point of this exercise. Make it clear to the handlers that the dogs are supposed to be looking at each other and nothing more—and that you expect them to keep them under con- trol. However, if dogs do “defend their turf” move quickly to have the handlers move the dogs back in line and don’t penalize the dogs. FAULTS Any deviation from the foregoing should be considered a fault; the seri- ousness of the fault depending upon the extent of the deviation.

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THE WELSH TERRIER

By Ereign H. Seacord

I purchased my f irst Welsh Ter- rier in 1976 and have always had at least one, often two and sometimes three (or more, espe- cially if there are puppies) living with me and my family at any given time. People call and ask about the breed, wanting to know what a WT is like to live with. I have to say that, like people, all WT’s are differ- ent, but generally you can count on a fairly active, healthy dog that is black & tan and around 20 lbs. Most WT’’s that I have known are easy keepers and love people. They don’t always get along with other dogs, especially those of the same sex and breed, but sometimes they do. They can be trained to tolerate cats and other animals, sometimes, espe- cially if this training starts at a young age. I don’t recommend that families with very young children (under 3) get a puppy of any breed, but many WT’s that I know love kids and tolerate being poked, hugged, and even dressed up, but there are also Welsh that aren’t so toler- ant! I tell folks that in my experience WT’s are not easy to house train, but that could be the trainers fault, because other people f ind this a fairly easy task! I also tell them that it’s important to establish yourself as pack leader right away since Welsh are f irst & foremost

terriers, and that implies a very outgo- ing, self assured and often bossy dog who needs to know the rules and needs f irm and consistent training. WT’s are interesting and fun to live with. Over the years I have competed in performance events with my Welsh Terriers. I have found that they seem much happier when they have a job to do, and they are a lot easier to live with when they are happy (and tired!). My favorite is Earthdog. Most of my WT’s hunt rodents, rabbits, woodchucks and snakes in our yard with obvious joy & limited (thankfully) success. ED trials, which are set up to test a dogs natu- ral hunting instincts, are a fun way to spend time with others who enjoy shar- ing their lives with a terrier, and the dogs really love it. A bit of training is usually a good idea if titles are your goal, and WT’s generally catch on to the game quickly. Obedience with a WT is not for the person who expects perfect scores and a polished performance, but it’s a great way to get your dog socialized with other dogs and an opportunity to teach your dog manners and basic skills for everyday living. But if you want to compete, WT’s are SMART! They learn the exercises quickly and are happy to perform for you as long as the reward is

I STRONGLY RECOMMEND

in sight, but once learned and executed, you’d better have some tricks up your sleeve to keep them interested. I know some WT’s that consistently get near perfect scores, but my dogs were never in that elite group. I often felt a certain amount of compassion from the obedi- ence judges, and I had a couple judges comment that they had been looking forward to judging the terrier that day. I guess they needed some comic relief ! The only other performance event I have personally competed in with my WT’s is Agility, and I strongly recom- mend training your WT to navigate a basic agility course, even if competi- tion is something in which you have no interest. The dogs love it, it’s great exer- cise for the handler, and it builds a bond between dog & handler that really feels good. It’s a good idea to have some obe- dience training before beginning agil- ity work, especially a solid recall, since most agility is done off lead. TRAINING YOUR WT TO NAVIGATE A BASIC AGILITY COURSE, even if competition is something in which you have no interest.

Welsh are first & foremost terriers, and that implies A VERY OUTGOING, SELF ASSURED AND OFTEN BOSSY DOG WHO NEEDS TO KNOW THE RULES AND NEEDS FIRM AND CONSISTENT TRAINING.

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AnAlysis of the WELSH TERRIER

RICHARD POWELL

KATHY ROST I reside in New Boston, Michigan. I am the Executive Administrative Assistant at the Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University. I am an avid knitter. I have had dogs all my life; with 59 years of showing dog and two years judging. I acquired my first Welsh Terrier in 1968 and have bred them exclusively ever since under the kennel name of Brynmawr. I have also served on several dog club boards and am pres- ently a board member of the Ann Arbor Kennel Club and Past President of the Welsh Terrier Club of America. In almost 50 years in the Breed (Brynmawr Welsh Terriers) I have bred over 30 Champions, including several BIS-winning Welsh and a National Specialty Winner. I have participated and titled Welsh Terriers in obedience, tracking and Earthdog. I am an AKC Breeder of Merit and a Parent Club Approved Breed Men- tor. I am also involved in WTCARES, the parent club rescue.

