Scottish Deerhound Breed Magazine - Showsight

DEERHOUND SCOTTISH

Let’s Talk Breed Education!

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Official Standard of the Scottish Deerhound Head : Should be broadest at the ears, narrowing slightly to the eyes, with the muzzle tapering more decidedly to the nose. The muzzle should be pointed, but the teeth and lips level. The head should be long, the skull flat rather than round with a very slight rise over the eyes but nothing approaching a stop. The hair on the skull should be moderately long and softer than the rest of the coat. The nose should be black (in some blue fawns-blue) and slightly aquiline. In lighter colored dogs the black muzzle is preferable. There should be a good mustache of rather silky hair and a fair beard. Ears: Should be set on high; in repose, folded back like a Greyhound's, though raised above the head in excitement without losing the fold, and even in some cases semi-erect. A prick ear is bad. Big thick ears hanging flat to the head or heavily coated with long hair are bad faults. The ears should be soft, glossy, like a mouse's coat to the touch and the smaller the better. There should be no long coat or long fringe, but there is sometimes a silky, silvery coat on the body of the ear and the tip. On all Deerhounds, irrespective of color of coat, the ears should be black or dark colored. Neck and Shoulders: The neck should be long-of a length befitting the Greyhound character of the dog. Extreme length is neither necessary nor desirable. Deerhounds do not stoop to their work like the Greyhounds. The mane, which every good specimen should have, sometimes detracts from the apparent length of the neck. The neck, however, must be strong as is necessary to hold a stag. The nape of the neck should be very prominent where the head is set on, and the throat clean cut at the angle and prominent. Shoulders should be well sloped; blades well back and not too much width between them. Loaded and straight shoulders are very bad faults. Tail : Should be tolerably long, tapering and reaching to within 1½ inches of the ground and about 1½ inches below the hocks. Dropped perfectly down or curved when the Deerhound is still, when in motion or excited, curved, but in no instance lifted out of line of the back. It should be well covered with hair, on the inside, thick and wiry, underside longer and towards the end a slight fringe is not objectionable. A curl or ring tail is undesirable. Eyes: Should be dark-generally dark brown, brown or hazel. A very light eye is not liked. The eye should be moderately full, with a soft look in repose, but a keen, far away look when the Deerhound is roused. Rims of eyelids should be black. Body : General formation is that of a Greyhound of larger size and bone. Chest deep rather than broad but not too narrow or slab-sided. Good girth of chest is indicative of great lung power. The loin well arched and drooping to the tail. A straight back is not desirable, this formation being unsuited for uphill work, and very unsightly. Legs and Feet: Legs should be broad and flat, and good broad forearms and elbows are desirable. Forelegs must, of course, be as straight as possible. Feet close and compact, with well- arranged toes. The hindquarters drooping, and as broad and powerful as possible, the hips being set wide apart. A narrow rear denotes lack of power. The stifles should be well bent, with great length from hip to hock, which should be broad and flat. Cowhocks, weak pasterns, straight stifles and splay feet are very bad faults. Coat : The hair on the body, neck and quarters should be harsh and wiry about 3 or 4 inches long; that on the head, breast and belly much softer. There should be a slight fringe on the inside of the forelegs and hind legs but nothing approaching the "feather" of a Collie. A woolly coat is bad. Some good strains have a mixture of silky coat with the hard which is preferable to a woolly

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coat. The climate of the United States tends to produce the mixed coat. The ideal coat is a thick, close-lying ragged coat, harsh or crisp to the touch. Color: Is a matter of fancy, but the dark blue-gray is most preferred. Next come the darker and lighter grays or brindles, the darkest being generally preferred. Yellow and sandy red or red fawn, especially with black ears and muzzles, are equally high in estimation. This was the color of the oldest known strains-the McNeil and Chesthill Menzies. White is condemned by all authorities, but a white chest and white toes, occurring as they do in many of the darkest-colored dogs, are not objected to, although the less the better, for the Deerhound is a self-colored dog. A white blaze on the head, or a white collar, should entirely disqualify. The less white the better but a slight white tip to the stern occurs in some of the best strains. Height: Height of Dogs - From 30 to 32 inches, or even more if there be symmetry without coarseness, which is rare. Height of Bitches - From 28 inches upwards. There is no objection to a bitch being large, unless too coarse, as even at her greatest height she does not approach that of the dog, and therefore could not be too big for work as overbig dogs are. Weight : From 85 to 110 pounds in dogs, and from 75 to 95 pounds in bitches. Points of the Deerhound, Arranged in Order of Importance 1. Typical-A Deerhound should resemble a rough-coated Greyhound of larger size and bone. 2. Movements-Easy, active and true. 3. As tall as possible consistent with quality. 4. Head-Long, level, well balanced, carried high. 5. Body-Long, very deep in brisket, well-sprung ribs and great breadth across hips. 6. Forelegs-Strong and quite straight, with elbows neither in nor out. 7. Thighs-Long and muscular, second thighs well muscled, stifles well bent. 8. Loins-Well arched, and belly well drawn up.

