ShowSight - August 2018

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Blaze

Blaze

M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n i n g & R e s e r v e B e s t I N S h o w w i n n i n g

Blaze platinum g r a n d c h a m p i o n T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E

Own e d by B e t h Me r c i e r & Mar gar e t D e F o r e | ag e n t C J Favr e | a s s i s t e d by ang e l a cha s e PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

# 1 BOXER * # 1 WORKING ** # 3 AMONG ALL BREEDS **

OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS BONNIE WAGAMAN DEBORAH CAYWOOD BRED BY BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 7/31/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7/31/18

G C H G C I N N I B O N ’ S B E D R O C K B OM B S H E L L

BOXER

MICHAEL McGUIRE PHOTO DESIGN ©2018

Wagaman IFC.indd 1

5 BEST IN SHOWS, 1 RESERVE BEST IN SHOW, 10 GROUP ONES & 5 BEST IN SPECIALTIES T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S F O R A N A M A Z I N G MO N T H :

BIS JUDGES: MRS. PATRICIA HASTINGS MR. JAMES E. NOE MS. PEGGY BEISEL-McILWAINE MR. JOHN P. WADE MS. KRISTEN L. FRANCIS RBIS JUDGE: MR. JON R COLE

GROUP JUDGES: MS. JOANNE (JAN) N. PAULK MR. HAL T. BIERMANN MR. R.C. WILLIAMS MR. P. LEVI MARSMAN MR. JAMES E FREDERIKSEN MS. VICKI E ALLENBRAND MRS. PATRICIA V. TROTTER MR. JOHN P. WADE MR. CHARLES E. TROTTER MR. SEI-ICHIRO ISHIMARU

BEST IN SPECIALTY JUDGES: (NOT PICTURED): MRS. DANELLE M BROWN MR. JOE WALTON MRS. JUDITH A BROWN BIS MR. CHARLES E TROTTER MS. JUDITH ANN SMITH

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FRENCH BULLDOG

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 6/30/18 **All systems as of 6/30/18

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BOXER

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER MONTGOMERY: THE TERRIER SHOW It’s never too early to talk about one of the world’s legendary dog shows: Montgomery County Kennel Club. Since its first event was held in 1929, “Montgomery” has been a must-attend destination for any serious Terrier fancier. Every autumn, breed- ers, owners, handlers and judges from all over the world gather in a beautiful corner of Southeastern Pennsylvania to showcase their dogs, exchange knowledge and ideas, and simply have a blast together. I say have a blast because, every time I’ve at- tended, never have I witnessed anything as beautiful, positive and enjoyable as this one-day event. Montgomery County isn’t just home to one big Terrier competi- tion. Its distinct role as host to dozens of National Specialties makes it unique among the world’s celebrated dog shows. The club’s international panel of judges draws large entries in most breeds, including many of the current top-winners and the next generation of hopefuls. Breeders make the pilgrimage too, some coming from as far away as Eastern Europe, South Ameri- can and the Far East. Everyone and anyone “in Terriers” wants to attend Montgomery. In challenging times, getting big-time entries isn’t easy, but the officers and members of Montgomery County seem to get the job done. How do they do it? I think they achieve their goal through operational excellence, encouraging exhibitors to smile as they keep the competitive attitude on-point, and by encour- aging “positive vibes” that seem to resonate throughout the show grounds. Montgomery manages to stay true to its tradi- tions even as it responds to the latest developments within our sport. This is why the show has continued to be a destination for so many, year after year. I take my hat off to “Montgomery” and to every Terrier person who has ever attended this show. I would also like to encourage anyone who does not have a Terrier to go to this memorable and rewarding event at least once. I am confident that you will benefit from the experience. However, if you are unable to be in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, on October 7, please visit Montgom- ery County’s Facebook page and be sure to read SHOWSIGHT Magazine’s November Edition where you’ll enjoy our big post- Montgomery showcase. Lastly, I encourage every single kennel club to spread the word about all that you do to make your show a destination. To share the good news about your club’s event, please email us at info@ aramediagrp.com or call 512-541-8128.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com

Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

ADVERTISING

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com, 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com, 201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com, 512 541 8128 JOSIAH IMPASTATO josiah@aramediagrp.com, 512 541 6355 JASON ULMER julmer@aramediagrp.com, 701 799 7404

Enjoy rest of the Summer! Best,

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Post- age paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opin- ions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submit- ted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

AJ ARAPOVIC OWNER/PUBLISHER

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table of CONTENTS 14 SHOWSIGHT

169 198 240 253 258 263 276 286 289 296

NATIONAL SPECIALTY REVIEW Various Guest Experts

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

36 ON THE LINE

HERDING DOGS Various Guest Experts

Barbara “BJ” Andrews

38 MEMORIES CAPTURED Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 46 WHICH CAME FIRST... Dan Sayers 54 THE SEVEN SECRETS TO SHOW SUCCESS Michael and Cathy Dugan 66 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr 69 QUIT YOUR COMPLAINING Dan Sayers

THE SAMOYED Various Guest Experts

THE FLAT-COATED RETRIEVER Various Guest Experts

THE BOSTON TERRIER Various Guest Experts

THE CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI Various Guest Experts

THE CHINESE CRESTED Various Guest Experts

78 BECOMING Jacqueline Fogel

THE GRAND BASSET GRIFFON VENDÉEN Various Guest Experts

84 BREEDER INTERVIEW Allan Reznik

THE NEWFOUNDLAND Various Guest Experts

98 SURVEY SAYS

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Do you ever ask Judges for post show feedback if your dog didn’t place?

