Showsight Presents the Norfolk Terrier

NORFOLK TERRIER THE

1. Where do you live? What do you do “outside” of dogs? 2. In cuteness the Norfolk ranks at the top of any list, and these fun, feisty friends currently rank #126 out of all 192 AKC- recognized breeds. We think everyone on earth should be a fan, but does the average person in the street recognize him? Is this good or bad when it comes to placing puppies? 3. Few of these dogs really “work” anymore. How has he adapted to civilian life? What qualities in the field also come in handy around the house? 4. Norfolk vs Norwich: is it only ears? What other differences might one find? 5. A true Terrier temperament requires a special household to be a perfect fit. What about the breed makes him an ideal companion? Drawbacks? 6. What special challenges do breeders face in our current eco- nomic and social climate? 7. At what age do you start to see definite signs of show-worthi- ness (or lack thereof)? 8. What is the most important thing about the breed for a nov- ice to keep in mind when judging? 9. What is your ultimate goal for the breed? 10. What is your favorite dog show memory? 11. Is there anything else you’ d like to share about the breed? Please elaborate. LORI PELLETIER I live in Exeter, Rhode

How has the breed adapted to civilian life? Norfolks love to work and adapt to just about any situation you ask them to handle. They will absolutely let you know if there are any vermin living in your home and will persist until they rid your home of them. Norfolk vs Norwich: is it only ears? What other differences might one find? They are entirely different breeds. I breed both and can tell you they are two distinct breeds in looks and temperament. Both make lovely companions and without living with both breeds the average person would not discern the differences. Everything from the way they breed to the way have their puppies, to how the mothers are with their puppies could not be more different.They mode of play is the difference between the two breeds as is their performance in the field and show ring. Norfolks are thinkers and are a bit more independent in life when asked to do a task the Nor- folk gladly performs the task on their own. Their Norwich cousin prefers that their people do the task with them or for them. I like to say my Norfolk want me but my Norwich need me. What about the breed makes them an ideal companion? Their size and portability make them a great companion. They are big dogs in a small package. They are willing to go and do anything a larger breed dog would do and they have the stamina to do it. What special challenges do breeders face in our current econom- ic and social climate? The largest challenge to our breed is the lack of young people getting into the breed. Without a new generation of breeders our breed will die out. At what age do I start to see definite signs of show-worthiness? I evaluate my puppies at ten weeks but a real show dog has been exhibiting signs since it was three to four weeks old. The most important thing about the breed for a novice to keep in mind when judging? This breed is supposed to be shown free stacked and free baited. Any dog that comes in the ring with its tail down is not showing proper temperament. My ultimate goal for the breed? To increase the number of breeders that will help to preserve our breed. My favorite dog show memory?When I received my first reserve best in show! I was the Breeder, Owner and Handler of the dog and he is all Avalon Bred. (Both the sire and the dam were Avalon breeding.) I have been in this breed for over 25 years and I have been lucky to incorporate some of the top dogs from the top kennels both in America and the UK into my breeding program. I have maintained a consistent type in my dogs and a temperament that I am very proud of. Avalon dogs can currently be found at the top of the breed standings in Conformation, Agility and Obedience. I am proud to say I have maintained type, working ability and temperament in my dogs.

Island. Outside of dogs, I teach animal science in a Vocational Agricultural High School in Massachusetts. Does the average per-

son in the street recognize the breed? No people on the street do not often recog- nize the breed but the breed always collects attention and people immediately want to know what the breed is. There are very few breed- ers in the United States that are actively breeding. So it is actually ok that they do not recognize them The demand far out- weighs the supply in our breed.

“Norfolks are thinkers and are a bit more independent in life when asked to do a task the Norfolk gladly performs the task on their own. Their Norwich cousin prefers that their people do the task with them or for them. I LIKE TO SAY MY NORFOLK WANT ME BUT MY NORWICH NEED ME.”

306 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , D ECEMBER 2019

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