9. Coat-Rough and hard, with softer beard and brows. 10. Feet-Close, compact, with well-knuckled toes. 11. Ears-Small (dark) with Greyhound-like carriage. 12. Eyes-Dark, moderately full. 13. Neck-Long, well arched, very strong with prominent nape. 14. Shoulders-Clean, set sloping. 15. Chest-Very deep but not too narrow. 16. Tail-Long and curved slightly, carried low. 17. Teeth-Strong and level. 18. Nails-Strong and curved. Disqualification: White blaze on the head, or a white collar.

Approved March, 1935

Understanding the Scottish Deerhound Standard

Courtesy of Sighthound Review Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring 2012 pp. 140-143 www.sighthoundreview.com and Sight and Scent October 2013 pp. 126, 129-132. www.sightandscentmagazine.com

TheTitan • Peogh & Glen. Crealock 1873

Preface

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he preface to the Scottish Deerhound Club of America breed standard and the Australian National Kennel Coun- cil breed standard reminds the fancy (if you look hard) of the historic function of the Deerhound. Brief mention is made of “coping with large Scottish deer (often weighing 250 pounds)” and much is made of the mythology of the “Royal dogs” owned by earls and noble lords*. More on function would have been helpful in interpreting the Standard, in particular helping to grade the severity of “faults”, “undesirables” and other deviations noted in the standard by assisting the reader in understanding to what extent the deviation affects the original purpose of the breed. Two key elements are instrumental in understanding Deerhound conformation: (a) its quarry, the Red deer (Cervus elaphus (scoticus)) and (b) the terrain over which this breed coursed. Red deer are smaller than an elk, but larger than a white-tailed deer. The Scottish Red deer, smaller than the Western European Red deer thanks to the inhospitable windswept hills of its habitat, weighed 225 to 300 pounds with a shoulder height of about 40 to 47 inches. The terrain is extraordinarily rough: peat bogs, stony hills covered with coarse heather, rocky crags and rushing burns. Watching Deerhounds work in their home terrain illuminates how this breed needs to be constructed and the Standard is the breed experts’ attempt to describe this.

* Fortunately the revised AKC The Complete Dog Book has a new introduction to the standard correcting this historically inaccurate romanticism encouraged by that great Deerhound fancier Sir Walter Scott. tish Deerhound have an interesting and rather chequered history. Early in the 1800s Archibald MacNeill of Colon- say revived the sport of coursing Red deer with the “High- land deer-hound” or “rough Scotch greyhound” on the islands of Colonsay and Jura. He describes a day of deer coursing (August 11, 1835) on the Island of Jura that saw six T hose few paragraphs adopted as the Scottish Deerhound breed Standard in 1935 by the AKC and subsequently immortalised by the show fancy as the “ideal” Scot-

sportsmen, a piper and a deer-stalker watch two deerhounds, Buskar and Bran take down a 308 pound stag that was 3 ft 11 ¼ inches at the shoulder. Buskar, his “best in field” dog, was painted by Sir Edwin Landseer, carefully measured and an ac- count of this event was published in William Scrope’s TheArt of Deerstalking (1838). There was no Sight and Scent Hound Magazine or Sighthound Review in those days! This descrip- tion became an important benchmark in understanding the working Deerhound.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lindt

at a meeting of the UK Deerhound Club, November 26th, 1892, and again endorsed in 1901. It was recognized by that time that the breed had, in effect, been saved from extinction by this new sport of dog showing in England. Specimens that were “over-big” for deerstalking, had regularly been sent south to compete in the show ring which they did with dis- tinction and the breed became very popular. That reality and pressure from Graham and Hood-Wright who were great ad- vocates of size (and then both went on to develop the Irish Wolfhound), ensured that the newly adopted 1892/1901 Stan- dard provided for a size greater than 30 inches …. “if there be symmetry without coarseness, which is rare”. Then in 1914, a major change took place to the Standard with the addition of “Points of a Deerhound arranged in Order of Importance” . Type was placed where it belongs … first in order of importance. The absence of a description of move- ment in the original Standard of 1892 was addressed. Also slipped into the Standard was the phrase “as tall as possi- ble consistent with quality” and the height limits were changed. Club minutes that might have explained this change have been lost, but most likely it reflects the continuing concern expressed by some of the Deerhound fancy (letters and discussion in The Stock-Keeper ) that the breed will lose popularity to its much larger competitor, the Irish Wolfhound. This, of course, is exactly what happened. Regardless, with this change the Deerhound officially became a show dog. The breed Standard adopted by the AKC in 1935, included these changes while also increasing the breed height by two inches “from 30 to 32” for males and for bitches “from 28 inches upwards” . Weights were correspondingly increased in the AKC version and the somewhat spurious claim that the cli- mate of the USA might produce a mixed silky and hard coat was added.