162 AKC NOHS TOP 100

298 ADVERTISING RATES

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! CONTACT US: 512.686.3466 | info@aramediagrp.com | subscriptions@aramediagrp.com | www.showsightmagazine.com S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 9

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PUG *ShowSight all breed stats as of 6/30/18

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GERMAN SHEPHERD

b r e d b y ED FERRELL & JOHN CONELY o w n e d b y JULIE TITTL & JULIA FOSTER - HESS

( 810 ) 625 - 5551 h a n d l e d b y

JULIA FOSTER - HESS JULIA - FOSTER.COM

BRONZE GRAND CHAMPION W O N D E R L A N D S D A R B Y V W O L F C R E E K

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The Breeder’s Bible Joseph Neil McGinnis III FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS

I n 1985 it was my pleasure to interview one of the Dog World’s greats, a woman who almost singlehandedly crested a dynasty, the quality and effects of which resonate to this day. Carol Garrison’s CARLEE MIN PINS still stands as a blueprint for what we’d all like to do. I now share with you the “rules’ she shared with us many years ago, If we heeded her words, I’ll bet it worked, and if we did not, per- haps now’s the time. I called it The Breeders’ Bible According to the late, great Carol Garrison . Here are the highlights:

NEVER OUTCROSS. To start your own line, find 2 lines that are compatible, that have no anomalies. This is where you derive dominance. If you don’t have a dominant dog bred to a dominant bitch, in lines what will ‘click’, you have nothing. KEEP YOUR NUMBERS MANAGEABLE. You cannot keep every dog. Don’t keep anything that is not helping your breeding program. Having too many will put you out of dogs faster than anything else. The number of brood bitches you have means nothing. It is the quality that counts. LOCK IN YOUR GOOD TRAITS. Concentrate on keeping the positive characteristics in your bloodline, keeping in mind your priorities. EDUCATE YOURSELF. You can acquire an ‘eye’ even if you’re not an artist. Take pic- tures, draw, learn. And study. REMEMBER: EVERYING IS HEREDITARY. You can not rationalize faults. If the mind is sound, a single bad experience will not ‘spook’ a dog forever. If the rear is sound, jumping off the couch will not cause the dog to limp for days. CO-OPERATION BETWEEN BREEDERS IS VERY IMPORTANT. Pet people won’t wait – if you don’t have something for them, they will wind up at a pet shop. We call back and forth, and can usually provide a good pet for these people. DON’T BE IN SUCH A HURRY. I always get suspicious of a dog that looks mature at 7-8 months. They will probably end up looking like a Mastiff. KEEP RECORDS. I keep graphs and weights of the puppies, and it is a tremen- dous aid in grading them. If you keep good records, you will soon see in black and white what you are producing. PLAN EVERYTHING FOR THE GOOD OF THE BREED. We have to fight for what is right. We need to educate our judges to see what breeders are aiming for. And, we must breed to the standard. So, now I hope you see what I mean about Carol’s modus operandi. As I said, it worked very well for her. To tell you the truth, I thought long and hard about publishing this article in this magazine. It would be easy to dismiss it by saying “Well, that’s fine and dandy for Min Pins, but what about my Danes, or Dandies (or Poodles, or you name) it but here’s the key: breeder. If you run a successful hotel, you could probably run a successful restaurant, automobile dealership, or flower shop—many of the same rules apply...and as I have said, this is the best ‘set of rules’ I’ve put my hands on yet, and I didn’t want to waste time. Because if the above article can improve the quality of one litter, or save one person from heartache, it was well worth it. Thank you, Carol.

Photo July 2018 by Zell von Pohlman

NEVER COMPROMISE. The quickest way to get burnt is to break you own rules. You must stick to your own code of ethics, in your breeding pro- gram, in dealing with the public…in all things. LEARN WHAT IS EASY TO CORRECT, AND WHAT IS HARD TO CORRECT. For example, in Min Pins, eye color is easy to correct. The hardest things to correct in that breed are bad rears and bad feet. Once you get certain faults in your own line, they will keep cropping up forever. NEVER BREED TO A DOG YOU HAVEN’T SEEN. Don’t breed to the top-wining dog just because he is the top winning dog. If it doesn’t click with your line, you will be doing more harm than good. NEVER RULE OUT A BREEDING THAT MAY IMPROVE YOUR LINE. Appreciate the gene pool of a good dog—any good dog. No matter where it comes from, a compatible gene pool is what you want. Some of the top-producing dogs are not Champi- ons: you want then to produce better than they are. Wouldn’t you think, if there was a non-famous dog with the traits you desired, that it would be worth it to try? What’s one breeding? LISTEN TO BREEDERS. It is very important for new people to talk to breeders, but everything they say is not gospel. Listen to everything, then decide for yourself. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘A GOOD BROOD BITCH’. Never breed a bitch that doesn’t possess as many positive traits as possible. You have to be very critical. KNOW YOUR PEDIGREES. It is important to know what the dogs were, where the pres- ent ones came from, but remember: the genes only hold for 3 or 4 generations—then, the influence dies out. Watch for the Top Producers. Top Producers produce. PUT EVERYTHING IN PERSPECTIVE. Decide what comes first in your breeding program, and stick with it.