I have owned and bred Welsh Terriers for roughly thirty years. I am honored to have been asked to judge the National Specialty for the second time in 2016. I have also judged the breed in Canada, South America and in Scandina- via. I live in central Penn- sylvania with my wife, Sue and we have raised two sons whilst running a busy kennel and small farm. We are about to

1. Describe the breed in three words. RP: Size, substance and quality. KR: Moderate, sturdy and basic.

move to a new house with much less land where, apart from enjoying time with the dogs, I hope to be able to expand the garden and continue showing chickens. I have shown dogs since I was ten years old, English Cockers in Junior handling, then English Setters and then all sorts of Terriers. Right now we are concentrating on the Welsh and Dachshunds in a very limited way. I have been judging for over ten years. My favor- ite assignments are the specialties but I must say judging huge entries of English Setters at championship shows in England has been exciting.

2. What are your “must have” traits in this breed? RP: Square, substantial and a brick-on-brick head. KR: Type, correct size, substance. Dogs with great shoulders should be acknowledged, as they are so hard to come by and so easily lost in a breeding program.

3. Are there any traits in this breed you fear are becoming exaggerated?

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RP: No. KR: The size is always important. The standard reads males to be 15" with a range of 15-15 ½ " being acceptable. It is very easy for the size to creep up. It’s been a long time since I saw a 15" male. Heads and necks are becoming too long. The heads are compared to a brick. They should be clean with level planes, but should never resemble a Wire Fox Terrier head. 4. Do you think the dogs you see in this breed are better now than they were when you first started judging? Why or why not? RP: There have been some really great ones in the past that were probably better than anything being shown now but overall, the breed is in better shape at the present time. “i do believe thAt the quAlity of the oveRAll Welsh Right noW is high. bReedeRs ARe PAying Attention to the stAndARd

KR: They are a moderate dog. Though we love the short backs, the Welsh Terrier is a “square” breed. They should not look like a miniature Airedale. I also think color is sometimes misunderstood. The grizzle coat is perfectly acceptable as well as dogs with darker jackets. 6. Is there anything else you’d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. RP: As are many other Terriers, this breed is on the low entry list. This means that they are often just handed to new judges with little research and experience. This is wrong. Every Terrier breed was designed to do a certain job in a specific area and the standards were written carefully for each breed to perform its job. The nuances for different breeds are so important and this is why new judges have to learn. I think it is really necessary to attend kennels, specialties and to go to the Montgom- ery County weekend at least one time, to get a grip on these breeds. If this does not happen, the chances that Terrier judging will become generic like so many other breeds is very likely. KR: Welsh Terriers are very strong in quality right now. Last year the top 6 were all Best in Show winners. And the dogs coming up in the classes also show promising qual- ity. It is an exciting time for the breed right now. 7. And, for a bit of humor: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever experienced at a dog show? RP: There have been lots of funny things happen and when I am judging or showing, I try to have a good time, but one memory constantly makes me smile thinking about it. I was judging in Atlantic City, New Jersey and this gentle- man in a kilt was showing a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I went up to him and said, “Good morning” and then start- ed to go over the dog. As I was getting close to the rear end, he said, “Oh excuse me” I stopped and exclaimed, “Yes?” He said, “Sorry, he just farted.” Not quite knowing what to do, I decided to stand back and let the air clear, so to speak, and in doing so, the moment got to me and I started to laugh hysterically! Lydia Coleman Hutchinson was doing Toys in the next ring, and asked, “What is so funny?” I told her and she could see the funny side of it too. Whilst judging, people say the funniest things. KR: At an outdoor show that was particularly windy and rainy day, I was desperately trying to anchor my wig while showing my puppy. We were doing pretty good until we were asked to spar. As we came to the center of the ring, my wig departed from my head. The Welsh sprang into action and KILLED it dead. The prey drive is obviously alive and well in the Welsh Terrier!

And the oveRAll PHYSICAL SOUNDNESS of the bReed.”

KR: I do believe that the quality of the overall Welsh right now is high. Breeders are paying attention to the stan- dard and the overall physical soundness of the breed. 5. What do you think new judges misunderstand about the breed? RP: I think there is still this mind set that a Welsh has to be thick. New judges are told that compared to a Fox Ter- rier or a Lakeland, the Welsh has to be the cart-horse as compared to the thoroughbred. A Welsh is the same size as a Fox Terrier, but weighing two pounds more—this is in the bone. Some judges, both old and new, see loaded shoulders and thick necks as being “Welshy”; however, I think that we are getting away from this mentality.

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