By the mid 1800s J.H. Walsh (“Stonehenge”) began press- ing for the development of breed standards as the sport of showing dogs increased in popularity. So began the very pub- lic debate about how a Deerhound should look. Weston Bell started the task in 1892 with his seminal book The Scottish Deerhound with Notes on its Origin and Characteristics . This provided a first prototype breed standard developed with the assistance of the Duchess of Wellington, the Mar- quis of Breadalbane, Captain Graham, G.W. Hickman and Robert Hood-Wright. Hickman summed up their conclu- sions: “Between the large greyhound and a small deerhound there was no difference in outward characteristics…the deerhound is simply a rough greyhound raised to a larger size by selec- tions, common to the whole of Scotland…the Highlands of Scotland, being the only place where the stag has remained in a wild state in any numbers…” Bell makes a clear distinction that while his description is of the “modern Deerhound” with measurements of speci- mens currently appearing in the show ring, the working Deerhound forms the basis of his written “ideal”. So, in def- erence to the working Deerhound he capped size at “29 to30 inches, but not over 30 inches” for males and “26 to 27” inches for bitches. “To run into and hold a full grown stag, a large and strong animal, is certainly required and it was found that a dog av- eraging 29 to 30 inches was the correct animal”. Hickman and Hood-Wright then went on to reformat this de- scription by Bell (with one crucial difference) into a Deer- hound Standard which was formally amended and approved

This is very important history for those judges that see the Standard as a tool for evaluating breed specimens on the basis of form following function. The Deerhound Standard already describes a modern show Deerhound so any exaggeration of the breed characteristics described in the Standard will move the Deerhound even farther from its working roots. TYPE (Point #1) is the sum of those qualities which are dis- tinctive to the breed which make the animal not a dog, but a Deerhound. Most breed standards start with General Ap- pearance but the Scottish Deerhound Club of America Deer- hound Standard follows the format of the original Hickman and Hood-Wright Deerhound Standard approved by the Deerhound Club (UK) in 1892. Head is mentioned first, but foremost in Points Arranged in Order of Importance is Type. Point # 1. A Deerhound should resemble a rough-coated Greyhound of larger size and bone. This is the General Ap- pearance missing at the beginning of this Standard. The overall first impression of a Deerhound should be that of a large Greyhound…not a giant Greyhound and not a small Irish Wolfhound. To quote G.A. Graham (Vero Shaw, 1881 p. 229) “The general appearance should be striking, elegant and aristocratic to a marked extent and nobility of carriage is a very strong feature of the breed”.

Bran (“the famous” pictured above in 1842 by Thomas Duncan) Height at shoulder: 29 inches Girth: 31 ½ inches “killed his first stag at 9 months and his last at 9 years”. Source: Vero Shaw (1879-91) The Illustrated Book of the Dog . Chapter XXXI.The Deerhound by G.A.Graham

MOVEMENT (Point #2): Almost as an afterthought, easy, active and true was added in the Points in 1914 to describe this breed’s movement. Perhaps the lapse was in recognition that the Deerhound is above all a galloping hound and trot- ting about the ring simply shows off a dog’s structure which only hints at how it may perform in the field. Deerhounds should be light on their feet, with a seemingly effortless abil- ity to bound over rough terrain.

Buskar (pictured below 1836 by Sir Edwin Landseer): Height at shoulder: 28 inches Girth at chest 32 inches Weight in running condition…85 pounds “The deer he killed that day in total weighed 308 pounds” Source: Scrope (1839) The Art of Deerstalking p.347

“easy” and “active”, Ch. Thistleglen Margot • Photo by Halvorson

Propulsion in the field comes from the rear assembly and drive from the rear, with no hint of closeness or cow hocks, is extremely important. Deerhounds, unlike Greyhounds, gallop with their head up when after deer and spring (or bound) over the terrain keeping the quarry sighted in the long thicket-like heather. Written reports from the 1800s

HEAD (Point #4): Long, level, well balanced, carried high . The head should look like that of a large, strong jawed Grey- hound. The length of the muzzle should appear and be, longer than the length of the skull as the jaws need length and strength to seize and hold the quarry. BODY (Point #5): Long, very deep in brisket, well-sprung ribs and great breadth across hips. A Deerhound is a “long- dog” in hunting nomenclature ... a dog that is slightly longer than tall. The croup should not be too steep nor too level: too steep a croup places the hindquarters too far under the galloping hound so all the power from the rear is lost; too level a croup forces the dog to work too hard to get suffi- cient leverage for a power take-off from the rear. The hips are the driving force of the Deerhound, so the rear must be broad at the pelvis with wide parallel hocks. This is the num- ber one fundamental requirement for a functional Deerhound due to its breed specific galloping style. To see the Deer- hound constantly leaping in the air to remain sighted as it bounds through heather or tall grass is to understand why the Standard says the rear must be “...as broad and power- ful as possible, the hips being set wide apart...”. FORELEGS & THIGHS (Point #6, #7): Legs should be well muscled with a well defined and muscled first and sec- ond thigh. Bend of stifle should be moderate, neither too straight nor sickle-hocked as the former does not provide sufficient leverage for springing through heather and uphill work and the latter is too weak and inefficient, breaking down with hard use. THELOIN (Point #8) which is the area between the end of the ribs and the pelvis, should be well arched , and belly well drawn up with the topline maintained while moving. The loin should be muscular (not fat), showing strength and flexibility as it provides propulsion in uphill work. COAT (Point #9): There are striking differences in Deer- hound coats today although the Standard specifies “harsh and wiry about 3 to 4 inches long” . This is the mature coat of a 4 to 5 year old. A puppy exhibiting this length of coat will generally be over coated as an adult and need strip- ping. The Deerhound is a natural breed that should be shown tidied up, but without stripping or sculpting the coat. A Deerhound should grow a correct coat by inheri- tance and have the correct body shape without needing it stripped, scissored, “Furminated” or plucked to meet the Standard. Coats are a result of genes, not climate. As de- scribed by Captain Graham in 1881, “The coat should be coarse and hard … a well covered head gives much “char- acter” … Some breeders hold that no Deerhound is wor- thy of notice unless he has a good rough head, with plenty of beard and coat generally … Here, however they are at fault as several of the best known dogs have nearly smooth heads.” (in Vero Shaw, 1881 p. 229-230)