JOE MCGINNIS, EDITOR EMERITUS

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G C H S T O N E R U N A F T E R N O O N T E A Siba

Thank You Breeder Judges Mr. Dennis McCoy (Best in Show) & Mr. Randy Garren (Group 1), for these tremendous honors.

M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R S P E C I A L T Y B E S T O F B R E E D W I N N E R

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA Assisted by Casey Bair

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STANDARD POODLE

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BRIARD

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NUMBER one

BULLDOG

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our sincerest appreciation to BEST IN SHOW JUDGE MR. MARK LUCAS!

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 6/30/18

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BULLDOG

BEST IN SHOW, MULTIPLE BESTS IN SPECIALTY SHOW, GCHS .

tintan MATA

owners JAY SERION / 206.356.4768 and XIAO LONG ZHU breeder ARMANDO MATA

@Nor cal bulldogger

Katie Gochev G r a p h i c s

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

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Rea L E G E N DA L E L A D Y L U K V G O L D G R O V E

B E S T I N S H O W & B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N I N G

O w n e r K e n i c h i K a t o

B r e e d e r & C o - O w n e r L a n a F e r g u s o n

C o - B r e e d e r G o l d g r o v e D o b e r m a n s

H a n d l e r A n d y L i n t o n , a n d y l i n t o n 1 0 @ y a h o o . c o m

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

S I LV E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N agan

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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*ShowSight breed stats as of 6/30/18

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10 * T O P

B R E E D ** #4 B E S T O F B R E E D T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R S . K A R E N M C F A R L A N E F O R T H I S V E R Y S P E C I A L W I N !

© B O O T H P H O T O B Y A L Y S S I A

G R A N D C H A M P I O N *** #2

B E S T O F B R E E D T H A N K Y O U J U D G E M R S . W E N D Y M A I S Y F O R T H I S V E R Y S P E C I A L W I N !

© B O O T H P H O T O B Y A L Y S S I A

C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S @ YA H O O . C O M

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S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H E D E L W E I S S A L I T T L E F R E A K Y D E A K Y

O W N E D B Y T R A C E Y M A I G N E , H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S | B R E D & H A N D L E D B Y K A T H Y K N O L E S

* S H O W S I G H T B R E E D & A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 6 / 3 0 / 1 8

* * S H O W S I G H T B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 6 / 3 0 / 1 8 * * * A K C G C H S T A T S A S O F 6 / 3 0 / 1 8

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STANDARD POODLE, MINIATURE POODLE

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Fairytale Briards present

bronze grand champion

Deauville du Tchibo d’Ebene

owned & loved by Odile Smith

presented by Greg Strong, AKC reg’d (410) 822-2187

assisted by Melissa LoPinto

Multiple Group & Best in Specialty ShowWinning

thank you judges

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BRIARD

Deauville

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T H A N K Y O U J U D G E P A T R I C I A U L L O A

# 14 H E RD I NG DOG *

NUMBER ONEE America’s AU S T RA L I AN C A T T L E DOG

A L L S Y S T E M S 2 0 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 * *

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18

**ALL SYSTEMS 2016, 2017 AND AS OF 6/30/18

Appearance of a

S T RONG , COMPAC T , SYMME T R I CAL WORK I NG DOG ! AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG 32 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018

B I S G CHP R E N E GAD E S PAY ’ N I T F ORWARD AT DAWN HE I R CGC HSA s

Combination of SUBS T ANCE , POWER AND BALANCE

O W N E D B Y J O Y C E R O W L A N D & L A U R I E Y O U M A N S | B R E D B Y J O Y C E R O W L A N D , L A U R I E Y O U M A N S & M A R T Y Y O U M A N S G R I F F I T H

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Bred & Owned by: Jacquelyn Johnson Chris Ann Moore Robert Moore Snapple &Kim Presented by: Kim & Gigi Griffith Co-Owned by: Kelli Watkins Kim Griffith

Thank you to judges James Noe, Patricia Hastings and Judith A. Brown for a fantastic trip to Texas and thank you to my good luck charms who came to visit!

*AKC Stats as of July 13

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AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

br onze grand champion Mu l t i p l e Bes t i n Spec i a l ty Show Wi nn i ng # 1 ACD Bitch All Breed * Shalimar & Oakwood Message In A Bottle Renegade

Photo by Gigi Griffith

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On The Line PARENT CLUB PROBLEMS BY BARBARA “BJ” ANDREWS

What is a Parent Club’s purpose? Does it only serve club members or should it serve the breed?

S h o w S i g h t readers are breeders and e x h i b i t o r s and I’d be willing to bet most of you belong to one or more breed clubs. So you are the experts on

breed itself. So in any dispute or problem, the board is duty- bound to act on behalf of the breed it represents. And, here’s the rub, that requires some work! Yes, it is more than setting up dog shows, serving a parent club requires diplomacy and actually serving the breed requires time and effort! Serving on a national breed club is more than just a “feath- er in your cap,” something to add to your list of accomplish- ments, something to help you get judging assignments or spe- cial wins “because you work for the club.” Serving the breed means welcoming newcomers. If you don’t like a person, don’t sweat it, you share a common bond and that has to mean more than how they dress or that they curse or drink or are of some other faith or social standing. A breed club isn’t about you. Your personal preferences or social standing means next to nothing compared to your breed knowledge and/or show ring success that can help to promote the breed and educate dog owners. No club constitution or bylaws prevents “outsiders” from asking for assistance. TheDogPress.com received a detailed complaint from a person rebuffed by a breed club. She had purchased a puppy represented as “show potential” for her son to show in the breed ring, agility and performance. The puppy failed its heart test and the breeder refused the own- er’s request for a replacement with a healthy puppy or failing that within a reasonable time, a refund of her purchase price. The breeder did not disclose any risks associated with the breed. Specifically she did not mention that heart prob- lems are common in that breed even though the buyer had stated their intention to compete in agility. When the own- er “reached out to the parent club for assistance” she was ignored. When she pursued it with the board, thinking it was just an oversight, she was told the club couldn’t get involved because she wasn’t a member! The club officer said that their constitution only allows members to file a complaint against another member. Why have a Code Of Ethics if a parent club refuses to consider an ethics violation charged by a non-member? How can a breed club purport to promote and protect the breed and refuse to help someone who provided proof that a member violated all forms of basic ethics? Like some of you, I’m old enough to remember when breed clubs welcomed new members and willingly-eagerly answered questions. Today, many clubs seem to hide health issues, thus misleading the newbie. Does your parent breed club provide educational mate- rial and up-to-date health information to any interested party? If not, why not? Please let me know if your club is doing a good job on what should be public breed education. Does the website deal openly with breed health issues? Does your club welcome new members? Are your elections certified by an outside party? You can email me directly at BJ@ToyFoxTerriersOBJ.com

what we call parent clubs because, like good parents, those clubs are supposed to look after their constituents, protect them from ignorance and help them succeed “out there.” If you have ever served on a national “parent” breed club board, follow this and let me know how your club handles complaints filed by non-members and also if your breed club is forthcoming on breed-related problems. If you’ve been in the sport for more than five years you know some clubs can be like getting stuck in a tar pit. Board members can be more about self-promotion than about pro- moting the breed and providing information to members. Is your parent club a great source of all information on the breed? Does it downplay breed problems or does it inform members? Is your club where you would go to find reputable breeders to help you learn about dogs? Are club officers and members there to guide you through a maze of dog stuff? After all, it is for the betterment of the breed, right? If we love the breed and want to help preserve the brains, charac- ter and conformation that attracted us to that breed, then you should help the club that is in charge of maintaining those very unique characteristics. Some breed clubs stand behind their breed and actively seek to educate and attract new supporters who will help the breed. That is their job and it will be in every parent club’s Articles Of Incorporation no matter where it is incorporated. All breed clubs are supposed to be in service to the breed and to the members. If a parent club fails to uphold the reason they were formed, then any club member can and should file charges against the sitting board. If that fails to correct the problem, the next step is to file formal charges through the American Kennel Club because it is AKC’s duty to oversee its member clubs. Some clubs have not yet been accepted/approved by AKC as a member club and if yours is one of them, then there is even great- er reason to not be silent if the parent breed club is not fulfilling its charter. WHAT ELSE DOES A “PARENT” BREED CLUB DO IN ADDITION TO HOLDING AND/OR SPONSORING “SPECIALTY” SHOWS FOR THE BREED? Breed clubs, national or local, exist to promote and serve the breed. That means they act on behalf of the breed, not just for board members. The membership is always more important than the board. Members are second only to the

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18 **SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18

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FLAT-COATED RETRIEVER

MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Carolina Foothills Classic Greenville Kennel Club & Piedmont Kennel Club July 26-29, 2018 . Greenville, SC 38 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018

At ROYAL CANIN ® , we obsess over purebred dogs—and the perfect nutrition for each of them. ROYAL CANIN ® formulas are developed with your breed’s unique needs in mind for superior muscle tone, coat health and digestion. As a breed expert, you know the right nutrition can unlock the magnificence inside your dogs, and so do we. FIT AND FINISHED. A Major Win for Breeders Join the Crown Partners Rewards Program Today! my.royalcanin.com

© ROYAL CANIN ® SAS 2017. All Rights Reserved. Image used with permission.