Photo courtesy of Dan Gauss

(Stonehenge, British Rural Sports , 1875) note this head - neck carriage and describe it as a feature that distinguishes the rough Scotch greyhound from other regional greyhound types... “...the deerhound gallops with his head in the air, and his body raised off the ground, ready for a spring at the throat or ear...while the greyhound, with his head close to the ground, lies down ventre à terre; and he is also prepared to pick up his game, not pull it down” . That characteristic is captured in easy and active . SIZE (Point #3) has been an ongoing debate for the past two hundred years and continues to this day. While the Standard reads as tall as possible consistent with quality Deerhounds greater than 30 inches at the shoulder are generally not func- tional on deer…that was a known fact. We know the measure- ments of two of the best working Deerhounds…Buskar and Bran (previous page). The Standard recognizes the “modern Deerhound” size and the show world’s expectation that “big- ger is better”, but this needs to be balanced by the knowledge that those famous for their functionality were not more than 30 inches. The battle over size will continue but moderation appears to be the most reasonable approach if type and breed health is to be maintained in the long term.

Photo courtesy of Annemiek Hawkins

FEET (Point #10): The Standard does not specify “cat” or “hare” feet, it says “feet close and compact” . The two mid- dle toes in a Deerhound foot are always slightly longer than the side toes, but should be so strong and well knuckled that the overall appearance of the foot is small and tight in rela- tion to the size of the dog. Long weak toes are a serious fault and functionally useless. As Miss A.N. Hartley describes in her book The Deerhound (1972), “Feet are most important, the pads should be large and thick making the feet look al- most as though they had little rubber balls under them”.

Champion Ayrshire • Painted by Arthur Wardle, c. 1908

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he Standard describes a mature Deerhound. A Deerhound generally isn’t fully mature until it reaches 4 to 5 years. Most Deerhounds are shown between the ages of one and four years. This makes judging this breed very difficult and expe- rience invaluable and appreciated. The Standard also describes breed features which are both aesthetic and functional.

Life Stages in a Bitch

Day old

18weeks

4 years (Am. Can. Champion)

7½ years (Best Vet. in Specialty)

A JUDGE SHOULD ALWAYS: Judge the dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Attend as many Deerhound Specialties/Breed Shows as pos- sible and always watch breed lure coursing events; Understand that the Standard describes functional points and those that are aesthetic / cosmetic, and be able to differ- entiate between them; Reward dogs by placing a priority on functionality as this breed is, above all, a galloping hound developed for a specific prey and terrain;

Avoid extremes in all points: extreme size, extreme bend of stifle, extreme roach over the loin, extreme depth of brisket, extreme coat… reward moderation as the best option for the long term health and conformation of the breed; And always remember that the Scottish Deerhound is not a giant Greyhound nor a small Irish Wolfhound… the Deerhound is a rough-coated Greyhound of larger size and bone.













THE AUTHOR: Barb Heidenreich (Fernhill) has been enslaved by Deerhounds and the Deerhound temperament for more than forty years. This passion has involved her attending thirty- nine (39) SDCA National Specialties, eight Deerhound Club (UK) Breed Shows, three Dava Quaich Coursing Meets and countless (ASFA, NOFCA and OLCA) coursing events. Under the Fernhill prefix she has been breeding, coursing and showing with the key goal of maintaining a functional hound that can excel in both the ring and field. The most glorious activity in the world she considers to be watching her own Deerhounds in full flight on the fields at Fern Hill.

This is an abridged version of “Visualizing the Scottish Deerhound Standard” prepared in 2004, updated 2012 for the affiliated conformation study groups of the Canadian Dog Judges Association. A copy of the full “Visualizing the Scottish Deerhound Standard” is available as a PDF on request from bh@fernhill.com

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“The most perfect creature of heaven.” ~ Sir Walter Scott “The Talisman”

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Monument to Sir Walter Scott, Edinburgh, Scotland

From William Scrope : The Art of Deerstalking, 1839

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The standard reference manual on the Scottish Deerhound. 1 st published in 1955, with reprints in 1972 and 1986. This book is available from the Deerhound Club (UK) www.deerhound.org

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Two elements that are key to understanding Deerhound conformation: A. The quarry:

The Red Deer ( Cervus elaphus scoticus ) Britain’s largest land mammal (250 - 300 pounds)

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Stags in the Scottish Highlands

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B. The terrain…stone crags, cliffs,bogs, fens, heather

The terrain

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Sketch by Henry Hope Crealock, 1873

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Sketch by Henry Hope Crealock, 1873

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The Deer Hunt and Two Deerhounds