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DACHSHUND (WIREHAIRED)

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BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18

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Number One M A L E B R E E D & A L L B R E E D * *ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 6/30/18

Thank you TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE PUT THIS YOUNG DOG IN THE TOP RANKINGS

Owned by HEIKE WEHRLE 847-366-1469

Bred by CHERYL CORSEN & DANETTE PRAWDZIK

Handl ed by HEIKE WEHRLE & CHARLIE ZIMMERMAN

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BELGIAN SHEEPDOG

Home of Best In Show Belgians I N C H A L L A H

Amadeus G C H G S UM E RW Y N D ’ S AMADEUS OF INCHALLAH S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 45

Which Came First… …the Ribbon or the Dog Show? BY DAN SAYERS A w a r d i n g r i b b o n s for class p l a c e -

Americans, it was the blue ribbon that came to symbolize quality and respectability. Although the written critique fad- ed into obscurity at North American dog shows, kennel clubs took to offering bigger and more elaborate rosettes for class winners and Group Placements. Now it seems a 12" rosette with a five-foot train is de rigueur for Best in Show! Emblazoned with both the show-giving club’s name and the date of the event, a ribbon or rosette represents a moment in time when a dog was acknowledged for its breed-specific quality. Every satin keepsake marks a milestone in a dog’s journey toward its championship and throughout its specials career. To most exhibitors, a ribbon also represents an invest- ment of time, training and talent—not to mention cold, hard cash and a dash of good luck. And as this investment in show ring success has increased, so too has the size of the symbols that represent that investment. Is it any wonder some rosettes have gotten as big as a Rottweiler’s noggin? Rosettes and ribbons are treasured mementos, no mat- ter their size. A ribbon is really a souvenir and, like all sou- venirs, it’s intended to be displayed. Shadow boxes, coffee table display cases and curio cabinets are just some of the more obvious presentation techniques, but a few resourceful exhibitors have even woven their satin souvenirs into fabric for pillowcases, crate covers and even clothing. Of course, the most time-honored way to display a cherished ribbon or rosette is to have it carefully matted and framed with the offi- cial win photo. Nothing distinguishes a single rosette (even a simple one) better than a montage that includes a photo with the judge holding the treasure that’s on display. After all, it’s important to honor the judge who awarded the win in the first place.

ments is a big part of what makes a dog show a dog show. In fact, ribbons, rosettes and printed sashes are so sought after by many of today’s exhibi- tors that some clubs have begun to offer spectacularly over- sized creations that dwarf even the giant breeds that earn them.

Their outlandish proportions and the attention to which they are paid might have some fanciers wondering, “Which came first, the ribbon or the dog show?” The first dog shows held in the United States were orga- nized by gentlemen hunters who gathered their gun dogs together for evaluation by other gentlemen hunters. Indi- vidual classes were established and dogs were sorted by a panel of judges whose collective opinions were recorded for posterity. When this system for assessing the merits of indi- vidual dogs grew into a sport, placements were commemo- rated with simple silk ribbons. But as kennel clubs flour- ished in large cities and became society affairs, entries were often encouraged by offering silver cups and bowls to the winners. Eventually, challenge trophies became the norm. But as the sport continued to grow to include middle-class

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*

*ShowSight breed stats as of 6/30/18

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 47

WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON

Which Came First…: …the Ribbon or the Dog Show? BY DAN SAYERS continued

“EARLY IMAGES OF WINNING SHOW DOGS WERE FREQUENTLY SHOT AT THE DOG’S LEVEL, REQUIRING BOTH HANDLER AND JUDGE TO KNEEL.”

Like a rosette, the win photo has always been a part of showing dogs. But time and technology have changed its significance. Early images of winning show dogs were frequently shot at the dog’s level, requiring both handler and judge to kneel. Gentlemen in those old photos are frequently immortalized on a single bended knee and female adjudicators are sometimes frozen in a distinctive squat with knees bent dis- creetly together and turned toward the dog. Judges in these old photos are gen- erally pictured holding a single ribbon or rosette, and any trophies are placed unceremoniously on the ground. Older photos were usually shot in the ring where spectators were often captured in the background. Later images show the dogs elevated on a platform, allow- ing everyone to stand. This arrange- ment also permitted trophies to be held by a presenter, usually a club member or

the occasional celebrity. In time, show photos became more formal, requir- ing a colorful backdrop large enough to embrace an army of officers and co-owners. This entourage required the photographer to widen his or her frame, resulting in photos where both the winning dog and the rosette seem like supporting players. Today, smart phones and social media have taken the win photo out of the hands of true professionals—show photographers and magazine editors— and into the hands of just about every- one else. The result is that every win can now be captured and promoted without benefit of a photographer’s experienced eye or an editor’s atten- tion to detail. Unlike the official show win photo, these “win posts” can be striking in their attention to anything but the winning dog’s breed type. “So, this just happened…,” reads a typical

post with an image of a grooming table serving double duty as a display coun- ter for all and sundry ribbons, rosettes, trophies and trinkets. This sort of post will sometimes include an informal photo of the winning dog, but it is the symbol of the win—the rosette—that often appears front and center. These posts have become the provenance of professional handler and amateur exhibitor alike, with one distinction: The pros usually include the name of the judge. This courtesy seems the least that should be done in the digital age to honor the legacy of a sport built by purebred dog breeders and the judges whose opinions reward their efforts. A ribbon is certainly an important piece of any dog’s show record, but it’s really just spun satin without the dog show.

The focus of attention in this photo with judge Maxwell Riddle and handler George Alston is crystal clear. (Notice the modest Group First rosette.) Photo courtesy The Book of the English Springer Spaniel by Anna Katherine Nicholas.

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S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 53

The Seven Secrets to Show Success

Be a Great Owner BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN

I was clueless. I was a long way from being a good show own- er, much less a great one. Cathy had been breeding dogs for many years and prior to that had bred and trained horses. Aviator Kennel finished several champions every year, almost always shown by Cathy or a friend of hers. She went to dog shows almost every week- end competing with good dogs and winning the occasional big championship. She rarely used a professional handler and was considered a successful breeder and owner of show dogs. She did virtually no marketing and had a small work- manlike web site. She spent a lot of time on her dogs and genuinely enjoyed the experience. Still, looking back over the last few years, we both realize that Cathy wasn’t a great show owner yet, even with her experience. Now, the trend is breeder-owner-handlers in the ring; something that changes almost everything—we’ll talk about that later. SO… WHAT IS A GREAT SHOW OWNER? Once we got married and I was fully committed to the life of dogs and shows I began to look at the business of pedi- greed dogs and the world they live in. From my legal and busi- ness background, as well as a stint as an CAO of a web devel- opment start up before the Internet bubble burst, I started to sort out some of the variables of the competition. Ever the statistician, I looked at the numbers comparing what it cost to show your own dogs every weekend, traveling all over the west coast competing with professional handlers and dealing with the vagaries of competition judging. I noticed that hardly anybody did any real marketing of their kennels, dogs, expertise or reputation. It was so, well, casual and civilized, or so I first thought. I began to realize that beneath all of this calm veneer of polite applause as dogs won in the ring was a caldron of fierce combat. Cathy won far more than other competing breeders, but she didn’t win best of breeds all the time, much less group and best in show wins. One of my first suggestions, carefully presented to the expert was that going to dog shows constantly and showing your own dogs wasn’t cost effective. I had quietly compiled and compared two business models for the competitions. The first one was the way most people show their dogs; just as Cathy had done for years. The other model moved to a different level. At that level you hired a regular professional handler, carefully planned which dog show offered the most promise, judges and points, managed which dogs were going to compete when and developed goals and benchmarks to monitor success. In this model, you

I used to think that when I thought of a vacation, I was getting ready to go to the City of Light—Paris. One of my favorite places, I got to know it well over the years, going there as often as I could. When Cathy and I spent our honeymoon there, she remarked that I knew my way around Paris better than I did Sacramento. Taking a carriage ride in Versailles, lounging around in a café enjoying a great aperitif was how life should be led, or so I thought. BUT: When Cathy and I got married several years ago, I fell down the rabbit hole of dog shows; many, many dog shows. Now the vacation is more likely to be at the Los Ange- les County Fairplex in Pomona for the five grueling days of the Mission Circuit. Instead of the famous “mistral” winds in Provence, I got to experience the Santa Ana winds of south- ern California. Ah, the life! THE ROOKIE DISCOVERS A SECRET WORLD: Like most people who have one of the 80 million dogs that inhabit this country, I grew up with dogs as pets and enjoyed the simple pleasures and devotion that comes from a canine companion. Feeding them, brushing them out once in a while, bathing them when they got too close to a skunk, playing fetch; that was pretty much as complicated as it got. I considered myself a dog person, a perfectly good owner who took responsibility for the animal in my care. I mean, of course I had heard of dog shows and Westminster and won- dered who those crazy people where who took that kind of stuff so seriously. I had no idea what the business of dogs was all about, but I do now. Cathy has been breeding dogs successfully since 1987 and when we were seeing each other I got a glimmer of what the show universe was like. One of the first shows I attend- ed with her was in Pleasanton, California, a pleasant simple enough place east of San Francisco. Wandering around a county fairground on a hot weekend, I began to think, “What the hell is this all about?” There were people, dogs, vendors and officials everywhere all working with deadly focus and concentration while dogs and handlers swept in and out of a show ring in some kind of incomprehensible order. I tried to follow and understand what was happening to no avail. Cathy tried to fill me in on the rules, classes, standards and judging rules, why some dogs got ribbons and others did not. She had a dog named Olivia who won sweepstakes and winner’s bitch out of the 9-12 puppy class, whatever that was. I was appro- priately pleased and impressed even though I didn’t why. I thought, “Wait a minute, I’m a lawyer with an MBA and a mas- ters in psychology, how tough can this be to understand?”

"Ace" in water performance work

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The Seven Secrets to Show Success:...