Oil by RichardAnsdell (1815-1885)

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Great Deerhounds from the past

~ Height 28 in. ~ Girth 32 in. ~Weight 85 pounds

Bran , an early Colonsay working hound picturedin 1842 “….killedhis first stag at 9 months and his last at 9 years ” ~ from Weston Bell The Scottish Deerhound, 1892

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Cupple’s Bran, whelped 1877: ~ pictured in George Cupples Scotch Deerhounds and Their Masters, 1894

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Buskar ~ painted by Sir Edwin Landseer, 1839

“ The deer he killed that day weighed in total 308 pounds” ~ height at shoulder 28 in. ~ girth 32 in. ~ weight..85 pounds

Print courtesy of the Tate Gallery

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Spey of the Foothills (b. June 30, 1923) Spey was a working Deerhound that was born in the foothills of the Rockies, hunted wolves and mule deer in Canada, gazelle,antelope and Hartebeest in Kenyaand Red deer in Scotland. He was shown by hisbreeder Charles Gordon in 1927 at Crufts and the Scottish Kennel Club Show winning Novice and Graduate classes… ~ Height 30”, ~ Girth 32 ½ inches, ~ Weight 78 pounds

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Pedigrees of Scottish Deerhounds , 1894, ~ compiled by Capt. G.A. Graham and edited by Edwin Weston Bell. 536 Deerhounds were entered into the record with this volume, with the branches of some stretching backto the early1800’s,clearly linked to family strains that had been bred pure since the 1750’s. This is an ancient breed with a well documented history.

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POINTS of A DEERHOUND The Standard describes a mature Deerhound. A Deerhound generally isn’t mature until 4+ years. Most Deerhounds are shown between the ages of 1 to 4 years. This makes judging Deerhounds a challenge!

Rossie Ralph, whelped 1887

“… bred by Mr. Clark, Glenfeshie, son of the noted foxhunter and breeder of deerhounds for many years.” ~ from Weston Bell’s The Scottish Deerhound, 1892.

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1)Type: a rough coated greyhound of larger size and bone

Fullerton was a Greyhound: winner of the Waterloo Cup in 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892.Afunctional Greyhoundat the pinnacle of British breeding… Always think rough-coated Greyhound of larger size and bone…

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“ If you look at a Deerhound and the word “wistful” comes unbidden into your mind; if suddenly you seem to see a long vista of Deerhounds stretching away into the past, it is probably that the hound is typical…”

Miss A.N. Hartley The Deerhound, 1953

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2) Movement: Easy, active and true

“ the deerhound gallops with its head in the air, and its body raised off the ground, ready for a spring at the throat or ear…while the greyhound, with his head close to the ground…is prepared to pick up his game, not pull it down” ~ Stonehenge, 1875

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Curtis Brown, with his engineering background went to great lengths to correct misconceptions about shoulder angulation and gaits based on function. He describesin Dog Locomotion and Gait Analysis , Ch. 7, the trottingstylesof breeds designed for galloping …. “ the rather long forward reach of the front paw; it looks spectacular, but is quite wrong for the breed’sfunction …it is regrettable that beauty of motion is selected in preference to proper functional style, but then maybe this should be expected in dog shows….since the function of Deerhounds is illegal, perhaps this isas it should be”

Source: Curtis Brown Dog Locomotion and Gait Analysis , 1986 by Hoflin Publishing.

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This is a galloping hound and trotting about the ring simply shows off a dogs structure. Deerhounds should be light on their feet…as this breed is an uphill galloping hound, and bounds over a rough, heather covered terrain.

Photo courtesy of Steve Surfman

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4) Head: Long, level, well balanced, carried high

Deerhound head at 5 years

Deerhound Heads by Sir Edwin Landseer (1802 – 1873)

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Muzzle pointed, head long, slight rise over the eyesbut nothingapproaching a stop, nose slightly aquiline…

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5) Body:…………… great breadth across the hips

Propulsion in the field comes from the rear assembly and drive from the rear with no hint of closeness or cow hocks is extremely important! Weakrear Strong functional rear

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15) Chest: Very deep but not too narrow

Two champion males from the early 1900’s

Two champion males from the late 1900’s

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6) Forelegs: Strong, straight, elbows neither in nor out 7)Thighs: Long, muscular, second thigh well muscled, stifles well bent 8) Loin: Well arched, belly drawn up

The Deerhound as pictured in British Rural Sports by Stonhenge (John Henry Walsh), 1857

Ch. Dhu Mohr ElenaTess Algonkian, whelped 1994. Tess was BOB at the 1998 SDCA National Specialty

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9) Coat: harsh and wiry….. with softer beard and brows

Roslyn~ 2 years Roslyn ~ 7 years What happens between year one and four? ~ the dog muscles up and has more substance and depth of brisket ~ the leggy adolescent look disappears ~ the croup drops slightly and rear angulation increases, ~ neck and chest fill out, ~ the coat develops with maturity and facial hair begins to grow

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Coat:Rough and hard ….3 or 4 inches long (a mature coat)…slight fringe, no feathering,the less white the better

“Dobey” A “wooly” ( incorrect) coat

“Ghost” ~ 13 years Arough hard, correct coat

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10) Feet: Close, compact, with well knuckled toes

The Standard does not specify “cat” or “hare” feet.The two middle toes in a Deerhound foot are alwaysslightly longer than the side toes…..longweak toes are a serious fault as they break on rough terrain. “… the fault of the present day Deerhound is certainly the open loose flat foot …” ~ Idstone, 1870.