BY MICHAEL AND CATHY DUGAN continued

“CATHY AND I HAVE LEARNED TO GO WITH THE FLOW OF THE DEMANDS OF COMPETING AT A HIGH LEVEL IN THE DOG WORLD.”

to doing what it takes to win the big shows. We now make little mini-vaca- tions out of the many shows that we attend. When the PWD National was in Rhode Island, we added a week to go to Cape Cod. Paris will always be there, I think. Because both Cathy and I are onboard to being as good of owners as we can and are willing to make sacri- fices of time and money, we can survive the craziness. Did I mention crazy? A great dog show owner is certifiably nuts. Now the movie Best In Show seems perfectly logical to me. Of course I’m going to become my local dog food store’s favor- ite customer. Of course I’m going to single-handedly pay my vet’s utility bills every month. Sure I’m going to send my dogs cross-country for a show because it’s the best place to be. It’s just fine that my entire schedule revolves around dogs and shows. And that’s not enough. Like any busi- ness or hobby-out-of-control, total per- sonal commitment means getting even more involved in the process. Breed- ing, training and showing dogs is not enough. Because you might actually have a few uncommitted minutes here and there, you have to start the pro- cess of being an AKC judge like Cathy, start being a ring steward like me, start attending judge’s and breed seminars and training sessions, join local ken- nel clubs, mentor other breeders, help owners become their own kennels, get involved in helping to put own regional and national specialties, write articles, track show and judging results and net- work in the broader world of dogs all over the world. Did I mention crazy? As with any obsessive behavior it’s therapeutic to ask yourself if this behav- ior is a good thing or not. To be a great show owner, try not to ask yourself that question. Cathy and I have learned to go with the flow of the demands of com- peting at a high level in the dog world. More important, when you see one of dogs competing for Best of Show in Madison Square Garden, the spotlight tracking her movement around the ring, you know you don’t have to ask that question; you know very well that’s it worth all it took to get here.

shows like the Golden Gate show in San Francisco, we started bringing as many as 17 dogs for competition and nearly 30 owners there for the party. With a formal set-up thirty feet wide with ban- ners, photos, dogs on the bench and owners, Aviator presented our best face forward to the 20,000 people that attend that show every year. Even with the move to the next level, we still weren’t fully prepared for what it takes to be a great show owner, prepared and willing to advance a unique dog like Ladybug. We had to really think about our answers to the hard questions confronting us to go to the next level. SO, TAKE THE QUIZ: First, were we prepared to make a total commitment of time, money and effort to leverage the success of Avia- tor to create and produce top ten dogs? We’ll talk about the amounts of money it takes to do this later in this series, but for now suffice it to say it costs a lot of money. Vacations? Forget it. Good- bye Paris, Hello Pomona. Even prior to Ladybug we had some top ten winners, but it was a real learning process even for Cathy. I had lots of time picking up waste in the kennel to think about how we could best market our dogs and our kennel. Did I mention waste? One of the striking things I noticed at dog shows that there were few couples there with their dogs. Almost always the owner and handler would be a woman with a couple of dogs. As I got to know more people in the business, I figured out that in a lot of cases, the husband was play- ing golf or at home in the woodwork- ing shop. Cathy and I had figured out how to share the dog business duties; she handled the intricacies of breeding, training and raising pups—I was the kennel boy. Whenever I talked to my sister in Texas, she would laugh about where destiny had taken me. More than once, she would ask, “Did you ever think your would be in the dog busi- ness, picking up waste?” Did I mention waste again? To be a great show owner, you and your part- ner have to both completely commit

"Mo" in water performance work

had the handler show all of your dogs except for those in bred by exhibitor or very young class dogs. Instead of going to shows constantly, we sent our dogs to show every weekend with the han- dler. We were going to shows in places like Monterey and let the handler go to Bakersfield (no offense to Bakersfield!). Believe or not, the second model was actually less expensive than the usual practice. More important, our dogs fin- ished faster, allowing Cathy the luxury of better planning about when dogs were actually ready to go into the ring. She had always carefully planned breed- ings; generally looking three years out to think about what she hoped to get for a particular breeding. Next, we started finishing seven to ten dogs per year, instead of two or three. That gave us a larger pool of champions and expanded the opportunities for breeding our own dogs in the future. Cathy now typically has ten bitches in the queue for breed- ing, allowing her to plan what the opti- mum time and best stud will give us what we want for competition. We also began to look at market- ing, beginning with our website Avia- torKennel.com . We had had a perfectly suitable static website as do most small businesses. What we did not have what a “portal”, that is, a large up-to-date web- site that offers a huge amount of infor- mation about us, the dogs, the kennel, PWDs, shows, health links and articles. We started to think about advertising and developing better links and con- tacts with our owners, our customers. As with any business, your customers are your best source of positive market- ing and sales. A happy owner walking around San Francisco with an Aviator dog is your best billboard. An owner invited to attend a dog show with you and watch as their pup wins a ribbon is very happy, indeed. At some of the big

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ENGLISH SETTER

© Holloway Photo

M B I S S I N T/A M G C H S C H There’s No Business Like Show Business C G C A , T K A SILVERLAKES

© Kohler

© Don Meyer

Thank you Judges Terry Depietro & Nikki Riggsbee

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GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

BARBARA &

Breeder/Owner/Handlers: Barbara & Dr. Gary McNeill Breeders of Merit . Oklahoma City, OK . 405-833-1774 . Silverlakegsps.com

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 59

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BRUSSELS GRIFFON

**

*

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/18

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BICHON FRISE

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 63

G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N

T HANK YOU J UDG E S

J A N P A U L K , J O Y C E V A N E K A N D R O B E R T L A M M

BEARDED COLLIE

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B E A R D E D C O L L I E *

M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W & M U L T I P L E S P E - C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

O W N E D B Y A N N A M A R I E Y U R A

B R E D & C O - O W N E D B Y R A Y H A R R I N G T O N

E X C L U S I V E L Y P R E S E N T E D B Y J A M E S B E T T I S

* S H O W S I G H T B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 6 / 3 0 / 1 8

S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , A UGUST 2018 • 65

Lines From Linda Always Remember Clint Harris BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR O ur sport has lost another legend, Clin- ton McGill October 27, 1924 - August 3, 2018

Always quite the sportsman, Clint and his second wife Joan Hall Harris enjoyed fishing and golf. Clint and Joanie were married for 48 years before she passed away. My late husband Jim and I were blessed with so many memories of golf outings with them. From Mackinaw Island at the marvelous Dog Days at Dan and Amelia Mussers’ Grand Hotel to Florida’s Handlers and Hackers golf tournaments, we exchanged jokes and big stories.

Harris. At age 93, Clint was going strong at what has turned out to be his last dog show, the Lou- isville Kennel Club only five months ago in March. His friends were amazed as he had overcome a life threatening fall only a year before on July 6. Last month on July 9, he

fell again. During the past year Clint was back to normal driv- ing around in a Jaguar and enjoying visits with his friends. He especially loved the company of his best buddies Janet and Darrell Manley. Following his most recent surgery last month, 20 min- utes after he came out of the recovery room, I received a photo of him giving me a thumbs up! That was Clint, always upbeat, fun and positive! Raised in the Crescent Hill area of Louisville, Kentucky, he attended Male High School and was an Eagle Scout. At age 17 Clint enlisted in the United States Army entering Ski Patrol training in Colorado. He also served in France as a Paratrooper, an MP and for a time cared for the military carrier pigeons. Following his military service, Clint became interested in dog training. With his first wife Billie Ed Williams Harris, he opened Waggin’Tail Kennels in Oldham County, Ken- tucky. Eventually the young couple moved the business of boarding, training and grooming to Louisville. For decades Clint was a Professional Dog Handler. He won Best in Show at the famed Westminster Kennel Club for two consecutive years in 1971 and 1972 with a Springer Spaniel bred by his sister, Ann H. Roberts. Later he became a popular all breed judge and for decades traveled nation- ally and internationally for judging assignments before he retired in 2012.

“HE WON BEST IN SHOW AT THE FAMED WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB

FOR TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS IN 1971 AND 1972 WITH A SPRINGER SPANIEL.”

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NORFOLK TERRIER

Lines From Linda: Always Remember Clint Harris

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR continued

“WHAT A DOLL HE WAS WITH HIS HANDSOME GOOD LOOKS, DARK HAIR

AND THAT FLAT TOP.”

Joanie & Clint Harris with “DJ” Ch. Chinoes Adamant James, Two Time Westminster BIS Winner

Clint is survived by his sister, Mary Lee Hendee of Chagrin Falls, Ohio and his three children, Barbara Johnson of Nicholasville, Kentucky, Blake Harris of Louisville, Kentucky and Natalie Mobley of Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was very proud of his seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Since I was a little girl old enough to walk a Collie on a leash, I have adored Clint Harris. In the old days it was the Professional Handlers who judged Junior Showmanship. He always placed me first. What a doll he was with his handsome good looks, dark hair and that flat top. I will “Always Remember” Clint Harris! A memorial service is being planned in October. The family requests remembrance contributions

Favorites among his golfing buddies were Dick Cooper, George Ward and Dr. Richard Greathouse! My Mother Hazel Ayers, my brother, Roy Ayers, Jr. and I joined Clint to celebrate and roast Dr. Richard Greathouse for the Lou- isville Kennel Club and the Collie Club of Kentucky. Doc and Clint, along with close friend Joe Gregory are true Louisville, Kentucky dog world legends! Judy Cooper and I along with Judy’s daughter Marcy Bankus spent an “Always Remember” day with Clint following his first fall. Oh, what reminiscing! That day I bonded with Clint’s daughter Barbie. She and I have kept in close touch since that special visit.

be made in Clint’s name to Take the Lead. www.takethelead.org or 800- 814-1123. For the many of you who have asked, the following are the contacts for Clint’s two daughters and son:

Barbie Harris Johnson 1509 Orchard Drive Nicholasville, KY 40356 859-797-9317 Natalie Harris Mobley 2894 E. Delhi Road Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 734-255-9827

Blake Harris 202 Idlewylde Drive Louisville, KY 40206 502-664-2206

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