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11)Ears: Small, dark, with Greyhound-like carriage

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12)Eyes: Dark and moderately full 13)Neck: Long, well arched, very strong with a prominent nape

Champion Ayrshire, 1904

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14) Shoulders: Clean and set sloping

Sight hound shoulder Shoulders are 14 th in order of importance in the Scottish Deerhound Standard as thisis a galloping breed… coursing hounds are not as excessively angulatedin the shoulder assembly as the trotting breeds… Comparison of front assemblies for different types of function. From Elliott’s Dog Steps ,1973 Howell publishing. UNDERSTANDING THE SCOTTISH DEERHOUND STANDARD

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UNDERSTANDING THE SCOTTISH DEERHOUND STANDARD

The Scottish Deerhound Club of America Breed Standard

describes breed features which are both aesthetic and functional.

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Lessons learned : A judge should always...

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UNDERSTANDING THE SCOTTISH DEERHOUND STANDARD

Judgethe dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Lessons learned A judge should always: •

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Judgethe dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Lessons learned A judge should always: •

Understand the difference between the functional points described in the Standard and why they are important and differentiate from those that are aesthetic – cosmetic;

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UNDERSTANDING THE SCOTTISH DEERHOUND STANDARD

Judgethe dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Lessons learned A judge should always: •

Understand the difference between the functional points described in the Standard and why they are important and differentiate from those that are aesthetic – cosmetic; Reward dogs by placing a priority on functionality;

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Judgethe dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Lessons learned A judge should always: •

Understand the difference between the functional points described in the Standard and why they are important and differentiate from those that are aesthetic – cosmetic; Reward dogs by placing a priority on functionality; Avoid extremes in all points: extreme size, extreme bend of stifle, extreme roach over the loin, extreme depth of brisket, extreme coat… rewardmoderation as the best option forthe long term health and conformation of the breed;

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UNDERSTANDING THE SCOTTISH DEERHOUND STANDARD

Judgethe dog, not the handler nor the “package”; Lessons learned A judge should always: •

Understand the difference between the functional points described in the Standard and why they are important and differentiate from those that are aesthetic – cosmetic; Reward dogs by placing a priority on functionality; Avoid extremes in all points: extreme size, extreme bend of stifle, extreme roach over the loin, extreme depth of brisket, extreme coat… rewardmoderation as the best option forthe long term health and conformation of the breed; Alwaysremember that the Scottish Deerhound is NOTa giant Greyhound NOR a small Irish Wolfhound; theDeerhound is a rough-coated greyhound of largersize and bone.

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Lessons learned A judge should always: •

Judgethe dog,not the handlernorthe “package”; Understand the difference between the functional points described in the Standard and why they are important and differentiate from those that are aesthetic – cosmetic; Rewarddogs by placinga priorityon functionality; Avoid extremes in all points: extreme size, extreme bend of stifle, extreme roach over the loin, extreme depth of brisket, extreme coat… reward moderation as the best option for the long term health and conformation of the breed; Always remember that the Scottish Deerhound is NOT a giant Greyhound NOR a small Irish Wolfhound; the Deerhound is a rough-coated greyhound of larger size and bone. Aboveall the Deerhoundis a gallopinghound…itlives to run!!

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Non cogito ergo zoom …

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PhotocourtesyofHana Voborníková

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Presentation compiled by Barbara Heidenreich, S.D.C.A. Archivist Supported by the Scottish Deerhound Club of America 2014 http://www.deerhound.org

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History and Judging of the Scottish Deerhound By Allyn Babitch Scottish Deerhound

HISTORY The Scottish Deerhound is an ancient breed, whose exact origins are unknown; but clearly they are a devel- opment from the old coursing Greyhounds, and are related to the larger Irish Wolfhounds. Names for the breed in history have included Scotch Greyhound and Highland Deerhound; reference is made to their development in a passage in English Dogges (1576), referring to Greyhounds: "Some are of the greater sorte, some of a lesser; some are smoothe skynned and some curled, the bigger therefore are appointed to hunt the bigger beastes, the buck, the hart, the doe." By the 17th century the term Deerhound was applied to the type used to pursue and bring down the Scottish Red Stag, which is akin to the American Elk, so a very large deer; and from these came the Deerhound seen today, which is known as the Scottish Deerhound in America. Throughout history Deerhounds were greatly valued for their hunting prowess, and their companionable nature, and were owned primarily by the nobility, who had the large tracts of land needed for deer coursing. Legend has it that a nobleman con- demned to death could buy his free- dom with a "leash" of Deerhounds, a "leash" meaning three in number. As the Stag became rarer in England and southern Scotland, in the 1700s, the breeding of Deerhounds became more confined to the northern Scottish Highlands, with the smaller Greyhound being used for hare coursing in other areas. The collapse of the clan system in the mid 1700s further reduced the number of breeders, and Deerhounds; it wasn't until Archibald and Duncan McNeill (later Lord Colonsay) worked

to restore the breed in the 1820s that the numbers began to be gradually increased, and the quality regained. They started appearing at dog shows in England in the mid 1800s- Queen Victoria became a Deerhound fancier, and helped its popularity to expand, as did Sir Walter Scott, a Deerhound owner, who deemed the breed "the most perfect creature of heaven". The breed came to America original- ly for hunting purposes- General American breeders gradually increased, and Deerhounds have been exported to Australia (where they are used successfully on kangaroo), and mainland Europe, with a few in other areas of the world. They are still quite a rare breed, though the spectacular Best in Show win by a Deerhound at Westminster Kennel Club in 2011 has made more people aware of the breed. Custer kept Greyhounds and Deerhounds and their crosses, for instance- and was recognized by the American Kennal Club for showing pur- poses in 1886. The World Wars hurt breeders of many breeds, and the numbers of dogs being bred; during World War Two the Deerhound was precariously preserved by a few dedicated British Isles breed- ers- the kennels of Ardkinglas, Rotherwood, Ross, Enterkine, and Geltsdale, being some that worked so

hard to keep the breed alive. American breeders gradually increased, and Deerhounds have been exported to Australia (where they are used suc- cessfully on kangaroo), and mainland Europe, with a few in other areas of the world. They are still quite a rare breed, though the spectacular Best in Show win by a Deerhound at Westminster Kennel Club in 2011 has made more people aware of the breed. It is claimed that the Deerhound of today is still very similar to the Deerhounds of yesteryear, and old prints attest this to be true; though the breed standard of the later 1800s, still used today, did allow for a slight increase in size. The capability to work and do a job of hunting big deer should still be apparent when viewing a modern Deerhound. JUDGING What many judges notice when view- ing the Scottish Deerhound ring, is that the dogs, while having a certain natural presence and elegance, are often not sparkly show dogs. The han- dlers, as well, are often owners and/or amateurs, and while many of them are quite competent, a number of them are not. It is therefore incumbent upon the judge to look past handling ability to the dog itself, and judge each indi- vidual on its relative merits, rather than just their presentation, and to be helpful to handlers still learning the ropes. That said, the dog should be imme- diately identifiable as a Deerhound, that is to say a larger rough coated coursing type Greyhound; with no con- fusion as to whether it's a Wolfhound. One should get a strong impression of a good blend of ruggedness and ele- gance, of strength and speed, of digni-

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Scottish Deerhound

History and Judging of the Scottish Deerhound

By Allyn Babitch

ty with a sense of humor. The dog should be temperamentally stable, friendly enough without necessarily being effusive, and not offering aggres- sion towards other dogs (or humans, naturally, but that is rare). It has been said that the Deerhound, while sweet and gentle, should still own the ground it stands on. The Standard outlines the various important features of the breed, and should be closely studied by anyone looking to judge the breed. The stan- dard was not reformatted, and is the same as it's been for many many years, so some references are historic and spe- cific to the breed. The size of Deerhounds was raised by a couple of inches with the current Standard, but it is cautioned that very large Deerhounds may not be functional; and excessive size is generally not championed in the breed, unless it is accompanied by great quality, which it only sometimes is. Balance is greatly valued, though it also offers a quandry- if a dog is balanced because it is lack- ing on both ends, is that better than a dog who is correct on one end but not the same on the other? As a breeder, I would personally rather only have one end to fix genetically- obviously having both ends match and be proper is ideal. Most often an unbalanced dog has more rear than front angulation, though occasionally it's the other way around. How the dog puts its various parts together on the move can be the deciding factor. Many judges will have the dogs go around the ring together first, to help settle them, and get an idea of how they handle themselves. In the exam functional aspects should be consid- ered more important than cosmetic ones, though of course the best dogs have both. The judges who consider the whole dog, mentally adding up the virtues and then subtracting the faults, and giving those with the high- est "score" the nod, are better; rather than eliminating a dog from considera-

tion just because of a particular fault (being a "fault judge"), unless that fault is excessive shyness or aggressiveness. Puppies and newcomer dogs obviously should be forgiven some nerves or hijinks, and should be be judged com- passionately and patiently. Movement- the standard gives it just three words, but they are telling ones- it says that the Deerhound's movement should be "easy, active, and true". Easy and true are fairly self evident- the easy meaning a nice flowing side gait, and the true meaning sound com- ing and going. The active is more open to interpretation, but the typical Deerhound trot has a lovely, and rather unique, "lilt" and suspension, covering a little extra ground in the air with each stride, without being extreme or too bouncy. This trait may have descended from ones needed for the rough terrain the Deerhound used to hunt on, in the Scottish moors; where having a certain tendinous and ligamentous elasticity allowed the dog to spring over heather and gorse in the pursuit of its quarry. Active should NOT be interpreted to mean hackneyed gait at the trot- this seems to be one trotting trait that does translate to the gallop, and negatively so; a hackneyed gallop is energy wast- ing, and not fast and ground covering, or especially agile. Hackneyed gait is not often seen in Deerhounds, happily, but should be appropriately faulted when it is seen. It's unknown whether the order of the movement traits (easy side gait, active side gait, and true coming and going) were meant to be put in descending order of importance, but many fanciers consider that a typical side gait is most highly important in a quality Deerhound. Sound coming and going is also important, but if it's at the expense of side gait may not be quite as much so. Deerhounds in gen- eral are sounder now than they were many years ago; but again, it should not be at the expense of the typical way

of moving from the side. For those into horses, a Deerhound's typical trot can perhaps be compared to a Third Level dressage horse doing a working or medium trot- big and open and flow- ing but not excessively fast or flashy. Other aspects to consider- condi- tioning and musculature are very important in any sighthound, but this can also present another quandry- how to compare a well made but "soft" or underconditioned dog to one who is less well made but well conditioned? Again remember genetics, and value inherent genetic traits more than developed ones, and functional traits more than cosmetic ones. If possible, knowing which traits are easier to fix genetically can help- the more geneti- cally persistent bad traits should per- haps be faulted more heavily than oth- ers which are known to be faster to change. In the case of a good dog with less good developed traits (condition- ing, grooming, show manners, etc.), a brief polite discussion with the han- dler might alert them to what they could do to present their dog better in the future. In conclusion, when judging the Scottish Deerhound, think “Big Deer"- the Deerhound's original prey, the Scottish Red Stag, is like our American Elk, so a formidable foe; requiring enough speed and endurance to catch up to, and enough strength and persis- tence to bring to bay or bring down. This royal hunter also had to be a great companion in the manor or castle, to adult, child, and other animals; and be stable, quiet, and dignified, while still fun to be around. The "fun" part of a Deerhound's personality may not be readily apparent at the show grounds, but at least the dignity, and the look of the original purpose, can be. And finally, thank you for judging our Deerhounds fairly and kindly, we do appreciate it! ■ Allyn Babitch, Sindar Scottish Deerhounds and SkyHorse Sport Curly Horses, San Jose, CA

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The Scottish Deerhound A History of the Breed and Its Standard By Rusty Kingery Scottish Deerhound

The Standard: Deerhounders are very protective of our breed Standard and Points. Changed only once (in 1935) since it was written in the late 1900s, we fought the AKC’s move to reformat our breed standard in 1985 when they were convincing other Breed clubs to do so. In partnership with the IWCA’s Sam Ewing, we threat- ened to sue the AKC if they tried to alter our Standards without our con- sent. We made it very clear that our Breed Clubs were the exclusive own- ers of their Standards, evidently a fact that the AKC had never consid- ered. Within the year the AKC [grudgingly] agreed that this was so and that changing the Standards could only be done if the Breed Clubs deemed it necessary.

weight. The height was raised to 30- 32, from 28-30 for males, 28 min for females from 26. The writers did not put an upper limit on females feeling it was unnecessary as they could not imagine a bitch ever reaching a dog’s height. As the Clans broke up, many Scots emigrated to Canada, US, and Australia, taking their dogs with them. The elk on the North American continent provided great hunts, as did the “Roo” in Australia. There is a painting of General Custer sitting outside his tent with a brace of fawn Deerhounds lolling next to him. There were six Deerhounds entered at the first Westminster Kennel Club: two from Custer’s ken- nel, one from the British Prince Consort’s kennel, and three local dogs. Custer’s kennel was kept up by an Aide to the General after his death at Little Big Horn. The AKC formed shortly after the Show and records show that Bonnie Robin #4345 was registered in 1886.

country rather than always holding them in one place as many other par- ent clubs do. The west coast Specialty has been held as far east as Denver but mostly takes place in California or Oregon. The mid west and east coast Specialties have been held in many different locations in those regions. From that first entry of 68 Deerhounds, our National Specialty entries range from over 100 in the west to well over 200 in the midwest and east. In addition to the National, there is also an Eastern Regional held in the Mid Atlantic States and a Western Regional in southern California each year. ■

History of the Deerhound and the Standard:

The use of the Deerhound for hunt- ing was pretty much a thing of the past after the break up of the Clans and their lands during the late 1800s. Because the dogs did not respect the borders of the now small- er forests and the landowners did not want to have their herds run into the neighboring forests, the use of rifles and tracking dogs became the hunting norm. Now without a “job,” the breed would have died out had it not been for some devoted Englishmen and the development of the Dog Show. A Standard was writ- ten with the help of those who still hunted with the breed. Their input is reflected in the picturesque lan- guage, for example, describing the back as “this formation being unsuit- ed for uphill work”. The change made in 1935 was to the height and

The Scottish Deerhound Club of America:

There had been other clubs formed over the years, but the SDCA, formed in the early 60s, has been in exis- tence continuously since that time. The SDCA is an AKC member club. The SDCA is proud to still have two of the original charter members still with us: Gayle Bontecou, Gayleward, and Kate Lyons, Lyonhill Kennels. Prior to 1976, Specialties were held mainly in the east with entries of about 16 dogs. The SDCA’s first independent Specialty was held in St. Louis in 1976 with an entry of 68 Deerhounds. It was decided to rotate the National Specialties around the

"Q" Ch. Jaraluv's Quite the One at 2 years old with Rusty Kingery.

Rusty Kingery SDCA Judges Education Coordinator

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